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Thursday, 05 Mar 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open Source Debate: Copyleft vs. Permissive Licenses

Filed under
GNU
OSS
Legal

Most discussions of free software licenses bore listeners. In fact, licenses are usually of such little interest that 85%of the projects on Github fail to have one.

However, one aspect of licensing never fails to stir partisan responses: the debate over the relative advantages of copyleft licenses such as the GNU General Public License (GPL), and permissive licenses such as the MIT or the Apache 2 licenses.

You only have to follow the links to Occupy GPL! that are making the rounds to see the emotions that this unending debate can still stir. Calling for an end to "GPL purism," and dismissing the GPL as "not a free license," the site calls on readers to use permissive licenses instead, describing them as "truly OSS [Open Source Software] licenses and urging readers to "Join the Fight!"

Occupy GPL! itself is unlikely to have a future. Anonymous calls to actions rarely succeed; people prefer to know who is giving the call to arms before they muster at the barricades. Nor is the site's outdated name and inconsistent diction, nor the high number of exclamation and question marks likely to inspire many readers. Still, the fact that the site exists at all, and the counter-responses in comments on Google+ show that the old debate is still very much alive.

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Security Onion: A Linux Distro For IDS, NSM, And Log Management

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Security Onion is a Linux distribution for intrusion detection, network security monitoring, and log management. It’s based on Ubuntu and contains Snort, Suricata, Bro, Sguil, Squert, Snorby, ELSA, Xplico, Network Miner, and many other security tools. Security Onion is a platform that allows you to monitor your network for security alerts. It’s simple enough to run in small environments without many issues and allows advanced users to deploy distributed systems that can be used in network enterprise type environments.

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UAE Exchange consolidates data centres with Red Hat Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that UAE Exchange, a leading foreign exchange and money transfer brand, has successfully created a scalable, secure, robust and high-performance datacenter environment by consolidating its IT infrastructure on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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Hackable Pi-like SBC opts for 1.6GHz quad-core STB SoC

Filed under
Android
Linux

Shenzhen Xunlong has launched a $59 open-spec “Orange Pi Plus” SBC with a 1.6GHz quad-core Allwinner H3 SoC, 40-pin Pi-compatible expansion, WiFi, and SATA.

In December when Shenzhen Xunlong Software announced its open-spec, Linux- and Android-ready Orange Pi and Orange Pi Mini SBCs, both of which use the dual-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner A20 system-on-chip, the company also briefly noted an upcoming, quad-core Orange Pi Plus. The Plus was said to offer a quad-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner A31 SoC with a PowerVR SGX544MP2 GPU. Instead, the shipping version, now available at AliExpress for $59, arrives with Allwinner’s new quad-core Cortex–A7 based H3 SoC and a Mali-400 MP2 GPU.

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Elementary, My Dear Linux User

Filed under
Linux

Upon first boot, Elementary obviously is designed to look and function like OS X. Although that might turn the stomachs of die-hard Linux fans, it provides an interesting platform for folks who appreciate the clean, functional layout Apple provides on its flagship OS. Elementary OS includes the Ubuntu Software Center, and like most variants, it can install any program in the Ubuntu repositories. Out of the box, however, it's a clean, fast operating system that people familiar with OS X will recognize right away.

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Top 10 Features of Linux Kernel 3.19

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel 3.19 has been officially announced by none other than its father, Linus Torvalds, on February 8, 2015. It is a great release that brings some very interesting features. Because we didn’t have access to a complete list of its features at the moment of writing the news article about its availability, we have decided to drop another one that highlights Linux 3.19 kernel’s prominent features.

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All Ubuntu Phones Are Now Sold Out, New Flash Sale at 3PM CET

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Amazing, simply amazing! We have no idea how many Ubuntu phone units were sold today, but after only three hours all available BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition smartphones were sold out. Looks like the Ubuntu community in Europe is really strong, as they also had to face some server issues with BQ’s online store, which apparently was not prepared for a large crowd.

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Also The Second Batch of Ubuntu Phones Was Sold Out in Ten Minutes

BQ Says They Received 12,000 Ubuntu Phone Orders Per Minute

Red Hat Upgrades Virtualization Platform

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

The prolific developers at Red Hat have been relatively quiet in the New Year. Now, the open source leader is picking up the pace with the introduction of the latest version of its enterprise virtualization tool.

The company announced general availability this week of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.5 aiming to offer tighter integration with OpenStack while promising to ease deployment of IT infrastructures for traditional virtualization workloads along with enterprise-level cloud infrastructure.

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Google Launches Open-Source, Cross-Cloud Benchmarking Tool

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Google
OSS

Google today launched PerfKit, an open-source cloud-benchmarking tool that, in Google’s words, is an “effort to define a canonical set of benchmarks to measure and compare cloud offerings.” The PerfKit tools currently support Google’s own Compute Engine, Amazon’s AWS and Microsoft’s Azure clouds. Google says it has worked on this project with over 30 researchers, companies and customers, including ARM, Canonical, Cisco, Intel, Microsoft, Rackspace and Red Hat.

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Without open source, there would be no DevOps

Filed under
OSS

If we're going to do DevOps, we have to give up open source. Right? Wait, we're an Agile shop, so we have to give that up, too. Right?

Over the last five years or so, I've talked with a lot of people confused about what it means to "do DevOps,” and clearly concerned about having to give up other things that have already proven their value in order to adopt DevOps. The bad news is, we've not done a good job in the DevOps community of nailing down what DevOps is and what it isn't at an earlier stage in our development.

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Cisco Takes Open Source Route to Policy Revamp

Filed under
OSS

Cisco is developing open source tools designed to allow network operators to describe policy in more meaningful terms.

The Noiro Networks team inside Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) is trying to solve the problem of network policy that doesn't make sense in an application-centric world. Typical networking policy uses networking language -- describing traffic flows or or whether specific ports are allowed to connect with each other. Instead, the Noiro Networks team is looking to describe policies in terms of how applications are allowed to interoperate, says Thomas Graf, a principal software engineer at Cisco working on Noiro Networks.

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Linux-based mobile manipulation robots due soon

Filed under
Linux

Former Unbounded Robotics execs have launched “Fetch Robotics” with $3 million in funding, and will ship a ROS-on-Linux mobile manipulator bot in Q2 2015.

A startup called Fetch Robotics has announced $3 million in Series A financing from O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures (OATV) and Shasta Ventures, along with a development team that jumped from the apparently now defunct Unbounded Robotics. Fetch Robotics plans to announce and ship two mobile manipulation robots in the second quarter that are aimed principally at the logistics and light industrial markets, “as well as for other human-robot collaboration opportunities,” says the company.

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Sony SmartWatch 3 Review: The Best-Performing Android Smartwatch Yet

Filed under
Reviews
Gadgets

Sony's been trying the smartwatch thing for years, but the original SmartWatch and the SmartWatch 2 both... what's the word I'm looking for here? Sucked? Yeah. But the SmartWatch 3 has solid performance and two nifty features you won't find on any other Android Wear. It's the first with built-in GPS and a screen you can read without backlighting.

Android Wear watches are off to a pretty decent start. The Moto 360, the LG G Watch R, and the Asus ZenWatch are all lovely and useful in their own ways. So why might you buy a Sony smartwatch instead?

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Finally: The best phablet in the world is getting Android Lollipop

Filed under
Android

After releasing Android 5.0 Lollipop updates for a variety of top flagship handsets in the past weeks, including the Galaxy S5 and Galaxy Note 3, Samsung has started rolling out the one official Lollipop ROM certain smartphone buyers were waiting for, the one made for the Galaxy Note 4.

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Android Lollipop Review: Google's Material Design Delivers The Goods

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Regardless of the tinkering Google's engineers have done under the bonnet, the most noticeable improvement has to be the overall look. Google is calling Android's fetching new aesthetic "Material Design" and it's all about giving the OS a more welcoming look. It's mostly flat colours, clever use of shadow and UI elements which look like layers of paper stacked on top of one another. Google has left behind the world of skeuomorphic design ­–– just like Apple did with iOS 7 –– and the end result is something that looks less cluttered and more eye-catching.

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today's leftovers

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux 3.19 File-System Tests Of EXT4, Btrfs, XFS & F2FS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

If you're wondering about any file-system performance changes for XFS/EXT4/Btrfs/F2FS when operating on a single SSD, I ran the vanilla Linux 3.18 vs. 3.19 benchmarks this weekend on an ASUS Zenbook UX301LAA with Intel Core i7 4558U Haswell processor and the file-system tests targeting the secondary 128GB SanDisk SATA3 SSD with this ultrabook. A development snapshot of Ubuntu 15.04 x86_64 was used for this kernel/file-system comparison with its updated file-system user-space utilities. For this testing, the stock mount options of each file-system was used.

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Scheduler Changes In Linux 3.20 Has Micro-Optimizations, Might Yield Power Savings

Filed under
Linux

The changes going in through Ingo Molnar's branches aren't incredibly exciting this round, but it looks like the scheduler tree updates have the potential to be semi-exciting. In particular, the kernel scheduler changes have minor micro-optimizations, various fixes and enhancements, and a idle-poll handler fix that has the potential to result in power-savings.

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Also: New & Improved Media Drivers For The Linux 3.20 Kernel

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