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Saturday, 22 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tizen News Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 4:56pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 4:55pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 4:54pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 4:53pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 4:50pm
Story Parrot Security 3.2 "CyberSloop" Ethical Hacking OS Is Out with Linux Kernel 4.7 Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 7:53am
Story Debian-Based Elive 2.7.8 Beta Linux OS Released with Extra Packages, Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 7:52am
Story Ubuntu 16.10 Review Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 12:54am
Story Wine 1.9.21 Update Improves Adobe Illustrator CS6 and The Longest Journey Demo Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 12:49am
Story Docker Brings Containers to China Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2016 - 12:43am

SUSE Leftovers

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  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/40
  • ERR_NETWORK_CHANGED in Chrome/Chomium @openSUSE_Tumbeweed @DELL_5510
  • YaST Team: Improving low-vision accessibility of the installer

    In our latest report, we promised you would not have to wait another three weeks to hear (or read) from us. And here we are again, but not with any of the anticipated topics (build time reduction and Euruko 2016), but with a call for help in a topic that could really make a difference for (open)SUSE.

    Nowadays, YaST team is trying to fix a long-standing issue in the installer: low-vision accessibility. In the past, a user could get a high-contrast mode just pressing shift+F4 during installation. Unfortunately, that feature does not work anymore and, to be honest, changing to a high-contrast palette is not enough. Other adjustments, like setting better font sizes, should be taken into account.

    Another option is to use the textmode installation and set some obscure variable (Y2NCURSES_COLOR_THEME) to get the high-contrast mode. But it sounds like the opposite to user friendly.

6 Ways Mr. Robot Is Putting Linux in the Public Eye

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One of the main Linux draws is its customization, and one of the most important areas is the desktop environment. Of the Linux desktop environments, GNOME and KDE are two of the leading environments. Tyrell Wellick (Martin Wallström) says to protagonist Elliot, “So I see you’re running Gnome! You know I’m actually on KDE myself.” Those familiar with Linux and its environments will appreciate this moment, especially Wellick’s follow up, “Yeah, I know what you’re thinking, I’m an executive running Linux, why am I even running Linux?”

Not only do we learn about KDE and GNOME, but there’s even a bit about the perception of Linux use in the enterprise (hint: it’s usually relegated to sysadmins and tech specialists, not execs).

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Security News

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  • Security advisories for Friday
  • surveillance, whistleblowing, and security engineering

    Imagine for a moment that you are a security engineer who discovers a backdoor that your company execs have been trying to hide from your team. Would you quit on ethical grounds or stay so that you can prevent this from happening again? I don’t think there is one right answer. Personally I am grateful both for those who left and blew the whistle, and for those who stayed to protect Yahoo’s 800 million users.

    Part of the job function of security engineers and pen testers is being ready for the moment you encounter something that you think should be disclosed but your company wants to keep secret. Think about what you would be willing to lose. Be prepared to escalate internally. Know the terms of your NDA and your exit agreement; try your best to honor them. Most of all, keep pushing for end-to-end encryption.

  • Digital Vigilantes Want to Shame DDoS Attackers And Their Corporate Enablers

    Hacker attacks that try to take down websites with a flood of bogus traffic, technically known as Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, have become a daily occurrence on the internet. The rise of DDoS has created a cottage industry of companies dedicated to mitigating the attacks, and, on the flip side, professional DDoS-for-hire services and gangs.

    Now, a group of security researchers wants to name and shame not only the hackers responsible for such crippling attacks, but also the internet providers and traffic carriers that enable them by turning a blind eye to their actions, with a project called SpoofIT.

  • Russia Drafting Law to Favor Open Source

    I wrote the original cyber-vulnerability letter to the White House in 1994, and instead of acting responsibly, the US Government allowed NSA -- with the active complicty of US communicaitons and computing provider CEOs -- to compromise all US offerings. Not only are the communications and computing devices and related consulting compromised, but so are larger offerings (e.g. Boeing aircraft, which come with a computer system pre-configured for US Government remote control take-over -- Lufthansa is reported to have discovered this and at great expense removed all US computers from every aircraft). NOTE: I am quite certain about both of the above indictments, but only a proper European Commission investigation can satisfy the public interest; I believe that the same problems infect C4I systems from China, France, Israel, and Russia, and I do not believe most people are aware that the electrical system is now easily used to enter computers that are nominally disconnected from the Internet.

  • Systemd vulnerability crashes Linux systems

    A new vulnerability has been discovered that could shut down most Linux systems using a command short enough to fit in a tweet.

Tizen in Africa

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Android Leftovers

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i.MX8 “eCockpit” SoC arrives, with media and IoT versions coming

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NXP unveiled its automotive i.MX8 Quad with four Cortex-A53 cores, two Cortex-M4F cores, and two GPUs. The QuadPlus and QuadMax add one and two -A72 cores.

Freescale teased its automotive i.MX8 family in 2015 before the company was acquired by NXP, a process that may have contributed to the SoC family’s delays. The first three i.MX8 models are now due to sample in Q1 2017, says NXP, which has already built a development kit for the SoC, shown farther below. In addition, plans have leaked for future i.MX8 models for multimedia and low-power IoT applications, including dual-core models (see farther below).

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LeEco Accidentally Reveals Phone, Android TV Lineup Ahead of U.S. Launch

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Chinese hardware upstart LeEco accidentally showed off key parts of its device lineup two weeks before the company is set to officially launch its US business Friday. The leak, which was first spotted by AndroidPolice, revealed two budget-phones as well as four different TV sets based on Google’s Android TV platform.

Product shots also show numerous LeEco-branded apps, suggesting that the company wants to use its devices to grow its entertainment services, much like it has done in China. A LeEco spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Read more

today's leftovers

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  • Plasma 5.8 LTS now available in KDE Neon

    KDE Neon, the newly popular distribution produced by KDE and Kubuntu developer Jonathan Riddell and based on Ubuntu is now available in version 5.8. The best part of this latest release? It includes the latest long term stable release of Plasma 5.8. You can get additional details about this release from Jonathan Riddell's blog.

  • KDE neon 5.8 Linux Distribution Arrives With Plasma 5.8 LTS Desktop
  • Wrapping up Outreachy

    Now that my time as an intern is over, I want to take a moment to thank Outreachy for giving me the opportunity to be a part of this amazing experience. Also a big thank you to my mentor Jim Hall and the GNOME design team (Allan and Jakub) for the guidance and encouragements they provided throughout these months. And finally, a thank you to GNOME community for being awesome ^_^

  • Linux Lite 3.2 Beta Released With Lite Desktop Widget

    The Linux Lite 3.2 Beta release has arrived for developer testing and to give an idea about the recent changes made to the Linux Lite distro. It now features a new Lite Desktop widget. The GRUB bootloader has been set to its default configuration which enables multibooting other operating systems alongside Linux Lite.

  • The Arch Terminal Desktop

    This linux desktop is an homage to one of our favorite distributions, Arch Linux-and reader KudalGadgil shared it with us in our desktop show and tell pool. Here's how you can get a similar look.

  • Insider Selling: Red Hat Inc. (RHT) EVP Sells 15,000 Shares of Stock
  • Desert Rotor’s Next Generation Drone Controller to Use Logic Supply's ML100 NUC

    Logic Supply informs Softpedia about a recent case study they're doing featuring drone control specialists Desert Rotor, a drone controller company that uses their ML100 industrial PC for its next-gen UAV control system.

    First, we'd like to inform the reader that Logic Supply is the leading industrial and embedded computer hardware manufacturer. The company is being known for creating some of the most powerful industrial products, from mini and rugged panel PCs and thin client computers to dust-resistant, fanless, and ventless units that can be used in virtualization and IoT (Internet of Things) markets, or other applications.

  • Samsung might soon be announcing a partnership with Mediatek

    It is no secret that Samsung uses Spreadtrum’s SOCs for most of its budget and mid range smartphones. Spreadtrum’s current best chip happens to be the SC9860- a 16nm process based 2GHz octacore 64 bit Cortex A53 SOC; these are chipset specifications from the yester-year and the technology is now moving into more powerful heterogeneous architectures involving ARM’s Cortex A73, A72 and A57 standards(and the low powered A53 cores for better battery efficiency). Now, this might not make any sense to a normal user. But over at Samsung, Spreadtrum’s slow development pace for its chips seems to be holding the Korean smartphone giant down from offering better (or more) midrange products.

Security Leftovers

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  • Promoting Cybersecurity Awareness

    We are happy to support National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM), a global effort between government and industry to ensure everyone has the resources they need to be safer, more secure and better able to protect their personal information online.

    We’ve talked about how cybersecurity is a shared responsibility, and that is the theme for National Cybersecurity Awareness Month – the Internet is a shared resource and securing it is our shared responsibility. This means technology companies, governments, and even users have to work together to protect and improve the security of the Internet. We all have to do our part to make the Internet safer and more secure for everyone. This is a time for all Internet users to Stop. Think. Connect. This month, and all year long, we want to help you be more “CyberAware.”

  • 'Security fatigue' is the worst thing to happen to people since insecurity

    CHANGING PASSWORDS is just too much for some people, according to research, and causes them to do stupid things.

    This is called 'security fatigue', apparently, and comes straight from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and a collection of clipboards and pens.

    "After updating your password for the umpteenth time, have you resorted to using one you know you'll remember because you've used it before? Have you ever given up on an online purchase because you just didn't feel like creating a new account?" asked NIST.

    "If you have done any of those things, it might be the result of ‘security fatigue'. It exposes online users to risk and costs businesses money in lost customers."

  • The new BYOD backlash hides an ulterior motive

    Recent research from IDC shows a clear picture: IT organizations are increasingly unhappy about BYOD and now want to curtail or end the practice.

    Their stated concern: The costs are too high and the savings too low. But those concerns are misguided and likely masking a secret agenda to regain control over mobile devices, not to save money. Face it: BYOD was never popular with IT.

Linux and Microsoft

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  • BIOS Problems and Solutions

    When Lenovo released the Yoga 900-13ISK2 it became apparent that Linux and BSD users could not rely on closed source BIOSes. Of course while it is rather naive to think that a Microsoft Signature Edition PC would be Linux friendly, one could hope that at least it would not be Linux or BSD hostile. On further analysis one can see that this is not the case, and any would-be Linux user is in for a very difficult time trying to load any operating system other than Windows 10.

    The exact reasons for this problem boil down to the inability of the BIOS to set Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) mode for the SSD. Now I knew long ago that closed source BIOSes could become a problem back in the mid-1990s. I've spent considerable time researching the ways one can obtain a computer with FOSS firmware.

    Before I go into the specifics of which computers actually have a BIOS with freely available source code allow me to recap some computer history. When we look at the original IBM PC BIOS we can see that it's been well analyzed and that no other operating systems have been locked out. In addition to this there was no way to alter the BIOS save for swapping out the BIOS chip and putting in a different one. So for several years people didn't give much thought to the BIOS, as long as their computer booted they could load whatever operating system they wanted, be it Unix, Minix, MS-DOS, CP/M, etc.

  • OCI Announces New Tools Projects and 1.0 Release Candidates

    With ContainerCon Europe currently underway in Berlin, we want to share some of the great progress the Open Container Initiative (OCI) has made.

    The OCI was launched with the express purpose of developing standards for the container format and runtime that will give everyone the ability to fully commit to container technologies today without worrying that their current choice of infrastructure, cloud provider or tooling will lock them in.

  • Never explain, never apologize: Microsoft silent on email server grief

    A tweak to Microsoft's cloud service has blocked a good number of people from accessing their messages.

    Specifically, the baffling and unannounced change affects users with connected accounts: these are email accounts hosted on third-party servers (such as a company's private server or an ISP's mail server) that are accessed via the cloud. People with this setup are no longer able to send or receive mail through Redmond's webmail service.

    Reg reader David Barrett, who runs an internet-facing server for his friends and a UK health charity, said the issue has left those users who run with outside mail systems unable to get their email for days now.

    "It happened around the end of last week/over the weekend and seems to have been a gradual rollout," he told us.

Leftovers: Software

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  • Xen & KVM Changes Line Up For Linux 4.9
  • Ramme is an Open-Source Instagram App for the Desktop

    Ubuntu Phone has an unofficial Instagram app called Instagraph, but (until now) there was no desktop client available for Ubuntu desktop.

    Although Instagram is (imo) best experienced through its official mobile apps, you can login and browse your feed via the Instagram website.

    But, next time you go to reach for your phone or open a new tab to browse your feed, try Ramme instead.

  • WhatsApp Version Free Download and Install Available for Ubuntu / Linux

    WhatsApp, the widely used free messaging system is now available on many platforms and operating systems. Previously, it was only available for the major platforms such as Android and iOS, but it has recently become available for ChromeOS – based devices like the Chromebooks and it seems to continue this trend of availability on as many platforms as possible.

  • Release 1.9.20

    The Wine Staging release 1.9.20 is now available.

  • Wine Staging 1.9.20 Comes Hot on the Heels of Wine 1.9.20 with More Improvements

    The Wine Staging development team announced recently the release and immediate availability of the Wine Staging 1.9.20 maintenance update for GNU/Linux operating systems.

    Coming hot on the heels of the Wine 1.9.20 development release, which brought reimplementation of the clipboard API (Application Programming Interface), message handling in WebServices component, multiple new API Set libraries, as well as a bunch of bug fixes, Wine Staging 1.9.20 adds some improvements on its own end.

today's howtos

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  • A New Mental Model for Computers and Networks
  • Securing the Cyrus SASL Sample Server and Client with Kerberos
  • Deploy containers with Atomic Host, Ansible, and Cockpit

    In the course of my job at Red Hat, I work with Docker containers on Fedora Atomic host every day. The Atomic Host from Project Atomic is a lightweight container OS that can run Linux containers in Docker format. It’s been modified for efficiency, making it optimal to use as a Docker run-time system for cloud environments.

    Fortunately I’ve found a great way to manage containers running on the host: Cockpit. Cockpit is a remote manager for GNU/Linux servers with a nice Web UI. It lets me manage servers and containers running on the host. You can read more about Cockpit in this overview article previously published here. However, I also wanted to automate running containers on the host, which I’ve done using Ansible.

    Note that we cannot use the dnf command on the Atomic Host. The host is designed not as a general purpose OS, but to be more fit for containers and other purposes. But it’s still very easy to set up applications and services on the Atomic Host. This post shows you how to automate and simplify this process.

Leftovers: Debian

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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  • Google Releases Indoor Mapping Tool to Open-Source Community

    Cartographer, which Google initially used internally only, enables real-time mapping inside buildings, the company says.
    Like it often does, Google has released into the open-source community an indoor mapping tool called Cartographer that it has used internally.

    Cartographer is designed to enable what is known as real-time simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM)—or the ability to build a 2D or 3D map while at the same time keeping track of an individual or robotic agent's location within that map.

    The algorithms used in SLAM combine data from various sensors such as Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems and cameras to determine the position of an object within an environment and to map that environment.

  • Open Source Explained in Less Than Three Minutes

    Free Code Camp is an organization that teaches people to code. As part of this free training, student coders produce free code needed by nonprofit organizations. Free Code Camp doesn’t accept donations, but you can support them by buying t-shirts, hoodies and audiobooks through their store.

  • Why I hate (all) software

    This article will be about OTRS, a ticket system we're using at the FSFE for handling things like swag orders, internship applications and so on. But it could actually be about any software. OTRS just happened to be in the line of fire this time.

    This will be an example in how to (not) manage user expectations. You may know the principle of least astonishment, and this will be a typical example of where it fails. The problem is in how a program communicates (or fails to communicate) to the user what it will do based on some input.

    The design principle of least astonishment simply means you should aim for designing your software in a way that what the user expects should happen when performing a certain operation, should also happen. If something else happens, that's bad design.

  • FreeBSD 11 Is Still Being Respun & Tested, Hope To Release Next Week

    Last week news came out that the FreeBSD 11.0 release wasn't going to happen as planned but it needed to be respun due to security issues. The release was supposed to happen on 3 October, but three days later we find out it needed to be re-spun again and is still going through testing.

  • An even more distributed ActivityPub

    So ActivityPub is nearing Candidate Recommendation status. If you want to hear a lot more about that whole process of getting there, and my recent trip to TPAC, and more, I wrote a post on the MediaGoblin blog about it.

    Last night my brother Stephen came over and he was talking about how he wished ActivityPub was more of a "transactional" system. I've been thinking about this myself. ActivityPub as it is designed is made for the social network of 2014 more or less: trying to reproduce what the silos do, which is mutate a big database for specific objects, but reproduce that in a distributed way. Well, mutating distributed systems is a bit risky. Can we do better, without throwing out the majority of the system? I think it's possible, with a couple of tweaks.

  • Register now for LibrePlanet 2017: "The Roots of Freedom" March 25-26, 2017 in Boston, MA
  • FSFE Newsletter - October 2016

    We're still not over how cool it was to see so many from our community join the FSFE Summit in September. It was a good experience and we're keen to repeat it. One of the highlights was the ending keynote where Julia Reda called out proprietary software as a threat to democracy. Be sure to view the keynote and some of the other talks from the Summit, either on our YouTube channel, or from our download server where you can get the available videos in webm format.

    We also celebrated the FSFE's 15th birthday in C-Base with a ceremony where we honored many of our local heroes from around Europe. C-Base has kindly provided a recording of the ceremony if you're interested in hearing the story of some of our heroes, all of whom you can find working in one of the FSFE's teams today.

  • Russian government ponders open source purchasing preference

    Open code with Russian services preferred, unless good excuses can be found

  • Tips for building your own maker workspace

    I firmly believe that in the absence of any intentional organizational strategy a person's workspace becomes a reflection of their mind. Like bits of knowledge stored in the brain, tools and assets instinctively find themselves organized in a way that feels right to the individual.

    If this holds true, it stands to reason that, more often than not, our workspaces are always naturally trending away from being tidy and highly-functional. At this point, the odds are good that I'm just trying to rationalize why my office is an unmitigated disaster most of the time, but since you've made it this far, let's make one more assumption: No two people are exactly alike, therefore no two workspaces are exactly alike.

    With this assertion firmly in place, I'd like to share a few things I've implemented for creating my workspace that have worked well for my brain. Your workspace will look different, but the practices I chose to follow here can be used for anyone looking to match their setup to their brain.

  • PHPUnit 5.6

    RPM of PHPUnit version 5.6 are available in remi repository for Fedorra ≥ 22 and for Enterprise Linux (CentOS, RHEL...).

Linux Kernel News

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  • Systemd Now Supports The RISC-V CPU Architecture
  • Persistent Memory Was A Popular Topic At This Week's LinuxCon Europe

    With Intel's 3D Xpoint Optane technology beginning to appear as extremely fast non-volatile memory and other advancing efforts in the NVDIMM space like ReRAM, persistent memory was a popular topic at this week's LinuxCon Europe event in Berlin.

    Persistent memory is about non-volatime memory that retains data while being DMA-capable and offer memory-like performance. There's been a lot of work building up in this space from libraries supporting it to DAX (Direct Access) support in Linux file-systems for use on persistent memory. Several presentations were done this week about the latest tech and Linux support for it.

  • Linux 4.9: F2FS Gets Performance Enhancements, EXT4 Gets Fixes

    The F2FS (Flash-Friendly File-System) and EXT4 file-system feature updates have been sent in for the Linux 4.9 merge window.

  • Intel Integrated Sensor Hub (ISH) Support In Linux 4.9 Kernel

    The Intel Integrated Sensor Hub (ISH) is supported in the Linux 4.9 kernel code for benefiting Cherrytrail mobile/convertible/ultrabook hardware and newer.

    The Intel ISH is an on-package sensor hub used on some systems in place of external sensor hubs. The ISH provides sensors like detecting device rotation, automatic backlight adjustment, and can also be responsible for some low-power sleep states. This is for Cherrytrail and newer, including some Skylake notebooks.

  • The State & Future Of Linux Power Management (2016)

Linux Graphics

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Some Myths About Linux That Cause New Users To Run Away From Linux

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Yes! You read right. While the world is realizing the power of Linux, on the other hand there are also people who are often found debating in the communities like, Reddit about how bad Linux is due to several problems. Several issues that are raised are actually myths about Linux. So here is a try from LinuxAndUbuntu to cover and clear some of the most talked Linux myths.

Read<br />

Games for GNU/Linux

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Why public libraries need to support open source

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People turn to public libraries for answers, and a lot of times libraries are superb at providing them. But when it comes to providing answers about open source, libraries have an uneven track record.

What can we do to make this better so that more people can turn to their public library to learn about open source software, hardware, and principles?

Right now, if you walked into my public library and pelted me with questions about open source—like, "What is it?" "How does it work?" "How can I use open source?"—I'd rattle off answers so fast you'd be walking out with a new tool or technology under your belt. Open source is a big world, so of course there are some things I don't know, but guess what? We have the Internet and books right at our finger tips. Saying that you don't know the answer is fine, and patrons will respect you for it. The key is helping them find the answer.

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More in Tux Machines

Yocto driven camera design taps octa-core Snapdragon

Qualcomm and Thundercomm unveiled a Linux-supported, 4K camera reference design with an octa-core Snapdragon 625 and video analytics software. Qualcomm and hardware partner Thundercomm Technology announced an IP Connected Camera reference design called the Snapdragon 625 IP Camera built around its 14nm-fabricated, octa-core Cortex-A53 Snapdragon 625 system-on-chip. This is Qualcomm’s first Connected Camera design to support Linux instead of Android. Read more

Renesas spins 3rd Gen automotive starter kits, adds new M3 SoC

Renesas has launched two Linux-ready R-Car starter kits optimized for AGL and GENIVI: an R-Car H3 based “Premier” and a “Pro” with a lower-end M3 SoC. Later this month, Renesas will begin selling two third-generation starter kits for its 64-bit ARM-based R-Car automotive SoCs. The kits are designed for ADAS, infotainment, reconfigurable digital clusters, and integrated digital cockpits. The two kits are optimized for open source Linux standards like Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) and GENIVI, but they also support QNX. Earlier R-Car automotive starter kits include last year’s R-Car H2 ADAS Starter Kit, based on its earlier H2 automotive SoC. Read more

Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released

The BSD-focused, Qt-powered Lumina Desktop Environment is out with its version 1.1 update. The developers behind the Lumina Desktop Environment consider it a "significant update" with both new and reworked utilities, infrastructure improvements, and other enhancements. Lumina 1.1 adds a pure Qt5 calculator, text editor improvements, the file manager has been completely overhauled, system application list management is much improved, and there is a range of other improvements. Read more

Radeon vs. Nouveau Open-Source Drivers On Mesa Git + Linux 4.9

For your viewing pleasure this Friday are some open-source AMD vs. NVIDIA numbers when using the latest open-source code on each side. Linux 4.9-rc1 was used while Ubuntu 16.10 paired with the Padoka PPA led to Mesa Git as of earlier this week plus LLVM 4.0 SVN. As covered recently, there are no Nouveau driver changes for Linux 4.9 while we had hoped the boost patches would land. Thus the re-clocking is still quite poor for this open-source NVIDIA driver stack. For the Nouveau tests I manually re-clocked each graphics card to the highest performance state (0f) after first re-clocking the cards to the 0a performance state for helping some of the GPUs that otherwise fail with memory re-clocking at 0f, as Nouveau developers have expressed this is the preferred approach for testing. Read more