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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A little look at Debian 7.0 srlinuxx 14/05/2013 - 2:50am
Story Ubuntu.com update srlinuxx 14/05/2013 - 2:47am
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 507 srlinuxx 13/05/2013 - 6:47pm
Story Debian Project News - May 13th srlinuxx 13/05/2013 - 6:45pm
Story Feature set of Linux 3.10 defined srlinuxx 13/05/2013 - 6:43pm
Story Firefox 21.0: Find out what is new srlinuxx 13/05/2013 - 6:41pm
Story History of Linux: Time For Open Source Documentary srlinuxx 13/05/2013 - 6:39pm
Blog entry Setting up a serial console fieldyweb 12/05/2013 - 7:12pm
Blog entry Getting Squid3 on Debian 6.x to work with Active Directory, Security Groups and Websense fieldyweb 12/05/2013 - 2:06pm
Story Ubuntu 13.04: What’s New srlinuxx 11/05/2013 - 11:28pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Plasma Weather Meeting and things to come...

  • Ubuntu Photo Manager Experiment
  • Gentoo Install - Day 3
  • 4 New Feature Proposed for Fedora 10
  • I converted to Ubuntu…
  • Ballmer: We'll look at open source, but we won't touch
  • Just because you are not paranoid doesn't mean they are not reading your Gmail
  • Canadian open source community upset over proposed copyright law
  • Lotus Symphony: Big Blue Got It Right This Time
  • Geek panties.
  • Fermi Scientific Linux. What is it?
  • Can the Average Lawyer Install An Ubuntu Linux Server? (Part II)
  • Home Automation and Media Projects
  • Tree-signing in Gentoo and recent research into Package Manager Security

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to stop printing in Linux

  • Using the 'find' command
  • 5 Tips to Make Working with the Shell Easier
  • Virtualbox vs. VMware Server
  • Howto Install VirtualBox 1.6 in Ubuntu
  • KDE: Right Click, Extract Here
  • Using GNU Screen on a Remote Machine
  • K9Copy - DVD Backup Tool

New research bots underscore AI's embrace of open-source

Filed under
OSS

eetimes.com: Though not the first open-source robot, iCub underscores a trend that is poised to increase the productivity of artificial-intelligence (AI) researchers, in the same way the open-source movement has enhanced work in other sectors of design.

SabayonLinux 3.5 - Review

Filed under
Linux

planetoss.com: After nearly a year of hard work, Sabayon team has released their new Gentoo based Linux, SabayonLinux 3.5 on 1st July 2008. Sabayon is the most successful project in making Gentoo beginner friendly.

5 reasons to avoid iPhone 3G

fsf.org/blogs: The 5 real reasons to avoid iPhone 3G: * iPhone completely blocks free software. Developers must pay a tax to Apple, who becomes the sole authority over what can and can't be on everyone's phones.

Plans for Gtk+/GNOME 3.0 surfaced

Filed under
Linux

liquidat.wordpress: At the GNOME conference GUADEC plans were presented how the transition to the new Gtk and GNOME is supposed to happen. The basic idea is to make the transition as smooth as possible by first cleaning up everything and introducing new concepts later on.

Why you want (and need) a Linux Live CD

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: For the most part, on this blog, I try to convince readers to do something defensive on their computers - like a parent nagging a child to eat their vegetables. Only once have I put my foot down, so to speak, saying unequivocally last year that all Windows XP users should employ DropMyRights. Now, another emphatic endorsement - all Windows users should have a Linux Live CD, and, know how to use it.

Why Debian's Still a Great Distro Choice

Filed under
Linux

blogs.pcmag.com: Every year or so, there's a new Linux distro darling. Last year's was Ubuntu, and I've lost track of what this year's favorite penguin might be. But a lot of newcomers to Linux seem to get the impression that a new distro is better than an older package because there'll be more attention paid to new technologies and easier user interfaces. In fact, pretty much the opposite is true.

UT3 Linux Client Is "In The Works"

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: It's been 234 days (or just shy of eight months) since Unreal Tournament 3 had shipped for the PC. Most would have thought the Linux client for this title from Epic Games would have arrived by now, but sadly it hasn't and there is no sign of when it will arrive.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 2 released

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 2 is released today. This alpha introduces KDE 4 - 4.1 beta 2, specifically - as the default version of KDE, and the latest development version of GNOME, 2.23.4. The kernel has also been updated to 2.6.26rc7. Mandriva warns that this is a true alpha, likely to contain many bugs related to the new version of KDE.

Sidux, a Great Alternative to Ubuntu, Part 2

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Last week we introduced ourselves to Sidux, the excellent Debian Sid implementation that makes Debian Sid a bit friendlier. Even though I thought I gave a number of reasons why a user might prefer Sidux to Debian Sid, or Ubuntu, or some other Debian derivative, they apparently were not clear to a number of readers.

Microsoft ditched as Anglicans go open source

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com.au: The Sydney Diocese of the Anglican Church has decided to cut the Microsoft umbilical cord by moving to open source, starting with Office which will be replaced in the next three years.

Bible Software on Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Software

ubuntuproductivity.com: I am keenly interested in software that can help when studying the Bible. Coming from the Mac OS where there are no good Bible software offerings anything would be a blessing. So, for all you fellow Ubuntu-using Christians here is what I found.

Bush Signs Spy Bill, ACLU Sues

Filed under
Security

blog.wired.com: In passing the FISA Amendments Act, US Congress gave the executive branch the power to order Google, AT&T and Yahoo to forward to the government all e-mails, phone calls and text messages where one party to the conversation is thought to be overseas.

Why openSUSE 11 is the Linux for me

Filed under
SUSE

sjvn: Recently, my colleague James Turner reviewed openSUSE 11 and he liked it. It's hard to tell from some of the notes he got back-shame on you people!--but he really did. I, on the other hand, love openSUSE 11.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 30

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #30 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: openSUSE Build Service 1.0 Released, Announcing openSUSE Day at LinuxWorld Expo, and People of openSUSE: Joe Brockmeier.

UMPCs and Linux: made for each other, and coming soon

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linux.com: Who knew that the biggest desktop Linux show of 2008 would turn out to be the June Computex show in Taipei, Taiwan, where the next generation of Linux desktop hardware was put on display? In fact, Linux was at the heart of no fewer than four different ultra mobile PCs (UMPC).

Ubuntu Kung Fu: Over 300 Tips, Tricks, Hints and Hacks

Filed under
Ubuntu

pragprog.com: Ubuntu’s rise to power has been rapid, historic and well-deserved. It’s the best Linux distribution ever, but most people only use a fraction of its power. Award-winning Linux author Keir Thomas gets down and dirty with Ubuntu to provide over 300 concise tips that enhance productivity, avoid annoyances, and simply get the most from Ubuntu. 375 pages, PDF = 22 USD.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • For those "oops" moments: ext3undel

  • Script for RAW files into JPEG (or TIFF or PNG…)
  • Tip-redirecting with sudo command
  • Monitoring network performance with GNetWatch
  • How to Install MSN Messenger on Ubuntu Linux?
  • Edit The Applications Menu With Two-Clicks : Ubuntu 8.04
  • Fix Java in Firefox 3
  • Building shared libraries with Libtool
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more