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Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Nouveau Update and Mesa 18.0 RC4 Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 6:19pm
Story Games: Train Station Simulator, Attack of the Earthlings, Steam Audio 2.0 and Nintendo Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 6:17pm
Story VLC 3.0 Vetinari Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 5:38pm
Story Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Plan and Derivative Reviewed Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 5:36pm
Story Quirky Xerus x86_64 version 8.4 released Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 5:28pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 5:12pm
Story GitHub: Here are the biggest open source project trends we'll see in 2018 Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 4:58pm
Story Arch Anywhere Is Dead, Long Live Anarchy Linux Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 4:55pm
Story Software: Nautilus, Python IDEs, Persepolis, Signal Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 4:13pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 4:11pm

Custom Embedded Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

In the past, many embedded projects used off-the-shelf distributions and stripped them down to bare essentials for a number of reasons. First, removing unused packages reduced storage requirements. Embedded systems are typically shy of large amounts of storage at boot time, and the storage available, in non-volatile memory, can require copying large amounts of the OS to memory to run. Second, removing unused packages reduced possible attack vectors. There is no sense hanging on to potentially vulnerable packages if you don't need them. Finally, removing unused packages reduced distribution management overhead. Having dependencies between packages means keeping them in sync if any one package requires an update from the upstream distribution. That can be a validation nightmare.

Yet, starting with an existing distribution and removing packages isn't as easy as it sounds. Removing one package might break dependencies held by a variety of other packages, and dependencies can change in the upstream distribution management. Additionally, some packages simply cannot be removed without great pain due to their integrated nature within the boot or runtime process. All of this takes control of the platform outside the project and can lead to unexpected delays in development.

A popular alternative is to build a custom distribution using build tools available from an upstream distribution provider. Both Gentoo and Debian provide options for this type of bottom-up build. The most popular of these is probably the Debian debootstrap utility. It retrieves prebuilt core components and allows users to cherry-pick the packages of interest in building their platforms. But, debootstrap originally was only for x86 platforms. Although there are ARM (and possibly other) options now, debootstrap and Gentoo's catalyst still take dependency management away from the local project.

Read more

Also: Open-Source Adreno A6xx GPU Support Posted

No new batches of ColorHug2

Servers: More on Kubernetes and Cisco Container Platform

Filed under
Server
  • Portworx Release Its Open Source Kubernetes Scheduler Extender, STORK

    Today Portworx released its new STorage Orchestrator Runtime for Kubernetes or STORK. According to the company, this new open-source project that takes advantage of the extensibility of Kubernetes to allow DevOps teams to run stateful applications like databases, queues and key-value stores more efficiently on Kubernetes. STORK provides key hyperconvergence, failure-domain awareness, storage health monitoring, and snapshot features for Kubernetes while being delivering through a plugin interface enabling it tow work with any storage driver for Kubernetes.

  • Kernel 4.16-rc1, Qubes OS 4.0, OpenSUSE's Tumbleweed and More

    Cisco announced its new Cisco Container Platform yesterday, which "simplifies and accelerates how application development and information technology (IT) operations teams configure, deploy, and manage container clusters based on 100 percent upstream Kubernetes."

  • Cisco Debuts Its Own Kubernetes Container Platform

    Cisco is getting deeper into the container world with the announcement on Jan. 31 that the company is building its own Cisco Container platform. The new platform is based on the open-source upstream Kubernetes container orchestration platform.

    The Cisco Container Platform will initially be available in April for Cisco's Hyperflex server system architecture, with a plan to add support for bare metal set to follow. The Cisco Container Platform adds Cisco's own control plane services on top of Kubernetes to enable what the company aims to be a turnkey deployment model.


    Sanjeev Rampal, Principal Engineer at Cisco, explained to ServerWatch that the plan is to have the Cisco Container Platform follow the upstream Kubernetes releases in an "N-1" cadence. The current most recent release of Kubernetes is version 1.9, with a 1.10 update expected to debut by March.

Canonical/Ubuntu Promote Snap and Microsoft Exploits That to Market Its Malware

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Red Hat: Red Hat's CIO, Red Hat Wants Telemetry in Linux, Wants 'to Extend Influence in Kubernetes Community'

Filed under
Red Hat

Software: Curl, AtCore, PiCluster, Prometheus, Vivaldi

Filed under
Software
  • Reducing 2038-problems in curl

    libcurl is very portable and is built and used on virtually all current widely used operating systems that run on 32bit or larger architectures (and on a fair amount of not so widely used ones as well).

    This offers some challenges. Keeping the code stellar and working on as many platforms as possible at the same time is hard work.

  • AtCore 1.0.0 Release.

    Today I would like to announce the release of AtCore 1.0.0. This is the first stable release for AtCore. Since its the first release and we have not written a “real” client for it yet we include our test GUI. If you own a 3D Printer you are encouraged to try AtCore for at least one print job.

  • PiCluster 2.3 is out!

    PiCluster aims to provide an easy-to-use solution to manage your Docker containers. A lot of work has gone into development over the past several months and  I am pleased to announce PiCluster 2.3! Let’s take a look at what is new in this release.

  • Changes in Prometheus 2.0

    2017 was a big year for the Prometheus project, as it published its 2.0 release in November. The new release ships numerous bug fixes, new features and, notably, a new storage engine that brings major performance improvements. This comes at the cost of incompatible changes to the storage and configuration-file formats. An overview of Prometheus and its new release was presented to the Kubernetes community in a talk held during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon. This article covers what changed in this new release and what is brewing next in the Prometheus community; it is a companion to this article, which provided a general introduction to monitoring with Prometheus.

  • Vivaldi 1.14 Debuts as World's First Web Browser to Feature Vertical Reader Mode

    Vivaldi Technologies announced today the release and general availability of the Vivaldi 1.14 web browser, which introduces several new features, optimizations, and bug fixes.

    Vivaldi 1.14 not only celebrates the project's third anniversary, but it becomes world's first web browser to introduce a vertical reader mode, which will benefit users of Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional, Japanese, and Korean languages. They can use the new vertical mode to more comfortably view and read texts in their languages in a distraction-free reader mode.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Battery Work for Fedora 28, Spec Change Statistics

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Improving Linux battery life, enabling PSR by default, testers wanted

    As you've probably read already I'm working on improving Linux laptop battery live, previously I've talked about enabling SATA link powermanagement by default. This is now enabled in rawhide / Fedora 28 since January 1st and so far no issues have been reported. This is really good news as this leads to significantly better idle power consumption (1 - 1.5W lower) on laptops with sata disks. Fedora 28 will also enable HDA codec autosuspend and autosuspend for USB Bluetooth controllers, for another (aprox) 0.8W gain.

  • Fedora 28 Will Hopefully Enable Intel PSR To Further Conserve Laptop Power

    Red Hat developer Hans de Goede has recently been on a mission to improve Linux battery life on Fedora. Now that SATA link power management is better handled and other tweaks, his latest target is on getting Intel's Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support enabled.

    Panel Self Refresh has been available for years but isn't enabled by default since for some hardware it can run into issues. PSR is part of the Embedded DisplayPort standard (eDP) for conserving power by being able to refresh the screen pixels directly when the screen's contents is not changing. PSR is supported by laptops/ultrabooks with eDP-based panels for the past several years, but again some quirky hardware can have issues with this functionality enabled.

  • Spec change statistics

    Over the last couple of days I took a look at all the spec files in Fedora. I wanted to find out how many packages have not been updated by someone else than release engineering for mass-rebuilds.

Linux 4.16 Gets Three New Driver Subsystems Plus VirtualBox Guest Driver

Filed under
Linux

Greg Kroah-Hartman's pull request of the char/misc driver work usually isn't too exciting each kernel cycle, but for Linux 4.16 it's definitely on the heavier side with introducing three new subsystems for different hardware busses.

The three new subsystems are Siox, Slimbus, and Soundwire.

Read more

Also: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Expands With Rook Storage Project

Graphics: Intel, Mesa and AMDGPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel's Mesa Driver Is OpenGL 4.6 Compliant, But Won't Be Mainline For A While

    As noted when covering the news yesterday of Khronos launching the OpenGL 4.6 Adopters Program, the NVIDIA proprietary driver and Intel's open-source Linux driver are the first OpenGL drivers considered 4.6 compliant. But on the Intel Linux side, the OpenGL 4.6 work has yet to be all upstreamed into Mesa.

    Igalia has put out a blog post today covering the new OpenGL Conformance Test Suite (CTS) and their work along with Intel developers in getting Intel's i965 Mesa driver across the OpenGL 4.6 milestone. But why I'm less than excited at the moment is the work isn't yet living within Mesa, meaning it will still be quite some time before users see this OpenGL 4.6 support with the latest Intel hardware. It's already too late for getting this work into the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release.

  • Some Early Bits Of The "Soft FP64" Infrastructure Will Be Mainlined Soon In Mesa

    David Airlie has announced his plans to begin mainlining some early infrastructure work on the "soft" FP64 code into Mesa Git. This doesn't yet allow for soft FP64 on older GPUs lacking the hardware capability to do this otherwise, but will help in another area and can make for easier mainlining of the actual soft FP64 support in the future.

    Due to some of his int/double conversion code not passing the OpenGL Conformance Test Suite or Piglit tests, David Airlie has decided to start bringing in some of the soft FP64 code into Mesa for addressing the problem. This doesn't yet enable soft FP64 but is a step in that direction and could make it easier to merge the actual support when the time comes. Elie Tournier at Collabora has been working on most of the soft FP64 code itself for emulating this capability with GLSL shaders.

  • Raven Ridge Gets Yet More AMDGPU DC Fixes

    While the Linux 4.15 kernel introduces AMDGPU DC display code support and is currently enabled just by default for RX Vega GPUs and newer, a lot of work continues going into this new display code stack.

    There are routine patch series being published for AMDGPU DC that expose the recent internal development efforts around AMDGPU DC, similar to how AMDVLK's public code-base gets updated in stages every so often. The common trend of recent AMDGPU DC updates is on fixes for the Raven Ridge APUs.

Mozilla: Security, NASA, Brazil, Compatibility, Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Unsanitary Firefox gets fix for critical HTML-handling hijack flaw

    Mozilla has patched a nasty security bug in Firefox, affecting versions 56, 57 and 58, and their point updates.

    The CVSS-8.8-rated flaw means that if an attacker can get a user to open a malicious document or link, remote code execution becomes a possibility – allowing spyware, ransomware and other nasties to be installed and run.

  • Open by Design: How NASA Innovates to Take on the Universe, with Steven Rader

    As Mozilla rethinks how we do open, thinking strategically about how we work with contributors and others throughout the product lifecycle (and sharing some of our approaches, well, openly), we thought it would be good to take a look at how NASA engineers use open innovation as an valuable tool.

    On January 31, we'll hear from Steve Rader, the Deputy Manager for NASA's Center of Excellence for Collaborative Innovation (CoECI). We'll learn how a large, bureaucratic organization tasked with the wildest innovation goals became more nimble and innovative by identifying and effectively working with outside collaborators, and what lessons might apply to us as we innovate in the open at Mozilla.

  • Rep of the Month – January 2018

    Cynthia is digital communications strategist and front-end developer with expertise on technical consulting, user and staff training and customer service in IT and Telecom segments. She has been a part of the Mozilla community for a long time and and her work has made a big push into Mozilla’s mission through local community efforts.

  • MDN browser compatibility data: Taking the guesswork out of web compatibility

    The most powerful aspect of the web is also what makes it so challenging to build for: its universality. When you create a website, you’re writing code that needs to be understood by a plethora of browsers on different devices and operating systems. It’s difficult.

    To make the web evolve in a sane and sustainable way for both users and developers, browser vendors work together to standardize new features, whether it’s a new HTML element, CSS property, or JavaScript API. But different vendors have different priorities, resources, and release cycles — so it’s very unlikely that a new feature will land on all the major browsers at once. As a web developer, this is something you must consider if you’re relying on a feature to build your site.

  • In Rust, ordinary vectors are values

    I’ve been thinking a lot about persistent collections lately and in particular how they relate to Rust, and I wanted to write up some of my observations.

More LibreOffice: LibreOffice and EPUB, 6.0 Release

Filed under
LibO

Games: PAWARUMI, Dino Run 2, BATTALION 1944, Rocket League, Surviving Mars

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Devices: Embedded Linux Conference, Mycroft, Congatec's conga-IT6

Filed under
Linux
  • ELC + OpenIoT: From Cloud Computing to Robot Apocalypse

    It’s time once again for that grand gathering of embedded Linux geeks known as the Embedded Linux Conference (ELC), as well as the co-located, non-Linux specific OpenIoT Summit. In this article, we take a closer look at the conference schedule, with keynotes and sessions you won’t want to miss.

    ELC + OpenIoT is happening Mar. 12-14 in Portland, Oregon, the home of Linus Torvalds, who created Linux as a desktop OS and has watched it spread throughout the server world. Over the past decade, Linux has found similar success in embedded gear ranging from mobile devices to Internet of Things hubs to industrial equipment to drones.

  • Privacy-Minded Smart Speaker May Struggle to Get to Know You

    Mycroft AI earlier this week announced that its Mark II smart speaker achieved full funding on Kickstarter in just 6.5 hours. As of Wednesday, pledges reached more than three times its US$50K goal -- with 23 days remaining in the campaign.

  • Mini-ITX board fosters flexibility and fights obsolescence

    Congatec unveiled a Mini-ITX style “conga-IT6” board that uses a plug-in COM Express module to supply processor and other core functions. CPU options currently include Intel Core, Xeon, Celeron, and Pentium, and AMD G-series and R-series chips, with up to 4x CPU cores and clocked at up to 4.3GHz.

GNOME and KDE in PureOS: diversity across devices

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME

PureOS, a Free Software Foundation endorsed GNU distribution, is what Purism pre-installs on all Librem laptops (in addition to it being freely available for the public to run on their own compatible hardware or virtual machines). It comes with a GNOME desktop environment by default, and of course, since we love free ethical software, users can use KDE that is also available within PureOS. This is the future we will continue to advance across all our devices: a PureOS GNOME-first strategy, with other Desktop Environments (DEs), such as KDE, available and supported by Purism.

At Purism we want a unified default desktop environment, and considering that we have chosen GNOME to be the default on laptops, we hope to extend GNOME to also be the default on phones. The ability for users to switch is also very powerful, and having a strong, usable, and supported alternative—that is, KDE/Plasma—for the Librem 5 offers the best of the “unified default” world and the “usable user choice” worlds.

Read more

Security: Spectre and Meltdown, ASUS, Lenovo (Windows)

Filed under
Security

MythTV 29.1 Released

Filed under
Movies
OSS
  • MythTV 29.1 Released

    Last July marked the release of MythTV 29 as the latest release of this once super popular Linux DVR/PVR software. Today marks the availability of MythTV 29.1.

  • Happy Release Day!

    The MythTV Team is pleased to announce the release of MythTV version v29.1

Server: STORK, Cisco Container Platform, and CoreOS

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Portworx open-sources STORK software to fix issues with data services on Kubernetes

    Software container company Portworx Inc. is unveiling a new open-source project aimed at developers, enabling them to run stateful applications such as databases, queues and key value stores more efficiently on Kubernetes.

    The STorage Orchestrator Runtime for Kubernetes, or STORK, works by communicating with storage drivers via a plugin interface so it can help address a number of issues that plague data services when running container software at scale.

  • Cisco jumps into containers

    How do you know when a technology has really made it? When companies that are not known for being innovators adopt it. That's the case today, as Cisco announced its Cisco Container Platform (CCP), a Kubernetes-based container platform. Another day, another company betting on Kubernetes for the cloud win.

    The CCP is designed to enable companies to build multi-cloud architectures with consistent application deployment and management on Cisco HyperFlex, virtual machines (VMs), and bare metal, both on premises and in the cloud. It will be available first on HyperFlex in April 2018. CCP will show up on other platforms this summer.

  • Red Hat buys the creator of a Chrome-based OS for servers

    The underpinnings of Chrome OS have found their way into the server room in a very roundabout way. Red Hat has acquired CoreOS, the creators of an operating system for containerized apps (Container Linux) that shares roots with both Google's Chromium OS project and Gentoo Linux. The $250 million deal promises to help Red Hat fulfill its dreams of helping people use open code to deploy apps in any environment they like, whether it's on a local network or multiple cloud services.

  • Red Hat Acquires CoreOS to Bolster Its Containerisation Efforts

    Expanding its presence in the world of containerisation, Red Hat has announced the acquisition of CoreOS, the container management startup that has been renowned for its CoreOS Tectonic, for $250 million (roughly Rs. 1,600 crores). The new deal is not only likely to help the North Carolina-headquartered company that is dominating the open source market but would also eventually give a boost to the existing enterprise-grade containerised infrastructure. CoreOS is also popular for developing Container Linux, which is a dedicated platform for containerised apps. The operating system shares foundations with Google's Chromium OS and Chrome OS in addition to leveraging modular Linux distribution Gentoo Linux. Having said that, the core interest of the acquired company lies within Kubernetes that is a modern distributed system designed by Google.

  • Linux Pioneer Red Hat Buys CoreOS for $250 Million

    Red Hat is an acknowledged player in open-source technologies, best known for its contribution to the success of Linux. The company has just disclosed a deal to buy CoreOS Inc. for $250 million – the container applications provider could be a great fit for the Red Hat ecosystem.

    Their products include a Linux distribution, also called CoreOS and Tectonic – a container management system based on Kubernetes, originally a Google platform.

    Red Hat already possesses a sizable container offerings portfolio, like Red Hat OpenShift, along with Kubernetes capabilities. CoreOS’s complementary solutions would accelerate development and encourage businesses to move to hybrid cloud structures – now a quick, easy transition.

Qubes OS 4.0-rc4 has been released!

Filed under
OS
Security

We’re pleased to announce the fourth release candidate for Qubes 4.0! This release contains important safeguards against the Spectre and Meltdown attacks, as well as bug fixes for many of the issues discovered in the previous release candidate. A full list of the Qubes 4.0 issues closed so far is available here. Further details about this release, including full installation instructions, are available in the Qubes 4.0 release notes. The new installation image is available on the Downloads page.

As always, we’re immensely grateful to our community of testers for taking the time to discover and report bugs. Thanks to your efforts, we’re able to fix these bugs before the final release of Qubes 4.0. We encourage you to continue diligently testing this fourth release candidate so that we can work together to improve Qubes 4.0 before the stable release.

Read more

Calligra 3.1.0 Released, More on Yesterday's Release of LibreOffice 6

Filed under
KDE
LibO
  • Calligra 3.1.0 released

    We are pleased to announce the release of Calligra 3.1.0 with the following apps included:
    Words, Sheets, Karbon, Gemini, and Plan.

    Note that Gemini, the KDE Office suite for 2-in-1 devices, is back after missing from the initial Calligra 3.0 release.

    Also note that Kexi, the visual database applications creator is close to release 3.1.0.
    See http://www.kexi-project.org.

    The following is a list of new features and bug fixes since the last release (3.0.1).

  • KDE's Calligra 3.1 Officially Released, Gemini Ported To KDE Frameworks 5

    The KDE Calligra graphics/office suite forked from KOffice is up to version 3.1.

    Landing the same week as the big LibreOffice 6.0 open-source office suite unveil is now the Calligra 3.1 suite's release.

    We've known the update was coming and they managed to deliver this v3.1 release one year after Calligra 3.0.

  • LibreOffice, the best office suite, gets even better with LibreOffice 6.0

    OK, if you are tied at the hip to Microsoft Office I can see why you'll continue to pay year after year for your Office subscription. But, seriously, if you're not, why aren't you using the newest version of LibreOffice 6.0?

    The bottom line is the open-source LibreOffice just works. I've used every office suite since WordStar and DataStar were things. LibreOffice is every bit as good as Microsoft Office and it's free to boot.

    You can run LibreOffice on Linux, macOS, and Windows. You can also use on your web browser, if you deploy LibreOffice Online as software-as-a-service server on a cloud, bare-iron, or in a Docker container.

  • How to install LibreOffice 6 on Linux
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More in Tux Machines

FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown (and Hugs)

  • FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown
    Landing in FreeBSD today was the mitigation work for the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities. It's taken a few more weeks longer than most of the Linux distributions to be re-worked for Spectre/Meltdown mitigation as well as DragonFlyBSD, but with FreeBSD Revision 329462 it appears their initial fixes are in place. There is Meltdown mitigation for Intel CPUs via a KPTI implementation similar to Linux, the Kernel Page Table Isolation. There is also a PCID (Process Context Identifier) optimization for Intel Westmere CPUs and newer, just as was also done on Linux.
  • FreeBSD outlaws virtual hugs
  • AsiaBSDCon 2018 Conference Programme

Linux: To recurse or not

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see. Read more

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Android Leftovers