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Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 1:10pm
Story GNU News Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 1:08pm
Story Project Releases Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 1:07pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 1:02pm
Story Italian Military's LibreOffice Migration Underway; 100,000+ PCs To Be Migrated Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 12:25pm
Story Every Little Hacker needs a Little Linux Computer Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 12:19pm
Story Can Justin Trudeau Fix Canada’s Broken Government IT System? Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 11:38am
Story Kaspersky Lab Announces Security solution for Tizen-based Internet of Things Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 10:48am
Story My Mom Runs Linux! Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 10:17am
Story FreeBSD 11.0 Final Release ISO Images Available For Download Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 9:33am

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat’s new installer lets you spin up a private cloud in just 4 hours

    Red Hat Inc. wants to help organizations deploy private clouds faster, and to that end has just unveiled a new tool called the QuickStart Cloud Installer (QCI) that should make it possible. The new installer comes just one week after the company rolled out Red Hat OpenStack Platform 9, based on the OpenStack Mitaka release.

    Red Hat’s new installer differs from previous installation tools the company has released in that it’s an all-in-one solution for installing various technologies from its product suite, including CloudForms, OpenShift and Red Hat Virtualization as well as OpenStack. Based on Red Hat’s Satellite system management technology, QCI allows users to create a fully functional private cloud environment in less than four hours, the company claims.

  • Understanding evdev

    evdev is a Linux-only generic protocol that the kernel uses to forward information and events about input devices to userspace. It's not just for mice and keyboards but any device that has any sort of axis, key or button, including things like webcams and remote controls. Each device is represented as a device node in the form of /dev/input/event0, with the trailing number increasing as you add more devices. The node numbers are re-used after you unplug a device, so don't hardcode the device node into a script. The device nodes are also only readable by root, thus you need to run any debugging tools as root too.

  • A Detailed Look At The Evdev Protocol
  • Chapeau 24 "Cancellara" Distribution Is Now in Beta, Based on Fedora 24 Linux OS

    Just a few days after informing the community about the plans for the upcoming Chapeau 24 "Cancellara" GNU/Linux distribution, developer Vince Pooley is now releasing the first Beta milestone into the wild.

    Yes, you're reading it right, a first Beta of Chapeau 24 "Cancellara" is now available for download so you can get an early taste of those awesome new features that we revealed for our readers in an initial report. And, as expected, the development release is based on the Fedora 24 operating system and ships with Linux 4.7 kernel.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Why real hackers prefer Linux over Windows and Mac

    We have published many tutorials for hackers and security researchers. You may have noticed that most tutorials are based on Linux operating systems. Even the hacking tools out there are based on Linux barring a few which are written for Windows and Mac. The moot question here is that why do hackers prefer Linux over Mac or Windows?

    Today we look at the reason why hackers always prefer Linux over Mac, Windows, and other operating systems. You may have your own reasons for choosing Linux but what do hackers really look forward to while working with Linux.

  • HDDCryptor Ransomware Overwrites Your MBR Using Open Source Tools [Ed: Windows ransom but the headline only says “Open Source”]

    Most of the research on this infection has been done by Marinho, who says that his company was called in to investigate and fix a massive infection at a multi-national company that affected computers in its Brazil, India, and US subsidiaries.

  • The power of protocol analyzers

    In the complicated world of networking, problems happen. But determining the exact cause of a novel issue in the heat of the moment gets dicey. In these cases, even otherwise competent engineers may be forced to rely on trial and error once Google-fu gives out.

    Luckily, there’s a secret weapon waiting for willing engineers to deploy—the protocol analyzer. This tool allows you to definitively determine the source of nearly any error, provided you educate yourself on the underlying protocol. The only catch for now? Many engineers avoid it entirely due to (totally unwarranted) dread.

  • Bitcoin: A Sequence of Proofs

    A potential solution to the growing pains of Bitcoin is the use of proof-of-stake rather than proof-of-work. An attacker which has a stake in the history already on the blockchain is unlikely to jeopardize it. In proof-of-stake, the cryptocurrency is paid by the miners into the bets of the next block to win. If an attacker bets on multiple chains, then they're guaranteed to lose money. This, combined with the fact that buying a lot of currency is more expensive than a lot of computer power, makes proof-of-stake practical. We will cover Peercoin later, which does proof of stake and has other mitigations for certain attacks.

    An interesting idea is vote tattling. When an attacker votes on one block with a predecessor, and then votes on another with the same predecessor, peers can observe this. They can report double voting by using the votes as cryptographically-verified evidence, and taking the attacker's vote-money.

Ayoub Elyasir: How Do You Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Ayoub Elyasir was born and raised in Tripoli, Libya. He currently works as a data engineer at Almadar. He says he’s passionate about “humanity, technology, open source, literature and poetry,” and enjoys swimming, body building and reading. Ayoub includes Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak as childhood heroes. His favorite food is grilled chicken and hummus.

Ayoub started using Linux years ago. In fact, he told us, “My migration to Linux dates back to 2008 with openSUSE 11.” Ayoub started to use Linux as a curiosity. However, today he uses Linux and open source products completely. He gradually shifted from KDE and openSUSE to Fedora with GNOME.

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A beginner's bumpy journey to find a few good bugs

Filed under
OSS

I'd been trying to contribute to open source for about two years. Yes. Two years. And there's one thing I can tell you with a lot of certainty—it is intimidating. It's tough to get started. You have to learn how to work within a large code base. You have to learn and adhere to a project's coding style guides. Nothing makes sense: the control flow, how different modules interact, how and why the code is organized the way it is—it's all one big maze. You need to muster a lot of courage to ask questions, dive into the code base knowing next to nothing, and keep fighting with it. (This is a generalization about how some projects operate, but many have difficulty making their projects accessible to new contributors.)

Read more

Overcoming language and distance barriers in open source projects

Filed under
OSS

Open source communities were among the first to use the Internet to make the physical distance between people irrelevant. The Internet is a great tool, since it helps us collaborate wherever we are. It doesn't matter if you're having lunch at the Eiffel Tower or waking up in sunny San Francisco, the Internet has helped us connect people on deeper levels.

I am from Peru, and have always lived in Peru. I study in Peru, and the Internet has helped me find valuable information for projects and life in general. However, when I joined the the Linux community, my life changed radically.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

#SoftwareFreedom: India’s Lukewarm Relationship with FOSS Needs to Change

Filed under
OSS

For a over decade, the third Saturday of every September has been celebrated as Software Freedom Day in dozens of countries around the world. The free and open source software (FOSS) movement, which grew in the 1980s out of frustrations with restrictions on use of copyrighted software, has changed considerably in the last decade. Barring a few exceptions, there has been a dilution in the focus on replacing Windows’ domination of mainstream computing. But FOSS, which some people may know as Linux, still forms the backbone of our technological lives. In developing countries like India, where scaling affordable access to technology is an admitted priority of the government, the promotion and adoption of FOSS seems to be a viable and pragmatic policy decision.

Whether one is aware of it or not, FOSS is behind the majority of all computing that makes modern, digital life possible. FOSS runs most of all smartphones, supercomputers, ATMs, servers and websites around the world. In India, two massive citizen-facing projects, our railway booking website IRCTC, and Aadhaar’s online infrastructure, use Linux servers too. But why should you care for FOSS?

Read more

4MLinux 20.0 Promises to Be a Special Version, Final Release Launches November 1

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia today, September 18, about the release and immediate availability for download of the Beta development milestone of his upcoming 4MLinux 20.0 GNU/Linux operating system.

And it looks like he has some big plans for the final, stable release of 4MLinux 20.0, which should hit the streets on November 1, 2016, promising users that it will be a special version of his independent operating system for personal computers, which always includes the latest and most advanced software versions and GNU/Linux technologies.

Read more

Linux 4.8-rc7

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.8-rc7 Kernel Released: Final In 1~2 Weeks

    Linus Torvalds announced the release of Linux 4.8-rc7 a few minutes ago and it's looking like this release cycle will likely drag on with a 4.8-rc8 release being likely next week.

  • Linux Kernel 4.8 Could Land October 2 as Linus Torvalds Announces the Seventh RC

    Linus Torvalds just made his regular Sunday announcement to inform the community about the availability of the seventh and last Release Candidate (RC) development build of the forthcoming Linux 4.8 kernel series.

    According to Linus Torvalds, Linux kernel 4.8 Release Candidate 7 is once again bigger in patches than he was expected. Last week, we reported that things are calming down and that this series will be a normal one with seven RCs, but it now looks like it won't happen, and there should be one more RC released next week, September 25, 2016.

  • Linux 4.8-rc7

    Normally rc7 is the last in the series before the final release, but by now I'm pretty sure that this is going to be one of those releases that come with an rc8. Things did't calm down as much as I would have liked, there are still a few discussions going on, and it's just unlikely that I will feel like it's all good and ready for a final 4.8 next Sunday.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

FSF/GNU

Filed under
GNU
  • Discord at Libreboot Over GNU Withdrawal

    A member of the Libreboot development team has painted a picture of a lead developer who is out-of-control.

    It will probably not come as a surprise to anyone who’s been following the news about Libreboot’s sudden withdrawal from the GNU Project that not everyone connected with the Libreboot project is in agreement with project lead Leah Rowe’s recent actions.

  • Nextcloud’s $79 Box, Vim Gets an Update & More…

    The biggest story in FOSS this week was really something of a nonstory about Libreboot suddenly leaving the GNU project. We’ve already covered the initial story, as well as responses by both RMS and the FSF, so no need to flog this horse again.

  • Emacs 25.1 Released With Cairo Drawing, Better Network Security
  • GnuCash 2.6.14 released

    The GnuCash development team announces GnuCash 2.6.14, the fourteenth maintenance release in the 2.6-stable series. Please take the tour of all the new features.

FreeBSD 11.0 Gets One Last Release Candidate Build, Final Version Is Coming Soon

Filed under
BSD

FreeBSD's Glen Barber announced the other day that the third, and hopefully the last Released Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system is now available for public testing.

Read more

FreeBSD 11.0 RC3

Filed under
BSD

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hyperledger and the Linux Foundation Opens Doors to the Public Blockchain Space

    Hyperledger, a cross-industry collaborative effort started by the Linux Foundation and joined by many banks, giant tech companies, blockchain specific companies and others, with the aim of developing an open source protocol for private blockchain use, has extended its hand to the public blockchain community in what appears to be an offer of partnership and closer collaboration.

  • Display compositing? What is it and which one should you use?
  • GNOME Games 3.22: the Giant Leap

    I didn't blog about Games since quite some time and the app changed a lot since 3.18. 3.20 was quite a small update featurewise: it added support for MAME and Neo Geo Pocket games, added the About dialog, allowed l10n of the application, added a Preferences window listing the available plugins and fixed other small bugs, but this release mainly saw refactoring work with the introduction of the plugins system where plugins allow to list games: the Steam plugin lists Steam games and the SNES plugin lists SNES games.

  • Elementary OS 0.4 (Overview)
  • Has HPE bought SUSE? No. But here’s what did happen…

    There are a number of articles, blogs and social media posts out with headlines like ‘SUSE’s been bought by HPE.’ Clearly, this is a misunderstanding of what was announced last week but once a meme is out there, others often follow and echo without checking out the source information carefully.

    So, lets clear things up by calling out some of the facts:

  • Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices Progress and Events

    Now, if this was any other article I would be laughing and citing it as an example of how Wikipedia is seriously failing, but in this case it’s had an adverse and detrimental effect on you, the backers of this project. There exists now a public record - an accusation by a Senior Wikipedia Administrator - that you are “sock puppets” with a “vested conflict of interest” in making statements on Wikipedia. Worse than that I have had to invest considerable time in ensuring that the Wikipedia article does not bring the EOMA68 project into disrepute, by being comprised of false and misleading statements. That’s several days worth of potential delay to fulfilling the promises that I’ve made to you. So for that and many other reasons which I’ve documented on the page, I’m supporting the “Deletion” of the Wikipedia Page. The thing is: what people actually collaboratively developed (before the COI-inspired editing began) was actually really good, so that has been preserved on the “talk” page of the elinux.org EOMA68 Specification. But what’s up there now is just… utterly misleading.

  • Skylake box-PC targets transportation applications
  • Samsung Z2 (SM-Z200F) Certified in Indonesia, likely Launching soon

    A Samsung smartphone carrying the model number SM-Z200F and manufactured in Indonesia has been officially certified today (September 16, 2016) by the Directorate General of Resources and Equipment of Post and Information (DG SDPPI), the local authority under whose purview that falls.

    The Samsung Z2 which is known to have the model number SM-Z200F had earlier landed the Indonesian agency on August 22 for evaluation and testing. The status of the Z2 changed yesterday after completion of the testing and was indicated as awaiting approval. However, that approval did drop today.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
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More in Tux Machines

Purism’s next product could be a smartphone that runs Linux/free software

Purism is a company that’s been developing laptops and tablets that run Linux-based, free and open source software for a few years. Now Purism is considering building a smartphone and the company is soliciting feedback from potential customers. The idea would be to release a Librem Phone that runs GNU/Linux rather than Android, and which offers security and privacy features to help set it apart from most other phones on the market. Read more

Cinnamon 3.2 in Linux Mint 18.1 Supports Vertical Panels, Better Accelerometers

After informing the community a few days ago about the Mintbox Mini Pro PC and the upcoming improvements and new features shipping with the XApps software projects in Linux Mint 18.1, Clement Lefebvre just published the monthly Linux Mint newsletter. Read more

Blender 2.78 Open-Source 3D Graphics Software Released with Spherical Stereo VR

Today, September 30, 2016, the Blender Foundation is proud to release Blender 2.78, the latest stable and most advanced version of the popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform Blender 3D modelling software. Blender 2.78 comes six months after the release of Blender 2.77, and it's a major update that adds numerous new features and improvements, among which we can mention rendering of spherical stereo images for VR (Virtual Reality), viewport rendering improvements, as well as brand new freehand curves drawing over surfaces. Moreover, the Grease Pencil received awesome improvements and it now doubles as both an animation and drawing tool, powerful new options have been added for B-Bones, it's now possible to import and export basic operators in the Alembic support, and the Cloth Physics feature received new Simulation Speed option and Dynamic Base Mesh support. Read more

OSS Leftovers

  • Tools for writing the next best seller
    I am using bibisco in conjunction with LibreOffice on my Ubuntu 16.04 Asus laptop that I converted over from Windows 7 to develop my characters, scenes, and plot. I tried Manuskript, but find that I like bibisco better, although the results are similar. For one, it gives helpful prompts.
  • GNOME Calendar App to Feature a New Sidebar, Week View & Attendees in GNOME 3.24
    GNOME developer Georges Stavracas wrote an in-depth blog post the other day to inform the GNOME, Linux, and Open Source communities about the upcoming improvements and new features coming to the GNOME Calendar apps. Now that some of us are already enjoying the recently released GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, the GNOME developers are hard at work to improve the GNOME apps and core components by either adding new exciting features and technologies or improving existing ones.
  • PHP version 5.6.27RC1 and 7.0.12RC1
  • Kubernetes Arrives in New Flavors
    Kubernetes has taken center stage in recent days, and, as we’ve been noting in recent posts, the open source container cluster manager is heading in new directions. Google has just announced the release of Kubernetes 1.4, which makes the tool much easier to install. Meanwhile, Canonical has now launched its own distribution of Kubernetes, with enterprise support, across a range of public clouds and private infrastructure. It's Kubernetes at the core, but features a number of extra bells and whistles.
  • 2016 Women in Open Source Award Winners
    We hope you enjoy and are inspired by this short video celebrating Preeti Murthy and Jessica McKellar, the winners of this year’s Red Hat Women in Open Source Awards.
  • Tech, talent and tools: The secret to monetizing open-source
    “In California during the gold rush, you didn’t make money digging for gold; you made money selling shovels,” said Mehta. A fitting metaphor for the idea that investing in talent and tools, especially tools, is how to turn a profit. The actual data, databases, algorithms and so on would be open source. Money would come from the tools to use that technology to benefit specific areas, such as automation of healthcare. And healthcare is a good place to start. “Big Data is all about making life cheaper, better. … If we forget about how to solve problems for humans, we’ve lost. We want to be known for enriching life,” said Mehta.
  • Changing the way we design for the web
    On the one hand, open source should mean lower cost of entry for people from poorer communities (like me, growing up). But on the other, I feel it is hard to contribute when under- or unemployed. I had a grant to work on the Web Animations API documentation, but I can't do as much as I'd like with other animation features (motion paths, advanced timing functions) because I need to spend a lot of time working on my own business, getting paid. Essentially this leads to an awkward model where the only contributors are employed programmers—and when it comes to open source animation or design APIs, platforms, etc, this lack of user input really starts to show. Or, the only products with thriving open source development teams are those that have financially lucrative futures, turning the open source software (OSS) model into a capitalist one.
  • Leaders in Data Management and Open Source Innovation to Gather for Postgres Vision 2016
  • CloudReady by neverware
    I thought I would put together a quick “installation” review of a product called CloudReady by neverware. What is CloudReady? CloudReady is basically a project to bring Chromium OS to those who would like to convert traditional laptops into Chromebook-like devices. I stumbled on them several months ago and finally decided to see how hard it was to install Chromium OS and how functional it actually was as a Chromebook-like device. I have a few low end (netbook-like) devices and I have been trying to figure out how I could make them functional for my boys, I thought this might be the solution.
  • Mozilla tells Firefox OS devs to fork off if they want to chase open web apps vision
    The Mozilla Foundation's Firefox development team has decided enough is enough and will stop supporting Windows XP and Vista in March 2017 and also bin Firefox OS. The OS first. In this post Mozillans Ari Jaaksi and David Bryant, respectively the head of connected devices and veep for platform engineering, write that “By the end of 2015 Mozilla leadership had come to the conclusion that our then Firefox OS initiative of shipping phones with commercial partners would not bring Mozilla the returns we sought.” That decision means that “as of the end of July 2016 have stopped all commercial development on Firefox OS.”
  • Cloudera Delivers Release Built on Apache Spark 2.0, and Advances Kudu
    Cloudera, focused on Apache Hadoop and other open source technologies,has announced its release built on the Apache Spark 2.0 (Beta), with enhancements to the API experience, performance improvements, and enhanced machine learning capabilities. The company is also working with the community to continue developing Apache Kudu 1.0, recently released by the Apache Software Foundation, which we covered here. Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. Taken together, Cloudera's new tools are giving it more diverse kinds of presence on the Big Data scene. Cloudera claims it was the first Hadoop big data analytics vendor to deliver a commercially supported version of Spark, and has participated actively in the open source community to enhance Spark for the enterprise through its One Platform Initiative. "With Spark 2.0, organizations are better able to take advantage of streaming data, develop richer machine learning models, and deploy them in real time, enabling more workloads to go into production," the company reports.
  • Cloudera Delivers Enterprise-Grade Real-Time Streaming and Machine Learning with Apache Spark 2.0 and Drives Community Innovation with Apache Kudu 1.0
  • INSIDE Secure and Marvell Deliver Open Source Open Data Plane Security VPN Solution [Ed: “open source Open Data Plane (ODP) security API” sounds like nonsensical openwashing]
    INSIDE Secure (Paris:INSD), at the heart of security solutions for mobile and connected devices and network equipment, today announced the Marvell-INSIDE Secure solution, a collaboration that provides open source Open Data Plane (ODP) security API support on Marvell’s ARMADA® 8K and ARMADA 7K System-on-Chip (SoC) families with embedded INSIDE Secure Security Protocol Accelerator IP technology. The Marvell-INSIDE Secure solution provides customers with an easy and efficient way to secure their high-speed networking applications with access to all of the ARM ecosystem’s software support.
  • GE, Bosch Combine Resources to Bolster IoT
  • OpenBSD 6.0 Limited Edition CD set (signed by developers)
    Five OpenBSD 6.0 CD-ROM copies were signed by 40 developers during the g2k16 Hackathon in Cambridge, UK. Those copies are being auctioned sequentially on ebay. All proceeds will be donated to the OpenBSD Foundation to support and further the development of free software based on the OpenBSD operating system.
  • Friday Working together for Free Software Directory IRC meetup: September 30th
  • Machine Learning with Python
    I first heard the term “machine learning” a few years ago, and to be honest, I basically ignored it that time. I knew that it was a powerful technique, and I knew that it was in vogue, but I didn’t know what it really was— what problems it was designed to solve, how it solved them and how it related to the other sorts of issues I was working on in my professional (consulting) life and in my graduate-school research. But in the past few years, machine learning has become a topic that most will avoid at their professional peril. Despite the scary-sounding name, the ideas behind machine learning aren’t that difficult to understand. Moreover, a great deal of open-source software makes it possible for anyone to use machine learning in their own work or research. I don’t think it’s an overstatement to say that machine learning already is having a huge impact on the computer industry and on our day-to-day lives.