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Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:54am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:51am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:46am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:35am
Story deepin 15.5 - A different desktop Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:17am
Story Linspire, Freespire and Black Lab Enterprise Linux Patched Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:08am
Story Linux 4.15 RC8 and Linux Kernel Mailing List Downtime Roy Schestowitz 1 15/01/2018 - 4:59am
Story GPD Win 2 – A Pocket-Sized Linux Games Machine? Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 4:40am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2018 - 11:03pm
Story Games: CAPS0ff, Godot, Quake 4, Event[0], Cold Space, Tale of Toast Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2018 - 9:15pm

UBports Is Making Progress With Unity 8 On The Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

While it's approaching one year since Canonical decided to divest from Unity 8 and mobile/convergence, the UBports community continues making some progress in getting their forked desktop environment ready for their forked Ubuntu Touch environment as well as the desktop.

Shared this weekend on YouTube is a new video showing off the current state of Unity 8 on the desktop. Recent work by the UBports folks includes better XMir support so applications like Google Chrome will behave properly, and more.

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9 Most Beautiful Linux Distros You Need To Use (2018 Edition)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux users have the liberty to enjoy an unparalleled freedom while choosing the Linux distributions as per their needs. Using different open source technologies, the developers keep creating something new and surprising the enthusiasts. Here, in this article, I’ll be listing the most beautiful Linux distros that have impressed me and other Linux users. This list is a mixture of newcomers and popular distros.

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'Chipocalypse'

Filed under
Security

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Gammu release day

    I've just released new versions of Gammu, python-gammu and Wammu. These are mostly bugfix releases (see individual changelogs for more details), but they bring back Wammu for Windows.

    This is especially big step for Wammu as the existing Windows binary was almost five years old. The another problem with that was that it was cross-compiled on Linux and it always did not behave correctly. The current binaries are automatically produced on AppVeyor during our continuous integration.

  • Opera 50 Debuts as World's First Web Browser with Anti-Bitcoin Mining Protection

    Opera Software released today the Opera 50 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, a major release that comes with innovative new features and dozens of improvements.

    Based on Chromium 63.0.3239.108, Opera 50 appears to be the only major web browser that promised to protect your computer against Bitcoin mining. Dubbed NoCoin, the anti-Bitcoin mining protection has been implemented in Opera's integrated ad blocker, which can be easily enabled in Settings under the Recommended lists of ad filters of the Block ads option.

  • Critical Annihilation is an explosion-heavy and stupidly fun twin-stick shooter

    Critical Annihilation is a twin-stick shooter where every single thing is made out of tiny blocks, it also happens to be an incredibly satisfying experience.

  • Babe Music Player Is Getting a Mobile-Friendly Qml Port

    It’s been almost a year since I publicly stood in front of you all to coo over the Qt-based Babe music player — and now I’m back to coo at it some more.

    You can blame Babe developer Camilo Higuita. He’s shared a new video of his app that has me excited. The clip, which is embedded above, demos the ‘initial work’ he’s made on a Qml port of the Babe that uses Kirgami.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Tizen, Project eelo, and Android 'Antivirus'

Filed under
Android
Linux

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Cable's Open Source Flirtation Heats Up

    CableLabs , the heart of cable research and development, has created its own OpenStack platform called the SDN/NFV Application Development Platform and Stack project, or SNAPS for short. That in itself isn't news -- SNAPS has been around since 2016 -- but the organization also introduced two related projects as part of its open source effort just three weeks ago. And CableLabs' lead architect for wired technologies, Randy Levensalor, opened up even more recently about how his team's approach differs from some of the NFV strategies undertaken by telecom operators when the virtualization craze first took hold.

  • The State of VACUUM

    In a recent blog post, I talked about why every system that implements MVCC needs some scheme for removing old row versions, and how VACUUM meets that need for PostgreSQL. In this post, I’d like to examine the history of VACUUM improvements in recent years, the state of VACUUM as it exists in PostgreSQL today, and how it might be improved in the future.

    When I first began using PostgreSQL, autovacuum did not exist, and I was not aware of the need for manual VACUUM. After a few months (!), I wondered why my database was so slow. Putting a vacuumdb command in cron, scheduled to run every 6 hours, was sufficient for my needs at the time, but it only worked because my database was small and handled a limited amount of traffic. In many environments, UPDATE and DELETE operations will target some tables much more often than others, and therefore some tables will accumulate dead row versions much more quickly than others, and therefore the interval between one VACUUM and the next should also vary. If a user with this kind of environment were to run a full-database VACUUM frequently enough to meet the needs of their most heavily-updated tables, they would VACUUM lightly-updated tables far more often than necessary, wasting effort. If they were to reduce the frequency of the full-database VACUUM to avoid wasting effort, heavily updated tables wouldn’t get vacuumed often enough and their on-disk size would grow as they filled up with dead row versions, otherwise known as “bloat”.

  • 20 years of the Open Source Initiative (OSI)

    No openwashing, thanks

    With so many vendors claiming to have ‘got the open religion’ but in fact doing nothing more than openwashing a few ‘less than key’ elements of their total technology stacks, the OSI says its next goals to promote open source’s viability/value to issues and look for areas where it can promote and champion implementation and what it calls ‘authentic participation’.

  • WP Engine Raises $250M to Grow WordPress Platform

    The open-source WordPress content management system has grown significantly over the last eight years and along with that growth, one of its leading backers, WP Engine, has also grown. On Jan. 4, WP Engine announced it raised a new $250 million round of funding from Silver Lake Partners.

    Silver Lake is well-known in the private equity world; not only did the firm work with Michael Dell to bring Dell Inc. private in 2013, but it also helped fund Dell's acquisition of EMC in 2015. WP Engine was founded in 2010, with total funding to date now standing at $291 million.

  • Enterprise Roles in Open Source Compliance

    There are generally two teams involved in achieving compliance: a core team and an extended team, with the latter typically being a superset of the former. The core team, often called the Open Source Review Board (OSRB), consists of three key representatives from engineering and product teams, one or more legal counsels, and the compliance officer/ open source program office manager.

  • What you didn't know about Creative Commons

    I attended film school, and later I taught at a film school, and even later I worked at a major film studio. There was a common thread through all these different angles of the creative industry: creators need content. Interestingly, one movement kept providing the solution, and that was free culture, or, as it has been formalized, Creative Commons.

  • Splice Hooking for Unix-Like Systems

    We actively use the Unix splice hooking approach described above in projects we create for our clients here at Apriorit, particularly in the area of cybersecurity. We’ve implemented this hook type for a variety of architectures and kernel versions, including x86_64, x86, and ARM in Linux 2.6.32 to 4.10.

    We hope that you find this approach useful and that you’ll be able to use some of the ideas presented in this article for your own hooking needs.

  • Inside the snake pit with ‘angr’ Python framework creator

    Well, angr is a highly modular Python framework that performs binary analysis using VEX as an intermediate representation. The name ‘angr’ is a pun on VEX, since when something is vexing, it makes you angry. It is made of many interlocking parts to provide useful abstractions for analysis. Under the hood, pretty much every primitive operation that angr does is a call into SimuVEX to execute some code.

    All IoT firmware is binary and only vendors have the source code. But often, IoT vendors don’t share source code, so security teams are left to find their own way to analyse the binary code. That means that, if you want to analyse IoT devices for vulnerabilities, then you need good binary analysis tools.

    Binary analysis goals: program verification; program testing; vulnerability excavation; vulnerability signature generation; reverse engineering; vulnerability excavation; exploit generation.

Servers: Five Linux Server Distributions to Consider in 2018, Spinnaker, 'Serverless', and Linux 2

Filed under
Server
  • Five Linux Server Distributions to Consider in 2018

    These five tried-and-tested Linux server distributions top our list for distros to consider for the data center or server room.

  • Get Started with Spinnaker on Kubernetes

    In the last previous installment of the series, we introduced Spinnaker as the multicloud deployment tool. We will explore how to setup Spinnaker on the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine and deploy your first application through it.

    In this tutorial, I will walk you through how to setup and configure Spinnaker on Minikube. Once it is up and running, we will deploy and scale a containerized application running in Kubernetes.

    Spinnaker is usually installed in a VM running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Thanks to the Helm community, it is now available as a Chart to install with just one command.

  • Know when to implement serverless vs. containers

    Serverless computing is either the perfect answer to an application deployment problem or an expensive disaster waiting to happen.

    VMs, containers and serverless architecture all have distinct pros and cons, but serverless might break everything if the applications aren't suited for that deployment architecture. To prevent an implosion in IT, give developers an educated assessment of serverless vs. containers for new deployments.

  • Amazon counters hybrid cloud model with Linux 2: Amazon launches next Linux server OS

    Amazon Web Services (AWS) recently launched Linux 2, with access to the latest 4.9 LTS kernel. According to the company, the newest version “provides a high performance, stable, and secure execution environment for cloud and enterprise applications.” The system includes five years of long-term security support and access to software packages through the Amazon Linux Extras repository. It is currently available for all AWS regions.

Security leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Python-Based Botnet Targets Linux Systems with Exposed SSH Ports

    Experts believe that an experienced cybercrime group has created a botnet from compromised Linux-based systems and is using these servers and devices to mine Monero, a digital currency.

    Crooks are apparently using brute-force attacks against Linux systems that feature exposed SSH ports. If they guess the password, they use Python scripts to install a Monero miner.

  • AMD PSP Affected By Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

    While all eyes have been on Intel this week with the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, a disclosure was publicly made this week surrounding AMD's PSP Secure Processor in an unrelated security bulletin.

    AMD's Secure Processor / Platform Security Processor (PSP) that is akin to Intel's Management Engine (ME) is reportedly vulnerable to remote code execution.

  • DragonFlyBSD Lands Fixes For Meltdown Vulnerability

    Linux, macOS, and Windows has taken most of the operating system attention when it comes down to the recently-disclosed Meltdown vulnerability but the BSDs too are prone to this CPU issue. DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has landed his fixes for Meltdown.

  • Spectre question

    Could ASLR be used to prevent the Spectre attack?

    The way Spectre mitigations are shaping up, it's going to require modification of every program that deals with sensitive data, inserting serialization instructions in the right places. Or programs can be compiled with all branch prediction disabled, with more of a speed hit.

    Either way, that's going to be piecemeal and error-prone. We'll be stuck with a new class of vulnerabilities for a long time. Perhaps good news for the security industry, but it's going to become as tediously bad as buffer overflows for the rest of us.

    Also, so far the mitigations being developed for Spectre only cover branching, but the Spectre paper also suggests the attack can be used in the absence of branches to eg determine the contents of registers, as long as the attacker knows the address of suitable instructions to leverage.

  • Intel Deploying Updates for Spectre and Meltdown Exploits

    Intel reports that company has developed and is rapidly issuing updates for all types of Intel-based computer systems — including personal computers and servers — that render those systems immune from “Spectre” and “Meltdown” exploits reported by Google Project Zero. I

  • Capsule8 Launches Open Source Sensor for Real-time Attack Detection Capable of Detecting Meltdown
  • You know what’s not affected by Meltdown or Spectre? The Raspberry Pi

    One or more of the security vulnerabilities disclosed this week affect nearly every modern smartphone, PC, and server processor. Intel processor are vulnerable to both Meltdown and Spectre attacks. AMD chips are vulnerable to Spectre attacks. And the ARM-based processors that are used in most modern smartphones can fall prey to a Spectre attack as well.

Mozilla: Trust Violations, Privacy Pretense and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla & Mr. Robot - Insert Freedom Here

    A few weeks ago, Mozilla finally showed us its true skin. No more illusions about its feel-goodie world-loving efforts. Yet another shark in the pond, after its share of filthy dimes. One day, there will be a new browser, and it will be something nice and cool and unspoiled by greed just yet. That will be the moment when I say goodbye to Firefox. For now, it's still the least annoying turd in the pile, and I'm exercising my rather futile civil duty to complain.

    In a world without real choice, the best you can do, short of a proper bloody revolution, is to bitch and moan and tell your story. Luckily, this seems to work well. If there's one good use to social media, it's blowing things out of proportion and making viral, tidal waves of feces. Harness that power. Fight back. Remember, there IS such a thing as bad publicity. When it hits their pocket, you know you're on the right track. So once again, thank you Mozilla for molesting my browser. Stay fake.

  • Mozilla statement on breach of Aadhaar data

    Mozilla is deeply concerned about recent reports that a private citizen was able to easily access the private Aadhaar data of more than one billion Indian citizens as reported by The Tribune.

    [...]

    Mozilla has been raising concerns about the security risks of companies using and integrating Aadhaar into their systems, and this latest, egregious breach should be a giant red flag to all companies as well as to the UIDAI and the Modi Government.

  • Lessons from the impl period
  • Looking back at Bugzilla and BMO in 2017

    Recently in the Bugzilla Project meeting, Gerv informed us that he would be resigning, and it was pretty clear that my lack of technical leadership was the cause. While I am sad to see Gerv go, it did make me realize I need to write more about the things I do.

Canonical Plans to Release Ubuntu 17.10 Respin ISOs for All Flavors Next Week

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical announced on Friday that it plans to release the promised respin ISO images of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system early next week on January 11.

The announcement comes minutes after Canonical announced the end of life of its Ubuntu 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" operating system on January 13, 2018, saying that it's beneficial to have Ubuntu 17.10 images available in the face of the impending EOL for Ubuntu 17.04, as users will need to upgrade their installations.

Last month, several users reported broken BIOSes due to a bug in the Ubuntu 17.10 installation images. Laptops from Lenovo, Acer, and Toshiba were affected by the issue, which locked users out of their BIOS settings. The bug could make user's system unbootable even if the image was booted in live mode.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 17.10 To Be Re-Released Next Week

Direct: Exceptional respins of Ubuntu 17.10 media; call for testing

Wine 3.0 Nearly Ready

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.0-rc5 is now available.

  • Wine 3.0-RC5 Released With More Bug Fixes

    We are stepping closer to the official Wine 3.0 release but not quite there yet though it's looking like it could be here within the next week or two.

    Coming out today is the fifth weekly release candidate ahead of Wine 3.0.0. Wine 3.0-RC5 has just nine known bug fixes ranging from taking care of issues with Slingplayer 2.0 to Eclipse Europa to Regedit problems.

Security: Updates, PyCryptoMiner, and Hardware Crisis

Filed under
Security

Fedora 28 Taking To Modularizing Their Anaconda Installer

Filed under
Red Hat

When talking about the Fedora/RedHat Anaconda installer it still brings back bad memories from the Anaconda fallout a few years ago when they went through some painful transitions that also led to release delays. In 2018, Fedora/RedHat developers are taking up the initiative of modularizing the Anaconda installer.

For the Fedora 28 release due out this spring, the plan is to split the Anaconda installer into several modules that in turn will communicate with eachother using a DBus API. The modularization effort sounds nice as long as it goes smoothly and doesn't lead to any fallout like with past Anaconda overhaul initiatives (though admittedly Anaconda has been playing nicely the past number of releases and no complaints on my end currently).

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Ubuntu 17.04, the Last Release with Unity 7, Reaches End of Life on January 13

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical announced today that it's putting an end to the support offered by the Linux company for its Ubuntu 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" operating system next week on January 13.

Launched last year on April 13, Ubuntu 17.04 was a powerful release, both inside and outside, running the latest (at that time) stable Linux 4.10 kernel series and shipping with an up-to-date graphics stack based on Mesa 17.0 and X.Org Server 1.19 series. It was also the last Ubuntu release to ship with the Unity 7 desktop by default.

"As a non-LTS release, 17.04 has a 9-month support cycle and, as such, will reach end of life on Saturday, January 13th," says Steve Langasek, Engineering Manager, Ubuntu Foundations at Canonical. "At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include information or updated packages for Ubuntu 17.04."

Read more

Direct: Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) reaches End of Life on January 13, 2018

Also: Announcing the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition 9370 with Ubuntu

Hackable, Rockchip-based media player also offers NAS and retro gaming

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Cloud Media’s open source “Popcorn Hour Transformer Media Computer / NAS” computer is based on Pine64’s RK3328-based Rock64 SBC, and supports Linux and Android media player, NAS, and retro gaming.

Cloud Media has spun a new variant of its Popcorn Hour media player that is open source in hardware and software thanks to its mainboard: Pine64’s open source, quad-core Cortex-A53 Rock64 SBC. It’s available in a Media Computer and NAS (network attached storage) version for the same price of $95.90 (2GB LPDDR3/16GB eMMC) or $115.90 (4GB/32GB), not counting SATA storage.

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RISC-V and Raspberry Pi Secure

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Security
  • RISC-V Foundation Trumpets Open-Source ISAs In Wake Of Meltdown, Spectre

    The RISC-V Foundation says that no currently announced RISC-V CPU is vulnerable to Meltdown and Spectre and, in the wake of those bugs, stressed the importance of open-source development and a modern ISA in preventing vulnerabilities.

    In consumer computing, we usually only hear about two instruction set architectures (ISA): x86 and ARM. Classified as a complex instruction set, x86 dominates the desktop and server space. Since the rise of smartphones, however, reduced-instruction-set (RISC) ARM processors have dominated the mobile computing market. Beyond x86, there aren’t many complex instruction sets still in use, but there are still many relevant RISC designs despite ARM’s seeming ubiquity.

    The lesser known RISC-V ISA is among those being developed to take on ARM. It was created in the University of California, Berkeley and is unique because it’s open-source. The ISA is actively being worked on and is now overseen by the RISC-V Foundation, which includes companies such as AMD, Nvidia, Micron, Qualcomm, and Microsoft. An ISA alone doesn’t define a CPU design, though. RISC-V being open-source means that anyone is free to build their own CPU to implement the ISA, or their own compiler to build software that can run on RISC-V CPUs.

  • WHY RASPBERRY PI ISN’T VULNERABLE TO SPECTRE OR MELTDOWN

    Over the last couple of days, there has been a lot of discussion about a pair of security vulnerabilities nicknamed Spectre and Meltdown. These affect all modern Intel processors, and (in the case of Spectre) many AMD processors and ARM cores. Spectre allows an attacker to bypass software checks to read data from arbitrary locations in the current address space; Meltdown allows an attacker to read data from arbitrary locations in the operating system kernel’s address space (which should normally be inaccessible to user programs).

    Both vulnerabilities exploit performance features (caching and speculative execution) common to many modern processors to leak data via a so-called side-channel attack. Happily, the Raspberry Pi isn’t susceptible to these vulnerabilities, because of the particular ARM cores that we use.

    To help us understand why, here’s a little primer on so

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Donald Knuth’s 80th Birthday and More

  • Octogenarianhood
    2018 began for me with an absolutely incredible 80th birthday celebration called Knuth80, held in the delightful city of Piteå in northern Sweden. It's impossible for me to thank adequately all of the wonderful people who contributed their time to making this event such a stunning success, certainly one of the greatest highlights of my life. Many of the happenings were also captured digitally in state-of-the-art audio and video, so that others will be able to share some of this joy. I'll link to that data when it becomes available.
  • Celebrating Donald Knuth’s 80th Birthday

    Don suggests that some of the participants who have a little free time might like to look at a few conjectures about set partitions and generating functions that he has put online at http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth/caspagf.txt

  • Tidyverse and data.table, sitting side by side ... (Part 1)
  • Rcpp 0.12.15: Numerous tweaks and enhancements
    The fifteenth release in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp landed on CRAN today after just a few days of gestation in incoming/. This release follows the 0.12.0 release from July 2016, the 0.12.1 release in September 2016, the 0.12.2 release in November 2016, the 0.12.3 release in January 2017, the 0.12.4 release in March 2016, the 0.12.5 release in May 2016, the 0.12.6 release in July 2016, the 0.12.7 release in September 2016, the 0.12.8 release in November 2016, the 0.12.9 release in January 2017, the 0.12.10.release in March 2017, the 0.12.11.release in May 2017, the 0.12.12 release in July 2017, the 0.12.13.release in late September 2017, and the 0.12.14.release in November 2017 making it the nineteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 1288 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further, along with another 91 in BioConductor.

Android Leftovers

Security: Updates and Botched Updates

  • Security updates for Monday
  • RedHat reverts patches to mitigate Spectre Variant 2
    RedHat previously released patches to mitigate this issue, however, in a rather controversial move, has decided to roll back these changes after complaints about systems failing to boot with the new patches, and instead is now recommending that, "subscribers contact their CPU OEM vendor to download the latest microcode/firmware for their processor."
  • Red Hat dumps Spectre CPU patches that brick servers
    Enterprise Linux vendor Red Hat will no longer distribute microcode patches to mitigate against the Spectre processor flaw after bugs in the patches stopped user systems from booting up. The company advised of its decision late last week after being alerted by its customers to problems with the patches. Red Hat is now reverting the microcode_ctl and linux-firmware packages it includes with its enterprise Linux distribution to older versions that are known to be stable. Microcode, also known as millicode and firmware, is software distributed by vendors to correct specific errors for processors.

OSS: 'IoT', Ellcrys, Genode OS

  • This is Why you Must Consider Open-Source IoT Solutions
    The Internet of things is growing exponentially. Its applications are unique and that is one of the reasons that this technology has become renowned. Organizations are finding ways to utilize this technology for improving their workforce, while AI impacts IoT to create smarter applications. Making use of IoT seems to be costlier for companies who are still in their infancy phase. For companies like these, open-source IoT solutions have been created so that they too can reap the benefits of IoT as a technology.
  • Ellcrys is a Breath of Fresh Air for Open Source Collaborators
    Ellcrys is an up and coming blockchain network that aims to revolutionize the way developers work together. In addition to trying to revitalize collaborative efforts, the company has an ICO that promises to make the mining and distribution of its native cryptocurrency fairer and more accessible.
  • Genode OS Framework Making Plans For 2018
    The Genode open-source operating system framework project has shared some of their planned goals for 2018. Genode in 2018 is looking to advance their "Sculpt" general purpose system scenario for the operating system. Back during the Genode OS 17.11 release they described Sculpt as "the approach to start with a minimalistic generic live system that can be interactively shaped into a desktop scenario by the user without any reboot. This is made possible by combining Genode's unique dynamic reconfiguration concept with the recently introduced package management, our custom GUI stack, and the many ready-to-use device-driver components that we developed over the past years."