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Saturday, 23 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Samsung Unveils Chromebook Plus V2 Convertible with New Processor, Rear Camera Roy Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 4:34pm
Story How Docker Is Helping to Save The World (Literally) Roy Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 4:30pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 3:58pm
Story 5 Commands for Checking Memory Usage in Linux Rianne Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 3:48pm
Story Modicia: Ultimate Linux with a Twist Rianne Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 3:43pm
Story How to Mount and Use an exFAT Drive on Ubuntu Linux itsfoss 15/06/2018 - 1:35pm
Story Fedora 29 To Fully Embrace The FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification Roy Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 9:11am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 8:01am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 8:00am
Story 4 tools for building embedded Linux systems Rianne Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 7:34am

Google's do no evil AI style likely to clash with open source approach

Filed under
Google
OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Google's do no evil AI style likely to clash with open source approach

    Google outlined its artificial intelligence principles in a move to placate employees who were worried about their work and research winding up in U.S. weapons systems.

    Guess what? It's already too late. There's no way that Google's open source approach and its headline principle to not allow its AI into weapons is going to mesh. Chances are fairly good that the technology already open sourced is in some fledgling weapon system somewhere. After all, TensorFlow and a bunch of other neural network tools are pretty damn handy.

  • Read Google's AI ethics memo: 'We are not developing AI for use in weapons'
  • Google Plans Not to Renew Its Contract for Project Maven, a Controversial Pentagon Drone AI Imaging Program
  • Google promises not to use A.I. for weapons or surveillance, for the most part
  • Google pledges not to develop AI weapons, but says it will still work with the military

    Google has released a set of principles to guide its work in artificial intelligence, making good on a promise to do so last month following controversy over its involvement in a Department of Defense drone project. The document, titled “Artificial Intelligence at Google: our principles,” does not directly reference this work, but makes clear that the company will not develop AI for use in weaponry. It also outlines a number of broad guidelines for AI, touching issues like bias, privacy, and human oversight.

    While the new principles forbid the development of AI weaponry, they state that Google will continue to work with the military “in many other areas.” Speaking to The Verge, a Google representative said that had these principles been published earlier, the company would likely not have become involved in the Pentagon’s drone project, which used AI to analyze surveillance footage. Although this application was for “non-offensive purposes,” and therefore hypothetically permitted under these guidelines, the representative said it was too close for comfort — suggesting Google will play it safe with future military contracts.

Mark Shuttleworth dishes on where Canonical and Ubuntu Linux are going next

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth looked good at OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. Not only were his company Canonical and operating system Ubuntu Linux doing well, but thanks to his microfasting diet, he's lost 40 pounds. Energized and feeling good, he's looking forward to taking Canonical to its initial public offering (IPO) in 2019 and making the company more powerful than ever.

It's taken him longer than expected to IPO Canonical. Shuttleworth explained, "We will do the right thing at the right time. That's not this year, though. There's a process that you have to go through and that takes time. We know what we need to hit in terms of revenue and growth and we're on track."

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NXP’s EdgeScale IoT management suite tapped for Linux gateways

Filed under
Linux

NXP announced partnerships with Alibaba and six embedded equipment companies that are deploying its EdgeScale middleware for secure edge computing device management on Linux-driven devices based on NXP QorIQ Layerscape SoCs.

In March, NXP announced its EdgeScale IoT middleware platform for its Arm-based QorIQ Layerscape networking SoCs. At Computex this week, NXP revealed a partnership with Chinese technology giant Alibaba, which is working with NXP on EdgeScale software. It also announced deployment deals with six OEM/ODM hardware companies: Accton, Delta Networks, Inc. (DNI), Imago, Nexcom, Scalys, and Senao. (See farther below for details on some of their EdgeScale-enabled products.)

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Samsung Chromebook Plus Adds Linux App Support

    Sooner than I honestly expected, it seems that the Crostini Project has made its way to the Developer channel on the Samsung Chromebook Plus.

    As Robby reported in early May, the Crostini Reddit revealed a user who was already up and running with Crostini(sort of) on the ARM-powered Chromebook. Additionally, a number of commits in the Chromium repository gave us some pretty solid evidence that developers had shifted their efforts to making the container tech work outside of the Pixelbook.

    Thanks to a recent update to the Developer channel, we are now seeing reports that ‘Kevin‘ a.k.a the Samsung Chromebook Plus can now run the Linux terminal app just like the Pixelbook does.

  • Samsung Chromebook Plus Now Supports Linux apps

    The Chrome OS ecosystem is finally changing. This comes after Chromebooks, and the Chrome OS, in general, are now supporting Linux apps. This means that Chromebooks could now actually run more applications. By doing so, tech-savvy users claim that Chromebooks would become eventually a major competitor to both Mac and Windows laptops.

  • Call for distros: Patch cups for better internationalization

    If you're reading this and use cups to print (almost certainly you do if you're on Linux), you may want to contact your distribution and ask them to add this patch.

    It adds translation support for a few keyword found in some printers PPD files. The CUPS upstream project has rejected with not much reason other than "PPD is old", without really taking into account it's really the only way you can get access to some advanced printer features (see comments in the same thread)

  • Linux Lite 4.0 – New Features and Step by Step Installation Guide

    Linux lite is one of the top and one of the most downloaded Linux distros and recently it has released its latest version in Linux Lite 4.0. In this article, we are going to look into the new features and enhancements that is made available in Linux Lite 4.0 along with a step by step guide to install Linux Lite 4.0 in your system.

Server News and LF

Filed under
Server
  • Designing new cloud architectures: Exploring CI/CD – from data centre to cloud

    Nobody knows what DevOps really is, but if you are not doing, using, breathing, dreaming – being? – DevOps, you’re doing it wrong. All teasing aside, with the advent of DevOps, the gap that existed between development teams and operation teams has become closer, to the extent of some companies mixing the teams. Even so, some of those took a different approach and have multidisciplinary teams where engineers work on the product throughout the lifecycle, coding, testing and deploying – including on occasion security teams as well, now called DevOpsSec.

  • How not to kill your DevOps team
  • Kubernetes Deep Dive and Use Cases

    When containers were first introduced in 2008, Virtual Machines, or VMs, were the state-of-the-art option to optimize a data center’s physical resources. This arrangement worked well enough, but had some flaws: Virtual machines utilized too many resources because they required both a complete operating system, and emulated instructions to reach the physical CPU. Even with some technologies like Intel VT-x and AMD-V that attempted to solve the emulation problem, virtual machines were behind bare metal.

  • Mesos and Kubernetes: It's Not a Competition

    The project was founded in 2009. In 2010 the team decided to donate the project to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). It was incubated at Apache and in 2013, it became a Top-Level Project (TLP).

    There were many reasons why the Mesos community chose Apache Software Foundation, such as the permissiveness of Apache licensing, and the fact that they already had a vibrant community of other such projects.  

    It was also about influence. A lot of people working on Mesos were also involved with Apache, and many people were working on projects like Hadoop. At the same time, many folks from the Mesos community were working on other Big Data projects like Spark. This cross-pollination led all three projects -- Hadoop, Mesos, and Spark -- to become ASF projects.

  • Why Linux Works [Ed: it says "This article was originally published in October, 2017"]

    The Linux community works, it turns out, because the Linux community isn’t too concerned about work, per se. As much as Linux has come to dominate many areas of corporate computing – from HPC to mobile to cloud – the engineers who write the Linux kernel tend to focus on the code itself, rather than their corporate interests therein.

    Such is one prominent conclusion that emerges from Dawn Foster’s doctoral work, examining collaboration on the Linux kernel. Foster, a former community lead at Intel and Puppet Labs, notes, “Many people consider themselves a Linux kernel developer first, an employee second.”

    With all the “foundation washing” corporations have inflicted upon various open source projects, hoping to hide corporate prerogatives behind a mask of supposed community, Linux has managed to keep itself pure. The question is how.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for Open Source Summit North America

    Keynote speakers include:

        Ajay Agrawal, Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning Expert, Author of Prediction Machines, and Founder of The Creative Destruction Lab
        Jennifer Cloer, Founder of reTHINKit and Creator and Executive Producer of The Chasing Grace Project
        Wim Coekaerts, Senior Vice President of Operating Systems and Virtualization Engineering, Oracle
        Ben Golub, Executive Chairman and Interim CEO, and Shawn Wilkinson, Co-founder, Storj Labs
        Preethi Kasireddy, Founder & CEO, TruStory
        Window Snyder, Chief Security Officer, Fastly
        Imad Sousou, Corporate Vice President and General Manager, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
        Sana Tariq, Senior Architect, E2E Service Orchestration, TELUS

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Looks like a Linux version of Bounty Train is coming

    If you like the sound of designing your own train, hiring crew and travelling across the dangerous Wild West then Bounty Train [Official Site] will probably be your thing.

  • Game developers fume as Apple deprecates OpenGL

     

    Additionally, the natural successor to OpenGL, called Vulkan, has never worked in macOS despite repeated requests from developers and even though it is an open source project.

  • Space Invaders at 40: 'I tried soldiers, but shooting people was frowned upon'

     

    Before Space Invaders – which did require Nishikado to build some hardware using parts ordered through the mail – games were often created by plotting out circuitry and electronic components on an arcade board. Nishikado saw another way, however, and pioneered the notion that games could be designed on a computer. His ambition wasn’t quite met by the underwhelming power of the microcomputers of the time, but in building his own development tools and customising the hardware, he set a convention for the future of the video game industry: games were now software, not hardware.  

  • Valve says it will allow ‘everything’ on Steam as long as it isn’t illegal or ‘trolling’

     

    In place of human curators, the company says that it’s building new tools to allow users more control over the kinds of games they see on the store. There will also be some kind of new tools for developers as well, likely to combat issues like review bombing.

  • Steam updates game-content guidelines, will include “something that you hate”

     

    "We've decided that the right approach is to allow everything onto the Steam Store, except for things that we decide are illegal or straight-up trolling," Johnson wrote. "Taking this approach allows us to focus less on trying to police what should be on Steam and more on building those tools to give people control over what kinds of content they see."

KDE: Cutelyst, Rust, KDE Connect, LabPlot and GSoC

Filed under
KDE
  • Cutelyst on TechEmpower benchmarks round 16

    Yesterday TechEmpower released the results for round 16 of their benchmarking tests, you can see their blog about it here. And like for round 15 I’d like add my commentary about it here.

    Before you look into the results web site it’s important to be aware of a few things, first round 16 runs on a new hardware newer and more powerful than the previous rounds, they also did a Dockerization of the tests which allowed us to pull different distro images, cache package install and isolate from other frameworks. So don’t try to compare to round 15.

  • Integrating QML and Rust: Creating a QMetaObject at Compile Time

    There were already numerous existing projects that attempt to integrate Qt and Rust. A great GUI toolkit should be working with a great language.

  • KDE Connect on Plasma Mobile

    The digital world has changed over the last 10 years. The usage of mobile devices skyrocketed whereas the desktop market is stagnating. The trend is also going towards smaller and convertible devices. The mobile market is controlled by two major corporations. One of them is religiously cutting down your personal freedom and aiming towards a walled garden proprietary ecosystem, the other one is disrespecting your privacy enormously. With Plasma Mobile the KDE community is envisioning a mobile experience that is giving you maximal freedom while ensuring your privacy. It seems like a bold venture, but we have to at least try, right?

    Plasma Mobile would not be a true KDE project without the same degree of integration with the desktop as we already have with Android devices. Therefore we aim to make Plasma Mobile a first-class citizen of KDE Connect.

    [...]

    Kirigami Framework it will run on Plasma Mobile automagically. What are you waiting for?

  • LabPlot getting support for MQTT

    After successfully connecting to the broker. The MQTT client subscribes to the "#" wildcard. This means that the client gets every message published on the broker, so we can add every active topic to a combo box. The user can choose from these topics the ones the MQTT client will subscribe to. Since lots of topics are added to the combo box, by starting to type the topic's name we can narrow down the list the user has to choose from. Subscribing and unsubscribing to a topic is also implemented.

  • GSoC 2018: Coding period (week 1-3)

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Devices: Eelo, The Psion Gemini, “Isaac" and Android P Beta 2

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • Leaving Apple & Google: a general eelo development status

    Last year, I decided to leave Apple & Google: I want to free myself from the smartphone duopole, I want to regain control over my data privacy, I want to protect my freedom.

    At first, I thought I would just fork Android, add a better design, remove any Google stuff, select a few privacy-compliant web services and add them to the system.

    A little more than 6 months later, I realize that we’re building something really, really bigger than I had expected. This is made possible by the tremendous support I’m getting from many people around the world, and by a growing community of eelo contributors…

  • The Psion Gemini

    So, I backed the Gemini and received my shiny new device just a few months after they said that it'd ship, not bad for an indiegogo project! Out of the box, I flashed it, using the non-approved linux flashing tool at that time, and failed to backup the parts that, err, I really didn't want blatted... So within hours I had a new phone that I, err, couldn't make calls on, which was marginally annoying. And the tech preview of Debian wasn't really worth it, as it was fairly much unusable (which was marginally upsetting, but hey) - after a few more hours / days of playing around I got the IMEI number back in to the Gemini and put back on the stock android image. I didn't at this point have working bluetooth or wifi, which was a bit of a pain too, turns out the mac addresses for those are also stored in the nvram (doh!), that's now mostly working through a bit of collaboration with another Gemini owner, my Gemini currently uses the mac addresses from his device... which I'll need to fix in the next month or so, else we'll have a mac address collision, probably.

  • Robotics dev kit runs new Isaac SDK on octa-core Xavier module

    Nvidia announced an “Isaac” software developer platform for robots and other autonomous machines that runs on its Linux-friendly octa-core, ARM64 “Jetson Xavier” module with integrated high-end Volta GPU. A $1,300 dev kit is due in August.

  • Android P Beta 2 Released With Final APIs, 157 New Emojis And More

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Mozilla goes multilingual with open source Common Voice speech recognition datasets

    Mozilla has announced that it’s expanding its crowdsourced Common Voice project — an initiative that’s setting out to create an open source voice-recognition dataset — to include more languages.

    The tech organization first announced Common Voice last June, inviting volunteers from around the world to record snippets of text with their voice through web and mobile apps.

  • LibreOffice Now Available On Haiku OS, Mesa 18.1 With Vulkan Being Worked On

    The BeOS-compatible Haiku OS had been struggling for some time with its application support, but it seems to be advancing more rapidly in the past year or two -- at least from being an outside observer on the project over the years.

  • Open Source News: WordPress GDPR Compliant; Liferay, Joomla New Releases and More

    WordPress 4.9.6 is now available, bringing a whole bunch of GDPR-compliant features with it. For example, site owners can now designate a privacy policy page which will be shown on login and registration pages. Furthermore, Wordpress site owners can now export a ZIP file containing a user’s personal data, using data gathered by WordPress and participating plugins. And finally, site owners can erase a user’s personal data, including data collected by participating plugins.

  • New wave of technology industry leaders join efforts to increase predictability in open source licensing

    The GNU General Public License (GPL) and GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) are among the most widely used open source software licenses covering many important software projects, including the Linux kernel. GPL version 3 (GPLv3) introduced an approach to termination that offers distributors of the code an opportunity to correct errors and mistakes in license compliance. This approach allows for enforcement of license compliance consistent with a community in which heavy-handed approaches to enforcement, including for financial gain, are out of place, the statement added.

  • Leap Motion Open Sources The Project North Star AR Headset's Schematics

    Leap Motion today released the designs for the Project North Star reference AR headset, along with instructions on how to put it together.

    Leap Motion has long been a proponent of immersive technology. The company specializes in gesture tracking technology and first introduced a peripheral that would enable you to control your PC with a wave of your hand. When VR hardware began to emerge in the consumer market, Leap Motion quickly adapted its technology for VR input. Now it has turned its sights to the budding AR market, but instead of offering to license its tracking technology to hardware makers, the company created a full reference headset to help accelerate AR HMD design.

  • Build Your Own AR Headset Using Leap Motion's Open Source Project North Star Design

    Less than two months since unveiling Project North Star, Leap Motion has released the reference design that will allow developers, makers, and even manufacturers to build their own augmented reality headsets based on Leap Motion's work.

    The version of the Project North Star headset built by Leap Motion features a pair of 1600 x 1400 displays capable of 120 fps and a combined field of view exceeding 100 degrees. The headset also features Leap Motion's next generation ultra-wide tracking module, which has yet to hit the market in an AR headset. The rest of the headset is comprised of a combination of off-the-shelf and 3D printed components.

  • Steve Jobs Promised Open Source FaceTime Back in 2010: What Happened?

    At this year’s WWDC, Apple introduced a major new feature for FaceTime: the ability to make group calls of up to 32 participants, provided that all users’ Apple devices are on iOS 12. But, eight years ago, Steve Jobs promised something different.

  • Legal battle may be to blame for Apple breaking its FaceTime promise
  • Here’s Why Apple Never Made FaceTime an Open-Standard as Promised
  • This could be why Apple has yet to make FaceTime an open-standard like it promised
  • Verizon looks to open source for Edge architectures

    To say that the network edge and edge computing is an area of much discussion is perhaps the understatement of the year, and the technology choices available to telcos can be perplexing. Verizon is one of the more progressive carriers in this area, so how did the US telco approach this new wild frontier and what were its requirements for a successful Edge deployment? There are numerous technology choices available, from VMs to containers, but just how robust and resilient are some of the new software and hardware projects – and are they what many operators like to call “telco grade”?

  • Introducing Gaum: An Open Source O/RM That isn’t an O/RM

    We decided that, until we better understood the best way to shape our data, we shouldn’t worry about optimizing the efficiency of storing it. The tricky thing with data efficiency, is that you first need to figure out the best way to extract the information your service requires, in order to determine the best architecture. A parallel could be drawn to a work table, you first need to use it, work on it, live it to analyze the mess and from it obtain a use pattern for your tools and then arrange them.

    And there, we made a compromise, an O/RM. O/RMs, like many other technologies that bridge two different paradigms, have their fair share of detractors and supporters… and we’ve certain experienced both sides. At first it was wonderful, in about a week we moved our code base to use the O/RM (I am intentionally omitting the name because I don’t believe in software shaming open source projects) and for a period it was good: We moved the structure of our data, added columns, made queries, moved info and it was all done relatively easily, almost “magically”.

Openwashing and FUD: VCV, Zip Slip, Microsoft and Snyk

Filed under
OSS

Programming: C, Microsoft, and Security Patches

Filed under
Development
  • One year of C

    It’s now nearly a year that I started writing non-trivial amounts of C code again (the first sokol_gfx.h commit was on the 14-Jul-2017), so I guess it’s time for a little retrospective.

  • How Will Microsoft Handle GitHub's Controversial Code?

    But the beloved developer platform may also introduce moderation headaches. Microsoft will soon need to formally decide what will happen to the many GitHub repositories that conflict with its own interests. The tech giant will face similar content moderations challenge that peers like Facebook and Google have, but with code instead of speech.

  • Atom Editor Development To Continue After Microsoft GitHub Acquisition

    After the recent news that Microsoft acquired GitHub, many users were concerned regarding the future of the popular free and open source code editor Atom, developed by GitHub. Lee Dom, Open Source Community Manager at GitHub, has assured users that "Atom remains key to GitHub", but he didn't get into any details.

  • Security updates for Thursday

First look: Huawei MateBook X Pro with Ubuntu 18.04 Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Huawei MateBook X Pro is a pretty nice little laptop, featuring a 13.9 inch, 3000 x 2000 pixel touchscreen display with super-slim bezels, an all-metal chassis, and support for up ton an Intel Core i7-8550U processor, 16GB of RAM, 512GB of storage, and NVIDIA GeForce MX150 graphics.

Huawei recently announced that the MateBook X Pro is coming to America, and it’s up for pre-order from B&H.

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Enter Jakarta EE: an Inoculation Against Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt in the Java Community

Filed under
Development

Developers can be passionate about the tools and languages they use for development. This passion is a double-edged knife. It can foster growth of the technology's adoption and inspire the direction of energy into the language that one has chosen to advocate. The passion might also scare off those who wish to use the language or are just entering the field, particularly when the opposing view is exaggerated, incorrect or out of date with the current state of the technology. This latter scenario injects (often unintentionally) into the dialogue regarding the technology in question Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).

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Mozilla: Firefox 60.0.2, Pseudolocalization in Firefox, WebExtension, Voice and Side View

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Releases Firefox 60.0.2 for Linux, Windows, Mac, and Android

    Mozilla released on Wednesday Firefox 60.0.2, the second point release of the Firefox 60 "Quantum" web browser series with an updated NSS component and various improvements.

    Coming about three weeks after Firefox 60.0.1, this point release isn't as imperious as it, but it updates the NSS (Network Security Services) component, a set of libraries for supporting cross-platform development of security-enabled server and client apps, to version 3.36.4 from 3.36.1 used in the previous release.

  • Pseudolocalization in Firefox

    One of the core projects we did over 2017 was a major overhaul of the Localization and Internationalization layers in Gecko, and all throughout the first half of 2018 we were introducing Fluent into Firefox.

  • Browser detection inside a WebExtension

    Just for the record, if you really need to know about the browser container of your WebExtension, do NOT rely on StackOverflow answers... Most of them are based, directly or not, on the User Agent string. So spoofable, so unreliable. Some will recommend to rely on a given API, implemented by Firefox and not Edge, or Chrome and not the others. In general valid for a limited time only... You can't even rely on chrome, browser or msBrowser since there are polyfills for that to make WebExtensions cross-browser.

  • Mozilla's Common Voice Project Now Multilingual, Victory at Sea Pacific Coming Soon to Linux, Thunar 1.8 Released and More

    Mozilla yesterday announced that its Common Voice project, which is crowdsourcing a large dataset of human voices for use in speech technology, will now be multilingual. You currently can donate your voice in German, French and Welsh, and Mozilla will be adding 40+ languages soon.

  • Browse Two Websites in One Tab With Firefox Side View

    Side View is a Firefox Test Pilot project, meaning it might become part of Firefox later. This simple feature lets you browse websites using the Firefox sidebar. Here’s a quick overview:

  • Firefox dropped below the 10% share value on Netmarketshare

    Google Chrome, Firefox's biggest rival in the browser world, managed to increase its massive lead from 60.08% in June 2017 to 62.85% in May 2018.

3rd Party Software in Fedora Workstation

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

So you have probably noticed by now that we started offering some 3rd party software in the latest Fedora Workstation namely Google Chrome, Steam, NVidia driver and PyCharm. This has come about due to a long discussion in the Fedora community on how we position Fedora Workstation and how we can improve our user experience. The principles we base of this policy you can read up on in this policy document. To sum it up though the idea is that while the Fedora operating system you install will continue as it has been for the last decade to be based on only free software (with an exception for firmware) you will be able to more easily find and install the plethora of applications out there through our software store application, GNOME Software. We also expect that as the world of Linux software moves towards containers in general and Flatpaks specifically we will have an increasing number of these 3rd party applications available in Fedora.

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Timekpr Revived: Easy To Use Parental Control Software For Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

Using Timekpr Revived, you can control the computer usage for certain user accounts by setting some predefined access rules.

Timekpr Revived is a fork of the old Timkpr application, which was initially updated with Ubuntu Unity support, but later received many other improvements, including porting the UI to GTK3, support for newer Ubuntu versions, and so on.

In recent weeks, Timekpr Revived has received support for KDE Plasma (the developer tested it in Kubuntu 18.04), as well as some important Ubuntu 18.04 (Gnome) fixes. As a result, Timekpr now runs in Unity, Gnome, KDE, Xfce, and MATE. Since I use Gnome, that's the only desktop environment in which I personally tried it though (on Ubuntu 18.04).

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GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

Filed under
Microsoft
GNOME

Microsoft is going to rename the Git Virtual File System to eliminate its clash with GNOMErs.

The purpose of the Git Virtual File System was laudable: Redmond's developers were sick of taking the afternoon off after typing “git clone” (even “git checkout” could take hours), so they gave GitHub users a workaround.

At the time, Microsoft's Saeed Noursalehi explained that GVFS “virtualises the file system beneath your repo and makes it appear as though all the files in your repo are present, but in reality only downloads a file the first time it is opened.”

At last, developers could handle terabyte-size repos without taking up knitting.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more