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Saturday, 28 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 10:51am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 10:35am
Story Why Linus Torvalds Doesn’t Like Using Debian Or Ubuntu Linux? Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 10:09am
Story A Minitel Terminal As A USB Linux Terminal Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 10:04am
Story Made-in-Vietnam open-source software supports IPv6 Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 9:48am
Story PS4 with Linux Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 9:45am
Story Time to choose: Are you investing in open source or not? Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 9:30am
Story Driving cars into the future with Linux Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 9:25am
Story BeagleBone Green Wireless, a Raspberry Pi 3 Competitor, Ships with Built-in WiFi Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 2:03am
Story Raspberry Pi-based signage stack gets Snappy Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2016 - 2:01am

How Fuzzing Can Make A Large Open Source Project More Secure

Filed under
OSS
Security

Emily Ratliff of the Linux Foundation explains the considerations to take when planning to fuzz your open source project

One of the best practices for secure development is dynamic analysis. Among such techniques, fuzzing has been highly popular since its invention and a multitude of fuzzing tools of varying sophistication have been developed.

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Also: Despite New FCC Rules, Linksys, Asus Say They'll Still Support Third Party Router Firmware

Ubuntu, Juju, Kubernetes and the DevOps DISCO [VIDEO]

Filed under
Ubuntu

There is no shortage of different ways to deploy and manage applications on servers in 2016. Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu Linux and Canonical Inc., has been advocating for the use of Juju and its system of "charms" to help manage server applications since 2011 with the release of Ubuntu 11.10, the "Oneiric Ocelot."

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Also: Portable Apps for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Now Available for Download

Orca Screen Reader Updated for GNOME 3.20.2 with Performance Improvements

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

The Orca open-source screen reader and magnifier software used by default in numerous GNU/Linux operating systems has been updated today, May 16, 2016, to version 3.20.2.

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Arch Linux and SparkyLinux Are Among the First Distros to Offer Linux Kernel 4.6

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel 4.6 was officially announced, as expected, on May 15, 2016, by Linus Torvalds, and we were just wondering which GNU/Linux distributions will be the first to adopt it.

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Wine 1.9.10

Filed under
Software

ChaletOS 16.04 Transforms Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Into a Windows 10 Lookalike

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

ChaletOS developer Dejan Petrovic today published a quick tutorial to teach users of his ChaletOS 16.04 operating system how to transform their desktops into Windows 10 lookalikes.

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ChaletOS 16.04 Linux Arrives for Windows Refugees, Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
OS
Linux

Today, May 16, 2016, Dejan Petrovic has had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of his newest ChaletOS operating system.

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BeagleBone Green Wireless adds WiFi, BLE, USBs

Filed under
Linux

The module also includes Bluetooth 4.1 Low Energy (BLE) with support for Bluetooth Advanced Audio Distribution Profile (A2DP) for stereo-quality audio control in automation projects. The Green Wireless SBC also supports Node-RED for wired IoT, and it integrates with the MRAA library, “so users can program with more Grove modules,” says the company.

Features borrowed from the BeagleBone Green and Black include the ability to run Linux on a 1GHz, Cortex-A8 TI Sitara AM3359 SoC with an Imagination PowerVR SGX530 GPU and a programmable PRU subsystem for industrial I/O. The 3.4 x 2.1-inch SBC similarly supplies 512MB of DDR3 RAM, 4GB of eMMC flash, and a microSD slot.

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Receives Minor Kernel Update That Patches Two Vulnerabilities

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Today, May 16, 2016, Canonical published multiple security notices to inform the Ubuntu community about the availability of a new kernel update for their operating systems.

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New Arduino Srl SBC merges Arduino, WiFi, and Linux

Filed under
Linux

Arduino Srl’s new “Arduino Industrial 101” SBC includes Arduino circuitry and I/O, along with a soldered-on WiFi module that runs Linino Linux.

Last November, Arduino Srl promised an Arduino Industrial 101 carrier board for Dog Hunter’s WiFi-enabled Chiwawa module, which is supported by the OpenWrt-based Linino Linux distribution. Arduino has now unveiled the resulting product: a $40, sandwich-style single board computer with a soldered-on, Arduino-branded version of the Chiwawa module, along with Linino Linux support.

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Mozilla and Linux Foundation Advance New Trends in Open Source Funding

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF
OSS

Who pays for open source development? Increasingly, large organizations like Mozilla and the Linux Foundation. That's the trend highlighted by recent moves like the expansion of the Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) project.

The Mozilla Foundation has long injected money into the open source ecosystem through partnerships with other projects and grants. But it formalized that mission last year by launching MOSS, which originally focused on supporting open source projects that directly complement or help form the basis for Mozilla's own products.

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Review: Rebellin Linux v3 GNOME

Filed under
Linux
GNOME
Reviews

Last week, I finished and passed my generals! This not only means that I can continue doing research here with a roof over my head and with money to feed myself; it also means that I now have the time to get back to doing reviews and posting about other things here. I'm starting this week by reviewing Rebellin Linux.

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Single sign-on improvements in Fedora 24

Filed under
Red Hat

How many times do you wish everything around you was a tiny bit smarter? A door opens automatically when you come in with bags of groceries. A light switches on when you step in. Entering a password twice in a row isn’t required to unlock your email after you logged in into your desktop.

Home automation has improved greatly in the last decade. Numerous sensors and smart switches are cheaper and more accessible every year. For example, offices and shopping malls in Finland have had automatically opening doors for years. Lights in my office switch off to conserve electricity when I’d get too deep into coding or a debugging session. Darkness is a result of me not moving much in my chair, as if I froze or need to be kicked out for a run.

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The need for Open source skills in Africa

Filed under
OSS

Despite the fact that OS skills development is nothing new, the subtle changes in business requirements over the years mean the need has progressed beyond foundational skills. Today, companies are looking for people who have more advanced OS skills reflecting a more dynamic, connected business landscape.

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Mozilla MOSS and Security

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla and Linux Foundation Advance New Trends in Open Source Funding

    Who pays for open source development? Increasingly, large organizations like Mozilla and the Linux Foundation. That's the trend highlighted by recent moves like the expansion of the Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) project.

    The Mozilla Foundation has long injected money into the open source ecosystem through partnerships with other projects and grants. But it formalized that mission last year by launching MOSS, which originally focused on supporting open source projects that directly complement or help form the basis for Mozilla's own products.

  • Mozilla Extends its MOSS Program, Providing Funding for Open Source Projects

    Mozilla isn't alone in funding open source development outside its own purview. The Linux Foundation and other organizations are well known for providing such funding. Mozilla is now spreading its MOSS effort even wider, though. It is adding a second track for MOSS called “Mission Partners” which is open to any open source project in the world which is undertaking an activity that meaningfully furthers Mozilla’s mission.

  • The FBI and the Mozilla Foundation Lock Horns over Known Security Hole

    The Mozilla Foundation and the FBI recently have clashed over security weaknesses. The FBI is aware of a weakness in the Tor browser that may affect Firefox—it's a weakness the FBI has exploited during an investigation.

    Mozilla wants the FBI to reveal the details of the exploit ahead of the trial, but the FBI is playing its cards close to its chest. Because of the potential risk to its users, Mozilla has turned to the courts to force the FBI to reveal its information.

    It's just the latest of several high-profile cases this year concerning security and privacy. Each of these cases has involved the Federal government and software firms or communities. For the average guy on the street, it's just business as usual. But for those who keep an ear to the ground, it's hard not to read between the lines.

Manjaro Linux 16.06 Release Candidate 1 Is Out with Linux Kernel 4.6 Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today, May 16, 2016, Philip Müller proudly announced the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC1) build of the highly anticipated Manjaro Linux 16.06 "Daniella" computer operating system based on Arch Linux.

Early adopters can now jump into the Manjaro Linux 16.06 RC bandwagon and take the upcoming for a test drive on their personal computers, as the team of skilled developers led by Philip Müller have done a great job in the past few months to make the Arch Linux-based distro as stable and reliable as possible.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Top 10 alternative to Notepad++ in Linux

    No doubt that notepad ++ is a fabulous application for programming and general text editing, itr os one of the best know text editor. But, sometimes a administrator or programmer required a text editor with more rich features which can not be fulfilled by ordinary text editor, there are many text editors/IDE which can be used in place of notepad++, in this lesson we will discuss 10 alternative to notepad++ in Linux.

  • New Version Of Linux Email Client `Geary` Released [PPA]

    Geary is an email client that uses a simple, modern interface, especially created for GNOME 3. Geary 0.11.0, released today, includes new features, improved server compatibility and network reliability, and various bug fixes.

  • WebTorrent Desktop 0.4.0 Released With Subtitles Support, More

    WebTorrent Desktop was updated to version 0.4.0 recently, receiving subtitles support, new "Create torrent" page and more.

  • Snap – I’ve got the package!

    Ba-ba-bam. Now, the number of puns and historic and cultural references that can be applied here is way, way too high. We have the mandatory Eurodance homage, but also the Google Chrome throw-a-hissy page and the Lonely Island Mother Lover song words. All good and well. But have you thought about Ubuntu, at all?

    Snap is the name of the new application packaging format for the Ubuntu core system. It differs from the standard RPM and DEB and whatnot in that it contains all the dependencies required to run the program, so you do not really rely on the underlying system capabilities. In other words, this is the first attempt by Canonical to create portable Ubuntu applications. Welcome.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Some new Breeze app icons in Frameworks 5.22

    Some icons I made, you can find them in KDE Frameworks 5.22

    The QOwnNotes icon became the official one. Give to this app a try, it’s super.

  • The initiation

    What will I be doing you ask? Well, as some people know Krita on Mac OS X is not quite there yet. Some of the new cool functionality added to Krita 3.0 is forcefully omitted from the OS X release. Deep down in the depths of Krita painting we paint decorations using Qt's kindly provided QPainter class. This class allows us to make pretty lines and shapes very easily, and is perfectly suited to drawing all of the overlay functionality (such as grids, cursors, guides, etc.). What could possibly go wrong there? Well, even though we are grateful to have such easy rendering functionality, the backend of those functions haven't exactly kept up with the times.

  • QtCon Call for Papers Extended!

    What have you been working on lately that you’d like to share at a QtCon talk? The Qt Community of developers wants to hear from you! Submit your proposal by Friday and get a chance to contribute to this one-off, unique Event in Berlin.

  • Care to help test Plasma 5.6.4?
  • Compiling all of Qt5, KF5, Plasma5, kdepim5, apps...

    I see a very high value in compiling my own Qt, and on top of it all the KDE-made software that I use. This makes it very easy to fix bugs and add improvements to the software I use on a day to day basis. Nowadays I think many developers use distro packages for Qt or KF5 or even the whole environment except for the one app they're working on, but in my opinion this leads to "silo" thinking, with workarounds in upper layers rather than fixing issues at the right place.

    So, here's a working and easy recipe for compiling all the Qt-based software you use.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Oracle Desperate

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Friday's security updates
  • Judge Says The FBI Can Keep Its Hacking Tool Secret, But Not The Evidence Obtained With It
    Michaud hasn't had the case against him dismissed, but the government will now have to rely on evidence it didn't gain access to by using its illegal search. And there can't be much of that, considering the FBI had no idea who Michaud was or where he resided until after the malware-that-isn't-malware had stripped away Tor's protections and revealed his IP address. The FBI really can't blame anyone but itself for this outcome. Judge Bryan may have agreed that the FBI had good reason to keep its technique secret, but there was nothing preventing the FBI from voluntarily turning over details on its hacking tool to Michaud. But it chose not to, despite his lawyer's assurance it would maintain as much of the FBI's secrecy as possible while still defending his client. Judge Bryan found the FBI's ex parte arguments persuasive and declared the agency could keep the info out of Michaud's hands. But doing so meant the judicial playing field was no longer level, as he acknowledged in his written ruling. Fortunately, the court has decided it's not going to allow the government to have its secrecy cake and eat it, too. If it wants to deploy exploits with minimal judicial oversight, then it has to realize it can't successfully counter suppression requests with vows of silence.
  • Researcher Pockets $30,000 in Chrome Bounties
    Having cashed in earlier in May to the tune of $15,500, Mlynski pocketed another $30,000 courtesy of Google’s bug bounty program after four high-severity vulnerabilities were patched in the Chrome browser, each worth $7,500 to the white-hat hacker.