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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Microsoft 'Loves' Linux in Munich Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 9:08am
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 9:05am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 9:02am
Story Future of Ubuntu phones and Ubuntu 17.04 Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 8:58am
Story RecalboxOS and PiE-Ink Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 8:57am
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 8:55am
Story FOSS Databases in the News Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 8:52am
Story BSD Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 8:46am
Story Programming and Security News Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 8:44am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2017 - 8:06am

Phones with Freedom

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Opening up ECOMP: Our Network Operating System for SDN

    Harmonizing SDN and NFV technologies benefits all communications industry members. It takes unnecessary friction out of the system. It gives service providers more control of their network services. It also enables both developers and operators to create effective services at speeds never before possible.

  • TM Forum finds lack of ‘glue’ challenging telecom’s open source efforts

    Has the rash of new open source-focused organizations hindered the deployment of open source solutions or is it just a lack of cohesion?

    One issue facing the telecommunication industry’s move towards greater use of open source software platforms is the dizzying array of organizations that have sprung up over the past couple of years focused on trying to help that transition. While the help is appreciated, it would seem that too much help could be confusing the process.

  • LibreOffice 5.3.0 Released and Available via PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Released: The Biggest Release So Far

    Finally after a long waiting. The Document Foundation announced the release of LibreOffice 5.3. Which fairly can be considered a huge release full of updates and new features for the free office suite.

  • Freenas 10 Beta 2 released
  • [Older] [was paywalled] The trouble with FreeBSD

    Benno Rice, a member of the FreeBSD core team, might be expected to feel out of place at linux.conf.au, but it was not his first time there. While at the 2016 event in Geelong, he saw a presentation on Rust community automation [YouTube] by Emily Dunham and wondered: why can't FreeBSD have such nice things? The 2017 conference, held in Hobart, chose "the future of open source" as its theme but, Rice said, he was there to speak about the past; by looking at how FreeBSD ran into trouble, perhaps we can all learn something useful about how we run our projects.

    He got involved with open source in the 1990s; he actually started with Linux, but somebody told him that "Linux is rubbish" and he should use FreeBSD instead. So he bought an iMac computer and got FreeBSD running on it; the project then punished him by giving him commit access. It is a great project, but it does have some problems relating to three factors in particular: FreeBSD is big, it's old, and its leadership can be slow to act.

    How big is FreeBSD? The project's Subversion repository is currently about 3.1GB in size; a checked-out tree takes about 600MB. It consists of 71,100 files, about 32 million lines of code. It takes 20-30 minutes to build the whole thing, which is a big improvement from the old days, when it could take several hours.

  • [Video] Richard Stallman Explains Everything

    Richard Stallman, Founder and Leader of the free software movement, joins David to discuss his creation of the computer operating system "GNU"...

  • From free software to liberal software

    Robert M. "r0ml" Lefkowitz was the fourth and final keynote speaker at linux.conf.au 2017 in Hobart, Tasmania. He immediately served notice that his talk was going to differ from those of his predecessors; they offered "deep insightful questions", while he had answers. Also, the first three were nice people. What followed was an energetic event that left many in the audience wondering what they had just witnessed. The future of free and open-source software is grim, he said, but maybe we can make something better to replace it.

  • OGP unveils catalogue of open government tools

    The Open Government Partnership has published the OGP Toolbox, aggregating the digital tools developed and used by organisations across the globe to improve democracy and promote openness. So far, it lists 1,266 tools, 189 use cases and 515 organisations.

  • New Dataset: Five Years of Longitudinal Data from Scratch

    Scratch is a block-based programming language created by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group (LLK) at the MIT Media Lab. Scratch gives kids the power to use programming to create their own interactive animations and computer games. Since 2007, the online community that allows Scratch programmers to share, remix, and socialize around their projects has drawn more than 16 million users who have shared nearly 20 million projects and more than 100 million comments. It is one of the most popular ways for kids to learn programming and among the larger online communities for kids in general.

  • GitLab.com luckily found lost data on a staging server

    GitLab.com, the wannabe GitHub alternative that yesterday went down hard and reported data loss, has confirmed that some data is gone but that its services are now operational again.

    The incident did not result in Git repos disappearing. Which may be why the company's PR reps characterised the lost data as “peripheral metadata that was written during a 6-hour window”. But in a a prose account of the incident, GitLab says “issues, merge requests, users, comments, snippets, etc.” were lost. The Register imagines many developers may not be entirely happy with those data types being considered peripheral to their efforts.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Hosted S/MIME by Google provides enhanced security for Gmail in the enterprise [Ed: It’s not end-to-end but end-to-Google i.e. end-to-NSA PRISM]

    We are constantly working to meet the needs of our enterprise customers, including enhanced security for their communications. Our aim is to offer a secure method to transport sensitive information despite insecure channels with email today and without compromising Gmail extensive protections for spam, phishing and malware.

  • Razer Core on Linux with Razer Blade Stealth and BIOS Mod
  • How Did Cybersecurity Become So Political?

    Less than a month before he was elected president, Donald Trump promised to make cybersecurity “an immediate and top priority for my administration.” He had talked about technology often on the campaign trail—mostly to attack Hillary Clinton for using a private email server when she was Secretary of State. But less than two weeks into his presidency, it’s Trump and his team who have struggled to plug important security holes, some of which are reminiscent of Clinton’s troubles.

  • New zero-day exploit affects current Windows versions

    A new zero-day exploit that affects current versions of Windows has been released on Github, according to an announcement from the Internet Storm Centre.

    Johannes Ullrich of the ISC said the exploit implemented an SMBv3 server and clients connecting to it would be affected.

    He said he had tested it with a fully patched Windows 10 machine and experienced a blue screen of death.

    "An attacker would have to trick the client to connect to this server. It isn't clear if this is exploitable beyond a denial of service," he wrote.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • `MyPaint` An Advanced Alternative To MS Paint for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    MyPaint is a free, open source, simple drawing and painting program for digital painters. It is way better and advanced than MS Windows paint, well the truth is you can't compare this great program with MS Paint. It lets you focus on the art instead of the program. You work on your canvas with minimum distractions, bringing up the interface only when you need it. MyPaint started in 2004 by Martin Renold, he wanted a smooth paint program which could help him digital painting with brush in different way to pressure and speed. MyPaint supports many graphics tablets such as Wacom, and many similar devices. The brush engine of MyPaint is versatile and configurable, and it offers useful, productive tools which a digital painter can expect from a program.

  • Calibre eBook Library and Editor and Library Now Support Latest Kobo Device

    Calibre is an eBook management software that is almost without equal, on any platform that runs it. A few years ago nobody could anticipate that eBooks will take our lives completely, but the rise of eBook readers and the fact that most books are cheaper in digital form, proves that it was inevitable for someone to take matters in his own hands and develop something that can actually manage an entire library.

  • Package managers all the way down

    Package managers are at the core of Linux distributions, but they are currently engulfed in a wave of changes and it's not clear how things will end up. Kristoffer Grönlund started his 2017 linux.conf.au talk on the subject by putting up a slide saying that "everything is terrible awesome". There are a number of frustrations that result from the current state of package management, but that frustration may well lead to better things in the future.

    Grönlund started by asking a simple question: what is a package manager? There are, in fact, two types of package managers out there, and the intersection between them is leading to some interesting problems.

    When most people think of package managers, they are thinking of a distribution package manager like zypper, DNF, or APT. These tools date back to the early days of Linux, when there were few boundaries between users, developers, and administrators; whoever we were, we had to do everything ourselves. Distribution package managers were construction kits that helped us to put our distributions together. They managed dependencies — both build and runtime dependencies, which are different things. They helped users install their software, administrators to keep systems up to date, and distributors to manage licenses.

  • Open Source Photography Software "Darktable" 2.2.2 has been Released

    Darktable is an open source photography workflow application and RAW developer. A virtual lighttable and darkroom for photographers. It manages your digital negatives in a database, lets you view them through a zoomable lighttable and enables you to develop raw images and enhance them.

  • 6 Cool Internet Radio Players For Linux

    There are quite a few Linux applications that can play Internet radio, but I thought I'd make a list of some of the most interesting apps that focus on this.

    The list includes lightweight Internet radio players, a fully fledged desktop application, a command line radio browser and player, as well as a GNOME Shell extension.

  • RcloneBrowser (Rclone GUI) Lets You Manage Multiple Cloud Storage Services From A Single Desktop App

    In case you're not familiar with Rclone, this is a command line tool for synchronizing files from or to cloud storage services, which supports Google Drive, Google Cloud Storage, Dropbox, Microsoft One Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Openstack Swift / Rackspace cloud files / Memset Memstore, Hubic, Yandex Disk, and Backblaze B2.

    Rclone can synchronize files either directly between these cloud services, or to / from your local filesystem.

  • 10 Best Linux Task Managers

    One of the most important things for Linux users is the task management, because all operating systems have mistakes, and Linux isn’t the exception yet. Sometimes, I have troubles with specific applications that collapse and the processes do not stop, it’s very weird, but sometimes it happens. So I use Linux task manager, find the process and finally, I kill it.

  • RPushbullet 0.3.0

    A major new update of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the to your browser, phone, tablet, ... -- or all at once.

  • Release Notes for fish 2.5.0 (released February 3, 2017)

    Starting with version 2.5, fish requires a more up-to-date version of C++, specifically C++11 (from 2011). This affects some older platforms:

  • GIMP 2.8.20 Release

    We are releasing GIMP 2.8.20 with various bug fixes—the most noticeable one being changes to the weird initial user interface language selection on macOS to make it use the user’s preferred language.

  • GNOME's Epiphany Web Browser Lands A Lot More 3.24 Feature Work

    Developers working on GNOME's Web Browser, Epiphany, have prepared the v3.23.5 release as their latest development version in the road towards GNOME 3.24.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Disgaea 2 is Now Available on Linux

    After the recent release of Owlboy, we are now getting Disgaea 2 ! This one was expected in January, and January it is. It’s almost strange when some port comes on time these days, and this one is a first citizen kind of port – same day release for all platforms (PC and Mac) as well Linux. Disgaea 2 is a very old game by now (PS2 era – released in 2006) and you could play it on an emulator if you really wanted to, but now it’s a lot more convenient this way.

  • You can get Total War WARHAMMER for $12 in the current Humble Monthly Bundle

    Don't pass up a fantastic deal guys. Total War WARHAMMER can be bagged for only $12 in the currently Humble Monthly Bundle.

  • Publishing the Data of our Last Linux Gamers Survey

    It’s been a while since we conducted our last survey (March 2016 actually!) and we have still not published the full analysis – unfortunately this kind of things takes time, and while we have not given up on releasing a complete overview of the result. However, in that last survey we have specifically asked folks if they wanted to publicly share their answers at the very end of the survey (the first time we did ask that).

  • Stellaris: Utopia, a major expansion announced

    Paradox has announced 'Stellaris: Utopia' [Steam, Official Site], a major new expansion for Stellaris bringing in lots of new toys.

  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided and XCOM 2 are both super cheap this weekend

    If you're a bit stuck this weekend I have great news! Both Deus Ex: Mankind Divided and XCOM 2 are really cheap this weekend!

    I'm amazed at how cheap they both are, considering they are both quite new.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE/Qt: PDF Module, Vaults, KDE Store

Filed under
KDE
  • New QtLabs PDF module

    A couple of years ago during a hackathon, a couple of us wrote a Qt wrapper around PDFium, the open-source PDF rendering engine which is used for viewing PDFs in Chromium. There have been a few fixes and improvements since then. Now we (finally) have made this module available under the LGPLv3 license.

  • Vaults - Encryption in Plasma

    Five years ago (I’m completely shocked how the time flies), we were working on Plasma Active, and one of the ideas was to allow the user to create private activities in which all the data would be encrypted.

    Now, while the idea itself was solid, there were big problems with its realization. There was no way to force applications to separate the configuration and other data based on whether the user is in the encrypted activity or not. Especially since the same application can run in multiple activities.

  • KDE Applications in Ubuntu Snap Store

    Following the recent addition of easy DBus service snapping in the snap binary bundle format, I am happy to say that we now have some of our KDE Applications in the Ubuntu 16.04 Snap Store.

  • Simple Menu launcher on KDE Store

    Quite a while ago already I wrote a launcher menu widget named Simple Menu. It's using the same backend I wrote for our bundled launchers, and it's a little bit like Application Dashboard scaled down into a small floating window, plus nifty horizontal pagination. It's also really simple and fast.

  • Chrome for iOS goes open source, a KDE-branded laptop, and more open source news

Events: WikiToLearn India, FOSDEM 2017, MesosCon

Filed under
OSS
  • A look back at the WikiToLearn India conference, 2017

    The first ever WikiToLearn India conference was a 2 day single track event held on the 18th and 19th of January, 2017 in Jaipur, India. The event welcomed talks from all domains of technology, but admittedly, talks around KDE and MediaWiki were preferred.

  • Almost at FOSDEM. Video volunteers?

    The Desktops DevRoom will be a blast again this year. While I have been in charge of it for 6? years already, the last two (since my twins) were born I had organized remotely and local duties were carried on by the Desktops DevRoom team (thank you Christophe Fergeau, Philippe Caseiro and others!).

  • Kube at FOSDEM 2017

    I haven’t talked about it much, but the last few months we’ve been busy working on Kube and we’re slowly closing in on a first tech preview.

  • Share Apache Mesos Best Practices, Lessons Learned, and More at MesosCon Events in 2017

    MesosCon is an annual conference held in three locations around the globe and organized by the Apache Mesos community in partnership with The Linux Foundation. The events bring together users and developers of the open source orchestration framework to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem.

    The MesosCon program committee is now seeking proposals from speakers with fresh ideas, enlightening case studies, best practices, or deep technical knowledge to share with the Apache Mesos community at MesosCon North America, Asia, and Europe in 2017.

Bodhi Needs Testers, Build Your Own PC

Filed under
-s

Jeff Hoogland today posted that time has come to polish up Swami and asked for his bravest users to install the newest to give it a go. Tails is the latest distribution to deprecate their 32-bit architecture and GIMP 2.8.20 was released. Liam Tung reported on a new self-assembled laptop able to run Linux and Rick Broida suggested some light-weight distros for such cases. Just in case you actually take that route, Jamie McKane shared some tips for first time computer assemblers.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Security News

Filed under
Security

Tails and 64-bit Processors

Filed under
Security
Debian
  • Next major Tails release will require a 64-bit processor

    The popular Linux distribution, Tails OS, carries the following slogan on its website “privacy for anyone anywhere”. It seems, though, following some of the latest news from the project, this slogan isn’t exactly true. Beginning with Tails 3.0, users will need a 64-bit processor powering their computer.

  • Privacy-focused Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 will drop 32-bit processor support

    If you find yourself needing an operating system that respects your privacy, you cannot go wrong with Tails. The live Linux-distro can be run from a DVD which is read-only, meaning there is less of a chance of files being left behind. Heck, Edward Snowden famously used it to protect himself when shining a light on the overreaching US government.

    Unfortunately for some users, Tails will soon not work on their computers. The upcoming version 3.0 of the operating system is dropping 32-bit processor support. While a decline in compatibility is normally a bad thing, in this case, it is good. You see, because there are so few 32-bit Tails users, the team was wasting resources by supporting them. Not to mention, 64-bit processors are more secure too.

Graphics News and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • OpenGL Shader Cache Support For RadeonSI Is Making Progress

    Last week we reported that Collabora developer Timothy Arceri would be trying to support Mesa's OpenGL shader cache with RadeonSI while since then work has begun to materialize.

    For RadeonSI Gallium3D users engaging in Linux gaming with shader-intensive workloads like Shadow of Mordor, the on-disk GLSL shader cache is taking shape. Follow this GitHub repository to stay updated with the latest shader cache developments pertaining to the open-source RadoenSI Gallium3D driver.

  • Mesa has a patch from a Valve developer to help ARK Survival Evolved run on the open source drivers

    Samuel Pitoiset from Valve has sent in yet another patch to Mesa, this one focuses on the ARK games: ARK Survival Evolved and Survival Of The Fittest to to run without overrides.

    Essentially, Samuel is arguing that overrides to force Mesa to use specific OpenGL versions should be mainly a developer-option, and that games which require it should auto-set it for users. I completely agree, it's less hassle for us and many people likely aren't aware that specific games need these hacks to run.

  • The Latest Changes With Phoronix Test Suite 7.0-Ringsaker

Development News:GitLab, Git, and PHP

Filed under
Development
  • GitLab Data Loss Incident Prompts a Review of its Restore Processes

    On Tuesday, a GitLab administrator had accidentally erased a directory of live production data during a routine database replication. In the process of restoring from the last backup, taken six hours prior, the company had discovered that none of its five backup routines worked entirely correctly. The incident report, which GitLab posted online, noted that erasure affected issues and merge requests but not the git repositories themselves.

  • Git v2.12.0-rc0
  • Git 2.12.0-rc0 Released With Various Improvements

    Coincidentally on the same day as Microsoft announcing the Git Virtual File-System, upstream Git developers have announced their first release candidate of the upcoming Git 2.12 milestone.

    Git 2.12-rc0 has 441 commits since v2.11 including Cygwin build updates, git p4 updates, GitLFS integration updates, additions to various Git sub-commands, some performance improvements, and a range of fixes and other smaller technical updates.

  • Clear Linux's Latest Performance-Optimizing Effort: Greater PHP Performance

    Developers working on Intel's Clear Linux distribution have taken to performance tuning of their stock PHP packages during their migration from PHP5 to PHP7.

    As we've shown in other Clear Linux benchmarks, this Intel Open-Source Technology Center project aims for delivering maximum out-of-the-box performance via tuning and patches where needed to their Linux kernel, aggressive GCC/Clang compiler defaults, and other steps for trying to deliver the best possible Intel x86_64 Linux performance. With the recent builds of this rolling-release distribution they are optimizing PHP 7.1.1 via PGO (Profile Guided Optimizations).

It's Become Much Easier To Run Steam On FreeBSD-Derived TrueOS

Filed under
BSD
Gaming

There have been ways to get Steam running on FreeBSD using Wine and efforts as well with using the operating system's Linux binary compatibility layer, but now it's become much easier for users of TrueOS, formerly known as PC-BSD.

Read more

BeagleBone Black gains $50 4.3-inch cap touchscreen Cape

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Element14 and Adafruit have launched a 4.3-inch, 480 x 272 capacitive touchscreen for the BeagleBone Black at an unprecedented price of only $50.

Adafruit has launched an Element14 made, 4.3-inch capacitive touchscreen for only $50, making it the only cap touchscreen for the SBC we’ve seen that sells for under $100. The Element 14 LCD Display Cape, also referred to by Adafruit as the 4.3” LCD Capacitive Touchscreen Display Cape for BeagleBone, is a full-color, backlit TFT touchscreen with 480 x 272-pixel resolution. The “high luminance,” 105.5 x 67.25 x 4.75mm display comes with a 69 x 67.5 x 17mm Cape interface board.

Read more

4MLinux 20.3 STABLE released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This is a minor maintenance release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel. The release ships with the Linux kernel 4.4.44. Additionally, some popular programs (Audacious, Dropbox, FileZilla, Firefox, Java RE, LibreOffice, PeaZip, Thunderbird, WinSCP) have been updated, too.

Read more

Wine 2.1 Development Release

Filed under
Software
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Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

  • A Minimal Chrome OS Theme for Tint2
    I used to (and sort-of-still-do, I guess) run a sister site focused on Google Chrome, Chromecast and Chromebooks, i.e. the Chrome ecosystem. As such I am a fan of Chromebooks and Chrome OS, a Linux-based distribution based on Gentoo. The appearance of Chrome OS has waxed and waned in sync with Google’s ambitions and positioning for the OS, going form hyper-minimal to a full desktop clone (with the desktop-y Chrome Apps platform) through to a Material Design inspired Android + Chrome hybrid today.
  • Off-The-Shelf Hacker: Linux for Cheap Hardware, Then and Now
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  • [Video] XPS 13 Review | Linux Action Show 457
  • GParted 0.28.1
    This release of GParted restores the ability to move/resize primary partitions when an extended partition exists. The move/resize regression was introduced in version 0.28.0. This release also includes some minor bug fixes.
  • Antergos Linux : The beauty built on Arch
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Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos