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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora Linux Developers Ask Users to Decide the Instant Messaging Integration into the Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2015 - 1:31am
Story GNOME Builder 3.16's Second Point Release Brings More Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2015 - 1:25am
Story Ten lessons from Open Source Open Society 2015 Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2015 - 1:09am
Story OnePlus One Ubuntu Touch to Get MultiROM Manager Support Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2015 - 12:56am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 10:34pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 10:33pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 10:26pm
Story ChromeOS 42.0.2311.87 (Official Build) (64-bit) – A brief look Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 10:07pm
Story Debian 8.0 Installer RC3 "Jessie" Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 8:30pm
Story LibreOffice 5.0 to Arrive in July, Bug Hunt Organized Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 8:21pm

Should Ubuntu Have Been Created

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Focus on the Inefficiency of Ubuntu
  • Should Ubuntu Have Been Created
  • Using Ubuntu Linux to Rescue Windows
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Beta 1
  • Ubuntu One Music Store Public Beta Begins
  • Ubuntu One and the Lucid Lynx
  • Ubuntu 10.04 in Beta, Stable Release in April
  • The UbuntuOne Music Store Now Open

Beware the King of the Trolls

Filed under
Microsoft

computerworlduk.com: If you haven't heard of Intellectual Ventures, you will do. Set up by ex-Microsoftie Nathan Myhrvold, with investments from Microsoft among others, it is basically a patenting machine – filing and buying them in huge quantities.

Five Best IRC Clients for Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: IRC is a vital part of participating in the Linux community, but choosing an IRC client can be a daunting task for new Linux users. If you're ready to start jumping into IRC, but not sure which client to start with, we've got five great clients to choose from.

Nexuiz Gets Forked, Turned Into Xonotic

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Nexuiz, an open-source first person shooter that we have been covering since its first release in 2005 and has turned into a game that offers impressive graphics and raises the bar for open-source gaming, has been forked by many of its core community developers.

First Look at Ubuntu 10.04 Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • First Look at Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Beta
  • Ubuntu's Latest Should Scare Microsoft

Red Hat, Novell: Reading the Stock Market Tea Leaves

Filed under
Linux

itworld.com: Spring has sprung, at least here in the Northern Hemisphere, and with it comes the blooming of flowers, the chirps of baby birds, and "Novell's Board of Directors reject[ing] Elliott Associates' unsolicited, conditional proposal as inadequate."

German goverment to users: Stop using Firefox!

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: The German government has issued a stern warning to telling them not to use Firefox because the browser contains a critical security vulnerability.

Free software's second era: The rise and fall of MySQL

Filed under
OSS

h-online.com: If the first era of free software was about the creation of the fully-rounded GNU/Linux operating system, the second saw a generation of key enterprise applications being written to run on that foundation.

Would Linux Be Better Off Without the FSF?

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Suppose the FOSS community wanted to hire a group to serve as its public relations department -- would the Free Software Foundation be right for the job?

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 346

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: System rescue and virus scanning with Dr.Web LiveCD
  • News: Ubuntu stirs debates over button placement, CrunchBang switches base, Debian presents DPL candidates, LiMux explains migration status, state of four distributions
  • Questions and answers: Restoring deleted files
  • Released last week: Mandriva Enterprise Server 5.1, SystemRescueCd 1.5.0, Parted Magic 4.9
  • Upcoming releases: FreeBSD 7.3, SliTaz GNU/Linux 3.0, Mandriva Linux 2010.1 Beta 1
  • New additions: GhostBSD, Ylmf OS
  • New distributions: infinityOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Freenode Fails.

bheekly.blogspot: Those who use freenode regularly must've been around when for 2-3 days, we all faced massive netsplits due to javascript spam. Funnily enough, the solution for that problem was bloody easy. Dudes. WTF?

rPath Joins Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: The Linux Foundation today announced that rPath is its newest member.

Google promises Chrome is not phoning home with your Web data

Filed under
Google

blogs.techrepublic.com: Despite the fact that I really like the Google Chrome Web browser, I gave up using it last month around the same I gave up Coke Zero. I gave up Coke Zero simply because of the caffeine. My reason for giving up Chrome was a little more complicated.

RIP Palm: it's over, and here's why

Filed under
Hardware

arstechnica.com: So what happened? Wasn't webOS the greatest thing since the original iPhone OS? Wasn't the Pre a great phone? How did Palm blow it so badly?

Making a copyright system that works

Filed under
Legal

FAside from a few vested interests in the entertainment industry, nearly everyone hates the system we’ve got — it’s clearly overreaching and ill-adapted to the electronic world of the internet. But what sort of system would we like?

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Compiz Fusion Status Update
  • 5 Open Source music sharing sites worth knowing
  • 256 colors terminal with tmux and urxvt
  • Installing Ubuntu Linux on a Netbook
  • Fix for - Amarok won't play audio files on Ubuntu
  • Five nice opensource games for Linux
  • Ubuntu loses the human aspect
  • Build a lighter Gnome in Ubuntu
  • DtO: When Alternative Platforms Meet
  • view the performance details of individual CPUs in top
  • Optimise your photos before you send them
  • Convert URLs into links in Gedit with Snippets
  • Latin America leads in school laptops

Commodore 64 Awakes From Slumber With Makeover

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet.com: The vintage Commodore 64 personal computer is getting a makeover, with a new design and the latest version of Ubuntu Linux.

5 Questions for Novell CEO

Filed under
SUSE
  • 5 Questions for Novell CEO Ron Hovsepian
  • Novell Rejects Takeover Bid… But Welcomes Other Bidders
  • More SUSE Linux Appliances Boot Up at Novell BrainShare

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #185

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is Issue #185 for the week March 14th - March 20th, 2010.

KOffice 2.2 Beta 1 Released

Filed under
Software

kdenews.org: The KOffice team is happy to announce the first beta of the upcoming 2.2 release of KOffice. Release 2.2 will be the first release where external companies and organizations have made significant contributions to development.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.