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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Debian Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:46pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:45pm
Story KDE Plasma 5.7.4 Desktop Environment Is Out with Plasma Desktop and KWin Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:44pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 6:39pm
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 5:03pm
Story Linux/FOSS Events: LinuxCon, ContainerCon, Software Freedom Day, and More Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 4:31pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 4:25pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 4:24pm
Story Nouveau Open-Source NVIDIA Tests On Linux 4.8, Mesa 12.1-dev Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 4:09pm
Story Proprietary licences both frustrating and pushing move to PostgreSQL Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 3:29pm

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Vendor-supplied or open-source HMI software?

    When an HMI project requires more functionality than that offered by self-contained touchscreen units, the next step is to use an industrial PC-based system. The PC can be a traditional keyboard and mouse if the environment allows, or an integrated computer/touchscreen with varying degrees of environmental protection.

    [...]

    The three biggest advantages when using open source are the price (free or close to it), the programmer’s ability to modify and extend the code in any way required and having the final project being a smaller, more efficient product. The programming skill needed to create an application is somewhat higher than what is required using off-the-shelf development packages.

  • 5 steps for making community decisions without consensus

    Healthy open source communities usually include a wide range of people with different ideologies, goals, values, and points of view—from anarchists to CEOs of major corporations. The normal approach for making decisions that affect the entire community should be an attempt to reach consensus through discussion; however, what if you're attempting to make a decision that is critically important, but there are irreconcilable differences in the community?

    The Xen Project community had such a decision to make in the wake of the XSA-7 security issue about the project's security policy. We knew beforehand that there was unlikely to be consensus, so we thought carefully about how we could approach the discussion.

    Our main goals were to find a "center of gravity" of the community preference, and to make sure that the people who didn't get what they wanted felt like their voice was heard and taken into consideration. In this article, I'll briefly summarize my conclusions from that experience.

  • How to fire yourself: A founder's dilemma

    I learned more about business, software, and, most importantly, people, in the first two years of Lucidworks than I did in the previous 10-15 years of school and work combined. Being a founder was (and is) a thrilling ride and one that expands your brain in ways you never knew it could expand. It's also an addictive ride, as your brain starts to crave the novelty of newness that comes from context switching between a dozen different things, seemingly all at once, as well as the satisfaction that comes from being "the one who gets it done." Not that you ever really are that person, but more on that in a moment.

  • HackerNest Tech Job Fair
  • Outreachy talk

    Yesterday I gave a talk about Outreachy to Girls Coding Kosova. Since there is isn’t anyone else from Kosovo who participated in Outreachy previously and they were not really informed about it, I thought I’d share my amazing experience and give some details about the program. I decided to focus more on the application process since that was the “tricky” part when I applied and seemed to be the same for them as well, since they had a lot of questions regarding the application part. I pretended to be applying for the second time and went through the application process step by step. Starting from choosing an organization, choosing a project, contacting mentors and coordinators via e-mail or IRC, making a small contribution etc.

  • MidnightBSD 0.8 Switches the System Compiler from GCC 4.2 to LLVM/Clang 3.3

    MidnightBSD developer Lucas Holt proudly announced the release of the MidnightBSD 0.8 operating system. Based on the latest BSD and FreeBSD technologies, this update brings you the latest software updates and under-the-hood improvements.

    MidnightBSD 0.8 is here eleven months after the release of MidnightBSD 0.7, and five months after the MidnightBSD 0.7.6 maintenance update. It's a major milestone that switches the system compilers from GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 4.2 to LLVM/Clang 3.3, uses the libdispatch library in the package manager, and fixes bugs for the mports framework.

  • Free Software Directory meeting recap for August 12th, 2016
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: August 19th
  • Vala -- seems ideal so far

    I was searching for a language to write the phone GUI with... python3+gtk3 is way too slow; 9 seconds for trivial application is a bit too much (on N900). python2+gtk2 is a lot better at 2 seconds. Lua should be even faster.

  • Revoking old PGP key

FOSS/Sharing in Governments

Filed under
OSS
  • US Government Reshapes Core Services Through Open Source

    Yesterday Kathryn Ryan interviewed Eric Hysen, the head of U.S. Digital Service at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) about his organisation’s efforts to streamline and improve government IT projects. Hysen, formerly a Silicon Valley tech guru at Google discusses how DHS is partnering top private sector tech expertise with innovators inside government to transform critical government services. This approach is part of a fundamental shift in thinking in the US that seeks to tackle Government services delivery problems through more open source and human centred design approaches. The interview is available here:

  • Slovakian Public Procurement Bulletin published in XML format

    The Slovakian Public Procurement Office (PPO) has published its Public Procurement Bulletin in an open XML format, making all announcements of public procurement, including editorial corrections, available for download and (automated) processing.

  • "Helsinki Region Infoshare service increasing trust toward city and officials"

    Over the last five years, more than 1200 datasets have been published on the open data portal of Greater Helsinki, comprising the Finnish cities of Helsinki, Vantaa, Espoo and Kauniainen. According to the City of Helsinki, just opening up the data has resulted in 1-2 percent savings. "Making lots of our city purchase data public has opened up a new view for citizens into city administration, and it increases people's trust toward the city and its officials," said Tanja Lahti, the project manager for the Helsinki Region Infoshare (HRI) service.

  • UN: open data to improve state accountability and transparency

    Publishing government data online can improve accountability and transparency not only of national governments, but also of parliaments and the judiciary. Consequently, open data will play an important role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that were adopted in 2015 by the United Nations with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development [1, 2]. "With growing access to social media, an increasing number of countries now proactively use networking opportunities to engage with people and evolve towards participatory decision-making. This is done through open data, online consultations, and multiple ICT-related channels."

'Top' Linux System Monitoring Tool

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Hello everyone. Once I used to be a Windows user but now I use Linux and I use Ubuntu distribution. When I switched to Linux, one of the initial tasks was to know the processes running in the background. In Windows, we have task manager which is GUI. In Linux we have so many task managers that are GUI & CLI both. In this article, I’ll mention one of the easiest CLI Linux system monitoring tool known as ‘Top’.

Read<br />
more

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.19.0 Video Player Released with More Wayland Improvements

    The developers of the open-source and cross-platform MPV video player software have announced the release of version 0.19.0, a new maintenance update that adds a few new features, options, and commands, and fixes lots of bugs.

    MPV 0.19.0 is here five weeks after the release of MPV 0.18.1 to improve the build system with and new "--htmldir" option, implement atomics support as a mandatory requirement, as well as to modify the wscript to add proper unversioned SONAME for the Android mobile platform.

  • Gammu 1.37.4

    It has been almost three months since last Gammu release and it's time to push fixes out to users. This time the amount of fixes is quite small, covering Huawei devices and text mode for sending SMS.

  • Ardour DAW releases new 5.0 version

    Long running, open source music production software has gotten a new version that introduces Windows support and a new design.

    Ardour is a capable DAW that allows you to record, edit and mix your music. It’s gained appeal around the world with it’s open source platform that allows musicians with proficient enough tech knowledge to tune the DAW to their perfect specifications.

  • Make GIMP look like Photoshop

    The GIMP has long been an important app for those who need to create and edit images, and now there’s a way to make it look and work like Photoshop.

  • Add 22 Instagram Effects to GIMP With This Plugins Pack
  • Netflix will work on Firefox 49 for Linux [Ed: yay! DRM!]

    In the upcoming release of Firefox 49, Mozilla will include support for Google's Content Decryption Module (CDM), Widevine. With this support, Firefox users on Linux will finally be able to watch Netflix content; previously Linux users had to watch Netflix using Google's Chrome browser.

    Mozilla Firefox users on Windows and Mac already had the ability to watch Netflix content as Widevine was switched on earlier for those users. Firefox 49 brings the Linux version up to parity.

Intel Joule SOM runs Ubuntu Core Linux and makes Raspberry Pi look like garbage

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

The original Raspberry Pi sparked the creativity of many developers and students, but it was woefully underpowered. Through several iterations, however, it slowly became more powerful. While the most recent version -- the Raspberry Pi 3 -- has a much more capable processor, some developers will still want even more horsepower.

Today, Intel announces a maker board that puts the Raspberry Pi 3 to shame. The Joule system-on-module mini-computer features RealSense camera support and runs Ubuntu Linux Core. Best of all, its specs are very impressive for what it is.

Read more

From Ubuntu to openSUSE: Notes on Photographic Workflow Migration

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

There is no such thing as the best Linux distribution for photographers. With some tweaking, any mainstream distro can be turned into a solid platform for managing and processing photos. After all, digiKam, Darktable, gThumb, and other popular photographic tools can be easily deployed on practically any Linux distribution with a minimum of effort.

The devil is in the detail, though, and small things might require some adjustments. My recent migration from Ubuntu to openSUSE Tumbleweed is a case in point. Most of the tools I use in my photographic workflow are available in openSUSE’s official software repositories, so deploying them was a rather straightforward affair. But there were a few things that needed some tweaking.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Nvidia 370.23 Beta Linux Graphics Driver Adds Overclock Support for GeForce GPUs

    On August 15, 2016, Nvidia rolled out a new Beta version of its graphics driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris operating systems, version 370.23, bringing various new features and improvements.

    According to the release notes, the Nvidia 370.23 Beta video driver implemented the ability for users to overclock or underclock their Nvidia GeForce GPUs (Graphics Processing Units). However, it appears that the new feature will only work with certain GPUs from the GeForce GTX 1000 series and later. To see the supported products, please consult the official announcement.

  • Nouveau Engine Reclocking Fixes Continue, NVIDIA Maxwell Re-Clocking Achieved

    Independent Nouveau developer Karol Herbst continues to be hard at work on improving the re-clocking state of the open-source NVIDIA Linux driver stack.

    Herbst today submitted his fifth version of a massive patch set to fix engine re-clocking. These re-clocking fixes should benefit GeForce GTX 400/500 "Fermi" hardware up through the latest Maxwell cards, but don't expect nothing yet for Pascal until NVIDIA releases that signed firmware to provide accelerated hardware support on this open-source driver.

  • Wayland / Weston 1.12 Now Available In Alpha Form

    The alpha release of the upcoming Wayland and Weston 1.12 version is now available.

    Wayland 1.12 is planned for release in September and release manager Bryce Harrington today announced the alpha release as the first step towards this next version. The feature work will also slow down at this stage.

Desktop Environments

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux 4.4.18

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.18 kernel.

All users of the 4.4 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 3.14.76

Linux Foundation becomes a PNDA-hugger

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation has added the Platform for Network Data Analytics – aka PNDA – to its stable of officially supported projects.

PNDA aggregates data from multiple sources on a network, be they-real time performance indicators or static sources like logs, then works with Apache Spark to do the usual Big Data thing of finding useful patterns. The tool's all about making it easy to gather, consume and crunch diverse data sources, rather than having to do custom integrations.

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LibreOffice and OpenOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo

Canonical to Bring Snappy Ubuntu Core to Advantech's x86-Based IoT Gateways

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today, August 16, 2016, Canonical, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, informed Softpedia about a strategic partnership with Advantech to bring the Snappy Ubuntu Core OS to its x86-based IoT gateways.

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6 Reasons You Should Choose openSUSE and the Geeko

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE is a staple of the Linux community. But even long-time open source advocates find themselves wondering what sets the distro apart. Lacking the clear direction of Ubuntu or the free software advocacy of Fedora, openSUSE can seem to lack vision.

Fortunately, that isn’t the case. There are good reasons openSUSE continues to attract users, and here are some of them. Maybe you will be the next person to fall in love with the Geeko.

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Netrunner Linux Becomes Maui, Now Based on KDE Neon and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Ubuntu

The Netrunner development team is pleased to announce the immediate availability for download of the first stable release of the Maui, their new GNU/Linux distribution based on the KDE Neon project.

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The 7 Best Linux Distros for Business

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Selecting the best Linux distro for business isn't easy. With over three hundred active Linux distributions, choosing one for your business can take some serious time.

Admittedly, you don't have to try all the Linux distro. A few distros, like deepin and elementary, are obviously aimed at desktop users. Probably, too, you won't want Ubuntu Studio, with its emphasis on creativity, or DebianEdu, which is obviously intended for the class room. Yet even if you eliminate the distros that are a personal hobby or most of the dozens derived from Debian or Ubuntu, the choices are still overwhelming.

Instead, you probably need to begin with the question: What business task do you plan to use your choice of distros for?

Read more

SystemRescueCd 4.8.1 Moves to Linux Kernels 4.4.17 and 4.1.30 LTS, Adds NetSurf

Filed under
Development
Linux

SystemRescueCd developer François Dupoux announced the release and immediate availability for download of the first maintenance update for the SystemRescueCd 4.8.x series.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box