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Saturday, 10 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 2:42am
Story Open/Hacker Hardware Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 2:40am
Story 4MLinux 20.1 released. Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:45am
Story Refracta 8.0 Is a Pint-Sized Powerhouse Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:35am
Story Clear Linux With Mesa 13 Is A Strong Match For Intel Linux Performance Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:30am
Story PTS: PHP 7.1 vs. PHP 7.0 vs. HHVM Benchmarks Roy Schestowitz 03/12/2016 - 1:27am
Story Best Features Of Linux Mint 18.1 ‘Serena’ Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 9:10pm
Story Linux Kernel 4.4.36 LTS Introduces Minor PA-RISC Changes, Wireless Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 6:50pm
Story Linux Kernel 4.8.12 Released, Brings PA-RISC, PowerPC, and x86 Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 6:48pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 02/12/2016 - 5:24pm

Never buying Windows again, eh? How about the Linux powered Oryx Pro?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Oryx Pro is the opposite of most of the laptops you have seen reviewed here recently. At 15.2x10.7x1.1" and 5.5lbs it is bulkier than the slim laptops dominating the market, not to mention the 2lb power brick. It also runs Ubuntu 16.04 LTS as opposed to Win10, thankfully the install is well configured for the hardware present according to the review at Ars Technica. The hardware on the other hand is familiar and rather impressive, a desktop class GTX 1060, an i7-6700HQ, 32GB of RAM, and a 256GB SSD. The model reviewed at Ars runs you almost $1900 or there is a 17" model, as well as a GTX 1070 upgrade available if you so desire. Pop by to take a look at the full review of this Linux powered laptop.

Read more

Also: Fedora 25 News & Update: New Linux Based Operating Sytem Available Now; Is This Windows 10, Mac OS Killer?

FreeDOS 1.2 RC2

Filed under
OS
OSS
  • FreeDOS 1.2 Release Candidate 2

    We started FreeDOS in 1994 to create a free and open source version of DOS that anyone could use. We've been slow to make new releases, but DOS isn't exactly a moving target anymore. New versions of FreeDOS are mostly about updating the software and making FreeDOS more modern. We made our first Alpha release in 1994, and our first Beta in 1998. In 2006, we finally released FreeDOS 1.0, and updated to FreeDOS 1.1 in 2012. And all these years later, it's exciting to see so many people using FreeDOS in 2016.

  • FreeDOS 1.2 RC2 Arrives, Still Evolving After 22 Years

    The second release candidate of FreeDOS 1.2 is now available, approximately one month after FreeDOS 1.2-RC1 and twenty-two years after the FreeDOS open-source project began.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 Slated for Early December Release for Ubuntu Phones, Tablets

Filed under
Ubuntu

On Thanksgiving day, Canonical's Lukasz Zemczak wrote yet another landing e-mail to inform the Ubuntu Phone and Tablet communities about the release date of the long-anticipated Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 software update.

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Canonical Releases Snapd 2.18 Snappy Daemon for Ubuntu Core 16 and Ubuntu 16.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Snappy Team, through Canonical's Michael Vogt, has had the great pleasure of announcing on November 24, 2016, the release of the snapd 2.18 maintenance update to Ubuntu's Snappy daemon.

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Love the Amazon Echo? Meet these 3 open source projects

Filed under
OSS

But where does open source fit into the picture? Is voice-controlled, connected future destined to be forever dominated by a few proprietary choices of custom-built hardware/software combinations that are essentially black boxes to their users? We hope not!

In fact, there are a few open source tools for voice control out there already, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the field grows as the technology becomes more pervasive. Looking for a weekend project? Check out a few of these options.

Read more

ALT Linux 8.1 Workstation Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.34, MATE & KDE Desktops

Filed under
Linux

On Thanksgiving day, BaseALT Ltd, through Michael Shigorin, proudly announced the release and general availability of the ALT Linux 8.1 Workstation distribution aimed for personal and corporate desktop use.

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antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" Linux OS Is Just Around the Corner, RC1 Out Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

During the first days of November, we reported that the antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" Linux operating system entered development, and that it will be based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.6 "Jessie".

Read more

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Qt 5.9 Planning For Feature Freeze, Other Changes

    While Qt 5.8 hasn't even been released yet, there is already release planning that is happening around Qt 5.9.

    Qt 5.8.0 isn't going to be released until the beginning of January due to the latest delays hampering the release. There is now a thread on the Qt mailing list simply entitled Qt 5.9. The Qt 5.9 plans being talked about are to do a feature freeze in early 2017, as soon as 1 February. They would be sticking hard to the feature freeze date to try to avoid any delays holding back the 5.9.0 release.

  • Darktable 2.2 Being Prepared For Release With Many Changes

    This week marks the Darktable 2.2.0-RC1 release as the developers of this open-source photography workflow software prepare for its official release, just in time if you are planning to get some new camera gear this holiday season.

    Darktable 2.2 is a big release even though Darktable 2.0 was great -- more than two thousand commits have gone into this 2.2 development code thus far.

  • Linux Users Unhappy as Adobe Flash Player keeps NPAPI architecture

    Adobe has announced that they will be continuing to support the NPAPI architecture for the Linux version of Flash in 2017 as well. This was not a decision embraced by everyone, as some Linux users voiced their complaints across the online medium.

  • SQL Server on Linux: Runs well in spite of internal quirks. Why? [Ed: Anderson pushes for Windows layer (back doors) on top of GNU/Linux which is what SQL Server technically requires. It's not really a Linux port.]

SitePoint on FOSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Groovy, an Open Source Success Story

    Apache Groovy is a multi-faceted general purpose programming language for the Java platform. While primarily an object-oriented language with many dynamic language features, it also supports functional programming, static type checking and static compilation. This article looks at some interesting aspects of Groovy’s history and some of the significant guiding principles which help keep it a vibrant open source project.

  • The Conventions of Contributing to Open Source

    We all love using open source, right? I have done my fair share of contributing to open source, mainly through small contributions here and there. I’ve tried to open source some libraries in the past, with varying levels of success and failure. I would say I am somewhere in the middle on the Contributor’s Spectrum. There are those that do much more and those that do much less.

  • How Open Sourcing Bootstrap Made It Huge

    Teaching and learning from each other and building awesome stuff as a result of open communication and collaboration lie at the heart of the open source philosophy. Bootstrap certainly stands out as one of the most successful instances of the open source approach, which has made it what it is today.

Pinebook is a Linux laptop with an ARM CPU for $89 and up

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Pine64 launched a single-board computer called the Pine A64 last year. It features an Allwinner A64 ARM Cortex-A53 processor and sells for $15 and up.

Now the company has introduced a laptop that uses the same processor and supports just about any Android or Linux-based software that can run on the Pine A64,.

The laptop is called the Pinebook, and there are two options available: an $89 version with an 11.6 inch display or a $99 model with a 14 inch screen.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Solus Users Receive Linux Kernel 4.8.10 and Vivaldi 1.5, QOwnNotes Lands as Well

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Fans of the Solus independent Linux-based operating system will be thrilled to learn that a bunch of new and updated packages made their way into the stable repositories a few moments ago.

We're using the distribution, so we just want to inform you as well about what landed today, November 24, 2016, just in time for the Thanksgiving holiday. First off, Solus is now powered by the latest Linux 4.8.10 kernel, which adds a bunch of networking improvements, and the recently released Vivaldi 1.5 web browser is available too.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The miracle of Lubuntu for older computers

    When it comes to Linux distributions you generally don’t hear a lot about Lubuntu. However, this Ubuntu spin can be a great help to users with older computers who need a light-weight distribution that requires minimal hardware resources.

  • Introducing the Linux Hardware Guide

    The Linux-Hardware-Guide tests and rates all types of hardware for their Linux compatibility for the knowledge base. A test report is created for each investigated hardware component and, if necessary, additional Linux configuration help is provided. Furthermore, Linux users can add their own hardware to the database and transmit hardware details and test results with a dedicated scan software. This allows creating a broad data basis and semi-automatic filling of the knowledge base. The Linux-Hardware-Guide is not limited to a single Linux distribution but instead tries to support all distributions and as many Linux users as possible. Currently, it supports 27 different Linux distributions. Additionally, the Linux-Hardware-Guide facilitates the knowledge transfer between Linux users who have exactly the same hardware under operation, because problem finding and solving often is much easier if someone else with exactly the same hardware is available.

  • My Lightning Talk from All Things Open 2016: 25 years of Linux in 5 minutes
  • Citrix Linux Virtual Desktop provides Windows VDI alternative

    Windows isn't going anywhere, but with Citrix's Linux Virtual Desktop, VDI admins who want to work with open source desktops can actually do so.

  • Skype Updates Linux Version to 1.12 [Ed: spyware]
  • JSON Home Tests and Keystone API changes
  • A tale of cylinders and shadows

    Like I wrote before, we at Collabora have been working on improving WebKitGTK+ performance for customer projects, such as Apertis. We took the opportunity brought by recent improvements to WebKitGTK+ and GTK+ itself to make the final leg of drawing contents to screen as efficient as possible. And then we went on investigating why so much CPU was still being used in some of our test cases.

    The first weird thing we noticed is performance was actually degraded on Wayland compared to running under X11. After some investigation we found a lot of time was being spent inside GTK+, painting the window’s background.

  • SUSE Releases The First Official 64-bit Linux OS For Raspberry Pi 3

    SUSE has released the first official 64-bit Linux-based operating system for Raspberry Pi 3. This release is basically a version of Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP2 that supports Raspberry Pi 3. The users need to visit SUSE’s website, make an account, and download the OS image.

  • YaST Team visits Euruko 2016

    As promised in previous posts, we want to share with you our experience and views from this year annual Ruby conference Euruko. Maybe “our” is too much to say, since we only sent one developer there. So to be precise, these are Josef Reidinger’s experience and views on the conference.

    This year Euruko took place in Sofia, capital of Bulgaria. It turned out to be a great conference place. Public transport works very well, everyone speak English and even when it uses Cyrilic alphabet, almost everything is written also in Latin one.

  • Debian stretch on the Raspberry Pi 3

    The last couple of days, I worked on getting Debian to run on the Raspberry Pi 3.

    Thanks to the work of many talented people, the Linux kernel in version 4.8 is _almost_ ready to run on the Raspberry Pi 3. The only missing thing is the bcm2835 MMC driver, which is required to read the root file system from the SD card. I’ve asked our maintainers to include the patch for the time being.

  • Debian miniconf in Cambridge

    I spent a few days in Cambridge for a minidebconf. This is a tiny version of the full annual Debconf. We had a couple of days for hacking, and another two days for talks.

  • Handset Installed Base Passed Tipping Point. Now More than Half of All Mobile Phone Handsets in Use are Smartphones

    We have passed a significant milestone for the planet's digital connectivity. As of last quarter, we passed the tipping point where now there are more smartphones in use, than dumbphones (aka 'featurephones'). The new sales of smartphones has been more than dumphones for three years but with the installed base, worldwide, it takes this long for the trends to catch up. And as smartphones now sell more than 4 out of every 5 new phones, this trend will go to its logical conclusion. In five years we're at the point where all new phones sold are smartphones; and by middle of the next decade, the last dumbphones will quietly disconnect from their networks for the last time.

  • Register Now – First ever Tizen Developer Conference for Smart TV comes to Russia, 2016

    For the first time we have a Tizen Developer Conference for Smart TV Russia 2016, taking place from November 30 – December 1, 2016. The event will be held in Moscow at the “Marriott Hotel Novy Arbat”.

    As the name suggests this will be a Tizen Developer Conference for Smart TV that will Introduce app developers to the exciting world of TV apps and educate them to the Tizen TV platform and architecture. You will be able to learn all the features and possibilities of SmartTV including multitasking, instantOn, preview, checkout on TV, etc.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Android 7.1 Nougat Features: What To Expect With Its New Upgrade?

    If you have one of the devices that’s eligible for this developer preview and you have been signed up for the Android Beta Program, then Google will automatically send an over-the-air (OTA) update to your device. The update will be over the coming week, according to Dave Burke, Google vice president of engineering. You can still sign up for the Android Beta Program if you want to test this latest OS release before it becomes available to everyone. And if you’d like, you can download images and flash them onto supported devices.

  • Nokia Android Phone Tipped to Have Zeiss Lens, 2K Display

    New details of the upcoming Nokia Android phone, expected to be unveiled at the MWC 2017 in Barcelona, have surfaced online. According to a tipster based in China, the upcoming Nokia Android phone will feature a 5.2-inch or 5.5-inch screen size. The rumours claim that the smartphone will sport 2K (QHD) display, which means that the handset may belong to the high-end category.

    Additionally, the Nokia Android phone is said to be powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 SoC which may seem slightly dated considering all new smartphones are now featuring Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 under the hood. One of the highlight feature of the upcoming Nokia Android phone is said to be the Zeiss lens for the primary camera, something that has been seen on earlier Nokia devices.

  • Android TV home screen bloat and how to fix it
  • How to see Wi-Fi passwords on an Android phone
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 May Update To Android 7.0 Nougat Starting In December

OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Are you powering your business with open source tech? Here’s why you should

    If open source is not already an integral part of your IT strategy, then it’s time for a re-think. Today’s open source solutions are just as secure and feature rich as the proprietary offerings in the market and come with many added benefits.

    Of course some might espouse the cost efficiencies of open source but for many organisations, the decision to adopt open source technologies has more to do with capability and community. For starters, open source is inherently flexible, removing vendor lock-in and providing code which can be customised or extended to meet a particular need. This flexibility is essential for rapid innovation and also adding new capabilities within already complex IT environments.

  • Nextcloud: an Open-source Dropbox, Google Drive Alternative

    Nextcloud is a cloud software alternative that gives you full control over your data. It’s designed for both individuals and organizations with many users. It’s a relatively young project, being a fork of the similar ownCloud project, which is also worth checking out and comparing.

  • Securing open source

    Open source software is on the up and up. More companies, software development houses and individual developers are making use of it. But, isn't the very concept of open source inimical to security? It could be argued both ways, but the reality is that if it is being used – and it is – then companies had better have a good understanding of the implications for their system, and how to secure it.

    First of all, some basics of the open source world. It is important to understand the difference between free and open source software. Free software is software that can be used without paying a licence fee – think of Adobe Acrobat Reader or Winzip – whereas open source software allows users to access the source code itself.

  • Keynote: Fujitsu's Open Source Journey - From Consumer to Apprentice Contributor
  • Fujitsu's Open Source Journey -- From Consumer to Contributor

    About a year ago, Fujitsu created the Open Service Catalog Manager (OSCM), their first full software project contribution to the open source space. Ries describes this a "winding road" where they moved through several different steps to ultimately release the OSCM as an open source project. They started with "Consensus Ridge" to decide whether Fujitsu should even do this as an open source project, which was easily answered because so many of their customers and the industry are demanding open source solutions.

  • Get emotional: Tips for open source communities

    Humans are driven quite a bit by emotions. You may be a rational human being, but your emotions will still drive many of your choices. You can be excited, angry, interested, or sad about things—it doesn't matter—you'll react to those emotions and you'll very often leak that into your communications.

    You'll likely leak your emotions, and so will other members of the community. If you think humans should suck it up and act like nothing is happening, I'm afraid you are living in a bubble. That is not how humans operate. That's not how humans interact.

    Some humans know this and these humans should make sure other humans know this as well: Emotions matter and they affect our daily tasks. Emotions take control over us many times during our day and they determine how our day will go. Being thick skinned doesn't really matter. It just means you can control your emotions a bit more than others, but you still react to them. You react in a different, perhaps more controlled, way but you still react to your emotions.

  • Making open source fashionable

    In March 2015, the leadership of Berlin-based Zalando gathered the company's entire tech team in a hip underground techno club (it's Berlin, after all) and announced a new way of working—something called "Radical Agility." Inspired by Daniel Pink's Drive, Brian Robertson's Holacracy system and the agile movement, Radical Agility emphasizes Drive's call for autonomy, mastery and purpose as the pillars of the company's tech strategy and culture.

  • Will Open Source Drive Blockchain Interoperability?

    Blockchain technology matured a lot this year. Sure, it's still unclear why banks should use it — needs vary by company. But it is clear blockchains provide more value if they can interact with each other.

    Competing blockchain vendors have worked hard to differentiate their products and sell them to banks. In the process some players have begun open-sourcing their software — following the same path as operating-system programmers and architects of the internet.

  • Pay the Price for Open Source

    Fast forward a few dozen years and here we are, Open Source is now an ecosystem, not a user group that you and five friends attend, or a magazine to which you subscribe. The problem is that most of us have stopped talking about the different types of open source, we just assume it is both. Most of the projects in our corner of the world – PHP – actually is both. The PHP license – a derivative of the BSD license – is very open about giving you freedom with very few responsibilities. Other projects use GPL, MIT, Apache, and other licenses. Each developer or group has the right to select whatever license they feel most comfortable with for their code. If you use their code, it is your responsibility to abide by the restrictions and responsibilities of their license.

  • 2017 Community Leadership Events: An Update

    This week I was delighted to see that we could take the wraps off a new event that I am running in conjunction with my friends at the Linux Foundation called the Community Leadership Conference. The event will be part of the Open Source Summit which was previously known as LinuxCon and I will be running it in Los Angeles from 11th – 13th Sep 2017 and Prague from 23rd – 25th Oct 2017.

    Now, some of you may be wondering if this replaces or is different to the Community Leadership Summit in Portland/Austin. Let me add some clarity.

  • Kicking off the 2016 End-of-Year Fundraiser

    Thanks to a single staff member, ten volunteer board members, and dozens of interns, volunteers, and members, the Open Source Initiative (OSI) protects and promotes open source software, development and communities, championing software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure, stewarding the Open Source Definition, and preventing abuse of the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement. Although primarily known for our role in certifying open source licenses, today OSI's mandate includes, fiscal sponsorships for emerging projects, hosting of open source working groups, and cross-discipline community building, all in an effort to extend the reach of open source in education, government, nonprofits, and business. In order to move forward with our work, we are asking members and open source contributors and enthusiasts to take the next step and donate to the OSI. Join us in our work for the next year by donating to the OSI today!

  • OpenBSD Foundation Welcomes First Iridium Donor: Smartisan

    Today's big news comes from the OpenBSD Foundation, via director Ken Westerback.

  • Open Government in France “a mini-revolution”

    “In five years, France has progressed from an “empty chair” policy to that of an observer and to then become a member of OGP and its vice-president”, declared Axelle Lemaire, France’s Secretary of State in charge of Digital Affairs, at the Paris Open Source Summit, speaking about the country’s Open Government policy.

  • EU-US Transatlantic Open Data Partnership publishes data access library

    This month, the eu.us.opendata library was published on GitHub. The software provides developers in the statistical programming language R with a universal way to access economic data from the EU and the USA.

    The library was developed as part of the EU-US Transatlantic Open Data Partnership, a collaboration between the US Department of Commerce and its Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) on the one hand, and the EC's DG Connect and Eurostat on the other.

  • Open Source Pancakes

    [drtorq] promises more hacking on the printer in the future, so this is just step one. We expect the mods will be a lot like a typical 3D printer, except the heated bed is absolutely necessary on this model. The printer is more like a CNC engraver than a 3D printer since it is basically an XY carriage with a nozzle that flows batter instead of polymer.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • The FBI Hacked Over 8,000 Computers In 120 Countries Based on One Warrant

    In January, Motherboard reported on the FBI's “unprecedented” hacking operation, in which the agency, using a single warrant, deployed malware to over one thousand alleged visitors of a dark web child pornography site. Now, it has emerged that the campaign was actually an order of magnitude larger.

    In all, the FBI obtained over 8,000 IP addresses, and hacked computers in 120 different countries, according to a transcript from a recent evidentiary hearing in a related case.

  • curl security audit

    I asked for, and we were granted a security audit of curl from the Mozilla Secure Open Source program a while ago. This was done by Mozilla getting a 3rd party company involved to do the job and footing the bill for it. The auditing company is called Cure53.

  • Personal data for more than 130,000 sailors was breached, Navy says

    The Navy was notified in October by Hewlett Packard Enterprise Services that a computer supporting a Navy contract was “compromised,” and that the names and social security numbers of 134,386 current and former sailors were accessed by unknown persons, the service said in a news release.

  • Your headphones could be spying on you

    JUST WHEN you thought you couldn’t possibly be carrying any more tracking devices, it looks like you can add another one to the mix.

    A team of researchers in Israel have discovered that with a little hardware hackery, your headphones can be used to listen in on you when plugged into your computer.

    It’s been known for a long time that if you plug a microphone into a speaker jack, it can sometimes make a tinny speaker (if you blast the volume). But what about the other way around?

    Ben Gurion University researchers have discovered that with a simple malware program which they've christened SPEAKE(a)R, Realtek codecs, which provide the built in sound on most motherboards, can be reassigned to turn the headphone jack into a microphone.

  • How to create heat maps to show who’s trying to connect your router
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices

Open Source Software A Core Competency For Effective Tech M&A

Imagine your company just acquired its competitor for $100 million. Now imagine the company’s most important asset – its proprietary software – is subject to third-party license conditions that require the proprietary software to be distributed free of charge or in source code form. Or, imagine these license conditions are discovered late in the diligence process, and the cost to replace the offending third-party software will costs tens of thousands of dollars and take months to remediate. Both scenarios exemplify the acute, distinct and often overlooked risks inherent to the commercial use of open source software. An effective tech M&A attorney must appreciate these risks and be prepared to take the steps necessary to mitigate or eliminate them. Over the past decade, open source software has become a mainstay in the technology community. Since its beginnings, open source software has always been viewed as a way to save money and jumpstart development projects, but it is increasingly being looked to for its quality solutions and operational advantages. Today, only a fraction of technology companies do not use open source software in any way. For most of the rest, it is mission critical. Read more

AMD Graphics

SUSE Leftovers

  • Git, Kernels, LightDM, More update in Tumbleweed
    Topping the list of updates for snapshot 20161129 was the update to Light Display Manager 1.21.1, which added an Application Programming Interface (API) version to the greeter-daemon protocol for future enhancements. Other updates in the snapshot include openVPN, which added a recommended utility for network and traffic protocols, and subpackages for systemd relevant for 32-bit users. Desktop manager xfdesktop updated to version 4.12.3 and introduced rotating wallpaper images if the images contain rotation information. The programming language vala, which aims to bring modern programming language features to GNOME developers without imposing any additional runtime requirements, updated in the 20161129 and 20161201 snapshots.
  • openSUSE Leap 42.1 upgrade to Leap 42.2
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/49
    I’m sure nobody doubted it, but Tumbleweed is back on the roll! And in fact, we did the impossible and released 8 snapshots in a week. This review will cover {1201..1208}.