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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A look at Mixxx in GNU/Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 7:42pm
Story Google’s updated AIY Vision and Voice kits ship with Raspberry Pi Zero WH Rianne Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 7:40pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 4:34pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 4:10pm
Story Events: Red Hat, Curl, and LF's Open Source Summit North America Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 4:09pm
Story Kernel and LF: Linux 5, FOSSology Turns 10, Xen Project Interview Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 4:05pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 3:59pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 3:57pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 3:53pm
Story Microsoft EEE/Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 17/04/2018 - 3:52pm

If You Want to Use A Phone as Your Main PC, You Should Buy Android

Filed under
Android

Before the inevitable “there’s no way I could do that” comments, let’s make one thing clear: this type of lifestyle isn’t for everyone. Not even close. In fact, there’s no possible way I could even do this.

But for anyone who doesn’t work from a computer, it’s really not a bad way to go. Phones are more powerful than ever and cover more ground than many people even need on the day-to-day.

Case in point: my wife.

She doesn’t need a computer (she has one, but doesn’t use it often), and does nearly everything from her phone. That is, by far, her main “computer.” In fact, I’m constantly impressed with the number of things and amount of research she can do from her phone.

But that’s exactly what got me thinking about this topic in the first place, because I bet there are a lot of people like that, and that number is growing daily. It’s actually pretty cool to see how things have evolved and changed in such a short period of time.

Read more

What is the Difference Between Android and Linux?

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Every now and then a colleague of mine tries to bump Linux’s user count share by arguing that Android can be considered a Linux distro because it uses the Linux kernel.

Let me sort this misunderstanding of whether Android can be considered a Linux distro out once and for all.

If you haven’t read our article on the difference between Unix and Linux you should start from there. I defined what Unix and Linux are, their history, and how they differ. The coax of the matter is that Linux is the kernel which was developed by Linus Torvalds in 1991 based on the MINIX OS.

Read more

ZFS on Linux data loss sparks small, swift upgrade

Filed under
Linux

Maintainers of ZFS on Linux have hustled out a new version after the previous release caused data loss.

ZFS on Linux 0.7.7 only landed on March 21st, but as this GitHub thread titled “Unlistable and disappearing files”, users experienced “Data loss when copying a directory with large-ish number of files.”

The bug meant that attempts copies produced errors that claimed the filesystem was full and resulted in files just not arriving at their intended destinations.

Users verified the problem under a few Linuxes and quickly debated whether to roll back or wait for relief.

Read more

Linux computer maker to move manufacturing to the U.S.

Filed under
Linux

Linux computer manufacturer System76 made its mark in part because of its commitment to open source principles and doing what it believes is right. Last year it released its homegrown Linux, Pop!_OS. In early March, System76 founder Carl Richell tweeted about the company's plans to locate its computer manufacturing factory in Denver, Colorado. By moving its manufacturing from China to the United States, System76 is offering more proof that it's not afraid to buck prevailing tech norms to do things "the System76 way."

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DragonFly BSD 5.2

Filed under
BSD

DragonFly version 5.2 brings Meltdown/Spectre mitigation, significant improvements to HAMMER2, ipfw, and graphics acceleration.

The details of all commits between the 5.0 and 5.2 branches are available in the associated commit messages for 5.2.0rc and 5.2.0.

Read more

KDE and GNOME: Offline Vaults, AtCore, KDE Connect and Nautilus

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Offline Vaults for an extra layer of protection

    I’m slowly returning to KDE development after a few months of being mostly in bugfix mode due to my other-life obligations (more on that later), so I decided to implement a new feature for my youngest project – the Plasma Vault.

    One of the possible attack vectors to your Plasma Vaults is that people could potentially have access to your computer while the vault is open.

    This is not a problem if we consider direct access because it is something that is easily controlled – you see everyone who approaches your computer, but the problem can be remote access.

  • [AtCore] April progress update

    It has been over a month since my last progress update. Here is what I’ve done.

  • KDE Connect desktop 1.3 released
  • KDE Connect 1.3 Gets An Extension For GNOME's Nautilus

    KDE Connect is the nifty KDE project providing allowing communication between your Linux desktop computer and your Android smartphone/tablet via a secure communication protocol. KDE Connect 1.3 is now the latest feature release.

    KDE Connect already allows functionality like viewing/replying to messages from your desktop, sending browser links to your phone, and other data synchronization abilities. With GNOME not having any compelling alternative to KDE Connect, today's v1.3 release adds in a Nautilus extension that allows users to send files to their phone from the GNOME file manager's context menu.

  • Proposal to add an Action-Info Bar to Nautilus

    We are looking into adding an action & info bar to Nautilus. The background about this proposal can be read on the task where we put the main goals, prior art, different proposals and mockups, etc.

    We are not sure whether this is the appropriate solution and whether the implementation we propose is ideal. In order to be more confident, we would like to gather early feedback on the current proposal. Also, we are looking for ideas on how to improve the overall approach.

    The current proposal is being worked in a branch and can be installed via Flatpak clicking here (Note: You might need to install it the the CLI by executing `flatpak install nautilus-dev.flatpak` due to a bug in Software).

Linux 4.17 Change To Allow RTCs To Live Beyond Their Intended Life

Filed under
Linux

The "real-time clock" (RTC) changes usually aren't too notable to the Linux kernel merge windows, but for the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel to prolong their life for decades to come, at least as far as the clock is concerned.

There still is the Year 2038 problem being dealt with across different parts of the Linux kernel as the most pressing and time sensitive Linux "Y2K"-like problem currently being tackled, but real-time clocks are also going to rollover at some point, assuming the hardware lasts that long. Kernel developers auditing the RTC drivers discovered that one RTC expired already in 2017, seven more drivers will expire before Year 2038, another 23 drivers will expire before Year 2069, 72 RTC drivers will expire by Year 2100, and 104 drivers will expire by Year 2106.

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Are You Ready for Lubuntu Next 18.04?

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's still under development but it's lightweight and looks promising. It has some problems but for those love testing, it's very interesting new distro, a new Lubuntu derivative with new user interface and a unique set of applications. And finally, its memory usage is so low, almost similar to Lubuntu 18.04 beta 2 itself (which is only ~230MiB), so Lubuntu Next could be considered as a full-featured Lubuntu alternative within its lightweight league.

Read more

Also: This Week in Lubuntu Development #2

Antergos 18.3 Gnome - Regression celebration

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

Antergos 18.3 is everything that 17.9 is not - in a bad way. My previous encounter with this distro was fairly good. There were issues, but they were not cardinal. This time around, we do gain some on the touchpad front, but everything else is a loss. Network support is bad, Nvidia didn't install outright, we have a font discrepancy between the live session and the installed system, no iPhone support, Steam crashes, and the list goes on. Virtually, everything is worse than it was.

Another thing that pops to mind - Manjaro seems to be holding well. Antergos 18.3 feels like it's been cobbled hastily, with no QA, and the end result is jarring, frustrating and saddening. I mean why? Just a few months ago, I selected this distro as the winner of my best-of-2017 Gnome list, and it really was unique, fun and colorful. The new edition retains the aesthetic spin, but it's more than negatively offset by hardware and software bugs and regressions. Unfortunately this time, I cannot recommend Antergos. 2/10. Hopefully, this is a one-time fluke, and it will go back to being a solid, refreshing alternative in the world painted Ubuntu. To be continued.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

KVM Updates For Linux 4.17 Bring VirtIO GPU Prep For S390, AMD Improvements

Filed under
Linux

The latest feature pull request for the Linux 4.17 kernel are the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) virtualization updates.

On the KVM x86 front for Linux 4.17 are some AMD improvements including pause loop exiting and AMD Core Perf Extensions support. Also in the x86 space is support for VMware magic I/O port and pseudo PMCs, synchronous register access, exposing nVMX capabilities to user-space, support for Hyper-V signaling via EventFD, and other optimizations and nested virtualization improvements.

Read more

Also: x86 Chinese CPU Manufacturer Zhaoxin Has Been Working On Linux Support

Graphics: Vulkan, AMD, Wayland 1.15 and Weston 4.0, NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan CTS 1.1.1 Adds 26,272 New Test Cases

    The Vulkan CTS as the conformance test suite for ensuring drivers are properly and fully implementing the Vulkan graphics and compute API continues getting even more in-depth and attempts to cover as many corner-cases as possible.

  • AMD Posts VP9 VA-API Video Acceleration For Gallium3D

    Hitting the Mesa mailing list today from AMD developers are a set of twenty-two patches providing VP9 video acceleration support via the Gallium3D VA-API state tracker.

    Before getting too excited though, this VP9 GPU-based video acceleration is just for "VCN" hardware. The only "Video Core Next" hardware out at the moment are the Raven Ridge APUs. With the next big Radeon discrete GPU launch though it should be safe to assume it will be VCN-based and thus with VP9 video support.

  • Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0 Officially Released

    Today marks the long-awaited debut of Wayland 1.15 and the Weston 4.0 reference compositor.

  • Mir Wayland Cut/Copy/Paste Support Being Worked On

    When it comes to Mir acting as a Wayland compositor, feature support continues to be extended for making this a more viable offering for those looking to have full Wayland support.

  • NVIDIA dropping support for 32bit Linux this month, also dropping Fermi series support

    If you're an NVIDIA user still on 32bit, you might want to think about finally updating as this month NVIDIA will be moving to only providing critical security updates for 32bit systems.

Security: Updates, Etherpad, Beep, Ubuntu, SourceClear

Filed under
Security

Games: XLEngine, Hand of Fate 2, GZDoom, Adventures of Square, Humble Store

Filed under
Gaming

Top 5 Most Useful Kali Linux Tools for Ethical Hackers

Filed under
Linux

Kali Linux is one of the most loved distros by the ethical hacking and security community because of its pen-testing and exploit tools. It is a free, and open-source Linux-based operating system designed for digital forensics, penetration testing, reversing, and security auditing. Kali allows you to download a range of security-related programs such as Metasploit, Nmap, Armitage, Burp, and much more that can be used to test your network for security loops. It can run natively when installing on a computer’s hard disk, can be booted from a live CD or live USB, or it can run on a virtual machine. Kali Linux has a lot of tools available to learn and practice.

Read more

phpMyAdmin 4.8.0 is Released

Filed under
OSS
  • phpMyAdmin 4.8.0 is released

    Welcome to phpMyAdmin version 4.8.0. We are excited to bring you this updated version with many new features and bug fixes. There are no changes to system requirements.

    A complete list of new features and bugs that have been fixed is available in the ChangeLog file or changelog.php included with this release.

  • phpMyAdmin 4.8 Brings Mobile Interface, 2FA & More

    Over the weekend marked the release of phpMyAdmin 4.8.0 as the latest major update to this widely-used MySQL web-based administration interface.

    The phpMyAdmin 4.8 release brings several security improvements, including support for Google Invisible Captcha, better reCAPTCHA handling, two factor authentication (2FA) and U2F support, removal of PHP eval() usage, and other changes in the name of better security.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux all-in-one: Slimbook Curve comes with your distro of choice pre-installed

    Spanish computer maker Slimbook has unveiled the Slimbook Curve, an all-in-one with a 24-inch curved screen made for GNU/Linux.

  • Slimbook Curve All-In-One Linux PC

    Spanish hardware and PC manufacturer Slimbook has created a new all-in-one Linux PC in the form of the aptly named Slimbook Curve, that features a curved 24 inch IPS display offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels as well as a matte, anti-glare finish. The Slimbook Curve can by installed with a wide variety of different Linux operating systems including No OS, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Ubuntu Mate, Debian, Elementary OS, Linux Mint, OpenSUSE, Antergos, Fedora and KDE Neon.

  • AIMS inverter control via GPIO ports

    I recently upgraded my inverter to a AIMS 1500 watt pure sine inverter (PWRI150024S). This is a decent inverter for the price, I hope. It seems reasonably efficient under load compared to other inverters. But when it's fully idle, it still consumes 4 watts of power.

    That's almost as much power as my laptop, and while 96 watt-hours per day may not sound like a lot of power, some days in winter, 100 watt-hours is my entire budget for the day. Adding more batteries just to power an idle inverter would be the normal solution, probably. Instead, I want to have my house computer turn it off when it's not being used.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Graphics: VC4 and AMDVLK Driver

  • VC4 display, VC5 kernel submitted
    For VC5, I renamed the kernel driver to “v3d” and submitted it to the kernel. Daniel Vetter came back right away with a bunch of useful feedback, and next week I’m resolving that feedback and continuing to work on the GMP support. On the vc4 front, I did the investigation of the HDL to determine that the OLED matrix applies before the gamma tables, so we can expose it in the DRM for Android’s color correction. Stefan was also interested in reworking his fencing patches to use syncobjs, so hopefully we can merge those and get DRM HWC support in mainline soon. I also pushed Gustavo’s patch for using the new core DRM infrastructure for async cursor updates. This doesn’t simplify our code much yet, but Boris has a series he’s working on that gets rid of a lot of custom vc4 display code by switching more code over to the new async support.
  • V3D DRM Driver Revised As It Works To Get Into The Mainline Kernel
    Eric Anholt of Broadcom has sent out his revised patches for the "V3D" DRM driver, which up until last week was known as the VC5 DRM driver. As explained last week, the VC5 driver components are being renamed to V3D since it ends up supporting more than just VC5 with Broadcom VC6 hardware already being supported too. Eric is making preparations to get this VideoCore driver into the mainline Linux kernel and he will then also rename the VC5 Gallium3D driver to V3D Gallium3D.
  • AMDVLK Driver Gets Fixed For Rise of the Tomb Raider Using Application Profiles
    With last week's release of Rise of the Tomb Raider on Linux ported by Feral Interactive, when it came to Radeon GPU support for this Vulkan-only Linux game port the Mesa RADV driver was supported while the official AMDVLK driver would lead to GPU hangs. That's now been fixed. With the latest AMDVLK/XGL source code as of today, the GPU hang issue for Rise of the Tomb Raider should now be resolved.

AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Performance Boosted By Updated BIOS/AGESA

With last week's initial launch-day Linux benchmarks of the Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X some found the Linux performance to be lower than Windows. While the root cause is undetermined, a BIOS/AGESA update does appear to help the Linux performance significantly at least with the motherboard where I've been doing most of my tests with the Ryzen 7 2700X. Here are the latest benchmark numbers. Read more

GNU: The GNU C Library 2.28 and Guix on Android

  • Glibc 2.28 Upstream Will Build/Run Cleanly On GNU Hurd
    While Linux distributions are still migrating to Glibc 2.27, in the two months since the release changes have continued building up for what will eventually become the GNU C Library 2.28. The Glibc 2.28 work queued thus far isn't nearly as exciting as all the performance optimizations and more introduced with Glibc 2.27, but it's a start. Most notable at this point for Glibc 2.28 is that it will now build and run cleanly on GNU/Hurd without requiring any out-of-tree patches. There has been a ton of Hurd-related commits to Glibc over the past month.
  • Guix on Android!
    Last year I thought to myself: since my phone is just a computer running an operating system called Android (or Replicant!), and that Android is based on a Linux kernel, it's just another foreign distribution I could install GNU Guix on, right? It turned out it was absolutely the case. Today I was reminded on IRC of my attempt last year at installing GNU Guix on my phone. Hence this blog post. I'll try to give you all the knowledge and commands required to install it on your own Android device.
  • GNU Guix Wrangled To Run On Android
    The GNU Guix transactional package manager can be made to run on Android smartphones/tablets, but not without lots of hoops to jump through first.