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Sunday, 25 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story HowTo watch TV on your Linux pc Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 11:54pm
Story Debunking four myths about Android, Google, and open-source Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 11:47pm
Story YaCy Team Celebrates Successful Campaign Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 11:39pm
Story MiracleCast: Miracast / WiFi Displays Come To Linux Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 11:05pm
Story Krunner: maximize your productivity in KDE’s Plasma Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 10:56pm
Story Top 9 Linux Podcasts Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 10:50pm
Story Linux-based NVR offers remote mobile access Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 10:44pm
Story GNOME 3.12 Removes Support for MD-RAID Because It Never Really Worked Well Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 10:40pm
Story Android: The Most Popular OS In The World Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 9:43pm
Story Galaxy S5 finger print scanner confirmed and explained Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 9:38pm

Ubuntu Server Edition 8.10: Nice, But Who Uses It?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Ubuntu 8.10, released at the end of October, includes several notable enhancements to the Server Edition. These new features augment the usability and versatility of Ubuntu on servers, but given the short lifespan of Ubuntu 8.10, I’m left wondering how many system administrators are going to use it.

Novell gets new Aussie chief

Filed under
SUSE

zdnet.com.au: Software company Novell has appointed former Oracle and Informix executive Alan Robinson to be its new managing director for Australia and New Zealand.

Open source fanciers finger Beeb's Win 7 'sales presentation'

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: The Open Source Consortium (OSC) has slammed the BBC’s recent coverage of Microsoft for providing a “sales presentation” about its forthcoming operating system, Windows 7.

The evolution of open source software

Filed under
OSS

useopensource.blogspot: If you have followed this blog for a while, you will know about my passion for open source software. I have always predicted that open source software would revolutionize the software industry, but I didn't quite understand how this would happen. I am now realizing that the future of open source software looks much different than I first expected.

KDE 4.2 is flat out going to rock

Filed under
KDE

movingparts.net: That’s my prediction. Of course, the truth of the matter is that KDE 4.2 (trunk) flat out rocks today. Seriously. I have never been more excited about the Linux desktop than I am right now.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How-To Triple Boot XP, Vista, Ubuntu Linux (Part 2)

  • create an envelope in OOo
  • Convert CloneCD disc image (.img) format to standard ISO (.iso)
  • Automated processing tools for better digital pictures
  • Examining the compilation process. part 3
  • Sun Presenter Console extension is useful but undocumented

  • Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) on Compaq Evo N610c
  • Bilski ruling: a victory on the path to ending software patents
  • When Device Support Goes Beyond Drivers
  • Linux Mint: A better Ubuntu
  • yet another reason to use linux
  • Review: All to AVI
  • Linux Void: Episode 12 - Progress?
  • The War of the Browsers
  • openSUSE 11.1 YaST preview - What’s the next step?
  • Debian gets ported to the G1
  • Review: Dell Inspiron Mini 9 netbook with Ubuntu Linux
  • Losing faith in F/LOSS, lastly because of OpenOffice.org 3.0.0
  • Debian Pure Blends
  • Interview: Amanda McPherson on the $25 Billion Linux Ecosystem
  • If The Matrix Runs on Windows
  • OpenOffice.org Achieves Ten Million Downloads
  • X3: Reunion Finally Goes Gold On Linux

How (and Why) To Wrap Your Head Around Free Software Licensing

Filed under
OSS

daniweb.com: Open source software is being taken seriously as a viable alternative to expensive proprietary applications but it's important to realize that, like its commercial brethren, it comes with a license for use. It's also important to remember that all open source licensing is not created equal.

KDE compositing in openSUSE11.1

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: As you might have noticed, KDE 4.1.3 has been released. The changelog part for KWin has just one change worth mentioning. But that is not the case for users of the openSUSE KDE:KDE4:Factory:Desktop packages.

How to ensure that your distribution gets rave reviews

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Companies which sell GNU/Linux distributions could increase the profile and sales of their products in one way: install them on top-tier laptops, tune them up so that everything runs like a dream and then hand them out to those who write about GNU/Linux.

First Programming Language - Python/Ruby?

Filed under
Software

terminally-incoherent.com: A little while ago we had an interesting discussion on what programming language should be taught to CS majors. I think that overwhelming number of people agreed that C++ is a solid choice because provides students with a very solid, low level background.

Booting Debian in 14 seconds

Filed under
Linux

debian-administration.org: Many readers will have heard about Arjan van de Ven and Auke Kok's work to boot an ASUS Eee 901 in 5 seconds. Inspired by this work, and because I have the same laptop, I decided to try to reproduce their results. So far I have not come very close to their 5 seconds, but I have made some significant improvements.

Go-oo: A Lighter, Faster OpenOffice, With Extras

Filed under
OOo

ostatic.com: One of the main complaints about the open source OpenOffice.org suite of productivity applications is that the applications are slow compared to the comparable Microsoft Office apps. If you've run into this problem, try Go-oo.

The Future of C++

Filed under
Software

theunixgeek.blogspot: Bjarne Stroustrup began C with Classes in 1979, as a better C that supports object-oriented programming, generic programming, and data abstraction. In 1983, it became C++. Nearing the end of the century, 1998, a C++ ANSI-ISO standard was created. Sometime in the near future, C++0x is coming along.

Free as in beer, but what about the liver transplant?

Filed under
OSS

bushweed.blogspot: When it comes to business, it's all about cost. Software is certainly no exception. From a business point of view, what does free software mean? If it's just free, and i'll maintain the simile of free beer, why isn't every art department using Blender or Gimp?

The top 10 greatest geeks of all time

itnews.com.au: Often unsung and underappreciated, their own personalities or lifestyles usually keep them from gaining greater public recognition. With so many great minds to choose from, it was all but impossible to narrow this list down to ten but after considerable argument we’re managed it.

Ubuntu vs OS X: The deathmatch

Filed under
Ubuntu

regebro.wordpress: As you may have seen from my recent posts I’m trying out OS X. There is no doubt that for the casual computer users viewpoint OS X kicks Linux’s ass. But I’m a open source computer programmer, and for us things are definitely not as clear cut. Five years ago, they probably would have been, but then Ubuntu arrived.

SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop Featured on 60 minutes

Filed under
SUSE

opsamericas.com: For anyone who was paying attention to this weeks 60 Minutes episode on CBS, you may have seen a clip of the HP 2133 Mini-Note PC with a SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop sticker on it!

Linux software installation myths

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: In a recent story about Microsoft running scared of Linux, I got a lot of mail saying things like, "when installing programs becomes as easy as Windows then Microsoft will be in trouble....most people couldn't be bothered stuffing around trying to find programs that will work and then figuring out how to install [them]." Ah, hello, it's actually easier to install software in Linux than it is in Windows.

Are Game Developers Finally Seeing the Linux Light?

Filed under
Linux

dthomasdigital.wordpress: In my last post one of the the feedback responses I received quipped that Linux was not ready for everyone. Among the many reason was that people wanted to play the latest games and that the latest games don’t come on the Linux platform.

Windows 7 no threat to netbook Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch.com: I've been nonplussed the last few weeks as ordinarily sane compu-journalists opine that Windows 7 will somehow kill Linux on netbooks. This weekend, I had a chance to actually see XP running on an EEE 900, and I can tell you, Linux has nothing to fear from Redmond.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Phone, Sep 2016 - Vorsprung durch Touch
    The Ubuntu Phone is getting better, and with every new iteration of the OTA, my little BQ Aquaris E4.5 is gaining more speed and functionality. Like in the air force, with an avionics upgrade, which transforms ancient wings into a powerful and modern bird of prey. Only the pace of advancement is lagging behind the market. See what Android and iOS can do, even Windows Phone, and you realize how late and insufficiently meaningful the Ubuntu Phone really is. This has to change, massively. This latest round does bring some fine goods to the table - more speed and stability, better icons, more overall visual polish, incremental improvements in the applications and the scopes. But that's not enough to win the heart of the average user. A more radical, app-centric effort is required. More focus on delivering the mobile experience, be it as it may. Ubuntu cannot revolutionalize that which is already considered the past. It can only join the club and enjoy the benefits of a well-established reality. And that is a kickass app stack that makes the touch device worth using in the first place. Still, it's not all gloomy. E4.5 is a better product now than it was a year ago, fact. Ubuntu Phone is a better operating system than it was even this spring, fact. So maybe one day we will see Ubuntu become an important if not dominant player in the phone and tablet space. It sure is heading in the right direction, my only fear is the availability of resources to pull off this massive rehaul that is needed to make it stand up to the old and proven giants. And that's it really. If you're keen on Linux (not Android) making it in the mobile world, do not forget to check my Ubuntu tablet review! Especially the convergence piece. On that merry note, you do remember that I'm running a wicked contest this year, too? He/she who reads my books might get a chance to win an M10 tablet. Indeed. Off you go, dear readers. Whereas I will now run the same set of tests we did here on the Aquaris tablet, and see how it likes the OTA-12 upgrade. The end.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 - new window snapping feature
  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 is Taking Place In Mid-November
  • Ubuntu Online Summit: 15-16 November 2016

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • 10 Top Open Source Artificial Intelligence Tools for Linux
    In this post, we shall cover a few of the top, open-source artificial intelligence (AI) tools for the Linux ecosystem. Currently, AI is one of the ever advancing fields in science and technology, with a major focus geared towards building software and hardware to solve every day life challenges in areas such as health care, education, security, manufacturing, banking and so much more.
  • List of FLOSS International Conferences September 2016 Materials
  • This Week In Servo 78
    Our overall roadmap is available online and now includes the initial Q3 plans. From now on, we plan to include the quarterly plan with a high-level breakdown in the roadmap page.
  • Firefox 49 Release: Find out what is new
    Firefox 49.0 is the next major stable release of the web browser. Firefox 48.0.2 and earlier versions of Firefox can be updated to the new release.
  • Open-Source Climate Change Data From NASA, NOAA, & Others Available For 1st Time
    Climate change has many components — rising sea levels, alterations in rainfall patterns, and an increase in severe storm activity, among others. Communities around the world are faced with the need to plan for climate change but don’t have the information available to do so effectively.
  • Another Setback for 3D Printed Gun Advocate Cody Wilson as Court of Appeals Rules That National Security Concerns Outweigh Free Speech
    It’s been a long, drawn-out battle, beginning in 2013 when Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, published the open source files for his 3D printed handgun, the Liberator, online. The State Department ordered that he take the files down, and Wilson complied, but not before thousands had downloaded them and spread them elsewhere on the Internet. In 2015, with the help of gun rights organization The Second Amendment Foundation, Wilson filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the State Department had violated not only his Second Amendment but his First Amendment rights. By suppressing his right to share information online, Wilson argued, the State Department was violating his right to free speech.
  • In 3D-Printed Gun Case, Federal Court Permits Speech Censorship in the Name of Alleged National Security
  • Oracle tries playing nice with Java EE rebels
    With Oracle now trying to get back on track with advancing enterprise Java, the company is seeking rapprochement with factions that had sought to advance the platform on their own. The two groups involved are mostly amenable to patching up the relationship. Oracle's Anil Gaur, group vice president of engineering, said this week he had already been in touch with some of the concerned parties. The two factions include Java EE Guardians, led by former Oracle Java EE evangelist Reza Rahman, and Microprofile.io, which has included participation from Red Hat and IBM.

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