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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story France parliamentary committee: 'encourage European open source software market Roy Schestowitz 23/07/2014 - 7:03am
Story Chrome OS to get comple overhaul with ‘Project Athena’ Rianne Schestowitz 23/07/2014 - 6:42am
Story Exclusive interview with Agustin Benito Bethencourt on joining Linaro Rianne Schestowitz 23/07/2014 - 6:34am
Story KDE's the Best, Wallen Interview, and Why Linux Rules Rianne Schestowitz 23/07/2014 - 6:23am
Story Linux 3.17 To Fix Up ASPM, Bring Other PCI Changes Rianne Schestowitz 23/07/2014 - 5:55am
Story QEMU 2.1.0-rc3 Has More Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 23/07/2014 - 5:41am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 10:44pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 10:43pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 10:42pm
Story Best Linux Browsers Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 9:19pm

5 Ways to Get Involved with Ubuntu–for Non-technical Users

Filed under
Ubuntu

2indya.com: If you are not a technical user of Linux but want to get involved with the sweeping wave of Linux/GNU operating system, Ubuntu offers you some great opportunities.

The Android name kerfluffle

blogs.zdnet.com: The media is absolutely filled with “oh noes” stories concerning Google, and its partners in the Open Handset Alliance, being sued by Erich Specht of Palatine, Ill over its use of the word Android to describe its mobile phones.

Windows 7 RC1 Review

Filed under
Microsoft

blog.scotsnewsletter.com: I’ve been working with the Windows 7 RC1 (release candidate 1) for about a week and a half now. Barring unforeseen bugs, I doubt at this point that Microsoft is more than four months away from the release of Windows 7.

ReactOS works! Sort of …

Filed under
OS

kmandla.wordpress: On a whim, I installed the latest pre-release release of ReactOS today. I tried it a long time ago and had no luck whatsoever — black screens, nonbooting or just generalized irregular behavior — and so I rarely give it a thought.

Creating A Fully Encrypted Para-Virtualised Xen Guest System Using Debian Lenny

Filed under
HowTos

This document explains how to set up a fully encrypted para-virtualized XEN instance. In this howto, the host system is running Debian Etch, while the guest system to be installed will be using Debian Lenny.

Why Desktop Linux isn't profitable

Filed under
Linux

zerias.blogspot: One of the more popular videos making the tech news rounds is Bryan Lunduke's Linux Sucks! video from LinuxFest NW. He makes several valid points, and covers one of my biggest problems with Open-Source development, the sheer number of duplicated efforts.

The future of PowerDevil (and of power management)

Filed under
KDE

drfav.wordpress: PowerDevil has proven to be quite a solid software, and I’m both proud and happy about it: the 4.2->4.3 transition has happened almost with no maintainance. The problem is that PowerDevil GUI does suck, big time, because it’s way too cluttered.

NoScript and AdBlock Plus Dramas

Filed under
Software

meandubuntu.wordpress: Maybe you’ve already read a bit about the big stink around NoScript? Personally, I find both of these extensions very useful, and have been using both for as long as I have been aware of them. Along with FireGestures, they are the first extensions I always install along with Firefox.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • KDE 4.2.2 still has a few problems

  • Gnot Invented Here
  • Migrating my home Ubuntu Server toward a linutop
  • GNU sed goes GPL3
  • Sometimes I Hate Gentoo
  • How Well Does Computer Humor Age?
  • FLOSS Weekly 67: Xen
  • QuakeLive Linux SITREP
  • Notification Changes For Karmic Koala
  • Using Mew as a Mail Client
  • How to set the date in Linux
  • Translate Your Documentation
  • Ubuntu Tip:Linking Music Across Operating Systems
  • How to securely clean up data on a hard disk on Linux
  • Installing Ubuntu without external media
  • How to Block AIM’s Annoying ‘AOL System Msg’ in Pidgin
  • The Best Virtual Drive For Linux
  • Insert the Last Argument of the Last Command
  • How to get Chromium daily builds in Ubuntu

openSUSE 11.1 Impressions

Filed under
SUSE

wlnelson.blogspot: I've never been a big fan of SuSE/openSUSE in the past. It's always felt like a mixed bag to me. Due to some coursework I need to perform for my university I felt I was best served by a distribution that has a very large package repository.

Migration to Mepis 8.0 Complete

Filed under
Linux

muskratsweb.net: Mepis 8.0 is working out just fine. I finally got VLC to play my media files, although Kaffiene and mplayer still just show a blue screen. I am now using Mepis as my fulltime/main desktop on my laptop.

A Weekend Look At OpenSolaris 2009.06

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: It has been a while since last talking about OpenSolaris 2009.06 at Phoronix, but this weekend we decided to fire up Sun's latest build based upon the SXCE 111a build available from Genunix.

Microsoft and Linux trade patent words in Europe

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

theregister.co.uk: Microsoft has teamed with General Electric to petition European regulators on a fundamental principle that will continue to drive a wedge between the company and open source supporters.

Ubuntu 9.04 and Intel graphics

Filed under
Ubuntu

h-online.com: For Linux users who don't need absolute top-notch 3D performance, Intel is considered the preferred graphics solution. However Intel’s drivers are currently in a state of some disarray.

Inside Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

informationweek.com: Critics are calling 'Jaunty Jackalope' as slick and seamless as Mac OS X. We uncover the Linux distro's pitfalls and gotchas.

Top 10 KDE4 Applications

Filed under
KDE

tuxarena.blogspot: Here's a list of great applications for the KDE 4 desktop such as Yakuake, Amarok 2, and SMPlayer.

FreeBSD 7.2 Review

Filed under
BSD

cyberciti.biz: FreeBSD is just plain old good UNIX with rock solid networking stack. It is quite popular amongst hosting companies, ISPs, portals (such as Yahoo) and a few large financial institutions because of its reliability, robustness and performance.

Do we really "need Photoshop" on the Linux desktop?

Filed under
Software

the-gay-bar.com: Whenever the talk comes to Desktop Linux and why it has not had the success people predicted this year you'll hear the "Photoshop Myth": "I would love to switch to Linux but I really need Photoshop."

Arch User Magazine Issue 2

Filed under
Linux

The second issue of Arch User Magazine is read to preuse. Some highlights are Replacing the Arch Initscripts, Command Line: Grep by Paragraph, and Disaster Preparation.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)

Security News

  • DB Ransom Attacks Spread to CouchDB and Hadoop [Ed: Get sysadmins who know what they are doing, as misconfigurations are expensive]
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Return on Risk Investment
  • Widely used WebEx plugin for Chrome will execute attack code—patch now!
    The Chrome browser extension for Cisco Systems WebEx communications and collaboration service was just updated to fix a vulnerability that leaves all 20 million users susceptible to drive-by attacks that can be carried out by just about any website they visit.
  • DDoS attacks larger, more frequent and complex says Arbor
    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are becoming more frequent and complex, forcing businesses to deploy purpose-built DDoS protection solutions, according to a new infrastructure security report which warns that the threat landscape has been transformed by the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) botnets. The annual worldwide infrastructure security report from Arbor Networks - the security division of NETSCOUT - reveals that the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack reported in 2016 was 800 Gbps, a 60% increase over 2015’s largest attack of 500 Gbps.