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Sunday, 24 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mesa 17.2.1 Released Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2017 - 9:17am
Story GNOME 3.26 is Available on Ubuntu Artful, Video Tour of Beta Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2017 - 9:15am
Story Mageia 6 Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2017 - 8:15am
Story BlackArch Linux A Pentesting Linux Distribution Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2017 - 8:10am
Story Replicant 6.0 Free Software Android Updated To Support 12 Devices Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2017 - 8:05am
Story Kernel: Linux Foundation, 4.14 RC1 and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2017 - 11:44pm
Story OSS: Jobs, Documentation, Being a FOSS Maintainer, and LinuxChix Meetup Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2017 - 11:40pm
Story GNOME and KDE: Dash to Dock, GNOME Shell, Librem 5, Krita and Randa Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2017 - 11:37pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2017 - 11:35pm
Story Red Hat: Oracle's Clone, GNU Work (GCC), Finance and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2017 - 11:32pm

Microsoft EEE and Openwashing: the Latest

Filed under
Microsoft

Hands On: Keeping a very old laptop useful with Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

About four years ago (Nov 2013) I bought a used, refurbished Lenovo T400 laptop computer and docking station. It was already about four years old at that time (most of the original product announcements and hands-on reviews I can find are from 2009), and another four years have gone by now, so I think it would be useful to have another look at it and see how it is holding up.

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Red Hat: Partnership, Shares, and Nominations Open for 2018 Red Hat Innovation Awards

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Red Hat

Vorke V2 Plus Mini PC – Ubuntu PC with Impressive Features

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

The Vorke V2 Mini PC is the latest to hit the market to compete with other mini PCs in the mini arena.

If you are looking for a mini PC that can get the job done, then take a look at the Vorke V2 Plus PC. This mini PC packs a lot of premium components into an ultra-portable housing that can fix right in the palm of your hand.
The Vorke V2 Plus has support for stunning 4K resolution thanks to the onboard Intel HD 620 graphics which deliver 1.5x better pixel production over the previous model. You can even tuck Vorke securely behind any monitor or TV that supports a VESA bracket.

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Also: Ubuntu devs look at making apt index files smaller

Manjaro Linux Now Has Its Very Own Laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux users who’ve dreamed of buying a laptop that runs Manjaro Linux can wake up happy — one has just been announced. The ‘Station X Spitfire Manjaro Special Edition’ is the first Manjaro-based laptop from UK-based computer sellers Station X.

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Security: Minnesota, Equifax, Virginia, Kaspersky, F-35

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Security

KDE: Kirigami Framework and KDE Applications 17.08

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Frameworks Now Shipping with Kirigami Framework for Building Convergent UIs

    After launching the first point release of the KDE Applications 17.08 software suite, the KDE project announced this week the release of KDE Frameworks 5.38.0, the monthly update to the open-source collection of add-on libraries for the latest Qt 5 technologies.

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Gets First Point Release, More Than 20 Bugs Got Squashed

    Right on the schedule, the latest stable KDE Applications 17.08 software suite got its first point release, versioned 17.08.1, this week, fixing more than 20 recorded bugs and improving support for several KDE apps.

    As expected, KDE Applications 17.08.1 is a bug fix release, addressing various of the bugs, crashes, and other issues reported by users since the launch of the KDE Applications 17.08 stable series in mid-August 2017. Numerous KDE apps received improvements, including bug not limited to Akonadi, Minuet, Akregator, Kdenlive, Ark, Cantor, Cervisia, Gwenview, JuK, Umbrello, Okular, Konsole, and Kontact.

GNOME: A Look At The New Features Of GNOME 3.26, Mutter, WebDriver Support in WebKitGTK+ 2.18

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GNOME
  • A Look At The New Features Of GNOME 3.26

    GNOME 3.26 is the project's latest six-month update to this open-source desktop environment to be used now by Ubuntu 17.10, Fedora 27, and others. I have been testing out the near-final GNOME 3.26 packages via the Fedora 27 repository over the weekend. Overall it's been a stable and good experience. Some of the new features or changes of GNOME 3.26 are outlined below.

  • GNOME's Mutter Loses Some Of Its X11 Dependence

    One of the interesting Google Summer of Code projects this year associated with the GNOME project was on reworking the Mutter compositor from requiring X11/XWayland code-paths for starting the Wayland compositor.

    Student developer Armin Krezović worked to address the issue that even when Mutter is acting as a Wayland compostior rather than just an X window manager, the X11 support is still present and there's a hard dependency on XWayland being present, even if it goes unused. Armin was partially successful in his summer work in allowing Mutter to act as a Wayland-only compositor, free from any XWayland support if so desired.

  • WebDriver support in WebKitGTK+ 2.18

    WebDriver is an automation API to control a web browser. It allows to create automated tests for web applications independently of the browser and platform. WebKitGTK+ 2.18, that will be released next week, includes an initial implementation of the WebDriver specification.

Red Hat: Oracle's Clone, Financial News, and Fedora

OSS: A Case for Open Source, SF Open Source Voting and More

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OSS
  • Interoperability: A Case for Open Source - GC@MC Commentary

    Catastrophe (cat) risk models are fundamental tools for insurers, reinsurers, emergency planners, urban planners, and every business or government entity impacted by natural catastrophes. Since their creation by commercial vendors, computerized models have been essential for risk selection, assessing capital adequacy and measuring profitability, and are critical in both the public and private sectors for catastrophe and emergency response management.

    “For over 25 years, these models have led us on a journey toward increased risk understanding,” says Peter Hearn, President and CEO, Guy Carpenter, “a journey that now continues with the availability of open source model environments. Clients and regulators alike want to bring transparency, increased competition, and lower costs to the existing ‘black box’ model so companies can develop their own view of risk.”

    “The challenge with the ‘black box’ model is people don’t understand the input and output, which are key decision-making variables for insurers and reinsurers.” He explains, “Insurers and reinsurers have a fiduciary obligation to understand their risks and the models used to evaluate that risk. Insurers must also be empowered to better communicate their risk management decisions to shareholders, policyholders and regulators. When companies can make more informed decisions, they are better stewards for the industry and can potentially offer more products and protection to the marketplace.”

  • SF Open Source Voting - September 2017 Update / Newsletter

    The 5-member, newly formed Open Source Voting System Technical Advisory Committee (OSVTAC) has now held two meetings at SF City Hall, and things are moving along quickly. The committee now has its own website (hosted on GitHub).

    At its second meeting, the committee approved the first iteration of its document of recommendations for the open source voting project. You can read the document online. Just like the committee's website, the recommendations are also hosted on GitHub. The recommendations are being developed in a way similar to how open-source software is developed. In addition to conventional methods like email, members of the public can also submit comments or suggested wording on GitHub, just like with open-source code. The committee will be able to discuss and vote on these suggestions at monthly meetings.

    One key difference from an open source project though is that because of state and local open meeting laws, committee members aren't allowed to collaborate as a group outside of noticed meetings. This approach of soliciting public feedback on GitHub is a bit like how the Whitehouse solicited feedback on its draft source code policy last year.

  • We need to talk about the social media silos

    I suppose with the rise of Google and especially Facebook, this has changed: Free software has lost the battle for nothing less than electronic communication between human beings to a proprietary behemoth, and it is already – exemplified in a very minor and random way by the Guaraní – doing serious damage to democracy, to freedom of speech and to civil society in general.

  • Presearch is building a blockchain-based search engine

    Presearch is a Canadian crypto-startup building a blockchain-based search engine to take on Google. It is officially described as a decentralized search engine powered by the community.

    As with crypto-starttups, the company is giving everybody the opportunity to get in on the ground floor by way of a token sale. Actually, this is the Lot 3 token sale, and each token is going for $0.15 USD, and you can get those after you create an account using BTC, ETH, or USD.

Software: VLC, OpenShot, OBS Studio, Caffeine

Filed under
Software
  • VLC Has Begun Working On Some 3D Video Playback Support

    It's been a while since last having anything to report on with VLC with the VLC 3.0 release still not available, but thanks to this year's Google Summer of Code, there was an interesting project around working on 3D format support.

    Mohammed Huzaifa is the student developer who spent the summer working on 3D support for libVLC.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Open-Source Video Editor Adds New Freeze & Zoom Presets, Many Fixes

    Jonathan Thomas, the creator of the open-source and cross-platform OpenShot video editor, announced OpenShot 2.4, a major release that adds new freeze and freeze & zoom presets, improves stability, as well as undo/redo history.

    First and foremost, OpenShot 2.4 wants to be a stability release that fixes a bunch of bugs and issues reported by users since previous versions of the applications. Most importantly, it addresses a nasty issue that was apparently the leading cause of numerous crashes. Therefore, it is recommended that all users update to OpenShot 2.4 or later as soon as possible.

  • OBS Studio – Record and Live Stream Videos from Linux Desktop

    OBS Studio is a free and open source cross-platform app with which you can create video records of your desktop screen and also live stream directly.

    You can use it to conveniently share your gaming, art, entertainment activities with Twitch.tv, YouTube, Hitbox.tv, DailyMotion, Connectcast.tv, CyberGame.tv, CashPlay.tv along with custom streaming servers free of charge!

  • CobiBird Theme Updated And Available For 17.04 Zesty/16.04 Xenial/Linux Mint 18
  • Caffeine Can Help You Disable Screenlock And Screensaver Temporarily

    Caffeine is pretty famous utility designed for Linux to disable screen-lock and screensaver temporarily so you can focus on what you are doing on your system. It stays in the panel and fairly straightforward application. It can be useful either you are working or listening or watching something that players don't prevent computer from going into sleep mode or prevent screensaver.

    Without caffeine you need to go to power management in the system settings then disable sleep and also screensaver, Caffeine solves this issue and it comes in handy as well because you can activate/deactivate it right from system tray just with a single click.

Linux 4.13.1, 4.12.12, and 4.9.49

Filed under
Linux

Laptops/Desktops With GNU/Linux Preinstalled: Talos II, Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Support the Talos II, a candidate for Respects Your Freedom certification, by pre-ordering by September 15

    We've previously supported the work of the folks at Raptor Engineering. This time, rather than a crowdfunding effort, we are asking you to support their work by pre-ordering the Talos II. The system comes in a variety of forms to meet your needs, from a workstation to rack-mounted to the board by itself. Raptor Engineering has put in a great deal of effort researching and prototyping this system, and now it is ready for prime time. The Talos II is great for any hacker who needs a powerful machine, perfect for developing even more free software.

  • FSF To Look At RYF Certification For The POWER9 Talos II

    Last month Raptor Engineering announced the Talos II POWER9-powered workstation that is cheaper than the original Talos Workstation while still aiming to be very free software friendly. The Free Software Foundation will be exploring the possibility of "Respect Your Freedom" certification on this hardware when it's ready to ship.

  • Chrome OS Will Soon Allow All Chromebook Owners to Rename USB Flash Drives

    Google's Chromium evangelist François Beaufort is back with more goodies for Chromebook owners, recently revealing the fact that future versions of Chrome OS will allow users to rename attached USB flash drives.

    A new "Rename" option has been added to the right-click context menu of the Files app on Chrome OS, which allows you to rename an attached USB flash storage devices, be it either a USB stick or an external drive. The renaming feature, which is currently available on the Chrome Canary experimental channel, can also be enabled using the CTRL+Enter keyboard shortcut on your Chromebook.

Canonical Wants to Bring Its Ubuntu Snappy Technologies to Android Devices

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

Canonical announced the release of Snapd 2.27 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Linux and other supported GNU/Linux distributions. This is a major release that adds significant improvements and new features.

The biggest new feature implemented in the Snapd 2.27 release is Android boot support, which should bring the Ubuntu Snappy technologies to a wide range of devices that are powered by Google's Linux-based Android mobile operating system, implementing support for transactional updates.

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Kernel: Linux 4.14 and Jente Hidskes Becomes Maintainer

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Linux

Best KDE Linux Distributions For Your Desktop, Quick Look at Next Kubuntu, and Randa

Filed under
KDE
  • Best KDE Linux Distributions For Your Desktop

    best kde linux distributions for your desktop
    KDE remains one of the most popular desktop environments available for Linux users. KDE prioritizes aesthetics and modernity with a user-friendly computing experience. It also comes with a host of applications and features that complete the experience. But which distro does KDE best? I certainly do not know the right answer but what I can do is share some of KDE's best distros in the market now. Some distros certainly do KDE better than others and if you’ve been burnt before, I bet one of these might change your mind. In no particular order, let’s go.

  • Quick Look at Kubuntu Artful Pre-Release

    This is Kubuntu 17.10 Beta 1 "Artful Aardvark", a pre-release version available for development/testing purpose. For you regular users, you are not supposed to install Beta 1 version, unless you want to simply try it and report bugs to Kubuntu Developers. For you not installing I made this short review to see how amazing Kubuntu Artful is already!

  • ERR (En Route to Randa)

    I’m happy to see KDEnlive Joseph and Grace again, and the PIM dudes (although they seem to have slunk off to one of the meeting rooms for Serious Talks already).

    Tomorrow starts at 7:02, when I have kitchen duty to roll out breakfast for 20-or-so Free Software hackers who are hungry from the fresh mountain air, and then after that it’s time to self-organize and sit down to work.

Games: Shroud of the Avatar, Super Blood Hockey, Dead Acres, Vulture, The End Is Nigh

Filed under
Gaming

Review: Parabola GNU/Linux-libre

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Parabola GNU/Linux-libre is one of a few Linux distributions that meet the Free Software Foundation's (FSF) guidelines for free operating systems. The distribution is based on Arch Linux and ships with the Linux-libre kernel, which doesn't include software for which no source code is available (or which is otherwise proprietary). On top of that Parabola removes any non-free packages from the system.

The distribution is available for the armv7, i686 and x86_64 architectures. The main ISO boots to a command line from where we can manually install the operating system, while a live ISO gives us the MATE desktop and access to a basic graphical installer. Interestingly, it is also possible to migrate from Arch Linux to Parabola.

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CruxEX 2017 Linux Distro Debuts with Revamped LXDE Desktop, Based on CRUX 3.3

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Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is informing us about the release and immediate availability of his CRUX-based CruxEX 3.3 distro, a release that bumps the Linux kernel to the 4.12 series and revamps the LXDE desktop environment.

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More in Tux Machines

XFree KWin, Plasma, KDE, and Qt/GTK

  • Announcing the XFree KWin project
    Over the last weeks I concentrated my work on KWin on what I call the XFree KWin project. The idea is to be able to start KWin/Wayland without XWayland support. While most of the changes required for it are already in Plasma 5.11, not everything got ready in time, but now everything is under review on phabricator, so it’s a good point in time to talk about this project.
  • Adapta Theme is Now Available for the #KDE Plasma Desktop
    A new port brings the Adapta GTK theme to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop for the first time, news that will please fans of its famous flat stylings.
  • A New Project To Let You Run Qt Apps With GTK+ Windowing System Integration
    A Norwegian developer has developed a new Qt platform abstraction plug-in to let Qt applications make use of GTK+ for windowing system integration. The Qt apps rely upon GTK+ as a host toolkit to provide GTK menus, GTK for input, and other integration bits.
  • Ant is a Flat GTK Theme with a Bloody Bite
    Between Arc, Adapta and Numix it kind of feels like Linux has the whole flat GTK theme thing covered. But proving their’s always room for one more is Ant.

Android Leftovers

Development: Blockchain for Good Hackathon, ASUS Tinker Board, React License, JavaScript, Pascal, Python

  • Blockchain for Good Hackathon, Saturday, 30 September and Sunday, 1 October
    The Blockchain for Good Hackathon takes place Saturday, 30 September and Sunday, 1 October. Full agenda can be found here.
  • ASUS Tinker Board Is An Interesting ARM SBC For About $60 USD
    Earlier this year ASUS announced the Tinker Board as their first step into the ARM single board computer world. Earlier this month I finally received a Tinker Board for testing and it has been quite interesting to say the least. The Tinker Board with its Rockchip SoC has been among the most competitive ARM SBCs we have tested to date in its price range and the form factor is compatible with the Raspberry Pi.
  • Configure Thunderbird to send patch friendly
  • Facebook to Relicense React Under MIT [Ed: as we hoped [1, 2]]
    Facebook has decided to change the React license from BSD+Patents to MIT to make it possible for companies to include React in Apache projects, and to avoid uncertain relationship with the open source community. Adam Wolff, an Engineering Director at Facebook, has announced that a number of projects - React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js – will soon start using the more standard MIT License instead of BSD+Patents. The reason provided is "because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons." While aware that the React’s BSD+Patents license has created "uncertainty" among users of the library, prompting some to select an alternative solution, Facebook does not "expect to win these teams back" but they still hope some will reconsider the issue. The change in license will become effective when React 16 will be released next week. Regarding other projects, Wolff said that "many of our popular projects will keep the BSD + Patents license for now", while they are "evaluating those projects' licenses too, but each project is different and alternative licensing options will depend on a variety of factors." It seems from this clause that Facebook plans to get rid of the BSD+Patents license entirely, but they need to figure out the best option for each project. [...] Facebook’s plan to switch to a standard license MIT, supported by Apache, completely solves this problem with React and several other projects. It remains to see what happens with the license of other Facebook projects, and how much this license issue has affected how React is perceived by the community.
  • To type or not to type: quantifying detectable bugs in JavaScript
  • Plug For PASCAL
  • V. Anton Spraul's Think Like a Programmer, Python Edition

New Manjaro Release

What a week we had. With this update we have removed most of our EOL tagged kernels. Please adopt to newer series of each, when still be used. PulseAudio and Gstreamer got renewed. Also most of our kernels got newer point-releases. Series v4.12 is now marked as EOL. Guillaume worked on Pamac to solve reported issues within our v6 series. The user experience should be much better now. Latest NetworkManager, Python and Haskell updates complete this update-pack. Please report back and give us feedback for given changes made to our repositories. Read more