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Monday, 27 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:22pm
Story GNOME News: GNOME 3.24, Vala, and GNOME Shell Extensions Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:19pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:16pm
Story New/Imminent Releases: Black Lab Linux, Exton|Defender, Mageia Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 3:15pm
Story 5 Signs That Show You’re a Linux Geek Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 2:47pm
Story Top 5 best rising Linux distros in 2017 Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 1:08pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 12:37pm
Story Hands-on: New PCLinuxOS installation images Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 12:34pm
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 12:28pm
Story budgie-remix 16.04.2 Comes Equipped with the HWE Kernel from Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2017 - 12:19pm

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Video: State of Linux Containers

    In this video from the 2017 HPC Advisory Council Stanford Conference, Christian Kniep from Gaikai presents: Best Practices: State of Linux Containers.

  • Telegram on Mobile and openSUSE

    Small Messaging Service, or SMS, is a very common and popular way to communicate today. It is a convenient way to transmit a short message. It has seemingly evolved into a way to carry on conversations throughout the day… but it is so 2007...

    [...]

    Privacy: The people behind Telegram are not making money off of your data and take privacy quite seriously. They have received a “generous donation” by an individual and have quite enough money for the time being. Maybe eventually they will have a paid service but not now.

  • NixNote An Unofficial Evernote Client For Linux/Ubuntu/Fedora

    Evernote is arguably the most popular and powerful note-taking tool available. You can save notes in different forms like text, pictures, videos, voice memos and web pages. There are clients available for the web, desktop operating systems (Windows and Mac) as well as mobile devices (Android and iOS) but none for the Linux desktop. There are a few third-party options available including GeekNote, Everpad and NixNote.

  • After a Year in Development, Parole Media Player 0.9 Arrives with New Mini Mode
  • Ardour 5.6 Open-Source DAW Improves Unloading of Large Sessions, Adds Many Fixes

    A new important update of the Ardour open-source and cross-platform DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) software has been released this past weekend for Linux-based operating systems, as well as macOS and Microsoft Windows platforms.

    Ardour 5.6 comes two months after the release of the previous version, and it looks like it's yet another big update implementing numerous improvements and fixing some of those nasty bugs reported by users lately. For example, the transport bar has been greatly revamped to use space more effectively and efficiently, and there's a new design that allows for session navigation while the Mixer tab is in use.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.31 Adds Qt 5.8 Support for C++ Highlighting, over 70 Bug Fixes

    KDE announced this weekend the general availability of the monthly maintenance update to their open-source KDE Frameworks project, a collection of over 70 add-on libraries for Qt 5 providing common functionality for many KDE apps.

    KDE Frameworks 5.31.0 is here with a total of 72 changes across most of its components, including Attica, which now supports display_name in categories, the Breeze icons, the framework integration, as well as KArchive archive manager and KAuth.

  • Kdenlive 16.12.2 Open-Source Video Editor Released with GPU Improvements, More

    Now that the second maintenance update to the KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for KDE Plasma desktops arrived, it's time for the Kdenlive developers to tell us all about the new features implemented in Kdenlive 16.12.2.

    >From the release notes, it looks like Kdenlive 16.12.2 is a small bugfix release adding a total of 20 changes, as the development team is currently concentrating all of their efforts on the refactoring of the timeline with its highly anticipated professional-grade feature and an extra layer of stability.

  • Canonical Now Offers Mesa 13.0.4 for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 in a PPA

    As we reported earlier this week, the soon-to-be-released Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system won't ship with the latest Mesa 13.0.x 3D Graphics Library, but with Mesa 12.0.6.

    If you're reading our previous report, we've provided users with detailed instructions on how to upgrade their Mesa graphics stack from version 12.0.6 to 13.0.4, but it now looks like Canonical's Timo Aaltonen has prepared a PPA (Personal Package Archive) for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 with Mesa 13.0.4.

CRUX 3.3 Linux Operating System Released with Linux 4.9.6, X.Org Server 1.19.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After being in development since the end of 2015, the CRUX 3.3 open-source Linux-based operating system has been released this past weekend, and it's now available for download.

Shipping with a multilib toolchain consisting of the Glibc (GNU C Library) 2.24, GNU Binutils 2.27, and GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6.3.0, CRUX 3.3 is powered by a kernel from the long-term supported and most advanced Linux 4.9 kernel branch, namely Linux kernel 4.9.6, and an updated graphics stack based on X.Org 7.7 and X.Org Server 1.19.1. Some important libraries have also been updated in CRUX 3.3.

Read more

Also: Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15r1 Release Notes

Linux Release Delay

Filed under
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds decides world doesn't need a new Linux today

    Those waiting for the milestone that would have been version 4.10 of the Linux kernel have another week to wait, after Linus Torvalds decided not to release the final version this week.

    “Hey, it's another week, and I could have released the final 4.10,” Torvalds posted to the Linux Kernel Mailing List, adding that “... I wouldn't have felt bad about just doing the final release today.”

  • Ten Exciting Features Of The Linux 4.10 Kernel

    The Linux 4.10 kernel didn't end up being released today, but was pushed back by an extra week. However, in looking forward to next weekend, here are ten of the features that excite us about Linux 4.10.

The Best Operating System for Linux Gaming: Which One Do You Use and Why?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

In the last few months, we tried multiple GNU/Linux distributions for gaming purposes, and we have arrived at the conclusion that there's no perfect operating system out there designed for Linux gaming.

We all know that the world of gaming is split between Nvidia and AMD users. Now, if you're using a Nvidia graphics card, even one from five years ago, chances are it's supported on most Linux-based operating systems because Nvidia provides up-to-date video drivers for most, if not all of its GPUs.

Read more

ToaruOS 1.0 Released, Hobby OS/Kernel Written From Scratch Over 6+ Years

Filed under
OS

In the past on Phoronix we have mentioned ToaruOS a few times. It's a "hobby" kernel and operating system written mostly from scratch yet supports Mesa, GCC, Python, and more. It's been in development since 2011 while now the operating system's 1.0 release finally took place.

The ToaruOS developer wrote in about the Toaru 1.0 release that took place at the end of January. He wrote, "After six years of development, I am very happy to finally announce the 1.0 release of ToaruOS. While I would not consider this "complete" - there is still much work to be done - it is time to refocus my development, and with that comes the time to declare a stable release. ToaruOS 1.0 has been the result of over half a decade of effort, with contributions from a dozen people besides myself."

Read more

Linux poll results: And the winners are...

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Slackware!? Yes, one of the oldest of Linux distributions won with just over 16 percent of the vote.

If that sounds a little odd, it is. On DistroWatch, a site that covers Linux distributions like paint, the top Linux desktop distros are Mint, Debian, Ubuntu, openSUSE, and Manjaro. Slackware comes in 28th place.

So why the discrepancy? With more than double the votes for any category, it appears there was vote-stuffing by Slackware fans.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • 'The Dweller' is a short and minimalistic but incredibly fun and solid puzzler that I highly recommend

    The Dweller is one of those obscure games that for some reason, despite being well made and original they pass completely unnoticed under the radar, and once you finally play them you not only feel you've spent a couple of hours on a worthy title, but also the fact itself of finding them is totally rewarding.

  • Gunmetal Arcadia released with same-day Linux support

    With so many releases lately, it’s a little hard to keep up with things sometimes. J. Kyle Pittman, creator of Super Win the Game, released his latest game earlier in the week and it combines colorful retro visuals with tightly precise gameplay.

  • Typoman: Revised released for Linux, a puzzle platformer with some word puzzling mixed in

    An indie puzzle platformer, where you must control the world around you with words, by the name of Typoman: Revised has made its way onto Linux via Steam.

    Typoman: Revised is a quite interesting puzzle platformer, where you control a character in a dark and dangerous world. To survive you need to rely on your ability to change the world around you by organizing letters you find into words, which have a physical effect on various aspects of the environment. For example, you can turn on various machinery by forming the word ”ON” or drop down a ladder by forming the word ”DOWN”. Finding the right letters and then figuring out which exact word will help you in any given scenario is fundamentally part of the puzzles.

Benchmark on Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • New Users Panel

    The GNOME Control Center redesign goes on. This release we are happy to announce the new Users Panel design. As you can see in the preview video below, we are moving away from a two column panel into a single page concept. These changes make the panel way clearer specially with the new shell.

  • Google Code In at coala

    We have always been active in engaging newcomers and teaching people about Open Source. It is only natural that we think and work towards helping pupils all over the world take this step and learn about contributing to open source. (If you are a teacher and reading this, reach out to us on coala.io/chat – we’re very interested in working with you and are also starting an initiative in germany to connect to schools.)

  • Recipes by mail

    Since I last wrote about GNOME recipes, we’ve mainly focused on completing our feature set for 3.24.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Oracle refuses to accept pro-Google “fair use” verdict in API battle

    Google successfully made its case to a jury last year that its use of Java APIs in Android was "fair use." A San Francisco federal jury rejected Oracle's claim that the mobile system infringed Oracle's copyrights.

    But Oracle isn't backing down. Late Friday, the company appealed the high-profile verdict to a federal appeals court.

    This is the latest stage of a seemingly never-ending legal battle over intellectual property that began in 2010. The conflict has meandered through two federal trials, in addition to multiple trips to the appellate courts and to the Supreme Court.

  • Most Successful Launch in History. Fastest Ever to 1 Billion Dollars. Fastest EVER. Mobile Is the Magical Money-Making Machine. I am talking about Pokemon Go of course

    Lets talk Pokemon Go. Mobile is the Magical Money-Making Machine. It is LITERALLY the fastest way to make money on the planet. The richest company in human history was on the brink of bankruptcy three decades ago. Then it discovered mobile. The second most valuable company in human history was a clueless internet search engine that said quite openly, we don't know how we'll make money but we'll figure it out. They found mobile. And the fastest ever company to become one of the 5 richest in the world, was also lost in its core business struggling to make money with social media. Then it discovered mobile. The secret sauce to why Apple, Google and Facebook are so filthy rich and profitable and valuable, they don't know what to do with their money - the secret is, Mobile. Mobile is the Magical Money-Making Machine! I should know, I literally wrote the book on how this industry makes its money (15 years ago, M-Profits, my second global bestseller, was translated and into multiple printings).

  • Google hints at Assistant coming to existing Android devices
  • Why You Shouldn’t Root Your Android Phone
  • Must read: top 10 Android stories

Linux 4.10-rc8

Filed under
Linux

Hey, it's another week, and I could have released the final 4.10.

It's not been all that busy, although we did have a number of small
last-minute regression fixes (some just reverting stuff that caused
problems and needed more thought, others fixing things). But nothing
out of the ordinary, and I wouldn't have felt bad about just doing the
final release today.

But I decided that there's also no huge overriding reason to do so
(other than getting back to the usual "rc7 is the last rc" schedule,
which would have been nice), and with travel coming up, I decided that
I didn't really need to open the merge window. I've done merge windows
during travel before, but I just prefer not to. If it was the second
week of the merge window when the big bulk of stuff had been merged,
that would be one thing, but that's not how the schedule turned out.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.10-rc8 Kernel Released, Final Pushed Out By One Week

Linux Kernel 4.10 Delayed by a Week, Last Release Candidate Is Now Available

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vulkan 1.0.40 Released With Fixes, SMPTE 2086 HDR Metadata Support
  • Intel's Linux Graphics Driver To Enable Atomic Support By Default

    The patch landed in Intel's drm-intel-next-queued branch this week for enabling atomic support by default on the hardware platforms where it's fully supported.

    Following this mailing list discussion, atomic support is now being turned on by default for the Intel Linux DRM driver while it's disabled-by-default support has been in good shape since Linux ~4.9. Though due to the timing of this change-over, this looks like it will be a change for Linux 4.12 as Intel's 4.11 DRM feature work is already over with the 4.11 merge window being imminent.

  • X.Org Server 1.20 Breaks The Video Driver ABI

    Just a quick note for anyone who routinely builds the latest X.Org Server from Git, the video driver ABI has been broken again, thus you'll need to rebuild your dependent DDX drivers assuming they have been modified for this new ABI.

Leftovers: Software (Ardour 5.6, Parole 0.9 and More)

Filed under
Software
  • Ardour 5.6 released

    Another two months of development has rolled by, involving more than 600 commits by developers, and it's time for us to release Ardour 5.6. Although there are no major new features in this release, there is the usual list of dozens of bug fixes major and minor, plus some workflow and GUI enhancements. There has been a significant rearrangement of the transport bar to try to use space more efficiently and effectively. The new design also permits session navigation while using the Mixer tab, and there are numerous optionally visible elements. Similarly, the Preferences dialog was rearranged to try to make it easier to find and browse the many, many available options. Other interesting new features: session archiving, a new General MIDI default synth for MIDI tracks, and direct and immediate control of routing for heavily multichannel (typically multitimbral) synth plugins.

  • Ardour 5.6 Digital Audio Workstation Released

    Available this weekend is the newest release of the Ardour digital audio workstation software for Linux, macOS, and Windows.

    Ardour 5.6 features some speed-up improvements in different areas, a mini-timeline was added to the toolbar, there's the ability to archive a session, various editor improvements, restored save-as support to work as intended, and more. There are also action/binding changes, scripting improvements, plugin improvements, and a wide-range of fixes.

  • Roundup of Recent App Updates: Harmony, Komorebi, Alduin

    Time for our weekly round up of recent app updates that weren’t quite big enough to merit their own dedicated post

    If you’re averse to Electron apps you’re advised to look away now. If an app you love got an update this week chances are it’s because we didn’t know about it, rather than we hate the app.

  • Xfce’s Parole Media Player Gets First Update In Over a Year

    Parole 0.9.0 brings a number of new features to Linux desktops, including a new mini-mode, working ‘play’ and ‘replay’ icons in the content area, and the window title and content title show the filename if no corresponding ID3 tag is detected.

  • Xfce Parole Media Player 0.9 Released

    Xfce developers have restored work on their Parole Media Player as the primary media player for this lightweight desktop environment.

  • Write Markdown with 8 Exceptional Open Source Editors

    By way of a succinct introduction, Markdown is a lightweight plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber together with Aaron Swartz. Markdown offers individuals “to write using an easy-to-read, easy-to-write plain text format, then convert it to structurally valid XHTML (or HTML)”. Markdown’s syntax consists of easy to remember symbols. It has a gentle learning curve; you can literally learn the Markdown syntax in the time it takes to fry some mushrooms (that’s about 10 minutes). By keeping the syntax as simple as possible, the risk of errors is minimized. Besides being a friendly syntax, it has the virtue of producing clean and valid (X)HTML output. If you have seen my HTML, you would know that’s pretty essential.

5 Linux Music Players You Should Consider Switching To

Filed under
Software

There are dozens of Linux music players out there, and this makes it difficult to find the best one for our usage. In the past we’ve reviewed some of these players, such as Cantata, Exaile, or even the lesser known ones like Clementine, Nightingale and Quod Libet.

In this article I will be covering more music players for Linux that in some aspects are even better than the ones we’ve already told you about.

Read more

Samsung’s Chromebook Pro gives me hope in Chrome OS—thanks to Android’s help

Filed under
Android
Reviews

The market is about to be flooded with a new wave of Chromebooks, all focused on Android apps. Chrome OS and Android were always meant for different devices, but now OEMs are making Chromebooks that can deliver the best of both worlds. Google's Play Store has already come to some older Chromebooks, but Samsung's new Chromebook Plus and Pro models are the first that explicitly play up their Android compatibility.

These devices follow in the footsteps of the Asus Chromebook Flip, which was the first Chrome OS two-in-one back when the operating system didn't really lend itself to that type of hardware design. Now a convertible design is apt to run Chrome OS and Android apps on the same system, but this union of operating systems isn't perfect yet.

Read more

An Everyday Linux User Review Of Fedora 25 - Oh No, So Many Problems

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

So where does that leave us?

I have always loved Fedora but I love music more and the amount of hassle and the amount of hoops I have had to jump through to try and get it working this time is just not worth the effort. The Google Chrome thing is also an issue for me. It works fine in openSUSE so why is it not working in Fedora?

Wayland seems to be performing well enough and I haven't experienced any problems that seem to be related to the graphical side of things.

Unfortunately I have witnessed far too many errors, notifications, application crashes and general pointless pain to be able to recommend Fedora 25. Fedora 23 worked great, 25 doesn't.

I recommend either CentOS or openSUSE for now.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • "elementary OS Pay-What-You-Want App Store" - Lunduke Hour - Feb 8, 2017
  • Podcast Season 5 Episode 2

    In this episode: We’ve got a live recording from FOSDEM (thanks Mike!), lots of news, lots of Finds and an awesome Voice of the Masses.

  • Intel's Atom C2000 chips are bricking products – and it's not just Cisco hit

    Intel's Atom C2000 processor family has a fault that effectively bricks devices, costing the company a significant amount of money to correct. But the semiconductor giant won't disclose precisely how many chips are affected nor which products are at risk.

    On its Q4 2016 earnings call earlier this month, chief financial officer Robert Swan said a product issue limited profitability during the quarter, forcing the biz to set aside a pot of cash to deal with the problem.

  • PSA: Intel Atom C2000 Chips Flaw Bricking Routers/NAS/Firewall devices that are powered by Linux, pfSense and FreeNAS
  • Bored with ho-hum cloud backups? Use Usenet (yes, Usenet!) instead

    Cloud backups these days are all the rage—for good reason. Rather than dealing with shuffling physical media offsite, you can simply back up the data offsite, where it can be stored in one of many professionally monitored data centers.

    Unfortunately, this kind of service isn’t free, and the cost can be a barrier. However, there is a cost-effective way to store your cloud backups: Usenet. With access to a Usenet news server, you can simply upload your backup there, and it will be stored redundantly in news servers all over the world. Best of all, this approach typically costs considerably less than a cloud backup service.

  • Intel Core i3 2100 Sandy Bridge vs. Core i3 7100 Kabylake Performance

    As a reminder, the Core i3 7100 is a dual-core processor with Hyper Threading, has a 3.9GHz base frequency (no Turbo Boost), 3MB Cache, HD Graphics 630 @ 1.1GHz, and a 51 Watt TDP. The Core i3 2100 from the start of 2011 was a dual-core with Hyper Threading too and a 3MB cache but only a 3.1GHz clock frequency and HD Graphics 2000 running @ 1.1GHz. The i3-2100 CPU had a 65 Watt TDP for this 32nm CPU compared to the i3-7100 being on a 14nm process and TDP of just 51 Watts.

  • [Cacti] Release Notes - 1.0.0
  • Dark Adwaita and HighContrast Themes for Qt

    One of our goals for Fedora Workstation is to run Qt applications in GNOME as seamlessly as possible. Their look should be as close to their GTK+ counterparts as possible, you shouldn’t have to set things on two different places just to make the change in both GTK+ and Qt applications.

  • Accelerated compositing in WebKitGTK+ 2.14.4

    WebKitGTK+ 2.14 release was very exciting for us, it finally introduced the threaded compositor to drastically improve the accelerated compositing performance. However, the threaded compositor imposed the accelerated compositing to be always enabled, even for non-accelerated contents. Unfortunately, this caused different kind of problems to several people, and proved that we are not ready to render everything with OpenGL yet.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2017/06

    This week we managed to get out 7 snapshots – I am going to review the snapshots {0203..0209}.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Linux Devices

  • AsteroidOS 1.0 Alpha on the Asus Zenwatch 3
    In a previous article, I published a small userspace image and Linux kernel for the Zenwatch 3 that enables root access with SSH over USB on the watch. By now, I reached my initial goal to get AsteroidOS, the alternative Android Wear operating system, running on the Zenwatch 3. Similar to SailfishOS and Ubuntu Touch, AsteroidOS uses the original Android kernel - a patched Linux kernel - with a GNU/Linux userspace that, in turn, also uses some of the original, closed-source Android libraries to access certain hardware like the GPU. As the Android libraries expect a different software ecosystem, e.g., a different C library called bionic, we cannot simply call the Android libraries from within a common GNU/Linux application. Instead, we need an additional software layer that translates between the Android and the common GNU/Linux world. This layer is called libhybris.
  • How Ironic: Harman Kardon’s Microsoft Cortana Speaker Is Powered by Linux
    Harman Kardon, the company recently acquired by Samsung, has developed its very own Cortana speaker, which is very similar to the Amazon Echo but featuring Microsoft’s famous digital assistant. And since Cortana is the key feature of this little device, it only makes sense for Harman Kardon to turn to Windows 10 to power the device. And yet, it looks like the so-called Harman Kardon is actually running Linux.
  • MontaVista® Launches Carrier Grade eXpress®(CGX) 2.2 Linux® for 5G and IoT at MWC 2017
  • The Numbers Article for Mobile in 2017 - All the Statistics You Could Ask For
    Mobile is the hottest industry. Banking and payments are rushing to mobile. Governments doing healthcare and education with mobile. Travel from airlines to taxis to trains and busses to hotel bookings is going mobile. Your driver's licence is migrating to the mobile phone as are your keys to your home. And all the other big tech stories from Internet of Things (IoT) to 'Big Data' analytics to Cloud computing - are all dependent on mobile. And next week we have the massive industry event in Barcelona, Mobile World Congress. My brand new TomiAhonen Almanac 2017 is now finished and is released today. So this is the perfect time to do my annual 'State of Mobile' blog of the major statistics. What are the big numbers. Lets start with reach. Yes, mobile is by far the most widely-spread communication technology humankind has ever witnessed.
  • Tizen Store Expands Its Service Coverage to 222 Countries
    The Tizen Store, as the name suggests, is the Tizen Application Store for developers to publish their free and paid for Tizen apps. In April 2015, we saw the store expand it’s coverage to include 182 countries, which was mainly for FREE apps, but we saw this as setting the foundation for providing paid for apps further down the road.

Android Leftovers