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Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 10 Linux Distros You Should Know About Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 7:33am
Story Intel's New Joule IoT Development Board Is Powered by Snappy Ubuntu Core Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 11:21pm
Story SparkyLinux 4.4 "Tyche" Arrives Powered by Linux Kernel 4.6.4, Debian Testing Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 11:20pm
Story 10-Way Radeon/AMDGPU Benchmarks On Linux 4.8 + Mesa 12.1 Git Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 11:18pm
Story 4MRescueKit 19.0 Enters Beta, Gets Antivirus Live CD 19.0-0.99.2 & 4MParted 19.0 Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 10:24pm
Story Linux Kernel 4.7.2 Is a Big Update with Numerous AMDGPU and ARM64 Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 10:23pm
Story Linux Event Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 8:26pm
Story Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 8:22pm
Story Security News Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 8:20pm
Story Leftovers: Software Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 8:17pm

OpenMandriva 3.0, Google Linux Snub, TCP Vulnerability

Filed under
-s

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 was announced Saturday with Linux 4.6.5, Plasma 5.6.5, and systemd 231. An early reviewer said he liked OpenMandriva but Plasma not as much. Elsewhere all anyone can seem to talk about is Google's decision to use something other than Linux to power its next embedded devices and a TCP vulnerability that could allow remote hijacking of Internet traffic. Patrick Volkerding has upgraded the toolchain in Slackware-current and Red Hat security expert said you can't trust any networks anywhere.

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Converged Terminal App Design in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Show Off Converged Terminal App Design

    Reshaping the classic terminal app to fit multi-form factor world isn't easy, but it's the task that the Canonical Design team face as part of their work on Unity 8.

  • Canonical Plans on Improving the Ubuntu Linux Terminal UX on Mobile and Desktop

    Canonical, through Jouni Helminen, announced on August 15, 2016, that they were planning on transforming the community-developed Terminal app into a convergent Linux terminal that's easy to use on both mobile phones and tablets.

    Terminal is a core Ubuntu Touch app and the only project to bring you the popular Linux shell on your Ubuntu Phone or Ubuntu Tablet devices. And now, Canonical's designers are in charge of offering a much more pleasant Linux terminal user experience by making Terminal convergent across all screen formats.

    "I would like to share the work so far, invite users of the app to comment on the new designs, and share ideas on what other new features would be desirable," says Jouni Helminen, Lead Designer at Canonical. "These visuals are work in progress - we would love to hear what kind of features you would like to see in your favorite terminal app!"
    ""

KDE Frameworks Now Requires Qt 5.5 or Later, Build 5.25.0 Updates Breeze Icons

Filed under
KDE

The KDE project announced this past weekend the release of KDE Frameworks 5.25.0, another monthly update to the collection of over 70 add-ons for the Qt5 GUI toolkit and the latest KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

KDE Frameworks 5.25.0 comes in time for the recently released KDE Plasma 5.7.3 maintenance update of the modern and widely used Linux desktop, promising to update many of the core components, including but not limited to Attica, which now follows HTTP redirects, the Breeze icon set with lots of additions, extra CMake modules, KDE Doxygen tools, KXMLGUI, KWindowSystem, and KWidgetsAddons.

KDE apps like KTextEditor, KArchive, and Sonnet received bugfixes and other improvements in the KDE Frameworks 5.25.0. The release also comes with many other updated components, among which Plasma Framework, NetworkManagerQt, KXMLGUI, KCoreAddons, KService, Kross, Solid, Package Framework, KNotification, KItemModels, KIO, KInit, KIconThemes, KHTML, KGlobalAccel, KFileMetaData, and KDeclarative.

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Also: Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.7.3, Mozilla Firefox 48.0 & Wine 1.9.16

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Goes Stable with KDE Plasma 5.6.5 and Linux Kernel 4.6.5

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Booting Lenovo T460s after Fedora 24 Updates
  • Flock 2016
  • Ideas for getting started in the Linux kernel

    Getting new people into OSS projects is always a challenge. The Linux kernel is no different and has it's own set of challenges. This is a follow up and expansion of some of what I talked about at Flock about contributing to the kernel.

    When I tell people I do kernel work I tend to get a lot of "Wow that's really hard, you must be smart" and "I always wanted to contribute to the kernel but I don't know how to get started". The former thought process tends to lead to the latter, moreso than other projects. I would like to dispel this notion once and for all: you do not have to have a special talent to work on the kernel unless you count dogged persistence and patience as a talent. Working in low level C has its own quriks the same way working in other languages does. C++ templates terrify me, javascript's type system (or lack there of) confuses me. You can learn the skills necessary to work in the kernel.

  • Żegnajcie! Fedora Flock 2016 in words

    From August 2 – 5, the annual Fedora contributor conference, Flock, was held in the beautiful city of Kraków, Poland. Fedora contributors from all over the world attend for a week of talks, workshops, collaboration, fun, and community building (if you’re tuning in and not sure what Fedora is exactly, you can read more here). Talks range from technical topics dealing with upcoming changes to the distribution, talks focusing on the community and things working well and how to improve, and many more. The workshops are a chance for people normally separated by thousands of miles to work and collaborate on real issues, problems, and tasks in the same room. As a Fedora contributor, this is the “premier” event to attend as a community member.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Server-Oriented Alpine Linux 3.4.3 Lands with Kernel 4.4.17 LTS, ownCloud 9.0.4

Filed under
Linux

The Alpine Linux development team is happy to announce the release and general availability for download of the third maintenance update to the Alpine Linux 3.4 series of server-oriented operating systems.

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4MParted 19.0 Distrolette Now In Beta, Based on 4MLinux 19.0 and GParted 0.26.1

Filed under
Development
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia today, August 15, 2016, about the availability of the first public Beta release of the upcoming 4MParted distrolette people can use to partition disk drives independent of a computer OS.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SELKS 3.0 Screenshot Tour
  • Live USB improvements

    live-grub-stick can now create bootable USB from openSUSE installation media isos (standard DVD or NET), difference from --isohybrid option is that the data already on the stick is not touched, the whole iso is available on the stick so you can use the stick to copy it around apart from being able to install from it.

  • Ubuntu Fan Launches Bid To Get ZTE to Make an Ubuntu Phone

    An Ubuntu Phone fan is attempting to get ZTE to make an Ubuntu-powered device, using the smartphone maker's new crowdsourced ideas platform.

  • Really Small Cheap Computers

    She runs FireFox, Chromium, LibreOffice and Gimp without issue. Browsing the web is much faster on her new PC even if it is small and cheap.

Linux Foundation and Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Kernel prepatch 4.8-rc2
  • Linux 4.8-rc2
  • Testing Network Connectivity for Applications in Containers

    Testing applications is a critical part of software development as illustrated by the rise of continuous integration and automated testing. In his upcoming LinuxCon + ContainerCon talk -- Testing Applications with Traffic Control in Containers -- Alban Crequy will focus on one area of testing that is difficult to automate: poor network connectivity. He will describe a testing approach which emulates network connectivity and which integrates existing Linux kernel features into higher level tools such as Kubernetes and Weave Scope. Additionally, he will show how an application running in Kubernetes behaves in response to changing network parameters.

  • IoTivity 2.0: What’s in Store?

    In May, we reported on an Embedded Linux Conference talk by Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec. We also looked at how the OCF has evolved from the earlier Open Interconnect Consortium (OIC) and acquired the assets of the Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) Forum. Here, we examine another ELC 2016 talk about the specifics of those integrations, as well as other changes planned for the IoTivity 2.0 release due later this year.

  • IoTivity 2.0 by Vijay Kesavan

    Release 2.0 of IoTivity is expected in the latter part of 2016, and this talk will preview some of the features and design updates to IoTivity that are being considered. Features under consideration will enable support for applications in the industrial, automotive, and health sectors. Additional features that enhance cloud technologies and services such as notifications and easy setup will also be discussed.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • OpenSK Hopes To Be The Vulkan Of Audio/Multimedia

    Trent Reed is a software engineer at Microsoft, but it does not appear that OpenSK is an officially sanctioned project by the Redmond company.

  • runC: The little container engine that could

    runC, a lightweight universal container runtime, is a command-line tool for spawning and running containers according to the Open Container Initiative (OCI) specification. That's the short version. The long version: The governance umbrella created by Docker, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Red Hat, and many other partners to create a common and standardized runtime specification has a readable spec document for the runtime elements of a container, and a usable implementation based on code contributed to the OCI by Docker. It includes libcontainer, the original lower-layer library interface originally used in the Docker engine, to set up the operating system constructs that we call a container.

    Given that runC is an open source project with a regular release cadence, you can find the code and respective releases on GitHub. If you download or build the runC binary you will have everything you need to get started using runC as a simple container executor based on the runtime spec elements: a JSON container configuration and a root filesystem bundle. Note that if you have an installation of Docker 1.11 or above you will automatically have a recent copy of runC installed on your system as well. It is most likely named docker-runC and installed in /usr/bin, and can be used outside of Docker just like any normal installation of runC.

  • GNU Health 3.0.3 patchset released
  • Copr Rebuild Tools

    So we re-built whole PyPI and RubyGems as RPM packages. But how exactly we did it?

    At first, we just didn't care about how to submit as many builds. Priority was to smooth rough edges in Copr to be even handle such load, therefore we only created few hacky scripts for obtaining all modules (gems) and submitting them one by one to Copr.

  • Skype for Linux 1.5 Alpha brings notification improvements and several bug fixes
  • Native Skype for Windows Phone walked behind shed, shot heard

    Microsoft's killed off a native Skype client for Windows Phone.

    WinPho users won't be alone: Redmond will also discontinue Skype clients on Android 4.02 or lower and iOS 7.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • One Of The Best Note-Taking Apps ‘Simplenote’ Is Now Open Source

    Simplenote, a lean but powerful note-taking app, has been made open source by its owner Automattic. Released under the GPLv2 license, developers can use its code for different platforms and take the app in new directions. But, it seems like the server-side code of the app is not yet released.

  • Research reports explore the open-source software market

    The mantra "you get what you pay for" doesn't always to software. Because sometimes the best software really is free.

  • Where in the World is the OSI?

    If you're out and about at conferences this month, we hope that you'll have a chance to attend one of these talks by OSI Board Members. If you're an OSI member and you'll be giving at talk about open source topics, please get in touch. We'd love to let folks know about your talk!

  • Firefox 49 for Linux Will Let You Watch Netflix Without Plugins

    Firefox is to begin supporting the Google Widevine CDM on Linux from next month, allowing native, plugin-free playback of encrypted media content like Netflix.

  • Firefox 49 To Offer Linux Widevine Support, Firefox Also Working On WebP Support

    There are two exciting bits of Mozilla Firefox news to pass along today: Winevine support on Linux out-of-the-box to handle Netflix and friends. Separately, WebP image support is being worked on.

    Trailing the Windows and OS X support, Winevine is being advertised as supported out-of-the-box now on Firefox for Linux. This change will happen for the upcoming Firefox 49 release.

  • Databricks' Kavitha Mariappan on Open Source Tools and Data Science

    Databricks, a company founded by the creators of the popular open-source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, has gained much momentum as Spark has gathered big backers and widespread development. Spark is one of the most active open source projects in the Big Data ecosystem, and there are increasing efforts among data scientists to leverage it and other open source tools.

  • Newton release previews, adoption trends, and more OpenStack news

    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud?

  • This Theme Pack Makes GIMP Look and Behave like Photoshop

    We’re all aware The GIMP is the best free alternative to Photoshop — but is there a way to make it look like Photoshop, too? This is open-source software we’re talking about, of course there is a way! Why Use a GIMP Photoshop Theme?

  • VMware survives GPL breach case, but plaintiff promises appeal

    Linux kernel developer Christoph Hellwig's bid to have VMware's knuckles rapped for breaching the GNU General Public Licence (GPL) has failed, for now, after the Landgericht Hamburg found in Virtzilla's favour.

    The Software Freedom Conservancy backed Hellwig when he alleged that some of his contributions to the Linux kernel have found their way into VMware's very proprietary flagship ESXi product, in a component called “vmklinux”. Hellwig and the Conservancy believe that as ESXi includes code licensed under the GPLv2, ESXi should itself be released as open source code under the same licence.

  • Linux developer loses case against VMware

    Hellwig claimed the outfit had violated version 2 of the GNU General Public Licence and says he will appeal against the verdict.

  • Open data on open data portals

    The Open Data Inception project presents a comprehensive list of more than 2600 open data portals all over the world. The information is geotagged so it can be searched by topic as well as country.

    The list has been compiled by the Open Data Soft company as a showcase. They wanted to bring together as many open data resources as they could, and present these on a map per country for easy browsing.

    The creators aim to maintain the list and ask visitors to contribute links to portals and datasets that are currently not yet in the list. The dataset itself has also been made available as open data.

  • Chemists to get their own service for preprint sharing

    Physics researchers have a long history of sharing work they're preparing for publication in order to solicit suggestions and comments from their peers. Like so many things, this behavior migrated to the Internet: Cornell University's arXiv server hosts over 1.1 million documents, many of which later appeared in formal peer-reviewed literature.

    The physics and astronomy communities see arXiv as beneficial, and biologists put together their own database called The BioRxiv. Now it appears that chemists are going to get their own equivalent. The American Chemical Society is asking for input from the research and publishing communities about what they'd like to see in a ChemRxiv.

  • Amazon Announces Application Load Balancer for the Cloud

    Load balancers have been part of the networking landscape for decades, more often than not in recent years being lumped together under the category of Application Delivery Controllers (ADC). Various load balancing services have been available in the cloud, but this week Amazon announced a significant new entrant - the Application Load Balancer for Elastic Load Balancing.

  • Carnegie Mellon U aims to unlock industrial 3D printing potential with new consortium that includes GE, Alcoa and United States Steel

    You don’t need to be an expert to see that 3D printing is slowly finding its way into the hands of designers throughout the world. From prototype airplane parts to hip replacements and implantable organs; 3D printing is appearing everywhere. But for the 3D printing revolution to really pick up steam, a major push or technological breakthrough is needed to make this a truly accessible and affordable large-scale manufacturing option. In an attempt to realize that breakthrough, Carnegie Mellon University has announced a new consortium that brings together major companies, nonprofit institutes and the US government. Together, they will be working to fully unlock the potential of industrial 3D printing.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

White House Source Code Policy

Filed under
OSS

Security News

Filed under
Security

Android and Fuchsia

Filed under
Android

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Flatpak: A new framework for building and distributing desktop applications

    Fragmentation is a longstanding Achilles heel for the Linux desktop. In a world of myriad incompatible distributions, popular apps are typically limited to one or two of the most popular distributions, and the creation of new apps is stifled. The impact of fragmentation on application developers offers a good example of the problem: To release an app for Linux, a developer must contend with different package formats and a baffling number of distributions, all of which have their own particular conventions. For those apps that do exist, maintenance and pre-release testing is difficult, if not impossible.

    The constantly changing nature of Linux distributions adds another dimension of complexity for the application developer. Each release of a distribution can bring changes that are incompatible with applications, causing bugs or stopping the app from working altogether. When problems do emerge, users often encounter them first, before developers do.

    Flatpak, a new framework for building and distributing desktop applications, is intended to change all this. Flatpak decouples the platforms on which applications run from the distributions. This means that, instead of chasing distributions, application developers get to pick the platform that they want to use. Flatpak then makes sure that that platform is available on all the various distributions.

  • Global Travel Technology Leader Amadeus Wins 2016 Red Hat Innovator of the Year Award
  • Deutsche Bank AG Reiterates Buy Rating for Red Hat Inc. (RHT)

    Red Hat Inc. (NYSE:RHT)‘s stock had its “buy” rating restated by stock analysts at Deutsche Bank AG in a research note issued on Saturday. They presently have a $95.00 price target on the open-source software company’s stock. Deutsche Bank AG’s target price suggests a potential upside of 28.38% from the company’s current price.

  • Market Review: Narrowing in on Shares of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat (RHT) Shares are Down -2.41%

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

GNOME Turns 19, GUADEC Coverge

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Turns 19 Years Old Today

    Today marks the 19th birthday of the GNOME project.

    Founded back in August of 1997 by two university students, Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena, the GNOME project has since grown into one of the biggest open-source projects in the world.

    Icaza and Quintero’s aim was to create an open-source, free desktop environment that was user-friendly, easy to use, and well designed.

    Through a diverse and global community the project gave birth to the GNOME desktop environment and the vibrant software ecosystem that has been built around it.

  • GNOME's GUADEC 2016 Videos Now Available

    Running this weekend in Karlsruhe, Germany was the 2016 GUADEC conference -- GNOME's annual big event. It looked like it was another excellent event and the videos are now available.

    I haven't yet found any resource with a complete list of all the slides from the event, but at least the video recordings are now available for those that were unable to watch the livestreams.

  • GUADEC 2016 – Day 1
  • GUADEC 2016 — Day 2

    A dinner tradition in our house is to share three great things from our day. Being at GUADEC is making it hard to remember to do this, so I thought I would list them here.

Btrfs RAID vs. Linux Software RAID Benchmarks On Linux 4.7

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this month I carried out some 4-disk Btrfs RAID benchmarks using four SATA 3.0 SSDs. Those tests were done using the Btrfs built-in RAID capabilities while today are some comparison tests against those numbers when using the Linux Software RAID setup via mdadm.

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More in Tux Machines

Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years. Read more

Rise of the Forks: Nextcloud and LibreOffice

  • ownCloud-Forked Nextcloud 10 Now Available
  • Secure, Monitor and Control your data with Nextcloud 10 – get it now!
    Nextcloud 10 is now available with many new features for system administrators to control and direct the flow of data between users on a Nextcloud server. Rule based file tagging and responding to these tags as well as other triggers like physical location, user group, file properties and request type enables administrators to specifically deny access to, convert, delete or retain data following business or legal requirements. Monitoring, security, performance and usability improvements complement this release, enabling larger and more efficient Nextcloud installations. You can get it on our install page or read on for details.
  • What makes a great Open Source project?
    Recently the Document Foundation has published its annual report for the year 2015. You can download it as a pdf by following this link, and you can now even purchase a paper copy of the report. This publication gives me the opportunity to talk a bit about what I think makes a great FOSS project and what I understand may be a great community. If it is possible to see this topic as something many people already went over and over again, think again: Free & Open Source Software is seen as having kept and even increased its momentum these past few years, with many innovative companies developing and distributing software licensed under a Free & Open Source license from the very beginning. This trend indicates two important points: FOSS is no longer something you can automagically use as a nice tag slapped on a commodity software; and FOSS projects cannot really be treated as afterthoughts or “nice-to-haves”. Gone are the days where many vendors could claim to be sympathetic and even supportive to FOSS but only insofar as their double-digits forecasted new software solution would not be affected by a cumbersome “community of developers”. Innovation relies on, starts with, runs thanks to FOSS technologies and practices. One question is to wonder what comes next. Another one is to wonder why Open Source is still seen as a complex maze of concepts and practices by so many in the IT industry. This post will try to address one major difficulty of FOSS: why do some projects fail while others succeed.

Red Hat News

  • Red Hat Virtualisation 4 woos VMware faithful
    It is easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn’t forgotten about you. Red Hat Virtualisation (RHV) 4.0 refreshes Red Hat’s open source virtualisation platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat’s product line. It is a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat’s virtualisation efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company’s intention to woo VMware customers.
  • Forbes Names Red Hat One of the World's Most Innovative Companies
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it has been named to Forbes' “World’s Most Innovative Companies” list. Red Hat was ranked as the 25th most innovative company in the world, marking the company's fourth appearance on the list (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Red Hat was named to Forbes' "World's Most Innovative Growth Companies" list in 2011.
  • Is this Large Market Cap Stock target price reasonable for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • World Wide Web became what it is thanks to Linux
    Linux is used to power the largest websites on the Internet, including Google, Facebook, Amazon, eBay, and Wikipedia.
  • SFC's Kuhn in firing line as Linus Torvalds takes aim
    A few days after he mused that there had been no reason for him to blow his stack recently, Linux creator Linus Torvalds has directed a blast at the Software Freedom Conservancy and its distinguished technologist Bradley Kuhn over the question of enforcing compliance of the GNU General Public Licence. Torvalds' rant came on Friday, as usual on a mailing list and on a thread which was started by Software Freedom Conservancy head Karen Sandler on Wednesday last week. She suggested that Linuxcon in Toronto, held from Monday to Thursday, also include a session on GPL enforcement.
  • Linux at 25: A pictorial history
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.