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Sunday, 21 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How to Build a Linux Media Server Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 7:12am
Story BattBorg: power your Raspberry Pi with almost any kind of battery Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 7:05am
Story Cortex-A5 SBC offers mainline Linux support Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:59am
Story The iPhone 6 Is Actually A Lot Like A 2012 Android Phone Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:52am
Story Open Source is driving disruption in technology: Interview with Nithya Ruff of SanDisk Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:46am
Story Black Lab Linux 6 Beta 1 Released Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:45am
Story Android apps start coming to Google Chrome OS Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:43am
Story Robot OS to support Linux and Android on Snapdragon Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:41am
Story ThinkPenguin wireless router now FSF-certified to respect your freedom Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:38am
Story Dev boards run KitKat on quad-core Snapdragon 805 Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:33am

5 things you need to know about the Raspberry Pi’s Epiphany web browser

Filed under
Linux
Web

Epiphany is a new web browser for the Raspberry Pi. It’s been modified to be faster, smoother and more powerful than the previous web browser, Midori, meaning it possible to watch 720p YouTube videos and browse more Javascript-heavy websites like RaspberryPi.org and RasPi.Today.

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Fedora 21 Alpha to slip by one week

Filed under
Red Hat

Today at Go/No-Go meeting it was decided to slip Fedora 21 Alpha release
by one week due to unresolved blocker bugs [1] and no release candidate
available. More details in meeting minutes [2].

As a result, ALL MAJOR MILESTONES, and their dependent tasks, will be
pushed out by one week [3].

The next Go/No-Go meeting is on Thursday, Sep 11, the same time at
#fedora-meeting-2 channel.

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Android Candy: Quit Thumbing Your Passwords!

Filed under
Android

With great power comes great responsibility, and it's important to understand what PasswordBox allows you to do. When you initially launch it, you'll be prompted for how you desire the application to handle when it locks your data and requires you to retype the master password. Ideally, this would be "immediately after you quit the app", but PasswordBox allows you to sacrifice security for convenience and will stay unlocked anywhere from 30 seconds to several hours. It even will let you rely on your Android lock screen for security and never prompt you for your master password!

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10 Reasons To Use Open Source Software Defined Networking [Slideshare]

Filed under
OSS

Open source software (OSS) now has a permanent role in the enterprise IT world. Gartner forecasts that open-source technology will be included in 85% of all commercial software packages by 2015 and 95% of mainstream IT organizations will leverage some element of OSS. One of the fastest growing segments within open software is Software Defined Networking (SDN), which simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure. The SDN market is projected to surge from $360M to $3.52B in 2018.

To understand more about open source SDN and why it is growing so quickly, I spoke with Neela Jacques, executive director of OpenDaylight. Neela works closely with the developer and user communities to advance SDN and Network Functions Virtualization (NFV). The range of software companies participating in OpenDaylight account for 95% of the entire SDN market. Neela and I took a look at the data on OSS and consolidated all the reasons that people use open source software for SDN into a top ten list.

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Firewall detects rogue cell towers that try to intercept your calls

Filed under
Android
Security

Most people know to turn off GPS on their mobiles if they are bothered about being tracked however fewer people know not to leave on Wi-Fi & call service as these also can be used to track you.

A CryptoPhone maker, GSMK, has developed a firewall that tells you if rogue cell towers are trying to connect to your phone. This is the first phone to protects against these attacks but it’s only compatible with one device, a modded Galaxy S3.

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Ubuntu Touch Can Now Be Used to Control AR Drones

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Touch platform is getting closer to a release on the market and some very interesting applications are making their way into the Ubuntu Store, like this drone control app.

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Debian PPA Utility

Filed under
Debian

Since its introduction, PPA’s are exclusively connected to Ubuntu and its derivatives (Mint, Elementary, etc …). But over time, a number of interesting projects appeared whose whole development is happening inside of PPA’s. To name few, I’m talking about TLP, Geary, Oracle Java Installer, Elementary OS and etc … Some of these projects are in WNPP without much happening for a long time, i.e: TLP

One option was to repackage these packages and then have them uploaded to Debian, or just go rogue and install them directly from its PPA’s. Title of this post might hint which path I took.

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Google Chrome 38 Beta Update Improved KDE Wallet Compatibility

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Google

The Beta branch of the Google Chrome browser, the Internet browser developed by Google, has been updated yet again and the developers have made a series of changes and improvements.

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HardenedBSD: The Latest BSD Project That Aims To Boost Security

Filed under
Security
BSD

HardenedBSD is the latest BSD distribution writing into Phoronix to share its work.

HardenedBSD isn't some radical new BSD operating system but rather it's working on being a security-enhanced version of FreeBSD. HardenedBSD is just about providing security enhancements on top of the FreeBSD code-base. This initiative just started this summer by Oliver Pinter and Shawn Webb.

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Linux Desktop Fragmentation Is a Feature, Not a Bug

Filed under
Linux

One of the most common expressions that you will hear in the Linux community is platform fragmentation, and it's also one of the contra arguments that people spout when citing reasons not to get a Linux OS. I'm here to tell you why platform fragmentation is actually a good thing.

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Android-x86 4.4 review – technically a distro?

Filed under
Android
Reviews

We’ve been keeping an eye on the development of Android-x86 for a little while now, with the release of 4.4 seemingly imminent for some months now. In the past we’ve managed to use dodgy hacks of Android on proper computers or an emulated version via the ADK, but this promises to be one of the first complete ports of the mobile operating system to x86.

Android-x86 is straight-up Android. There are no extra Linux repositories or a custom desktop to accommodate a mouse and keyboard on a standard computer or laptop. What you get is the standard Android 4.4 interface that can be used by touchscreens along with mouse and keyboards. Android actually has some level of mouse support already included in its code anyway, so the main changes revolve around the actual porting of the kernel and components, along with support for the kind of hardware you only get on PC such as wired networks.

The live disc is handled quite differently from a usual Linux distro. Starting it live will get you into an instance of Android that you can easily play around with: it acts exactly like any Android device would if you’d turned it on for the first time, asking for settings and login details. All of this will not be saved so it serves well as a test of the system more than anything else.

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More Linux Benchmarks Of The AMD FX-8370E / FX-8370 / FX-9590

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

In adding some extra tests besides what was shared in our large Linux review of the new AMD FX CPUs from earlier in the week, that included a fairly big comparison of Intel and AMD CPUs, here's some more Linux test results for just the FX-8370E, FX-8370, and FX-9590 processors.

This latest article are some more results conducted from the ASRock 990FX Killer AM3+ motherboard for all three eight-core CPUs. The Cooler Master Seidon 120XL water cooler was used for keeping the CPUs running well. Ubuntu 14.04 was still the host on the system while using the Linux 3.17 development kernel and Mesa 10.4-devel via the Oibaf PPA. GCC 4.8.2 was the host compiler.

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Best Android tablets (September 2014 edition)

Filed under
Android

All of the tablets features here are very capable, powerful workhorses, and are ideal not only for home users, but also for enterprise users or those looking for a BYOD tablet. Any one of these will give you an excellent Android experience, and when combined with the right apps, will allow you to get a lot of work done when you're away from your desk.

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Tux Machines Ten Months Later

Filed under
News

It wasn’t a big surprise when Linton announced her intention to sell the site. For a while it had been obvious she wasn’t putting the time into it she once had. Since the site had started in 2004, it had been constantly maintained, with links to other sites being posted daily, if not more often. Recently, it had lost that dependability. Days, sometimes weeks, would go by without the site being updated.
“I’m just getting too old and tired to keep the site up the way it and its loyal visitors deserve,” she wrote. “It may get better next spring, but this fall I’ll end up losing all my visitors I’m afraid.”

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Samsung's Tizen-Based Gear S Throws a Curve at Smartwatch Market

Filed under
Linux

Prior to this week's IFA show in Berlin, Samsung showed off its third Tizen Linux-based smartwatch. The Gear S offers several innovations compared to the Tizen-based Gear 2 and Gear Neo smartwatches, including autonomous operation and a curved screen. The Gear S will ship in Korea in October, followed by a global launch. According to this mostly favorable CNET Gear S hands-on, there are no current plans for a U.S. launch.

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More Nouveau Re-Clocking Patches Published

Filed under
Hardware

A few weeks back Roy posted improved re-clocking code for NVA3 GPUs. Today his latest set of patches work on memory re-clocking improvements for DDR2/DDR3 hardware. The patches also implement wait-for-vblank to remove flickering during memory re-clocking, improvements for reducing the downtime of PFIFO pauses, etc. These patches are prep work for the actual memory re-clocking code that he says will follow later.

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Citrix ShareConnect Puts Desktop Applications on Android Tablets

Filed under
Android

“Today’s workforce is more mobile than ever and they face two major challenges; not all data is stored in the cloud and many desktop apps are not fully functional through mobile apps,” said Jesse Lipson, vice president, Citrix, in a statement. “With ShareConnect, users can access and edit files, use industry-specific desktop apps critical to getting their work done and even use their business networks – all through a simple interface, optimized pixel by pixel for tablets.”
Network access is built into the ShareConnect app allowing users to run resource-intensive desktop programs on the go. Applications are optimized for the iPad and Android OS, according to the company, opening in full screen mode and responding to pinches, swipes and other common mobile gestures.

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YES, I have ridden the UNICORN: The Ubuntu Utopic unicorn

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 14.10, nicknamed Utopic Unicorn, is coming in just a few months. Alpha releases have been available for some time but beta testing started last week, meaning code is generally stable enough for virtual machines and other testing scenarios.

Ubuntu's current release cycle means that the main Ubuntu line usually sits out the first beta and 14.10 is no exception. There is no beta 1 for Ubuntu 14.10; instead this beta consists of a number of participating "flavors," whose betas are also now available.

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Can this free software company secure the future of Linux for the city of Munich?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There are many solved problems in open source. Groupware is not one of them.

How else would you explain the number of migrations that fail on average in groupware? The Swiss canton of Solothurn is just one example among many as a result of groupware vendors who have given up and transitioned to Outlook or the web to meet their needs. Kolab does things differently. For one, Outlook will never be the client for the Linux desktop. And, the web is a good answer for a lot of things, but not all.

The city of Munich is another good case to look at; they successfully completed a Linux migration that has saved them millions of Euros. But now, the newly elected mayor and his deputy have made the news by publicly considering a migration back to Windows. To explore this further, let's first ignore for a moment that the City Council would need to approve any change in strategy and has renewed its dedication to LiMux. Let's also ignore the fact that the City employees do not consider it a good idea to go back to Windows.

So, what was it that prompted LiMux to be put into question in the news?

If you guessed that Office interoperatbility may have something to do with it, you would be right. As long as there are competing standards there will be incompatibility between the dominant vendor and the rest of the market. Document exchange remains a constant issue that is ultimately only solved at the political level. This particular problem is not technical and the UK has recently demonstrated that they will choose open documents as the standard format to deal with it.

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