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Saturday, 30 Aug 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The top 14 hidden features in Windows, iOS, and Android Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 12:46am
Story Android-on-ARM mini-PC draws less than 7W Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 12:37am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 9:09pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 9:08pm
Story Userptr Support Set For AMD Radeon GPUs In Linux 3.18 Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 8:03pm
Story Rugged mini-PCs have four gigabit ports, run Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:56pm
Story LinuxCon: What's Going On With Fedora.Next Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:49pm
Story Intel Sandy Bridge Gains On Linux 3.17 Extend Beyond Graphics Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:47pm
Story Acer Offers New Desktop Chromebox Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:36pm
Story Android in-dash IVI device revs up in India Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:17pm

First preview for Slackware of Plasma 5

Filed under
KDE
Slack

Today is my son’s 16th birthday, and I do have a gift for all of you, not just for him. I present to you a first preview for Slackware, of the KDE Frameworks 5.1.0 libraries, combined with Plasma 5.0.1, the next-generation desktop workspace from KDE.

I wrote about this in my previous post, but now you can experience it first-hand: Plasma 5.0 improves support for high-DPI displays and comes with a “converged shell”, i.e. one Plasma codebase for different target devices like desktop computers, laptops, tablet, phones etc. Plasma 5 uses a new fully hardware-accelerated OpenGL(ES) graphics stack. Plasma 5 is built using Qt 5 and Frameworks 5.

And with the Breeze themed artwork and its own Oxygen font, this desktop looks clean and modern.

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64-bit mobile processors for Android L is coming

Filed under
Android
Linux

Back in 2011, Nvidia announced to the world that they had acquired a license for the latest ARM instruction set, the ARM v8. But the most exciting part of the deal was that the new ARM instruction set is 64-bit. After making 32-bit mobile CPUs, Nvidia was set to take their Tegra K1 platform to the next level with a 64-bit mobile CPU. At the Hot Chips conference this year, Nvidia revealed their little project that they have been quietly working in for all these year. The Tegra K1 ARM v8 64-bit chip from Nvidia is ready for a release later next year. The new chip is codenamed Project Denver.

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Canonical Closes a pyCADF Exploit in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has published details in a security notice about a pyCADF vulnerability in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) that has been identified and corrected.

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Linux-based controller mixes Atom SoC with Kintex-7 FPGA

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

NI’s new 4-slot CompactRIO control system combines a dual-core Atom E3825 with a Kintex-7 FPGA, and features industrial temperatures and NI Real-Time Linux.

The National Instruments (NI) “CompactRIO 4-slot Performance Controller” is the high end “performance” big brother to NI’s “value” CompactRIO cRIO-9068 model, introduced a year ago. Whereas the cRIO-9068 runs NI Linux Real-Time OS on a Xilinx ARM+FPGA hybrid Zynq-7020 system-on-chip, the new CompactRIO splits processing duty between an Intel Atom processor and a higher-end Xilinx Kintex-7 325T FPGA. The CompactRIO uses a dual-core, 1.33GHz Atom E3825 SoC from the latest, 22nm Bay-Trail-I generation, featuring a relatively low, 6 Watt TDP.

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Linux 3.17 Doesn't Do Much For AMD Kaveri's Graphics Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Following yesterday's RadeonSI Gallium3D vs. Catalyst comparison using the new AMD A10-7800 Kaveri APU with Radeon R7 Graphics, I then upgraded to the latest Git code for the Linux 3.17 kernel to look for performance changes.

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Fedora:Alpha Change Deadline to slip one more week

Filed under
Red Hat

Greetings!
Alpha Change Deadline slips one more week due to requested glibc/GCC mass
rebuild [1]. Alpha Change Deadline is now 2014-08-19.

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Raspberry Pi-powered Bigtrak

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets

The Raspberry Pi is a small, low-cost computer designed to promote an interest in computing and programming – but it doesn’t have to be straight-laced computing. In fact, in this article we’ll be showing you how you can use it to turn a Bigtrak into a robot. That’s educational, right?

The Bigtrak is a toy that takes in a list of straightforward commands (Go forwards, turn left, turn right) and then executes them. To make things more interesting we’re going to remove the existing circuitry and replace it with a Raspberry Pi, using a small motor driver to safely control the motors in the Bigtrak, which we’ll then set up to be controlled via a PlayStation 3 DualShock controller.

Everything required on the software side comes pre- installed on the latest Raspbian OS images, so all we need to translate changes from the controller to the motors is a small Python script that uses the Pygame and RPI.GPIO modules.

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Trying The Configurable 45 Watt TDP With AMD's A10-7800 / A6-7400K

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

AMD Kaveri APUs feature a configurable TDP whereby users can opt to run their A-Series APUs with a lower power consumption and operating temperature but at the cost of slightly reduced performance.

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The Book

Filed under
KDE

When inviting to the Randa 2014 meeting, Mario had the idea to write a book about KDE Frameworks. Valorie picked up this idea and kicked off a small team to tackle the task. So in the middle of August, Valorie, Rohan, Mirko and me gathered in a small room under the roof of the Randa house and started to ponder how to accomplish writing a book in the week of the meeting. Three days later and with the help of many others, Valorie showed around the first version of the book on her Kindle at breakfast. Mission accomplished.

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In the Android Ecosystem, Fragmentation is Nothing New

Filed under
Android

All the way back in 2011, before Android marched to the top of the mobile platform wars, developers were voicing concerns about the fragmentation of the platform. In a post back then, I noted this quote from a study that Appcelerator and IDC did: "The Appcelerator-IDC Q2 2011 Mobile Developer Survey Report, taken April 11-13, shows that interest in Android has recently plateaued as concerns around fragmentation and disappointing results from early tablet sales have caused developers to pull back from their previous steadily increasing enthusiasm for Google’s mobile operating system."

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Panamax Open Source Tool Simplifies Docker Management

Filed under
OSS

In a very short amount of time, Docker--an open source tool for managing applications in containers--has become all the rage, and now CenturyLink has announced that it is releasing its Docker management tool Panamax to the open source community. Panamax is targeted to give developers one management platform to create, share and deploy Docker-containerized applications.

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Linux APIC Code Prepares For A Major Overhaul

Filed under
Linux

The x86 APIC subsystem within the Linux kernel is beginning the process of a major overhaul with the Linux 3.17 kernel.

The Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller (APIC) support is being overhauled to support physical IOAPIC hot-plugging. Within the Linux 3.17 kernel this feature isn't present but the prepatory work is moving forward after a first attempt at the hot-plug support was rejected on technical grounds. In prepping for the APIC hot-plug support, obsolete driver abstractions were removed and other changes made for this merge window.

Those concerned about the Linux APIC code can find out more about the forthcoming changes via this lengthy mailing list message.

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Fedora Flock 2014

Filed under
Red Hat

Overall the Flock was awesome. The quality of all technical presentations/workshops was really high. It's amazing how many things currently going on at the Fedora community, not just related to our Operation System (the distribution) but also innovative things that we develop or lead that in the long run benefit the whole Free Software community. As always I had the chance to meet, talk and collaborate in person with many Fedorians and that's always motivating for my contribution to the project.

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KDE Frameworks Sprint - How to Release a Platform

Filed under
KDE

KDE Frameworks 5 is the result of two years of hard work porting, tidying, modularizing and refactoring KDELibs4 into a new addition to the Qt 5 platform. In January, Alex Fiestas announced The KDE Barcelona Hub—an office where anyone is welcome to come and work on KDE projects. It was just what the Frameworks team needed to finish off the code so it could be released to the world. Read on for some of what happened.

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Upstream and Downstream: why packaging takes time

Filed under
KDE

Here in the KDE office in Barcelona some people spend their time on purely upstream KDE projects and some of us are primarily interested in making distros work which mean our users can get all the stuff we make. I've been asked why we don't just automate the packaging and go and do more productive things. One view of making on a distro like Kubuntu is that its just a way to package up the hard work done by others to take all the credit. I don't deny that, but there's quite a lot to the packaging of all that hard work, for a start there's a lot of it these days.

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Everyday I help libraries make the switch to open source

Filed under
OSS

My first serious introduction to open source software came with my first summer work-study job. I was working on my undergraduate degree in computer science, and applied to my local library to work in the children's area. But the library's network admin, Cindy Murdock, snapped me up as soon as she saw "shell scripting" on my resume. From there I began to learn about all the ways open source software can be used in libraries.

My library began using it with BSD-based routers in our small, rural libraries. At the time, dial-up was the only option for Internet access there. By the time I arrived, the library was already using open source software for routers, web servers, and content filters. From there we began branching out into other software. We set up a digital repository using Greenstone, and we were looking for an open source intergrated library system (ILS). We streamlined our people-counting system with a setup including wireless sensors that report to a server. I was able to write a more advanced reporting system using its API, which I also released.

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Open Potential

Filed under
OSS

Research from CWJobs has found that almost half (48 per cent) of IT professionals believe there are more jobs in open source than there were a year ago. Moreover, the survey of over 300 IT professionals found 62 per cent of the opinion that businesses were missing out on the opportunities generated by open source. The survey also found 71 per cent of respondents believe open source will be required more widely in future, with the biggest growth expected to be in advertising and media, telecoms and financial services.

The top benefits for businesses choosing to use open source software are believed to be flexibility (45 per cent) and cost (33 per cent), yet almost half (46 per cent) of professionals think organisations do not understand the advantages of using open source software.

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9 Signs You Should Use Linux on Your Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

you may know Linux operating systems are in the vast majority of cases completely free, and not just free in the sense that you don't have to pay anything, but also in the sense that you're free to legally copy it as many times as you want and share with anyone. What's called illegal piracy in the Windows world pretty much doesn't exist in the Linux world. That's the nature of open source software licensing.

This can lead to money savings because you don't have to buy Windows upgrades to run it legally, and if you're upgrading multiple systems (family, business, etc.) this can add up.

Yet despite being free the quality is surprisingly good. Big companies like Canonical, RedHat, Novell, Google and so on are funding its development and making money on related support services they offer their business users. The model is shown to work. You may not be foreign to open source software if you've used popular programs like Chrome, Firefox, VLC, and many others, all of which are open source, like Linux.

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Professors embed students directly into open source communities

Filed under
OSS

Ellis, whose students have contributed to Caribou, an on-screen keyboard that's part of the GNOME desktop, explained that seasoned students often prefer to submit patches to projects, while beginner-level students are more content to interview existing contributors, explore collaboration technologies like Git or IRC, and embark on what Ellis calls open source "field trips"—toe-dipping excursions into various communities...

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Black Lab Linux 6.0 Preview 2 Is Now Based on Xfce and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – Gallery

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Black Lab Linux 6.0 Preview 2, a distribution based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, has been released and is now ready for testing.

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