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Monday, 02 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 10:19am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 10:16am
Story Thunderbird's fate Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 10:16am
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 10:15am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 10:14am
Story Leftovers: More BSD Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 10:13am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 10:12am
Story Distro Choices Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 8:56am
Story elementary OS 0.3.2 "Freya" review Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 8:55am
Story Should MS Buy Canonical, No Year of Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2016 - 8:46am

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • The Operating System is the Target

    Abstracting the OS away isn't inherently bad. Writing a program to run across multiple OS's will need to unify the semantics of each system somehow. But making more use of the OS where appropriate can simplify a program while making it more robust and debuggable. OS's already provide a wide range of tools to inspect what they are doing and by using the OS you get that introspection for free. Maybe next time you see yourself writing a service or tool, take a moment and see where the OS might be able to help you solve it.

  • Learn Git and GitHub Through Videos

    These days, GitHub is pretty much the warehouse district where nearly all open source projects are stored and maintained. There are some tricks to navigating the site, which can easily be mastered by watching tutorial videos.

  • 11 resources for teaching and learning Python

    If you're looking to teach, tutor, or mentor beginning programmers, you've got your work cut out for you. Different learning styles, varying levels of knowledge, and a subject area that's a moving target all conspire to see you run ragged as an instructor. Luckily, there is help available—lots of help. It comes in the form of open source textbooks, tools, and even games—all created to make being a teacher (and a learner) easier than ever before.

Raspberry Pi 3 review: The revolutionary $35 mini-PC cures its biggest headaches

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

At first blush, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B appears physically identical to the year-old Raspberry Pi 2 Model B: the same port selection, the same GPIO pin layout, the same basic board layout, et cetera. But don’t let that fool you! The leap to the Raspberry Pi 3 is just as significant as the prior upgrade, supercharging performance even further and eliminating what few lingering setup hassles remained in the Raspberry Pi formula, all while maintaining the same dirt-cheap $35 price point.

Read more

Also: Arduino compatible IoT board offers LoRa wireless

Firebird 3.0 is released

Filed under
OSS

Firebird Project is happy to announce general availability of Firebird 3.0 — the latest major release of the Firebird relational database.

The primary goals for Firebird 3.0 were to unify the server architecture and to improve support for SMP and multiple-core hardware platforms. Parallel objectives were to improve threading of engine processes and the options for sharing page cache across thread and connection boundaries.

Read more

Also: Weekly phpMyAdmin contributions 2016-W15

DragonFly BSD 4.4.3 Point Release Brings OpenSSL 1.0.1s, Intel Skylake Support

Filed under
BSD

Not a GNU/Linux operating system but DragonFly BSD is one of the most appreciated BSD distributions out there, so today we're informing you about the release of DragonFly BSD 4.4.3.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Xubuntu 16.04 LTS Default Wallpapers Revealed Ahead of the April 21st Launch

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Xubuntu team has announced earlier the winners of the Xubuntu 16.04 wallpaper contest that took place over the last few weeks, which basically means that they've revealed the default wallpapers for the Xenial release.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu SDK IDE and DevKit Officially Released for Ubuntu 16.04, Built on Qt 5.6

Fedora 24 Beta Freeze Now in Effect, to Be Seeded to Public Testers on May 3

Filed under
Red Hat

The development cycle of the upcoming Fedora 24 Linux operating system continues at a fast pace, and Fedora Project's Dennis Gilmore just announced today, April 19, 2016, two important milestones in the release schedule of the GNU/Linux distribution.

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Linux For All (LFA) Distro Brings Fluxbox WM and Cairo-Dock to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton today, April 19, 2016, informs us about the immediate availability of a new build of his Linux for All (LFA) Live Linux kernel-based operating system.

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Audio over HDMI comes to Intel Cherry Trail PCs running Linux

Filed under
Linux

Computers with Intel Atom Cherry Trail processors generally offer better performance than models with older Bay Trail chips. For example, the 2nd-gen Intel Compute Stick with an Atom x5-Z8300 outperformed the 1st-gen model with an Atom Z3735F chip in pretty much every CPU and graphics speed test I could throw at it.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Getting FOSS Text-to-Speech App Ready for Prime Time

Filed under
OSS

It’s been a while now since we talked about creating a front end GUI to the open source text-to-speech program, MaryTTS. I have a personal stake in this, as I lost my larynx, and thus my voice, due to throat cancer.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.6.3 Desktop Environment Released Patches a KWin Crash, Fixes Bugs

Filed under
KDE

Today, April 19, 2016, KDE announced the immediate availability of the third maintenance release in the stable KDE Plasma 5.6 series of the popular desktop environment used in numerous GNU/Linux operating systems by default.

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming (Tomb Raider, Super Cane Magic ZERO, Duskers)

Filed under
Gaming

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Linux Foundation News

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Foundation’s Jim Zemlin keynote speaker at ITS America 2016

    Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation, will take centre stage at ITS America 2016 San Jose on Tuesday, 14 June as the keynote speaker for day two of the event, The Infrastructure of Things.

  • Companies That Support Linux: CoSoSys

    CoSoSys develops data-loss prevention products for computers and mobile devices that access and store sensitive data. The company’s Endpoint Protector 4 features device control to manage Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux machines.

    Recently, CoSoSys joined The Linux Foundation and released a private beta version of Data Loss Prevention for Linux, which is available upon request for Ubuntu, openSUSE, CentOS, and Red Hat. The company is also investigating the possibility of expanding its technology to help manage wearable devices.

  • A Look Into Linux.com's New Server Stack

    While our updated Linux.com boasts a clean look and fresh interface for our users, there’s also an entirely new infrastructure stack that we’re happy to take you on a tour of. Linux.com serves over two million page views a month: providing news and technical articles as well as hosting a dynamic community of logged-in users in our forums and Q&A parts of our site.

    The previous platform running Linux.com suffered from several scalability problems. Most significantly, it had no native ability to cache and re-serve the same pages to anonymous visitors, but beyond that, the underlying web application and custom code was also slow to generate each individual pageview.

Wine Staging 1.9.8

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Staging 1.9.8 Has Better Support for Running 64-bit Windows Apps on Linux

    The Wine Staging team announced a few minutes ago, April 19, 2016, that the Wine Staging 1.9.8 development release is now available for download via the official channels.

  • Release 1.9.8

    Time for another release! Wine Staging 1.9.8 is now available. This version contains improvements for 64 bit support and MSYS2.

  • Wine-Staging 1.9.8 Improves 64-bit Windows App/Game Support

    Adding in more experimental patches over last week's Wine 1.9.8 development release is the routine Wine-Staging update.

    Wine-Staging 1.9.8 is carrying more patches to improve support for running 64-bit Windows software -- particularly on OS X, there is improved compatibility with MSYS2, and a variety of other improvements that are ready in the Wine-Staging realm but not yet ready to be mainlined in Wine.

Some Distributions Are Already Making Changes To Linux's Scheduler

Filed under
Linux

Already it's looking like the research from the recently covered The Linux Scheduler: a Decade of Wasted Cores that called out the Linux kernel in being a poor scheduler is having an impact.

While we haven't seen any major upstream improvements yet to the Linux kernel scheduler, it looks like some parties are beginning to take note and better analyze the scheduler for possible performance improvements. Intel's Clear Linux distribution that's known for being focused on high out-of-the-box performance (even faster Intel graphics) already took action and landed some changes to their kernel's scheduler.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.