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Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 5 Raspberry Pi Operating Systems That Aren’t Linux Rianne Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 6:05pm
Story Linux and the beauty of browser-based games Rianne Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 6:02pm
Story Tiny, rugged IoT gateways offer 10-year Linux support Rianne Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 5:56pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:57am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:53am
Story Microsoft Copies Cygwin 2 Decades Late Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:51am
Story Security: Open Source Security Podcast, Old JavaScript Crypto Flaw and New FUD-based Marketing Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:48am
Story Apple Threats Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:47am
Story 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:18am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:14am

Graphics: RADV, vGPU, Libinput, Etnaviv

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • VK_AMD_shader_core_properties Now Supported By RADV

    Thanks to Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's Linux driver team, the RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver supports the new VK_AMD_shader_core_properties extension.

    A few days back Vulkan 1.1.72 was released and one of three new extensions was VK_AMD_shader_core_properties. This AMD shader core properties extension to Vulkan exposes physical device characteristics like the number of shader engines, SIMDs per compute unit, threads per wavefront, and other shader related hardware details.

  • Making Use Of Intel vGPU Support On Linux 4.16 & QEMU 2.12

    As of the Linux 4.16 kernel that was released one week ago, the kernel-side bits are in place for Intel Virtual GPU support and in user-space the upcoming QEMU 2.12 has the necessary code for the GTK and SPICE code-paths.

  • Libinput 1.10.4 Makes Touchpads A Bit Snappier

    Libinput 1.10.14 is now available and while it's just a point release, there is at least one change sure to catch your attention.

  • Etnaviv Performance Counter Support Merged Into Mesa 18.1

    Landing in Linux 4.15 was performance counters support in the Etnaviv DRM driver as the low-level bits for exposing the hardware counters with this reverse-engineered, open-source Vivante graphics driver. The user-space/Mesa side code has now landed too.

    With Mesa 18.1 paired with Linux 4.15 or newer will now be support for exposing the hardware performance counters for seeing more characteristics about the GPU's performance in working to optimize your game/application or the driver itself for efficient usage on Vivante GC hardware.

Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta From Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

This step-by-step tutorial demonstrates how to upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta from Ubuntu 17.10.
Read more

Albanian Open Source Conference OSCAL’18 is Now Open For Registration

Filed under
News

Albania’s premier open source event OSCAL will be held on19-20 May 2018 in Tirana. Registration for the event is now open.
Read more

The current state of Linux video editing 2018

Filed under
Linux

It's pretty well known that Linux is a big deal in modern movie making. Linux is the standard base, a literal industry standard for digital effects but, like all technology with momentum, it seems that the process of cutting footage still defaults mostly to a non-Linux platform. Slowly, however, as artists seek to simplify and consolidate the post-production pipeline, Linux video editing is gaining in popularity.

Read more

Review: Sortix 1.0

Filed under
Reviews

Sortix is a relatively new project, less than a third the age of Linux, and appears to be mostly a one-person development project. To me, this makes the progress made so far amazing. The system has a working installer and partition manager, it works with multiple file systems, has a working collection of ported GNU tools and can run graphical games. It's quite a feat of coding to get all of this working in so short a time. What really impressed me though was that the operating system's documentation (exploring what it does, what it does not yet do and how the pieces work) is clear and up to date. In that regard a lot of other open source projects could follow Sortix's example.

Unfortunately, at this time, Sortix is not a practical operating system for most scenarios. We can test it, develop code on the platform and learn from its design, but Sortix lacks networking, multi-user security and a working desktop environment. This makes the project more of a developer playground than a system for end users to run. Still, in the realm of a personal hobby project, Sortix is one of the coolest creations I have seen in a while.

Read more

Security: Switches, Cisco, FUD, Beep, Android

Filed under
Security

​How many Linux users are there anyway?

Filed under
Android
Linux

Perhaps the most unbiased numbers are from the federal government's Digital Analytics Program (DAP). DAP's numbers come from the billion visits over the past 90 days to over 400 US executive branch government domains. That's about 5,000 total websites. These visitors appear to be largely US citizens. You can see this from the most popular websites: The US Postal Service, the IRS, and Medline Plus.

By DAP's count, Linux is bundled in with 0.6 percent other. Chrome OS, according to DAP, has more users: 1.3 percent.

Still, while desktop Linux is a minority desktop operating system, it still has millions of users, and that's a lot more than a mere fraction of 1 percent.

And, when it comes to overall end-user operating system, Linux-based Android has 70.96 percent of the mobile market by NetMarketShare's count. By DAP's reckoning, Android has 19.9 percent of all end-user systems, while StatCounter shows Android as even more popular than Windows by 39.49 percent to 36.62 percent.

Read more

Stable kernels 4.16.1, 4.14.33, 4.9.93, 4.4.127 and 3.18.103

Filed under
Linux

Linux 4.16.1 and Outline of the Past Week for Linux 4.17 Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.16.1

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.16.1 kernel.

    All users of the 4.16 kernel series must upgrade.

  • Linux 4.16 Reaches Its First Point Release With Over 30 Fixes

    Greg Kroah-Hartman today released the first stable point update to the Linux 4.16 kernel that debuted one week ago.

    There are just under three dozen changes in Linux 4.16.1, including some crypto fixes seeming to represent a bulk of the work along with some USB, staging, serial, Bluetooth, and other updates. One hardware item sticking out is fixed TrackStick detection for Lenovo ThinkPad L570 and Dell Latitude 7370 notebooks.

  • The Big Changes Merged This Week For The Linux 4.17 Kernel

    We are now through the first week of the two week long Linux 4.17 kernel merge window process for introducing the new features/functionality to this next big kernel release.

[Old] Distributions are becoming irrelevant: difference was our strength and our liability

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

For someone that has spent the past thirteen years defining himself as a developer of a Linux distribution (whether I really am still a Gentoo Linux developer or not is up for debate I’m sure), having to write a title like this is obviously hard. But from the day I started working on open source software to now I have grown a lot, and I have realized I have been wrong about many things in the past.

One thing that I realized recently is that nowadays, distributions lost the war. As the title of this post says, difference is our strength, but at the same time, it is also the seed of our ruin. Take distributions: Gentoo, Fedora, Debian, SuSE, Archlinux, Ubuntu. They all look and act differently, focusing on different target users, and because of this they differ significantly in which software they make available, which versions are made available, and how much effort is spent on testing, both the package itself and the system integration.

Read more

FreeCAD 0.17 Released With Various Workbench Improvements

Filed under
GNU

For fans of the FreeCAD open-source 3D CAD modeling software, a new major release is now available -- the first update in almost two years.

FreeCAD 0.17 is now available to succeed FreeCAD 0.16 from April of 2016. While it may not be nearly as well off as AutoCAD or other alternatives, FreeCAD does continue getting better while being free and open-source software.

Read more

Original: Release notes 0.17

Fedora: Fedora Local Repo, Rawhide Notes and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Local Repo

    Let’s suppose that you want to test a package not yet landed in the Fedora repos, include it in the installation process or in a Live CD (more on a future post).

  • Rawhide notes from the trail: more rocky trail

    I am looking forward to next week when we hope to get things setup for some gating in rawhide. I know it couldn’t handle all these issues, but it’s a start and we can add things as we know how to detect them in advance.

  • Installing go1.10.1 (Fedora 27)

Making cloud-native computing universal and sustainable

Filed under
Server

I’ve been fortunate to have the opportunity to build an open source foundation from scratch the last couple of years by serving as the founding executive director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Since late 2015, the foundation has grown to comprise more than 200 members worldwide and 18 innovative cloud-native projects. Also, for the first time, we recently published an annual report representing what our community accomplished in 2017.

What has been interesting about this experience is that more people know about our projects, such as Kubernetes, Envoy, and Prometheus, than know about the open source foundation behind them. The goal of this article is to explain exactly what the purpose of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is and how we support our community of cloud-native open infrastructure projects.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Timespinner is an upcoming metroidvania that’s looking great and is fun to play

    Following a successful crowdfunding campaign several years ago, this 2d metroidvania has grown and matured as a project. I had a chance to play a closed beta and things look promising.

  • What’s New in Enso OS 0.2.1

    Enso OS 0.2.1 is the latest release of Enso Linux Distribution 0.2 series. This release features Xfce 4.12 series as default desktop environment, include the Panther application launcher, which it can resizing itself on change of the screen resolution. Also Plank dock installed by default.

    Based on Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS and using Linux Kernel 4.4, which means that it offers support for the latest hardware components available on the market. Galal now includes a new windows switcher that lists the active windows in a much more easy to read manner that is more familiar to users than was previously implemented. Enso greeter now applies a nice blur effect onto the set background which was kindly taken from the Deepin project

  • What Else Will Red Hat Acquire?

    Linux may not be the OS of choice for desktops, but it dominates the world when it comes to supercomputers, web servers, and Chromebooks. Additionally, Linux Kernel actually powers the Android OS that is used in Android-based mobile devices. According to market reports, as of 2017, Linux powered all of the top 500 supercomputers in the world.

  • Fedora 28 : Golang by JetBrains .
  • Debian & Stuff -- Montreal Debian Meeting

    Today we had a meeting of the local Montreal Debian group. The last meetings we had were centered on working on finishing the DebConf17 final report and some people told us they didn't feel welcome because they weren't part of the organisation of the conference.

    I thus decided to call today's event "Debian & Stuff" and invite people to come hack with us on diverse Debian related projects. Most of the people who came were part of the DC17 local team, but a few other people came anyway and we all had a great time. Someone even came from Ottawa to learn how to compile the Linux kernel!

  • Linux Mint Launching SFF MintBox Mini 2 and Mini 2 Pro PCs Running Linux Mint 19

    The Linux Mint development team recently announced the MintBox Mini 2 and MintBox Mini 2 Pro small form factor PCs which will ship with Linux Mint 19 this summer. The tiny passively cooled computers are based on Compulab’s Fitlet2 SFF barebones PC and comes in two flavors: the base Mini 2 with Intel Celeron J3455, 4GB DDR3L, and 64GB SATA SSD and the Mini 2 Pro with J3455 processor, 8GB RAM, and 120GB solid state drive. The MintBox Mini 2 PCs measure 4.4” x 3.3” x 1.3” and weigh approximately 12 ounces.

howtos and software

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • How to set up a MegaRAID SAS 9361-8i controller card on an OpenPOWER system
  • Creating Virtual Disks Using Linux Command Line
  • 2-Minute Linux Tip: Learn how to use the contrab command
  • The Shuf Command Tutorial With Examples For Beginners
  • Using SS to monitor connections in GNU/Linux for new users

    The ever popular Netstat tool, has been depricated for quite a few years now, and newer tools have been developed for the command line to replace it; namely, ss.

    Using ss is extremely simple, given the power behind the command, and the amount of information you can obtain while using it, such as information for TCP, UDP, PACKET, RAW, DCCP and UNIX Sockets.

  • Pidgin 2.13 Linux Desktop Instant Messaging Client Released

    Desktop-based instant messaging clients are becoming increasingly rare in the age of mobile apps and browser-based alternatives, but Pidgin formerly known as GAIM continues moving along albeit slowly. Recently the Pidgin 2.13.0 release happened without much attention.

    Pidgin 2.13 was released back in March with a number of bug fixes, better support for dark themes, improved transparency handling, API updates, and more but it was mostly just about fixing a number of bugs. Pidgin 2.13.0 had been the first update in one year since Pidgin 2.12.

  • kTLS in Cubemap

    Cubemap, my video reflector, is getting TLS support. This isn't really because I think Cubemap video is very privacy-sensitive (although I suppose it does protect it against any meddling ISP middleboxes that would want to transcode the video), but putting non-TLS video on TLS pages is getting increasingly frowned upon by browsers—it used to provoke mixed content warnings, but now, it's usually just blocked outright.

    This took longer than one would expect, since Cubemap prides itself on extremely high performance. (Even when it was written, five years ago, it could sustain multiple 10gig links on a single, old quadcore.) Cubemap is different from regular HTTP servers in that it doesn't really care about small requests; it doesn't do HLS or MPEG-DASH (although HLS support is also on its way!), just a single very long stream of video, so startup time doesn't matter at all. To that extent, it uses sendfile() (from a buffer file, usually on tmpfs or similar), which wasn't compatible with TLS… until now.

  •  

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 1

    In the spirit of This week in Firefox/Rust/Servo, we’ve decided to start sharing weekly updates on the progress of the Mozilla Mixed Reality team. Late last year, we brought together all of the people working on Virtual and Augmented Reality at Mozilla to work in our new Mixed Reality program.

  • Microsoft’s Open Source Tool To Run More Linux Distros on Windows
  • Open source isn’t the community you think it is [Ed: The usual from Mac Asay]

    Thirteen years ago, I dug into academic research that showed how Mozilla’s Firefox browser and the Apache HTTP Server were both developed by a small cadre of core contributors. While the population of contributors broadened with things like bug fixes, the central development work for these and virtually all other projects was done by a talented group of core committers.

  • ZeMarmot, main contributor of GIMP 2.10.0-RC1!

    Two weeks ago, we released GIMP 2.10.0-RC1! This is our first release candidate before the stable release GIMP 2.10.0. Yes, you heard it well, the release you have been waiting for, for 6 years, is just around the corner!

  • Matthew Garrett Calls on Symantec to Share Its Code, EFF Questions Google's Work on Project Maven and More

    Linux kernel developer, free software activist and Google engineer Matthew Garrett discovered that Symantec is using a Linux distro based on the QCA Software Development Kit (QSDK) project: "This is a GPLv2-licensed, open-source platform built around the Linux-based OpenWrt Wi-Fi router operating system" (if true, this means Symantic needs to share the Norton Core Router's code). So, Garrett tweeted "Hi @NortonOnline the Norton Core is clearly running Linux and the license requires you to distribute the kernel source code so where can I get it?"

  • Best Programming Language

    Python wins Best Programming Language again this year in Linux Journal's annual Readers' Choice Awards. It's easy to use, powerful and versatile with a really large and active community. Having that supportive community ensures that developers of all skill levels easily can find the support and documentation they require, which feeds Python's popularity. It certainly helps that Python has something like a corporate sponsor. Python is recognized as an official language at Google, running on many of its internal systems and showing up in many Google APIs. In fact, Google's developer website offers free Python classes, videos and exercises.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

University students create award-winning open source projects

In my short time working for Clarkson University, I've realized what a huge impact this small university is making on the open source world. Our 4,300 student-strong science and technology-focused institution, located just south of the Canadian border in Potsdam, New York, hosts the Clarkson Open Source Institute (COSI), dedicated to promoting open source software and providing equipment and support for student projects. While many universities offer opportunities for students to get involved in open source projects, it's rare to have an entire institute dedicated to promoting open source development. COSI is part of Clarkson's Applied Computer Science Labs within the computer science department. It, along with the Internet Teaching Lab and the Virtual Reality Lab, is run by students (supported by faculty advisers), allowing them to gain experience in managing both facilities and projects while still undergraduates. Read more

Linux 4.17-rc2

So rc2 is out, and things look fairly normal. The diff looks a bit unusual, with the tools subdirectory dominating, with 30%+ of the whole diff. Mostly perf and test scripts. But if you ignore that, the rest looks fairly usual. Arch updates (s390 and x86 dominate) and drivers (networking, gpu, HID, mmc, misc) are the bulk of it, with misc other changes all over (filesystems, core kernel, networking, docs). We've still got some known fallout from the merge window, but it shouldn't affect most normal configurations, so go out and test. Linus Read more Also: Upstream Linux support for new NXP i.MX8