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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Servers? We don't need no stinkin' servers! Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 9:01am
Story Understanding SELinux labels for container runtimes Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 8:50am
Story Canonical Wants to Collect Some Data from Ubuntu Users to Improve New Releases Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 8:47am
Story Solus 4 Is Coming Soon with Experimental Wayland Session for GNOME, Linux 4.15 Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 8:44am
Story A look at Linux Mint 18.3 KDE – The Last KDE Linux Mint Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 8:40am
Story i.MX6 UL based COM/SBC hybrid has FPGA with programmable ZPU core Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 8:36am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 11:36pm
Story Security: Windows, Salon, Fraud. Skype and More Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 11:10pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 9:38pm
Story AMD Vega 8 Graphics Performance On Linux With The Ryzen 3 2200G Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2018 - 9:31pm

The Linux ranger

Filed under
Linux

For those of us who cut our technical teeth on the Unix/Linux command line, the relatively new ranger makes examining files a very different experience. A file manager that works inside a terminal window, ranger provides useful information and makes it very easy to move into directories, view file content or jump into an editor to make changes.

Unlike most file managers which work on the desktop, but leave you to the whims of ls, cat and more to get a solid handle on files and contents, ranger provides a very nice mix of file listing and contents displays with an easy way to start editing. In fact, among some Linux users, ranger has become very popular.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Happy birthday open source: A look back at the software that's pushing tech forward

    From that original definition, the idea of "free" (as in "freedom," not "price") software was born. In part, because of the Open Source Definition, plenty of game-changing software has been developed. However, even before the Open Source Definition came into being, there was Richard Stallman, who launched the GNU Project, aimed at creating an operating system free from source code restraints. In 1985, Stallman published the GNU Manifesto in Dr. Dobb's Journal of Software Tools. Eight years after that, Eric S. Raymond would go on to publish The Cathedral and the Bazaar, which was a detailed analysis of the hacker community as it pertains to free software principles. It was Raymond's publication that led Netscape to release their Navigator browser as free software.

  • Nextcloud 13 Released With Better Interface, End-To-End Encryption

    The ownCloud-forked Nextcloud software for file hosting and communication is out with their latest major release.

    Nextcloud 13 is a big release with improvements to the user-interface, end-to-end encryption support is available as a tech preview, much better performance, new collaboration capabilities, Nextcloud Talk is available for built-in audio/video/text communication, and a wide range of other work has taken place over the last nine months.

  • Who really contributes to open source [Ed: Mac Asay keeps attacking FOSS and promoting Microsoft lies. Is he still pursuing that Microsoft job he once applied for?]
  • Deutsche Bank open sources more code

    Deutsche Bank has taken a second step in its open source odyssey, making software code publicly available designed to help firms better understand their IT environments.

    [...]

    Waltz is the second major batch of code Deutsche Bank has made public as part of its new commitment to open source. Late last year, over 150,000 lines of code - known as 'Plexus Interop' - from its electronic trading platform Autobahn was put into the public domain.

  • Google not taking down adware VLC clone for Android

    ideoLAN, the developers of VLC media player, told TorrentFreak it is struggling to get clones of its software removed from Google Play.

    This follows the company recently turning down millions of euros to bundle its software with advertising.

    VLC is an open source application licensed under the GNU General Public License, which means you may use its code as long as you publish any software you develop based on it.

  • New Open Source Drug Discovery Initiative Takes Aim At “Devastating” Disease

    A consortium including the Drugs for Neglected Disease initiative has launched a groundbreaking open source drug discovery project as way to find new drugs to treat mycetoma, a “devastating disease for which current treatments are ineffective, expensive, and toxic,” the group said.

    According to a paper laying out the “open pharma” drug development concept, “There are many potential advantages of an open source approach, such as improved efficiency, the quality and relevance of the research, and wider participation by the scientific and patient communities; a blend of traditional and innovative financing mechanisms will have to be adopted.”

  • SiFive Launches World's First Linux-Capable RISC-V Based SoC

    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, launched the industry’s first Linux-capable RISC-V based processor SoC. The company demonstrated the first real-world use of the HiFive Unleashed board featuring the Freedom U540 SoC, based on its U54-MC Core IP, at the FOSDEM open source developer conference on Saturday.

    During the session, SiFive provided updates on the RISC-V Linux effort, surprising attendees with an announcement that the presentation had been run on the HiFive Unleashed development board. With the availability of the HiFive Unleashed board and Freedom U540 SoC, SiFive has brought to market the first multicore RISC-V chip designed for commercialization, and now offers the industry’s widest array of RISC-V based Core IP.

  • 3D printing - Downloading the world [Ed: People now print the parts they need and greedy lawyers start bickering about "intellectual property (IP) rights."]

    The growth of the World Wide Web has transformed the process of copying digital files from an onerous task requiring the swapping of data carriers (tape-to-tape copying anyone?) to one where digital files are only ever a few commands away or are delivered automatically without user interaction. While this has made life easier in many respects, disruption on this scale also presents challenges. The music industry, for example, has spent millions trying to solve the resulting unauthorised copying issues.

Security Catastrophe at Octoly

Filed under
Security
  • Bad Influence: How A Marketing Startup Exposed Thousands of Social Media Stars
  • More Than 12,000 Influencers, Brands Targeted in Latest Data Breach

    It happened to Target, Forever 21, Neiman Marcus, TJX Companies, and Yahoo. Their systems were infiltrated by hackers and the data that they had stored, including consumers’ names, addresses, payment information, and in some cases, social security numbers, were stolen. Now, influencers and high-end beauty and fashion brands, are the target, as Octoly, a Paris-based influencer agency, has confirmed that it has experienced a data breach, putting more than 12,000 prominent social media influencers from YouTube, Instagram, and Twitter at risk.

  • 12,000 Influencers Had Their Data Leaked by Marketing Firm Octoly

    Unfortunately, that is just what happened last month to around 12,000 social media stars who work with Paris-based influencer marketplace Octoly. According to cyber risk company UpGuard, carelessness on the part of Octoly led to influencers' personal information — like street addresses, phone numbers, birth dates, email addresses and more — becoming accessible in a public database.

Events: openSUSE Conference 2018, LinuxConfAu 2018, Linux Conference Australia in 2019

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Where to Stay, Getting Around Prague for oSC18

    Prague is a beautiful city and you can bet that the city will be crowded during the openSUSE Conference. Hotels are already starting to fill up, so it’s best to take a look at the hotels we recommend now before all the hotels are booked out.

    There are six hotels that are recommended, but feel free to book at other hotels in the city. The section for recommended lodging on the openSUSE Conference 2018 webpage gives options for hotels as low as 40 EUR a night to above 120 EUR. Each listing on the section gives a little info about the hotel.

  • Freedom Embedded: Devices that Respect Users and Communities: LinuxConfAu 2018, Sydney, Australia

    FSF executive director John Sullivan delivered the talk "Freedom Embedded: Devices that Respect Users and Communities" in January 2018, at LinuxConfAu 2018. In this talk, John explains the FSF's certification program called “Respects Your Freedom” (RYF) that awards a certification mark to hardware meeting a set of free software standards (fsf.org/ryf).

  • Linux Conference Australia heads to Christchurch in 2019

    Up to 800 delegates from around Australasia and the world will meet in Christchurch for Linux Conference Australia in 2019.

    The 20th anniversary of the annual conference will run from 21-25 January next year at the University of Canterbury, organisers have announced.

    Content will feature up to 100 speakers covering topics such as the Linux kernel, open source hardware and software, open government data and the various communities that have evolved around them.

  • Major tech conference confirmed for Christchurch

    One of the most respected technical conferences to be held in Australasia is coming to Christchurch.

    Between 500-800 delegates from around Australasia and the world will meet in the city in 2019 for linux.conf.au. It will be the 20th anniversary of the annual conference, which will run from 21-25 January 2019 at the University of Canterbury.

Programming/Development: AmplitudeJS, Python, and Buzzword 'DevOps'

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Development

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

MS Office Alternative SoftMaker Office 2018 is Now Available for Linux

Filed under
News

Premium office suite SoftMaker has released its latest version for Linux. The new version comes with ribbon interface, improved compatibility with Microsoft Office and several other improvements.
Read more

FOSDEM Posts and Coverage

Filed under
OSS
  • GStreamer 1.14 Working On AV1 & RTSP 2.0 Support, Promote MP3 Encoder/Decoder

    GStreamer core developer Tim-Philipp Müller has provided some insight about some current and upcoming happenings for the GStreamer multimedia framework project. He also addressed the recurring comment of "write it in Rust!" for better security/safety/reliability.

  • Developers Start Getting Excited For MySQL 8.0, Several Talks From FOSDEM

    MySQL 8.0 should presumably appear this year although no public release date has been set. At last weekend's FOSDEM conference in Brussels were many talks about developers and database administrators eager for MySQL 8.0, well, at least for those not on the MariaDB bandwagon.

  • Gentoo at FOSDEM 2018

    Gentoo Linux participated with a stand during this year's FOSDEM 2018, as has been the case for the past several years. Three Gentoo developers had talks this year, Haubi was back with a Gentoo-related talk on Unix?

  • Arch monthly January

    Arch Linux Trusted Users, Developers and members of the Security team have been at FOSDEM. Next year there will be more stickers hopefully and maybe a talk, but it was great to meet some Arch users in real life, discuss and even hack on the Security Tracker.

KDE: KMyMoney 5.0.0, Plasma 5.12, Qt Creator 4.6 Beta, AtCore

Filed under
KDE
  • KMyMoney 5.0.0 released

    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present version 5.0.0 of its open source Personal Finance Manager.

    As with every release, the KMyMoney development team has been working hard to make this release better and easier to use in every way. We have also made quite a few improvements. We are confident you will like what you see.

    The largest amount of work has gone towards basing this version on KDE Frameworks. Many of the underlying libraries used by the application have been reorganized and improved, but most of that is behind the scenes, and not directly visible to the end user. Some of the general look and feel may have changed, but the basic functionality of the program remains the same, aside from intentional improvements and additions.

  • KMyMoney 5.0 Released, Ported To KDE Frameworks 5

    KMyMoney, the KDE personal finance manager program, has reached version 5.0 and with that big "5" release it's been ported to KDE Frameworks 5.

    KMyMoney 5.0 is now running on KDE Frameworks 5 and the many changes involved there with adapting to new/updated libraries. There has also been bug fixes along the way, improvements to generating money reports, support for logarithmic axes in report graphics, support for more currencies, and a variety of bug fixes both user-facing and other internal code improvements.

  • Plasma 5.12 LTS is in KDE neon User Editions

    Plasma 5.12 LTS was launched today after some months focusing on speed and stability of the original and best Linux desktop.

    We’ve updated the packages in KDE neon User Edition and in KDE neon User LTS Edition. The installable image is also updated.

  • Plasma 5.12.0

    Plasma 5.12 LTS is the second long-term support release from the Plasma 5 team. We have been working hard, focusing on speed and stability for this release. Boot time to desktop has been improved by reviewing the code for anything which blocks execution. The team has been triaging and fixing bugs in every aspect of the codebase, tidying up artwork, removing corner cases, and ensuring cross-desktop integration. For the first time, we offer our Wayland integration on long-term support, so you can be sure we will continue to provide bug fixes and improvements to the Wayland experience.

  • The future of distros

    Today KDE released Plasma 5.12 with Long Term Support–the culmination of more than a year of work. It’s really awesome, and we think you’ll love it!

  • Qt Creator 4.6 Beta released

    The possibly most noteworthy and least directly visible change is that we upgraded the backend for the Clang code model from Clang 3.9 to Clang 5.0. This enables support for many C++17 features that were not available in Clang 3.9. The Clang code model is not used by default. Open Help > About Plugins (Qt Creator > About Plugins on macOS) and turn on the ClangCodeModel plugin to enable it.

  • Qt Creator 4.6 Beta Rolls Out With C++17 Features, Navigation Improvements

    The Qt Company this morning announced the beta availability of the Qt Creator 4.6 integrated development environment.

    While it has been two months to the day since the Qt Creator 4.5 release, there is a fair amount of changes in store for the Qt Creator 4.6 release.

    Thanks to Qt Creator 4.6 Beta upgrading its Clang code model back-end from v3.9 to v5.0, there is now support for many more C++17 features. Qt Creator 4.6 also now allows for integrating Clang-Tidy and Clazy warnings into diagnostic messages within the C++ editor.

  • AtCore: 100 Downloads \o/

    Last week we made the first release of AtCore. But before that, we left AtCore on the beta version for more than a month until the 1.0 release. With the 3 months that AtCore is out for public use, we didn’t receive any bug report, but a lot of congrats and feature requests.

Security: Windows, WiFi Routers, Privacy and More

Filed under
Security
  • The worst types of ransomware attacks [Ed: Windows]
  • All versions' of Windows vulnerable to tweaked Shadow Broker NSA exploits

    A security researcher has revealed how sophisticated NSA exploits, which were stolen and published online by hacker group Shadow Brokers, can be tweaked to exploit vulnerabilities in all versions of Windows, including Windows 10.

    Back in 2016, the hacker group named Shadow Brokers stole weaponised cyber-tools from the US National Security Agency and published them online, thereby enabling other cyber- criminals to use the tools to attack targeted organisations and to gain access to systems.

  • Leaked NSA Exploits Modified To Attack Every Windows Version Since 2000

    Probably, the most famous of the NSA tools leaked by the hacker group Shadow Brokers was EnternalBlue which gave birth to dangerous malware like WannaCry, Petya, and more recently, the cryptojacking malware WannaMine.

    Now, Sean Dillion, a security researcher at RiskSense, has modified the source code of three other leaked NSA tools called EnternalRomance, EternalChampion, and EnternalSynergy. In the past, he also ported the EternalBlue exploit to work on Windows 10.

  • WiFi Routers Riddled With Holes: Report [Ed: default passwords]

    Insignary, a startup security firm based in South Korea, conducted comprehensive binary code scans for known security vulnerabilities in WiFi routers. The company conducted scans across a spectrum of the firmware used by the most popular home, small and mid-sized business and enterprise-class WiFi routers.

  • As data protection laws strengthen open-source software governance becomes critical [Ed: Nothing to do with FOSS. Proprietary software has more holes and some cannot/will not be patched.]

    The cadence of delivery isn’t hampered by new layers of governance (as using automated security audits allows for real-time testing as new code is developed). And with accurate audit trails, organisations can prove the extent to which they have gone, to ensure secure code that culminates in safe and compliant applications.

  • Episode 81 - Autosploit, bug bounties, and the future of security

New Linux User? Try These 8 Great Essential Linux Apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

When you are new to Linux, even if you are not new to computers in general, one of the problems you will face is which apps to use. With millions of Linux apps, the choice is certainly not easy. Below you will find eight (out of millions) essential Linux apps to get you settled in quickly.

Most of these apps are not exclusive to Linux. If you have used Windows/Mac before, chances are you are familiar with some of them. Depending on what your needs and interests are, you might not need all these apps, but in my opinion, most or all of the apps on this list are useful for newbies who are just starting out on Linux.

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Also: Missing Microsoft Office? Try SoftMaker Office 2018 for Linux

Kali Linux 2018.1 Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Welcome to our first release of 2018, Kali Linux 2018.1. This fine release contains all updated packages and bug fixes since our 2017.3 release last November. This release wasn’t without its challenges–from the Meltdown and Spectre excitement (patches will be in the 4.15 kernel) to a couple of other nasty bugs, we had our work cut out for us but we prevailed in time to deliver this latest and greatest version for your installation pleasure.

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Kernel: Hardware Support, D-Bus, GCC 8, Linux 4.16

Filed under
Linux
  • Dell / Lenovo / ASUS / Acer Laptop Platform Driver Updates For Linux 4.16

    Darren Hart of VMware's Open-Source Technology Center sent out the platform-drivers-x86 updates today for the Linux 4.16 kernel.

  • D-Bus Broker 10 Released

    What you won't find landing in the current in-development Linux 4.16 kernel is BUS1, the in-kernel IPC mechanism built out of the failure of KDBUS to reach the mainline kernel. While BUS1 isn't ready for mainline yet, D-Bus Broker continues moving along as a D-Bus compatible message bus delivering higher performance and reliability.

  • Linux Kernel's GCC-Plugins Infrastructure Now Supports GCC 8

    The GCC 8 stable compiler (GCC 8.1) should be officially released in the next month or two and Linux 4.16's gcc-plugins infrastructure is picking up support for this annual update to the GNU Compiler Collection.

  • Linux 4.16 Picking Up Another SMP Optimization

    Last week Ingo Molnar sent in the main batch of scheduler updates for the Linux 4.16 kernel merge window, which included smarter task migration to try to yield better scalability, while today a second set of updates were sent in with an additional SMP optimization.

    The optimization work last week and the new set of tweaks sent in today come courtesy of Linux developer Mel Gorman. The SMP balancing optimizations sent in via this pull request should provide some benefits in some situations, particularly if using the XFS file-system.

Games: Deep Sixed, Guts and Glory, MXGP3, Pocket Universe : Create Your Community

Filed under
Gaming

Qt Creator 4.6 Beta released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.6 Beta!
C++ Support

The possibly most noteworthy and least directly visible change is that we upgraded the backend for the Clang code model from Clang 3.9 to Clang 5.0. This enables support for many C++17 features that were not available in Clang 3.9. The Clang code model is not used by default. Open Help > About Plugins (Qt Creator > About Plugins on macOS) and turn on the ClangCodeModel plugin to enable it.

Read more

Also: Qt Creator 4.6 Beta Rolls Out With C++17 Features, Navigation Improvements

MATE 1.20 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After 11 months of development the MATE Desktop team are pleased as punch to announce the release of MATE Desktop 1.20. We’d like to thank every MATE contributor for their help making this release possible.

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Linux Foundation and OPNFV Verified Program (OVP)​

Filed under
Linux
  • OPNFV Certifies NFV Infrastructure Via Verification Program

    The OPNFV open source project today announced its OPNFV Verified Program (OVP), which will bring consistency to certification of network functions virtualization (NFV) components at the infrastructure level.

    OPNFV has been helping vendors and service providers by testing NFV components across various open source ecosystems. Its new OVP initiative will formalize this process and even provide a “OVP certified” logo to components that comply.

  • OPNFV verification program establishes testing, deployment methods to simplify NFV adoption

    The​ OPNFV Project​ has introduced the OPNFV Verified Program (OVP)​ with an eye toward simplifying adoption of commercial NFV products. ​

    ​OVP establishes an industry threshold based on OPNFV capabilities and test cases. Users can get started at the new ​OPNFV Verified portal​.

  • OPNFV Verification Program to Simplify Commercial NFV Adoption

    The OPNFV Project, an open source project within The Linux Foundation that facilitates the development and evolution of Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) components across various open source ecosystems through integration, deployment, and testing, today announced the availability of the OPNFV Verified Program (OVP).

This open-source Echo rival respects your privacy and doesn’t want to sell you anything

Filed under
Linux
OSS

While a real butler will cost you a fortune in wages, digital assistants are cheap and plentiful – and with names almost as archaic as Jeeves, to boot. Alexa, Bixby, Cortana, Siri and Google Assistant all want your business, but there’s a reason the prices are so tempting: each is backed by a massive company very keen to tempt you into its ecosystem for targeted advertising, direct sales or general company revenue.

This week’s crowdfund is different: a smart speaker that has a refreshing desire not to sell at you. Alphr readers, meet Mycroft.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
  •  
  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

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