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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 8:11am
Story Intel's SGX tiptoes towards Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 7:35am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2016 - 10:58pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2016 - 10:19pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2016 - 10:18pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2016 - 10:17pm
Story Debian News Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2016 - 10:16pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2016 - 10:15pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2016 - 10:11pm
Story Nautilus Development Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2016 - 10:05pm

Linux Kernel 4.6.4 Released with Networking Improvements and Updated Drivers

Filed under
Linux

Today, July 11, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the fourth maintenance update for the Linux 4.6 kernel series.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.6.4

Linux 4.4.15

Mini-PC runs Ubuntu on quad-core Bay Trail Atom

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mele has launched a “Star Cloud PCG03” mini-PC that runs Ubuntu on a quad-core Atom Z3735F with 2GB RAM, 64GB eMMC, three USB ports, Ethernet, and WiFi.

Shenzhen Mele Digital Technology Ltd. has released an Ubuntu 14.04 equipped Star Cloud PCG03 mini-PC based on its earlier Windows-based Mini PC PCG09 and Mini PC PCG03. Like these models, as well as Mele’s first Ubuntu-based device, the Star Cloud PCG02 stick PC, the new Star Cloud PCG03 mini-PC runs on a quad-core, 1.33GHz (1.83GHz turbo) Atom Z3735F, a tablet-focused SoC from Intel’s 22nm Bay Trail generation.

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Also: Star Cloud PCG03U Ubuntu Mini PC Unveiled For $90

Net users duke it out over whether Jia Jia, China’s beautiful android, is the fairest of them all

Filed under
Android

Remember Asuna and Junco Chihara, two entries in Japan’s race to create the most hyperreal android ever? Despite their lifelike appearances compared to many other robots out there, some people still aren’t able to get past the “uncanny valley” phenomenon as a result of their unnatural facial movements.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Kernel Development - Greg Kroah-Hartman
  • SHAPING THE SCENARIO TASKS

    This week we are moving on to Creating the scenario tasks for GNOME programs. After a discussion with Jim Hall(my mentor), Allan and Jakub(GNOME design team),we decided to look back at the usability test results from the last round of Outreachy, and focus on the tasks that the participants struggled to accomplish. For example: Finding the zoom button in Image Viewer (header bar button), changing the month/year in Calendar (header bar buttons), searching (header bar button) and copying in Characters (primary window button), annotating and bookmarking in Evince (header bar menus), and other tasks in Nautilus (several were header bar menus). Re-using these scenario tasks will allow us to compare how the design patterns have improved over time.

  • Getting ready for usability tests

    In this test, Diana will ask testers to simulate an "unboxing" of a new system. The tester will turn on the laptop or computer, watch the computer start up, and login to a fresh "test" account so they get first-user experience.

  • New install medium 2016.07.09

    Dual architecture (i686 and x86_64):

    Main ISO - Live ISO image for installation and recovery.
    MATE desktop ISO - Live ISO image for installation and recovery (with MATE Desktop Environment).
    TalkingParabola ISO - Live ISO image for installation and recovery (adapted for blind and visually impaired users).

  • Google Summer of Code student focuses on next steps
  • Week 5&6 Report

    During week 5 and 6, I have been to the debian conference 2016. It was really interesting meeting with a lot of people all so involved in Debian.

  • Linux Mint 18 is here, but Linux Mint 17.3 users can't upgrade just yet

    The Linux Mint project released the final version of Linux Mint 18 “Sarah” on June 30. The project is now working on an upgrade path for Linux Mint 17.3 users.

  • Tata Elxsi to demonstrate Automotive Grade Linux-based infotainment and instrument cluster solutions at the Automotive Linux Summit 2016

    Automotive OEMs, across the world are increasingly focusing on owning the infotainment software functionality to drive a better infotainment experience, enable faster time-to-market and feature updates, to effectively address key trends such as connected and integrated infotainment systems, multi-modal interfaces and HMI design to avoid driver distraction / information overload.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • All the Apache Streaming Projects: An Exploratory Guide

    The speed at which data is generated, consumed, processed, and analyzed is increasing at an unbelievably rapid pace. Social media, the Internet of Things, ad tech, and gaming verticals are struggling to deal with the disproportionate size of data sets. These industries demand data processing and analysis in near real-time. Traditional big data-styled frameworks such as Apache Hadoop is not well-suited for these use cases.

    As a result, multiple open source projects have been started in the last few years to deal with the streaming data. All were designed to process a never-ending sequence of records originating from more than one source. From Kafka to Beam, there are over a dozen Apache projects in various stages of completion.

  • prpl Foundation Unveils the First Open Source Hypervisor for the Internet of Things
  • In the Wake of ownCloud, Here Comes Nextcloud

    The extremely popular ownCloud open source file-sharing and storage platform for building private clouds has been much in the news lately. CTO and founder of ownCloud Frank Karlitschek resigned from the company a few months ago. His open letter announcing the move pointed to possible friction created as ownCloud moved forward as a commercial entity as opposed to a solely community focused, open source project.

    Karlitschek had a plan, though. He is now out with a fork of ownCloud called Nextcloud, and there are strong signs that we can expect good things from this open platform.

  • Getting started with Git

    In the introduction to this series we learned who should use Git, and what it is for. Today we will learn how to clone public Git repositories, and how to extract individual files without cloning the whole works.

    Since Git is so popular, it makes life a lot easier if you're at least familiar with it at a basic level. If you can grasp the basics (and you can, I promise!), then you'll be able to download whatever you need, and maybe even contribute stuff back. And that, after all, is what open source is all about: having access to the code that makes up the software you run, the freedom to share it with others, and the right to change it as you please. Git makes this whole process easy, as long as you're comfortable with Git.

  • Never Discount the Soft Skills for Career Building

    As an open source professional, even if you have the technical chops required for a position, it doesn’t necessarily mean you are a “shoe-in” for the role. Surprisingly, what many don’t know is that what sets you apart from other candidates in the interview process is your soft skills. Finding a professional who has the technical skills to handle a job can be difficult, but finding a professional who has both the technical skills required and the personal attributes that enable collaboration with team members can even more challenging.

    For open source professionals looking to move, improving some of your soft skills is a great way to make yourself indispensable to employers. Focusing on these skills allows you to still grow professionally and attract potential employers without having to go through the formal training methods required to learn some of the more technical skills. In particular, pay specific attention to some of the skills listed below, as they were found to be amongst the top soft skills employers on Dice requested from open source professionals:

  • Why Companies Adopt Microservices And How They Succeed

    This post into delves into the non-technical aspects of adopting microservices within a company. With the world now being driven by technology, companies must learn to adapt, stay agile and continue to increase velocity in their core business.

  • Building a Machine Learning Orchestration Framework on Apache Mesos
  • Managing Large SQL Database Clusters with the Apache Mesos Crate Framework
  • Redis on Apache Mesos, A New Framework - Dhilip Kumar S, Huawei Technologies
  • You've Read Our Open-Source Research Guidebook. Now Let's Use It.

    RuNet Echo has now published eight installments in a guidebook on conducting open-source research on the Russian Internet. This ninth and final entry takes the tools and instructions we've been studying and applies them to a single case study: the wildfires that caused significant damage to the Siberian city of Chita in 2015.

  • Plug-and-play server provides access to millions of digital documents in Africa

    The WiderNet project, which is affiliated with WiderNet@UNC at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, provides resources, coaching, training, computers, and educational materials to schools, clinics, libraries, and homes in underserved areas of the world. In this interview, Cliff Missen, the Director of the WiderNet Project, explains how the non-profit helps improve digital education and communications for international communities.

  • Facebook launches open source cellular system
  • Facebook unveils open-source mobile tech
  • This new Facebook device aims to bring internet to the ends of the earth
  • iPod

    Unfortunately I have found writing to the iPod to be very poor with Rockbox, but it's fine for playback, and booting the iPod in OF or DFU mode is very easy and works reliably.

  • Rcpp now used by over 700 CRAN packages
  • IoT puts assembly language back on the charts

    Let's do the time warp again: according to an outfit that tracks programming languages, the Internet of Things is re-igniting demand for assembly language skills.

    Software consultancy TIOBE's Programming Community Index has turned up the re-emergence of assembly programming in its monthly index (the definition of the index is here).

FOSS in Europe

Filed under
OSS
  • Could open source help kill piracy in Romania?

    Open source enthusiast Petru Ratiu stressed that although Linux might be cost-effective, it’s not completely free, as it implies payments like the ones associated with support and training. As for the administration, he emphasised the need for open data and open formats.

  • New European contest to promote IT reuse

    The EC will award EUR 15,000 and EUR 10,000 to the two most-proven IT solutions reused by each of the four levels of public administration: cross-border, national, regional and local.

    Contenders for the ‘Sharing & Reuse Award’ can register their project here. The contest is open until 28 October 2016 and the prizes will be announced in March 2017.

    “We want to award existing IT solutions that have been developed and shared by public administrations, and that can be further reused across Europe”, says Margarida Abecasis, in charge of the ISA² programme, under whose auspices the awards are run.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Is Your Antivirus Making Your PC More Hackable? Probably YES!f

    Is your antivirus software protecting you from all kinds of malware and security threats? The answer to this questions is a big NO. While one shouldn’t completely get rid of his/her antivirus solution, one shouldn’t be too carefree having them installed. We also advise our readers to follow the basic security practices to stay safe on the internet.

  • Social Media Accounts Of Twitter And Yahoo CEOs Hacked By OurMine

    Hacking group OurMine has now targetted Jack Dorsey and Marissa Mayer. OurMine recently hacked their Twitter accounts and posted messages on their profile. OurMine has triggered the frequency of its operations in the recent times and targeting multiple high-profile tech CEOs and celebrities.

  • Let's Encrypt torpedoes cost and maintenance issues for Free RTC

    Many people have now heard of the EFF-backed free certificate authority Let's Encrypt. Not only is it free of charge, it has also introduced a fully automated mechanism for certificate renewals, eliminating a tedious chore that has imposed upon busy sysadmins everywhere for many years.

    These two benefits - elimination of cost and elimination of annual maintenance effort - imply that server operators can now deploy certificates for far more services than they would have previously.

  • Voice Commands Hidden In YouTube Videos Can Hack Your Smartphone
  • This is quite a nice tool – magic-wormhole

    This beats doing a scp from system to system, especially if the receiving system is behind a NAT and/or firewall.

  • Entry level AI

    I was listening to the podcast Security Weekly and the topic of using AI For security work came up. This got me thinking about how most people make their way into security and what something like AI might mean for the industry.

    In virtually every industry you start out doing some sort of horrible job nobody else wants to do, but you have to start there because it's the place you start to learn the skills you need for more exciting and interesting work. Nobody wants to go over yesterday's security event log, but somebody does it.

Linux Mint 18: The best desktop -- period

Filed under
Linux

You could keep worrying about being forced to upgrade to Windows 10, or you could try the best of all Linux desktops: Mint 18.

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In mourning for Nano, chap crafts 1k-loc text editor

Filed under
GNU
OSS

Ticked off by the news that Nano opted out of GNU, a programmer called Salvatore Sanfilippo has written his own text editor.

What's impressive about it is that it provides a basic code editor with syntax highlighting and search, without ncurses as a dependency, and in a mere 1,000 lines of code (at Github).

Read more

Graphics: Libinput, SwiftShader, Plasma

  • Mode Switching Coming For Graphics Tablets In Libinput 1.4

    Linux input expert Peter Hutterer at Red Hat has shared an upcoming feature of libinput 1.4: mode switching support for graphics tablet (e.g. Wacom tablets) for switching through different behavior depending upon button presses.

  • libinput and graphics tablet mode support

    In an earlier post, I explained how we added graphics tablet pad support to libinput. Read that article first, otherwise this article here will be quite confusing.

    A lot of tablet pads have mode-switching capabilities. Specifically, they have a set of LEDs and pressing one of the buttons cycles the LEDs. And software is expected to map the ring, strip or buttons to different functionality depending on the mode. A common configuration for a ring or strip would be to send scroll events in mode 1 but zoom in/out when in mode 2. On the Intuos Pro series tablets that mode switch button is the one in the center of the ring. On the Cintiq 21UX2 there are two sets of buttons, one left and one right and one mode toggle button each. The Cintiq 24HD is even more special, it has three separate buttons on each side to switch to a mode directly (rather than just cycling through the modes).

  • Google's SwiftShader Released

    Year by year, plain-old HTML 5 websites are becoming fancier, and right now, the home entertainment world is buzzing about VR and 3D. But most sites are missing the boat; they have no 3D content. Well, that's about to change.

    Google recently opened the source code for its SwiftShader project. If you have used Google Chrome or Android, you probably have seen SwiftShader in action before. It's a high-performance software renderer that improves the performance of games or 3D content on low-end machines.

    Until recently, SwiftShader was a closed-source project. Although Android and Chromium are open source, SwiftShader always was distributed as a separate component, covered by a proprietary license. Now that Google has released SwiftShader to the world, other web browser developers will be able to use it too. This, in turn, should stimulate the development of richer 3D web content.

  • KDE Plasma Users Are Still Running Into Multi-Screen Issues

    KDE Plasma 5.7 was advertised as having better multi-screen support, but it turns out there's still more work to do as various problems in the open-source Linux desktop stack are leading to a less than ideal experience.

Dear Valve and Steam Machines OEMs, you have it all wrong

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Most of us reading this site want Steam Machines to do well. Not all of us will be interested in buying the hardware, but we're aware that its success is also tied to the success of Linux as a gaming platform, which is why I'm pretty miffed that the OEMs and Valve have messed it up.

Valve have done well with the controller and with making SteamOS pretty coherent and user-friendly, but messed it up when it came to defining what a Steam Machine actually is, leaving it open to interpretation. I've said this time and time again, but the original Steam Machines line-up was a complete mess. We had everything from $1500 PCs to ludicrously overpriced machines which didn't even have discreet graphics cards.

Even the best offerings fall short. Alienware's cheapest offering comes in at $450 (this should be the ideal price point in my opinion), but offers a mere 4GB RAM. If you want to scale this up to 8GB, you have to pay $750 since it also means upping the CPU to an i5. Does a GTX 960 need an i5 to do its thing? No, not really. You might get a few extra frames or do better in a more CPU-intensive game, but if one tries to step outside the worldview of a PC gamer and into one of a console gamer, then it doesn't take long to realise that those $200 aren't worth it, but $20 for an extra stick of 4GB RAM would be worth it.

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The 10 Coolest Open-Source Products Of 2016 (So Far)

Filed under
OSS

Through the first half of 2016, open-source products haven't been a sideshow to the main events from fully proprietary products. Open-source products have been front and center, as a wave of new offerings in storage, containers, networking and other hot areas have been unveiled. And if Red Hat president and CEO Jim Whitehurst is right, this is still the early innings for open source. During the Red Hat Summit in June -- where the theme was "The Power of Participation" -- Whitehurst put his view this way: "Our ability to harness and distill the best ideas will determine human progress for the next century. … Our future depends on participation."

Here are the 10 coolest open-source products we've been tracking through the first half of 2016.

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Multi-screen woes in Plasma 5.7

Filed under
KDE

With Plasma 5.7 we promised improved multi-screen support. While we achieved that, some users are still experiencing issues. This is unfortunate and our users have all the reasons to be disappointed with us. We are working very hard to fix the issues which have been reported to us since the release.

But there are many situations where users blame us for issues not under our control. With this blog post I want to describe some of the problems we got reported and explain them.

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Side-by-side: openSuSE Tumbleweed and Leap

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

Leap, on the other hand, should never have such stability problems. It is so extensively tested, and so conservatively updated, that such problems are extremely unlikely to make it through. While the Leap distribution doesn't have that long of a history to look at (it's initial release was in April 2015), I think it is safe to say that Leap is related to SuSE Linux Enterprise in much the same way that Tumbleweed is tied to factory, and one thing that SuSE Linux Enterprise is very well known for is rock solid stability.

That's pretty much it, so I hope this brief review of the two distributions is helpful in deciding which would be right for your purposes.

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Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

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The subtle art of the Desktop

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