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Friday, 20 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Stable kernels 4.9.94, 4.4.128 and 3.18.105 Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 12:14am
Story Compact aircraft computer takes flight with Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 11:55pm
Story Games: Ryan Gordon, Voxel Turf, System Shock Roy Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 11:50pm
Story Free Software Foundation's Conference and Free Software Directory Meetup Roy Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 11:46pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 11:16pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 7:19pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 7:18pm
Story Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Integrates Canonical Livepatch for Rebootless Kernel Updates Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 6:00pm
Story More Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 5:47pm
Story Oracle's Kernel (Linux) Roy Schestowitz 13/04/2018 - 4:35pm

Early Features Begin Receiving Approval For Fedora 29

Filed under
Red Hat

Today was another weekly Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo). We had been looking forward to this meeting for a decision on the GNOME auto-suspend by default behavior but there wasn't a quorum and that topic was then diverted until next week. But there were also early Fedora 29 features approved this week.

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Ubuntu: Ubuntu 18.04 Preparations

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 Gives Nautilus a Striking New Look

    There’s a rather large visual change in Ubuntu 18.04 that I’ve only just noticed.

    It’s not because the change in question is subtle or easy to miss. It’s because I have only just booted up a copy of the Bionic Beaver thanks to the release of Ubuntu 18.04 beta 2.

  • Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS 'Bionic Beaver' Beta 2 now available

    Ubuntu Linux 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" is almost here -- it is due on April 26. In the interim, today, the second -- and final -- beta becomes available. Bionic Beaver is very significant, as it is an LTS version, meaning "Long Term Support." This is important to those that prefer stability to bleeding edge and don't want to deal with the hassle of upgrades. In other words, you can install 18.04 and be confident that it will be supported for 5 years. In comparison, non-LTS Ubuntu versions get a mere 9 months.

    There is plenty to be excited about with Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS 'Bionic Beaver' Beta 2, including the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment -- Beta 1 did not include GNOME at all. Of course, all the other DE flavors are available too, such as KDE and Xfce. The kernel is at 4.15, which while not the most current version, is still quite modern. Also included is LibreOffice 6.0 -- an essential tool that rivals Microsoft Office. Wayland is available as a technical preview, although X remains the default display server -- for now.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 Final Beta Available to Download

    USB thumb drives at the ready as the Ubuntu 18.04 beta download is now available for testing.

    This release marks the first official testing snapshot of what will become Ubuntu 18.04 LTS later this month.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Final Beta Released
  • Ubuntu Studio 18.04 Bionic Beaver Beta is released!

    The beta of the upcoming release of Ubuntu Studio 18.04 is ready for testing.

    You may find the images at cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntustudio/releases/bionic/beta-2/. More information can be found in the Beta Release Notes.

  • Ubuntu MATE 18.04 Beta 2

    We are preparing Ubuntu MATE 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) for distribution on April 26th, 2018 With this Beta pre-release, you can see what we are trying out in preparation for our next (stable) version.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Final Beta released

    The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta release of the
    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Desktop, Server, and Cloud products.

    Codenamed "Bionic Beaver", 18.04 LTS continues Ubuntu's proud tradition
    of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a
    high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.  The team has been hard
    at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

    This beta release includes images from not only the Ubuntu Desktop,
    Server, and Cloud products, but also the Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu
    Budgie, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu flavours.

    The beta images are known to be reasonably free of showstopper CD
    build or installer bugs, while representing a very recent snapshot of
    18.04 that should be representative of the features intended to ship
    with the final release expected on April 26th, 2018.

Games: Tomb Raider, System Shock, BadLands RoadTrip, Nantucket and More

Filed under
Gaming

Mozilla: Rust, Firefox Performance and MDN

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The Rust Team All Hands in Berlin: a Recap

    Last week we held an “All Hands” event in Berlin, which drew more than 50 people involved in 15 different Rust Teams or Working Groups, with a majority being volunteer contributors. This was the first such event, and its location reflects the current concentration of team members in Europe. The week was a smashing success which we plan to repeat on at least an annual basis.

    The impetus for this get-together was, in part, our ambitious plans to ship Rust, 2018 edition later this year. A week of work-focused facetime was a great way to kick off these efforts!

    We’ve also asked attendees to blog and tweet about their experiences at the #RustAllHands hashtag; the Content Team will be gathering up and summarizing this content as well.

  • Proposal: Knowledge Base Spring Cleaning at SUMO – June 2018
  • Firefox Performance Update #5

    And here we are with another Firefox Performance Update!

    This performance update is brought to you by perf.html! perf.html is our web-based profile analysis tool. We use it to analyze profiles gathered with the Gecko Profiler Add-on which helps us figure out why Firefox is feeling slow or sluggish. It’s probably the most important performance tool in our toolbox.

  • MDN Changelog for March 2018

KDE Ships Release Candidate of KDE Applications 18.04

Filed under
KDE

April 6, 2018. Today KDE released the release candidate of the new versions of KDE Applications. With dependency and feature freezes in place, the KDE team's focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing.

Check the community release notes for information on tarballs and known issues. A more complete announcement will be available for the final release

The KDE Applications 18.04 releases need a thorough testing in order to maintain and improve the quality and user experience. Actual users are critical to maintaining high KDE quality, because developers simply cannot test every possible configuration. We're counting on you to help find bugs early so they can be squashed before the final release. Please consider joining the team by installing the release candidate and reporting any bugs.

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Also: KDE Applications 18.04 Release Candidate Arrives

MX Linux: A Mid-Weight Distro Focused on Simplicity

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

MX Linux makes transitioning from just about any desktop operating system simple. Although some might find the desktop interface to be a bit less-than-modern, the distribution’s primary focus isn’t on beauty, but simplicity. To that end, MX Linux succeeds in stellar fashion. This flavor of Linux can make anyone feel right at home on Linux. Spin up this mid-weight distribution and see if it can’t serve as your daily driver.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Huawei Unveils Open Source DMM Project That Redesigns the Protocol Stack Container in Networking

    At the 2018 Open Networking Summit North America, Huawei introduced the new Dual Modes, Multi-Protocols, Multi-Instances (DMM) open source project—a protocol stack framework—which elevates different protocol stacks for networking application developers. DMM is a Fast Data Project and a part of the FD.io community, which is tailored for open source software and aims to provide high-performance networking solutions. Leveraging Huawei's expertise in providing cost-effective network solutions to customers, DMM will make it possible to use diverse protocol stacks for different apps, as well as simplify the process of developing a new protocol stack. This new framework will provide the enterprise industry with a more open, pluralistic, and reliable networking solution.

  • FOSSASIA experience

    I spend most of my time at the Debian booth. People swing by the booth and they talked about their experience with Debian. It was fun to meet them all. Prior to the conference I created a wiki page to coordinate Debian booth at exhibition which really helped.

    I met three Debian Developers - Chow Loong Jin (hyperair), Andrew Lee 李健秋 (ajqlee) and Héctor Orón Martínez (zumbi). Andrew Lee and zumbi also volunteered at Debian booth from time to time along with Balasankar ‘balu’ C (balasankarc). Hyperair was sitting at HackerspaceSG booth, just two booth across from us.

  • uBlock Origin is Back-to-Back March Addonness Champion

    It’s been three weeks and we’ve almost run out of sports metaphors. We’re happy to announce that after three rounds and thousands of votes you have crowned uBlock Origin March Addonness champion for the second year in a row!

  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: April 6th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC
  • Guix & reproducible builds at LibrePlanet 2018

    LibrePlanet, the yearly free software conference organized by the Free Software Foundation, took place a week ago. Among the many great talks and workshops, David Thompson, a core Guix developer also working as a DevOps, presented many aspects of Guix and GuixSD in his talk, Practical, verifiable software freedom with GuixSD (video, slides).

  • How to create an impact map for teams

    Give impact mapping a try and let us know how it works for you. You can use any mind map software to create your first impact map, but you might prefer to start with pen and paper and sticky notes, or even a nice clean whiteboard.

  • Is Python a Good Choice for Entrerprise Projects?

    If you follow me for a long time, you know I've been doing Python for more than ten years now and even wrote two books about it. So while I'm obviously biased, and before writing a reply, I would also like to take a step back and reassure you, dear reader, that I've used plenty of other programming languages those last 20 years: Perl, C, PHP, Lua, Lisp, Java, etc. I've built tiny to big projects with some of them, and I consider that Lisp is the best programming language.

Mainstream academia embraces open source hardware

Filed under
OSS

Twenty years ago, even staunch proponents of free and open source software like Richard Stallman questioned the social imperative for free hardware designs. Academics had barely started to consider the concept; the number of papers coming out annually on the topic were less than could be counted on someone's fingers.

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Submitting my first patch to the Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

I started using Linux three years ago while attending university, and I was fascinated to discover a different desktop environment. My professor introduced me to the Ubuntu operating system, and I decided to dual-boot it along with Windows on my laptop the same day.

Within three months, I had completely abandoned Windows and shifted to Fedora after hearing about the RPM Package Manager. I also tried running Debian for stability, but in early 2017 I realized Arch Linux suits all my needs for cutting-edge packages. Now I use it along with the KDE desktop and can customize it according to my needs.

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Ubuntu, Lubuntu and Xubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Final Beta Released, Available for Download Now

    Canonical released today the beta development version (a.k.a. Final Beta) of its upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, along with the second beta for opt-in flavors.

    While many of the opt-in Ubuntu flavors participated in last month's beta release, this is the first time Ubuntu 18.04 LTS gets a public beta build that users can actually download and install on their personal computers if they plan on becoming early adopters ahead of the official release later this month.

  • Lubuntu Bionic Beaver Final Beta has been released!

    Lubuntu Bionic Beaver Final Beta (soon to be 18.04) has been released!

    Thanks to the hard work of the Lubuntu team, we are pleased to announce the final beta!

  • Xubuntu 18.04 Community Wallpaper Contest Winners!

    The Xubuntu team are happy to announce the results of the 18.04 community wallpaper contest!

    We want to send out a huge thanks to every contestant; last time we had 92 submissions but now you all made us work much harder in picking the best ones out with a total of 162 submissions!

Software: Flowblade, Linux Package Managers, and Programmers' Tools

Filed under
Software
  • A look at GNU/Linux exclusive Flowblade video editor

    As a journalism student, I deal with both print but also multimedia forms of journalism, on a daily basis.

    Generally speaking, I have always used various Adobe software for my needs, such as Audition for my audio, and Premiere for my video while in school, but I know that there is plenty of awesome and free (albeit I will concede, rarely as fully-featured) software out there that could be used to substitute. One example, is Flowblade.

    Flowblade is a GNU/Linux exclusive, which is pretty cool really, given that nowadays many of the tools and applications people use on GNU/Linux are available for other systems as well. Thankfully, Flowblade is pretty sophisticated, so many may find it to be more of a suitable replacement for other software, than expected from an exclusive.

    Not to be dismissive and say that all GNU/Linux exclusive software is terrible or anything, but its a fairly common opinion of less than stellar software attempting to emulate its Windows counterpart.

  • Linux Package Managers

    We’ll compare different Linux Package Managers. Between all Linux distributions, one of the things they share is the need to be able to install new software packages onto the system. Depending on the distribution, various package managers are available, allowing the user to install, manage, and remove packages easily and quickly. Package managers are very good at streamlining installs, with common installation locations and configurations. In this article, we will discuss the different available package managers, what distributions they can be used on, and what makes each unique. We will cover Debian-Based Package Managers, RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)-Based Package Managers, and other custom designed package managers.

  • 10 Reasons why Linux is better for programmers and developers

    Linux based operating systems are very popular among programmers, developers and server administrators. But still, there are many new programmers unaware of the power of Linux and it’s flexibility. I’m talking about those programmers who’ve just started the career and been a Windows user for a long time.

  • Top 5 Popular Free Source Code Editors for Programmers

    A source code editor is a program specifically designed for editing source code of computer programs. It can be a stand-alone application or part of any IDE or web browser. It is the most important tool for programmers because editing a source code is the main job for a programmer.

​Symantec may violate Linux GPL in Norton Core Router

Filed under
GNU
Legal

For years, embedded device manufacturers have been illegally using Linux. Typically, they use Linux without publishing their device's source code, which Linux's GNU General Public License version 2 (GPLv2) requires them to do. Well, guess what? Another vendor, this time Symantec, appears to be the guilty party.

This was revealed when Google engineer and Linux security expert Matthew Garrett was diving into his new Norton Core Router. This is a high-end Wi-Fi router. Symantec claims it's regularly updated with the latest security mechanisms. Garrett popped his box open to take a deeper look into Symantec's magic security sauce.

What he found appears to be a Linux distribution based on the QCA Software Development Kit (QSDK) project. This is a GPLv2-licensed, open-source platform built around the Linux-based OpenWrt Wi-Fi router operating system.

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Fedora To Decide What To Do About GNOME 3.28's Auto-Suspend Default

Filed under
Red Hat

While Ubuntu developers have decided to no longer enable auto-suspend by default as set with the new GNOME 3.28 desktop when running on AC power, Fedora developers are still debating the issue.

While there is certainly overlap between Fedora/RedHat developers and those working on GNOME, including those that sanctioned this upstream change during the GNOME 3.28 cycle, the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) has now been summoned to voice their opinion on the matter as well as the Fedora Workstation special interest group.

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Games: Phoenix RC, Undead Horde, Crusader Kings II

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
  • Linux 4.17 Gets PhoenixRC Flight Controller Support & PS/2 Mouse Improvements

    From several of the pull requests covered on Phoronix this week for the in-progress Linux 4.17 kernel, there are many areas seeing improved hardware/device support with this next kernel upgrade, including the input drivers.

    Last month I wrote about Phoenix RC Flight Controller support coming to Linux. That flight controller is modelled after radio controllers for model airplanes/helicopters/drones and designed for the Phoenix RC model aircraft/drone simulator on Windows, but thanks to a passionate independent developer, is now being supported on Linux. I was surprised by the interest indeed in this driver/controller support.

  • The latest teaser for the action adventure 'Undead Horde' from 10tons is out

    Ready to become a Necromancer? Undead Horde [Official Site] from 10tons is starting to look really damn good and it's coming to Linux.

  • Crusader Kings II is free to keep if you grab in the next two days

    The medieval grand strategy title/kinslaying-simulator has been made free to get for a limited time. There’s also a general sale of all of its DLC.

Graphics: DXVK. NVIDIA and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • DXVK 0.41 Released, Slightly More CPU Efficient & Offers A Heads-Up Display

    DXVK 0.41 is now available as the library for Wine users to have Direct3D 11 implemented over Vulkan for generally allowing higher performance than Wine's own D3D11-over-OpenGL layer.

    DXVK continues making great progress for getting D3D11 over Vulkan. DXVK 0.41 improvements include a slight reduction to the overall CPU overhead, better GPU saturation for deferred contexts, and a configurable HUD. There are also bug fixes to get better in spec with SPIR-V and fixes for the games World of Warships and Nier: Automata, among other fixes.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 8.1 Released, Now Supports Real-Time HEVC 4K @ 60 FPS

    NVIDIA has released a new version of their Video Codec SDK that serves as CUDA-based, cross-platform video encode and decode functionality that ultimately succeeds their VDPAU Linux video decode stack for GPU video coding needs.

  • Panfrost Project Getting "Half-Way Driver" To Gallium3D

    Alyssa Rosenzweig who has been leading the charge recently on the open-source Mali T700 GPU driver that was called "Chai" but has been renamed to "Panfrost" is now pursuing a "half-way driver" approach to testing their knowledge of the hardware's command stream.

Security: Linux Foundation's 'Product Placement' for Nitrokey and New FUD

Filed under
Security

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Podcast. Dustin Kirkland Leaving, Nextcloud Box

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E05 – High Five - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Google Cloud Poaches Ubuntu's VP of Product

    After being at Canonical for a decade (aside from a brief stint at Gazzang), Dustin Kirkland who most recently served as the company's VP of Product, is joining Google.

    Dustin Kirkland managed the product teams for Ubuntu server, cloud, desktop and IoT the past five years while he's been an open-source developer since the late 90's and continues to maintain many Ubuntu packages himself. Dustin is a highly-skilled developer and manager while now he will be focusing his efforts on the Google Cloud.

  • The Nextcloud Box: a review of building an IoT device with snaps

    In 2016, Canonical, Nextcloud and WDLabs introduced the Nextcloud Box, the first IoT style device running with snaps out of the box. Besides sales of nearly 2K boxes before Western Digital shut down their research division WDLabs late last year, the snap been extremely popular with some days hitting over 10,000 downloads. Its installed base is estimated to be over 8000, making it a popular way to run a private cloud. Read our guest blog by Nextcloud’s Jos Poortvliet on to learn more about Nextcloud, the Box and how snaps help thousands of Nextcloud users keep their data under their control.

Servers: Akash, Containers and More

Filed under
Server
  • ​Want to profit from your underused servers? Overclock has an idea

    Akash is a blockchain-powered, open, and decentralized compute marketplace, which enables you to monetize your business's underused server capacity. With up to 85 percent of the world's compute capacity sitting unused in data centers, there's a lot of compute out there.

  • 5 Things to Know Before Adopting Microservice and Container Architectures

    We definitely consider ourselves early adopters of containers, and we started packaging services in them almost as soon as Docker released its first production-ready version in the summer of 2014. Many of the customers I talk with are just now beginning — or thinking about beginning — such journeys, and they want to know everything we know. They want to know how we make it work, and how we architected it. But part of the process, I like to stress, is that they need to know what we learned from where we struggled along the way.

  • Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry: Better Together

    Industry veterans have cast predictions far and wide on what to expect in 2018. And while we can’t ensure every prediction will come true, many would agree that the container industry will continue to grow as it maintains support for businesses looking to leverage new technologies and platforms. In fact, the application container market is projected to grow from $762 million in 2016 to $2.7 billion by 2020 according to 451 Research.

    With this explosive growth, it’s easy to understand why some individuals are seeing Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry as competitive projects. The reality? While there is some functional overlap between the two, they ultimately serve complementary purposes that work toward the same goal. By taking approaches that leverage both projects, organizations are actually making it easier to manage their entire cloud environment.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2, Replacement for gksu

  • The Unique Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2
    It is the most unique among the Official Flavors in the 18.04. It's the only to bring Chromium browser, and it gives you the unique Budgie Desktop experiences. It is really a good place for everyone who wants new, distinct desktop experience with modern version of software and broad space to explore. And ultimately it is still available for 32 bit, which has been abandoned by Ubuntu original. We will wait until the planned release on April 26.
  • Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Behind communitheme: interviewing Frederik
    My name is Frederik, I live in Germany and I am working as a java software developer in my daily job. I am using Ubuntu since 5 years and quickly started to report bugs and issues when they jumped into my face. Apart from that, I like good music, and beautiful software. I also make my own music in my free time.
  • gksu Removed From Ubuntu, Here's The Recommended Replacement
    gksu is used to allow elevating your permissions when running graphical applications, for example in case you want to run a graphical text editor as root to edit a system file, or to be able to remove or add a file to a system folder.
  •  

Devices: Aaeon, Tizen and Android

OSS Leftovers

  • Open source crucial to Orange as it prepares for ONAP deployment
    Orange has long played a key part in the testing and adoption of ONAP, dating back to when its ECOMP predecessor was created by AT&T as a platform for managing a software-defined network. The move to open source and its development as the ONAP project has made the platform a key component of the new telco open networking movement. But why should other telcos look to ONAP as they embark on their network transformation strategies, and how does it help enable the automated network that will lead to new business opportunities?
  • Lessons from OpenStack Telemetry: Deflation
    At some point, the rules relaxed on new projects addition with the Big Tent initiative, allowing us to rename ourselves to the OpenStack Telemetry team and splitting Ceilometer into several subprojects: Aodh (alarm evaluation functionality) and Panko (events storage). Gnocchi was able to join the OpenStack Telemetry party for its first anniversary.
  • Dev-tools in 2018
    This is a bit late (how is it the middle of April already?!), but the dev-tools team has lots of exciting plans for 2018 and I want to talk about them! [...] We're creating two new teams - Rustdoc, and IDEs and editors - and going to work more closely with the Cargo team. We're also spinning up a bunch of working groups. These are more focused, less formal teams, they are dedicated to a single tool or task, rather than to strategy and decision making. Primarily they are a way to let people working on a tool work more effectively. The dev-tools team will continue to coordinate work and keep track of the big picture.
  • Nonny de la Peña & the Power of Immersive Storytelling
    This week, we’re highlighting VR’s groundbreaking potential to take audiences inside stories with a four part video series. There aren’t many examples of creators doing that more effectively and powerfully than Nonny de la Peña. Nonny de la Peña is a former correspondent for Newsweek, the New York Times and other major outlets. For more than a decade now, de la Peña has been focused on merging her passion for documentary filmmaking with a deep-seeded expertise in VR. She essentially invented the field of “immersive journalism” through her company, Emblematic Group.
  • Collabora Online 3.2 Brings More Powerful Features to LibreOffice in the Cloud
    Michael Meeks of the Collabora Productivity has the pleasure of informing Softpedia today on the availability of Collabora Online 3.2, the second point release of the Collabora Online 3 series that promises yet another layer of new features and improvements to the enterprise-ready, cloud-based office suite. Based on the LibreOffice 6.1 open-source office suite, Collabora Online 3.2 introduces support for creating and inserting charts into Writer and Impress documents, and the ability to validate data in Calc, which might come in handy for engineers who want to do a final assembly inspection on their tablets, as well as to collaborate with their colleagues to ensure all tests are passed by a complete product.
  • Oracle demands dev tear down iOS app that has 'JavaScript' in its name
    Oracle, claims developer Zhongmin Steven Guo, has demanded that Apple remove an app he created because it contains the trademarked term "JavaScript." The app in question, published by Guo's Tyanya Software LLC – which appears to be more a liability shield than a thriving software business – is titled "HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, HTML, Snippet Editor." The name, Guo explains in a Hacker News comment, was chosen in an effort to "game the App Store ranking by adding all the keywords to the app name."
  • FoundationDB is Open Source
    Starting today, FoundationDB starts its next chapter as an open source project! FoundationDB is a distributed datastore, designed from the ground up to be deployed on clusters of commodity hardware. These clusters scale well as you add machines, automatically heal from hardware failures, and have a simple API. The key-value store supports fully global, cross-row ACID transactions. That's the highest level of data consistency possible. What does this mean for you? Strong consistency makes your application code simpler, your data models more efficient, and your failure modes less surprising. The great thing is that FoundationDB is already well-established — it's actively developed and has years of production use. We intend to drive FoundationDB forward as a community project and we welcome your participation.
  • Apple Open Sources FoundationDB, Releases Code On GitHub
    Back in 2015, Apple bought FoundationDB, a NoSQL database company. It created a distributed database of the same name designed to deal with large masses of structured data across clusters of servers. In a recent development, Apple has shared the FoundationDB core and turned it into an open source project.
  • Microsoft offers limited-time 30 percent discount on SQL Server on Linux [Ed: Microsoft is googlebombing Linux again and as I predicted it would be done only to help Microsoft sell malicious proprietary software. Mary Jo Foley is like Microsoft marketing at CBS. In this case she promotes proprietary software. She also says "SQL Server on Linux" (no such thing exists, it's an illusion).]
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: April 20th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC
    Help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. Every Friday we meet on IRC in the #fsf channel on irc.freenode.org. Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.
  • Researchers deliver open-source simulator for cyber physical systems
    Cyber physical systems (CPS) are attracting more attention than ever thanks to the rapid development of the Internet of Things (IoT) and its combination with artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and the cloud. These interacting networks of physical and computational components will provide the foundation of critical infrastructure, form the basis of ‘smart’ services, and improve the quality of life in areas ranging from energy and environment to transportation and healthcare. CPS technologies are already transforming the way people interact with engineered systems in the ‘real’ or ‘physical’ world, just as the internet has transformed the way people interact with information. Yet, due to their complexity, the developers of CPS face a major problem: the lack of simulation tools and models for their design and analysis.
  • Creators face an evolving challenge protecting IP
    The GNU General Public License, under which the operating system Linux and much open-source software is shared, is another example of copyleft. Open-source software, where programs are worked on together by loosely connected developer communities rather than traditional software houses, show one way IP can be shared without stifling innovation. Linux, the mobile operating system Android and the database system MySQL have all achieved widespread adoption, and are continually innovating despite, or perhaps because of, being open source.
  • Emerging Tech Speaker Series Talk with Rian Wanstreet
    This is an opportunity for the open source community, as alternative technologies and platforms are being developed which provide farmers the ability to farm outside of walled gardens. From open source seed initiatives, to open farm technologies, to data platform cooperatives, there is a small, but growing, collaborative movement that recognizes that farmers are at a critical moment: they can help to establish tools that advance freedom, or accept machines that foster dependencies.
  • Williamson Schools to develop open source social studies curriculum
    The open source science curriculum saved the district about $3.3 million. An open source social studies curriculum may post similar savings, with estimates at about $3.5-4 million, Gaddis said.
  • Large Open-Source Data Set Released to Help Train Algorithms Spot Malware
    For the first time, a large dataset has been released by a security firm to help AI research and training of machine learning models that statically detect malware. The data set released by cybersecurity firm Endgame is called EMBER is a collection of more than a million representations of benign and malicious Windows-portable executable files. Hyrum Anderson, Endgame's technical director of data science who worked on EMBER, says: "This dataset fills a void in the information security machine learning community: a benign/malicious dataset that is large, open and general enough to cover several interesting use cases. ... [We] hope that the dataset, code and baseline model provided by EMBER will help invigorate machine learning research for malware detection, in much the same way that benchmark datasets have advanced computer vision research."

Android Leftovers