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Sunday, 23 Nov 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's howtos

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HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Leftovers: Screenshots

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Reviews

How to Find the Best Linux Distribution for a Specific Task

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GNU
Linux

If you’re looking for a Linux distribution to handle a specific (even niche) task, there most certainly is a distribution ready to serve. From routers to desktops, from servers to multi-media...there’s a Linux for everything.

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Red Hat releases Cloud Infrastructure version 5, expands Wipro partnership

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Red Hat
Server

Red Hat has launched version 5 of its Cloud Infrastructure package, which is intended for organizations that want to dabble in both OpenStack and traditional data center virtualization simultaneously.

Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure (RHCI) version 5 debuted on Monday at the OpenStack Summit in Paris. As before, it bundles the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack infrastructure-as-a-service platform with the company’s virtualization platform and CloudForms, its tool for managing hybrid cloud setups.

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Larry Augustin: Open source pioneer. SugarCRM CEO. Gym rat.

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Interviews
OSS

Larry Augustin spoke with TechRepublic about his work at SugarCRM, why he bets on big markets, and how he helped coin the term "open source."

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Linux Foundation: Open Source is Eating the Software World

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GNU
Linux
OSS

In every sector of the technology world there is now an open source project that is defining that particular technology. Software drives value in nearly every industry, and open source projects are where most of that value comes from.

That’s according to Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation and one of Monday’s keynote speakers at this week’s OpenStack summit in Paris – the first in Europe. “Open source is really eating the software world,” Zemlin said, adapting the famous phrase from a 2011 Wall Street Journal OpEd by venture capitalist Mark Andreessen, titled Software is eating the world.

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The Linux desktop-a-week review: ChromeOS

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GNU
Linux
Google

This is not a review of ChromeOS. Nor is it a discussion of the viability of using a Chromebook as your primary computer.

No, sir. We’re simply going to be looking at ChromeOS as a Desktop Environment from a usability perspective, and how it compares to the other Linux Desktop Environments I have reviewed in my “Desktop-a-week” series thus far.

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Atomic Mode-Setting Moves Along For KMS Drivers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Vetter posted his atomic mode-setting patch series in latest form on Sunday. There's the helper libraries for migrating over to atomic mode-setting and the other core/driver interface changes for this work. The description on his latest patch series is quite lengthy so check it out if you're wanting to learn some more. These patches though don't offer the actual atomic mode-setting ioctl to expose to user-space.

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Sorry, Windows Fans, but Can You Run 100 Apps at Once and Still Use the PC?

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Linux distributions are always heralded as the most secure operating systems and Windows is usually left in the dust, but it's good to know that it can also perform much better in other areas, like application and memory management.

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Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 Utopic Unicorn : Released with GNOME 3.12 and Kernel 3.16

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 Utopic Unicorn is an official ubuntu flavor based on Ubuntu 14.10 and uses GNOME 3.12 as the desktop environment. It released and announced by Ubuntu GNOME Development Team with new features and updated applications.

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Midokura Embarks On A High Risk Strategy--Open Sources Its Core technology

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OSS

Open source is a great thing. It’s certainly an awesome way for a fledgling project to gain some momentum – one only needs to see the rapid growth of Linux, OpenStack, Cloud Foundry and Docker to see the benefits that open source brings.

But at the same time open source is kind of toxic to traditional commercial models – by giving away the source code for a project, it is (arguably) all the more difficult to monetize said project than it is for those vendors who keep their source code locked down and proprietary. It’s for that reason that the most feasible way to make money out of open source is by offering paid services on top of the software – the core may come for free, but there is certainly money to be made by holding customers’ hands as they use that code.

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Ubuntu Community Will Resist the Switch to Unity 8

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers are working to bring the new Unity 8 to the desktop flavor of the distribution and it will take a while, but users are not really mentally prepared for the change. It will be different from Unity 7, which is the version currently in use, and not many people will be happy.

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The First Browser Dedicated to Developers is Coming

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Moz/FF

At Mozilla we know that developers are the cornerstone of the Web, that’s why we actively push standards and continue to build great tools to make it easier for you to create awesome Web content and apps.

When building for the Web, developers tend to use a myriad of different tools which often don’t work well together. This means you end up switching between different tools, platforms and browsers which can slow you down and make you less productive.

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Google’s Android Begins to Top Out

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Android
Google

Android ran 84% of smartphones shipped globally in the third quarter, according to research firm Strategy Analytics, down slightly from 85% in the second quarter.

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Display Managers In Plasma 5

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KDE

KDM was dropped from Plasma 5. KDM includes code from XDM dating back to 1988! It had served it's job well. However, we're now at a point where we need the backend to be Wayland ready and we want to use more modern QML in the front end. When you have to replace both the back and front ends, it's a sign to just start from scratch.

There was some work done 2 years ago into sharing code with LightDM. In the meantime a separate project was started, SDDM which is (yet another) display manager.

Although personally I was very happy with what we had with LightDM it definitely doesn't make sense to split resources, so we focussed everything on SDDM and I have been helping work on that transferring knowledge from my old project.

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Btrfs RAID: Built-In/Native RAID vs. Mdadm

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Linux

Last month on Phoronix I posted some dual-HDD Btrfs RAID benchmarks and that was followed by Btrfs RAID 0/1/5/6/10 testing on four Intel solid-state drives. In still testing the four Intel Series 530 SSDs in a RAID array, the new benchmarks today are a comparison of the performance when using Btrfs' built-in RAID capabilities versus setting up a Linux 3.18 software RAID with Btrfs on the same hardware/software using mdadm.

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Thoughts on crashdumps.

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Development

Linux has what appears to be a useful feature that can be enabled to diagnose tricky kernel bugs. The feature is called kdump. A crashdump mechanism that uses kexec to switch to a different kernel, before writing out memory to disk, nfs, wherever. It’s a pretty neat idea.

Unfortunately, I have _never_ seen it working when I needed it.
I know it’s possible, because some of my co-workers swear by crashdumps for diagnosing tricky RHEL bugs. Someone every single RHEL release invests the time to fix up a bunch of bugs and get it into a working state again. But because Fedora is constantly moving, it’s near constantly broken in some non-trivial way.

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Certified Ubuntu images coming to Google Cloud Platform

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Google
Ubuntu

Mobile advertising and social data tied up like ribbons to holiday tech story packages are starting to fall like autumn leaves, but the cloud will partially hover over the spotlight for the first half of the month.

That's because both Google and Amazon, among others, are scheduled to reveal big steps in each of their cloud strategies. The first trickle of news comes from Canonical, the United Kingdom-based open source software platform pusher of Ubuntu.

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New OpenBSD version includes fork of OpenSSL

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Security
BSD

The OpenBSD project has released version 5.6 of its operating system. It includes LibreSSL, the fork of the OpenSSL cryptographic library in which a serious vulnerability was discovered earlier this year.

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