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Wednesday, 29 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Funny Linux Commands - Check Weather And Surf StackOverflow In Linux Terminal

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Let’s have fun with Linux Terminal today. Also, if you are a developer, let’s reduce one context switch that you perform while development; switching to browser for solution in StackOverflow. It's well-known fact, less context switch, less distraction and more productivity. In this article, we’ll explore two fun and useful things that you can do right through terminal without opening browser that you would do normally.

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Linux Utility - Understand Linux Crontab Or Cron Expressions To Run Command At Specific Interval

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Linux Crontab helps you to run commands, apps or scripts at a custom specific interval. You can schedule the run at the required interval. Crontab runs in background as daemon and check crontab file at /etc/crontab and /etc/cron.*/ directories. These include cron.d/, cron.daily/, cron.hourly/, cron.monthly/, cron.weekly/ directories. In this article, we'll discuss the cron expressions and how to configure your commands to run daily, weekly or every minute as per your requirement through Linux Crontab.

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[Solved] Dependency Is Not satisfiable: libvpx1 Error While Installing VirtualBox In Linux Mint 18 Beta

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Linux Mint 18 Beta was recently released. Though it's beta but since its release I have been using it without any issue. There is no crash, no stuck. Pretty stable. But, today when I tried to install VirtualBox in Linux mint, it gave me an error that the dependency not satisfied libvpx1. If you're using Linux Mint 18 Beta then you'll not be able to install Virtualbox or any other app if that depends on libvpx1.

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Linux Utilities - Linux File Sharing Over Network Computers Using scp And rsync

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In this article we shall discuss about two powerful Linux utilities that are used for sharing file/folder to network computers that are scp and rsync. scp allows you to simply copy directories or files from/to any remote destination whereas the rsync, besides simply copying files also acts as a synchronising tool that would synchronise the changes between source and destination. The discussion below is about their usage and various parameters that can be used along with to increase speed and security.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Russian government hackers penetrated DNC, stole opposition research on Trump [Ed: Microsoft Windows again]

    Russian government hackers penetrated the computer network of the Democratic National Committee and gained access to the entire database of opposition research on GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump, according to committee officials and security experts who responded to the breach.

  • Bears in the Midst: Intrusion into the Democratic National Committee

    The COZY BEAR intrusion relied primarily on the SeaDaddy implant developed in Python and compiled with py2exe and another Powershell backdoor with persistence accomplished via Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) system, which allowed the adversary to launch malicious code automatically after a specified period of system uptime or on a specific schedule. The Powershell backdoor is ingenious in its simplicity and power. It consists of a single obfuscated command setup to run persistently, such as...

  • Big data will fix internet security ... eventually [Ed: Microsoft’s Grimes says mass surveillance (‘big data’) will fix Internet security eventually]

    I’ve always thought that improved computer security controls would “fix” the internet and stop persistent criminality -- turns out it might be big data analytics instead.

  • Symantec dons a Blue Coat [Ed: two evil companies are now one]

    Symantec will pay US$4.65 billion in an all-cash deal to buy privately-held Blue Coat to ramp up its enterprise security offerings.

Ubuntu MATE 16.04: there is always room for improvement

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Who is the main audience of Ubuntu 16.04 MATE? From my point of view, these are people who started their Linux life a long time ago when GNOME 2 was one of few desktop environments available for Linux distributions. Since then, we have gotten a lot more players and forks on the "market".

Yes, MATE is better looking than GNOME 2 was a few years ago. But other desktop environments also did not stay the same during this time.

I used the Cinnamon desktop environment on Linux Mint for some time a year or so ago. For me, it was a much more convenient desktop environment than I found MATE to be in Ubuntu realization of it.

I also faced some crashes of different applications during my Live run of Ubuntu 16.04 MATE.

It all means that MATE team still has room for improvement.

Will I try Ubuntu MATE sometime in the future? Maybe. Let's see where history takes us.

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LibreOffice 5.2 Beta 2 Now Available as a Snap for Ubuntu Linux, Other Distros

Filed under
LibO

GNU/Linux developer Björn Michaelsen reported on June 14, 2016, managing to package the latest Beta build of the upcoming LibreOffice 5.2 office suite as a Snap package for various GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu.

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European colleges share SMEs open source training

Filed under
OSS

Tertiary education institutes (hochschule and university college) and ICT training specialists from across Europe are creating a course to train students to help small and medium-sized enterprises select and use open source cloud services. The course will be tested on Spanish and British exchange students working for SMEs in the two countries.

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Fedora Wallpaper

Filed under
Red Hat

For some a computer wallpaper is not thought about and the default wallpaper stays for the live of their computer, others they like to pick a soothing scene of peace and serenity. At time I like The Serenity, but I usually like to rotate my wallpaper on a semi-monthly basis. While search the web for a new wallpaper I stumbled across a Legends of Zelda Logo wallpaper that I liked the look of. Not a fan of the Legend of Zelda I wanted to do something similar for Fedora.

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Day in the life of a Fedora Packager

Filed under
Red Hat

Ever wondered what it’s like being involved with the Fedora Project? There are many different roles and types of people that help make Fedora what it is. One common form of contributing is packaging. This is when someone takes software, “packages” it in the RPM format, and publishes the RPM to the Fedora repositories. There’s some steps along the way to being a packager. In this article, Fedora packager James Hogarth, responsible for ownCloud, Certbot (formerly LetsEncrypt), and more, details a day in the life of what it’s like being a Fedora Packager.

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Hyve Mobility announces Buzz and Storm smartphones with pure Android

Filed under
Android

Hyve Mobility, a new technology startup has announced its first two smartphones. The Buzz and Storm smartphones will run pure Android.

Hyve Buzz and Storm smartphones run stock Android 5.1 Lollipop, although an Android Marshmallow update is being promised soon.

The focus here is not the devices itself, but the pure Android experience. However, apart from pure Android, Hyve Mobility’s Buzz and Storm are just like any other smartphone in the market.

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Android inventor Andy Rubin thinks the future of smartphones might be a single AI

Filed under
Android

Andy Rubin, who co-founded Android and jump-started Google's robotics efforts, imagines a future where artificial intelligence is so powerful that it powers every connected device. Speaking at Bloomberg's Tech Conference in San Francisco today, Rubin said a combination of quantum computing and AI advancements could yield a conscious intelligence that would underpin every piece of technology. "If you have computing that is as powerful as this could be, you might only need one," Rubin says. "It might not be something you carry around; it just has to be conscious."

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Android N 7.0 review - hands on, how to get it, best features, release date, name

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Bucking its usual trend, Google has been treating us to Developer Preview versions of its next mobile operating system, Android N. While its name is still yet to be officially decided, following Google I/O you're now able to try out Developer Preview 3, which Google is describing as the first beta-quality candidate.

As such, if you were sat on the fence as to whether or not to try it out on your main phone or tablet, now might be the time to jump in and get among the Beta fun. If you're already on the Beta, an OTA update should be rolling out to get you to the latest version. If you're looking to do a fresh install, instructions are below.

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Antergos 2016.06.14 ISOs Are Out Now, the Last to Offer Support for 32-Bit PCs

Filed under
Linux

Antergos' Dustin Falgout announced just a few minutes ago, June 15, 2016, that the latest ISO images for the Arch Linux-based operating system are now available for download.

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PCLinuxOS 64 2016.05 Trinity Linux OS Brings Back Old Memories for KDE3.5 Fans

Filed under
PCLOS

We've promised to introduce you, guys, to more PCLinuxOS editions as soon as we are in possession of the needed information, so today, June 15, 2016, we're presenting the PCLinuxOS Trinity Community Edition.

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This Week in Techrights

Filed under
News

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux: Assembly Required

    Even for Linux, you have to consider the platform. In my case, I’m using a 64-bit Intel/AMD PC. But you might be using a 32-bit version or running on ARM (or any other CPU Linux supports). There is even a 32-bit interface for 64-bit Linux (x32), if you are interested in that. The second order of business, then, is to figure out what the CPU architecture looks like.

  • Git v2.9.0 released
  • Day of Infamy, the WWII mod for Insurgency is being turned into a full game

    Having a proper WWII shooter on Linux is going to be pretty awesome.

  • LaKademy 2016 ‒ strewing FLOSS culture

    KDE is a free software community full of diversity and, as such, we foster several meetings and welcome people from all over the world. The 4th Latin-America KDE Summit (LaKademy 2016) took place from 26-29 May at Federal University of State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Brazil. Since 2014, LaKademy has become a yearly meeting (it happened every two years since 2010) and that has proven to be a quite important step to create a "sprint culture", narrow the ties with the global community, and better support newcomers. In every new edition, old LaKademy participants are more experienced about how sprints work and, therefore, more skillful in the task of guiding newcomers through their way into the Free Software world.

  • GParted 0.26.1 Ensures Bootloaders Work on EXT4 Partitions Smaller Than 16 TB

    GParted developer Curtis Gedak has announced the availability of the first point release for the GParted 0.26 open-source partition editor utility announced back in April 2016.

    Launched on April 26, GParted 0.26.0 introduced some exciting new features and improvements, among which we can mention read-only support for encrypted filesystems with the LUKS method, as well as the implementation of a progress bar for file system copy methods supporting EXT2, EXT3, EXT4, XFS, and NTFS.

  • ExLight Linux 160612 Screenshot Tour
  • Analyst’s Recommendation on Red Hat (RHT)
  • Ubuntu Snappy-Based Package Format Aims to Bridge Linux Divide
  • Russia mulls bug bounty to harden govt software

    Local media report deputy Communications Minister Aleksei Sokolov is discussing a possible bug bounty with the Russian tech sector.

    The implications of such a bounty are being considered including staffing requirements for bug triage and validation, and the need to find a way to force developers to develop and apply patches for affected software.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Scality unveils open source Scality S3 Server
  • For Scality’s RING, '6' is magic number
  • Jos Poortvliet: On Open Source, forking and collaboration: Nextcloud 9 is here!
  • 21 Inc. Creates Open Source Library For Machine-Payable Web

    21 Inc. has made its software free, ‘turning any computer into a bitcoin computer’, the company announced on Medium. Once a computer has installed the software, the user can get bitcoin using any device nearly anywhere without a bank account or credit cards.

  • Expanding Mozilla’s Boards

    In a post earlier this month, I mentioned the importance of building a network of people who can help us identify and recruit potential Board level contributors and senior advisors. We are also currently working to expand both the Mozilla Foundation and Mozilla Corporation Boards.

  • CEO Spotlight: EHR vendor Medsphere will continue to build on its open source heritage

    Even if the Department of Veterans Affairs were to switch from its Vista system, the basis of Medsphere’s OpenVista EHR, Medsphere would continue to thrive, Irv Lichtenwald said.

  • LLVM's Clang Begins Better Supporting Musl Libc

    Patches are landing in LLVM Clang to improve the compiler's support for musl libc as an alternative to glibc on Linux-based systems.

    LLVM has added Musl to the triple and work in Clang to enable the compiler to support targets such as x86_64-pc-linux-musl for building binaries against this alternative libc implementation. The later patch explains, "This make it easy for clang to work on some musl-based systems like Alpine Linux and certain flavors of Gentoo."

  • Gains of government software repositories are many

    Repositories for software and services developed by and for public administrations have multiple advantages, emphasises Elena Muñoz Salinero, head of Spain’s technology transfer centre (Centro de Transferencia de Technologica, CTT). Repositories make it easier to find suitable solutions, reduce costs, and let users share best practices.

  • Open Source Bionics Promise: Affordably Make Lives Better

    We already know that open source gives us better and more secure software. But with the advent of 3D printing, the open source model shows even more meaningful promise in areas like open source bionics.

  • Make things 'til you make it at the Blowing Things Up Lab

    Recently while reading a tweet from the Blowing Things Up Lab, I learned about Emily Daub, a maker and college student who designed a running shirt that helps runners be more visible to motorists—my daughter is a runner so this sounds like a great idea to me.

    The shirt is photosensitive which cause the light intensity of the fabric to change in ambient light. According to Emily Daub, "If you run at night, this is for you. This lights up as it gets darker outside on two independent photocells and no microcontroller!" In this interview, I ask Emily more about this fantastic invention.

    Fun fact: Blowing Things Up (BTU) lab is located at the University of Colorado in Boulder, where Emily is a student of Alicia Gibb's, the executive director of the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA), who I wrote about last year and contributed to our 2015 Open Source Yearbook.

  • Government commits to Open Contracting Data Standard

    New Open Government National Action Plan includes Crown Commercial Service in lead role and further developments of GOV.UK

    The Crown Commercial Service (CCS) is to implement a standard for open data in contracting later this year as a first step towards its wider use in government.

  • Razer unveils new Open Source Virtual Reality headset

    Gaming hardware and peripheral maker Razer Inc has announced the new HDK2, a VR device that is part of its Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) initiative, whose goal is “to create a universal open source VR ecosystem for technologies across different brands and companies.”

    The new headset is still considered a developer kit that is not ready for mass production, but at $400, it offers a number of high end features that put it on par with its much more expensive competition, Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. HDK2 offers a 2160 x 1200 dual display resolution, which is 1080 X 1200 for each eye. It also offers a frame rate or 90 frames per second, as well as a front-facing infrared camera and a number of other features.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Canonical, Snappy and the marketing value of collaboration
    Canonical implies it is collaborating with nearly every major Linux distro for its Snappy project. It is not. And what could have been a marketing win for it is now a loss.
  • How to install MongoDB community edition on Ubuntu Linux
    MongoDB is a NoSQL database that avoids the traditional structure of relational databases in favor of document-oriented JSON-like objects. What this translates to is the integration between application and data is faster and easier. If that's not enough, consider this: MongoDB is one the databases preferred by big data and large enterprise companies, including Adobe, Craigslist, eBay, FIFA, Foursquare, and LinkedIn.
  • No WhatsApp, but fixes set to come for Ubuntu Phone
    Users of the Ubuntu Phone will have to get used to the fact that popular Android apps like WhatsApp are unlikely to be made available for the platform, at least not in in the short term. Facebook owns WhatsApp and the communications app now has more than a billion users.
  • Ubuntu Developers Discuss Again About Dropping Support For 32-bit x86
    Ubuntu developers are once again pondering the possibility of dropping support for i386 (32-bit x86) as installation media for their Linux distribution. The matter of dropping Ubuntu i386 ISOs has been brought up many times the past few years, but ultimately it's kept getting pushed back for users still running Ubuntu Linux on old hardware and other reasons. Dropping Ubuntu for i386 keeps getting brought up namely for the installer media rather than the i386 package archive itself.

Sabayon 16.07 Ships with Linux Kernel 4.6.3, Introduces the First LXQt Flavor

Today, June 28, 2016, the developers of the Gentoo-based Sabayon Linux computer operating system have had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of new respin ISO images for the month of July 2016. Right on the schedule, Sabayon 16.07 Live ISO images are now available for download, switching the OS to the latest Linux 4.6.3 kernel from the deprecated Linux 4.5 branch that shipped with the May ISO respins of the GNU/Linux distribution, Sabayon 16.05. Read more

Android Apps Turn Chromebooks Into Macbook Killers

  • Android Apps Turn Chromebooks Into Macbook Killers
    When Chromebooks launched in the summer of 2011, they seemed destined to fail, much like the underpowered, internet-dependent netbooks that came before them. But in the five years since, Chromebooks have defied expectations, becoming the most used device in US classrooms and even outselling Macs for the first time this year. Still, people complain about their inability to run useful software, but that’s all about to change.
  • Android apps could turn Chromebooks into MacBook killers

today's leftovers

  • Permabit Debuts Only Complete Data Reduction for the Linux Storage Stack
    Permabit Technology Corporation, the leader in data reduction technology, today announced the latest release of its Virtual Data Optimizer (VDO) software, VDO 6. The newest release of VDO delivers the company's patented deduplication, HIOPS Compression™ and thin provisioning in a commercial software package for Linux, expanding availability beyond the OEM marketplace to include the leading Professional Services organizations that are enabling today's modern Hybrid Cloud data centers.
  • My KIWI/OBS talk from oSC'16
    Last Friday, at openSUSE Conference 2016, I was giving a talk together with Christian Schneemann about KIWI and OBS (the events.opensuse.org software is not able to manage "two speakers for one talk", this is why I am not listed in the schedule).
  • AppliedMicro Announces the Availability of its Mudan Storage Platform at Red Hat Summit 2016
  • AsteroidOS smartwatch OS wants you, developers
    AsteroidOS is a new open source operating system specifically designed to serve software application development on smartwatches. The project is now gaining some traction and has been reported to now be looking for developer and community contribution engagement.