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Sunday, 19 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games: Space Pirates And Zombies, Rec Center Tycoon and More Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2017 - 6:04pm
Story Security: Fancy Bear, MINIX, WikiLeaks Vault 8, Face ID Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2017 - 5:02pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 12/11/2017 - 5:00pm
Story KDE Frameworks 5.40 Software Stack Brings OpenSSL 1.1 Support, over 80 Changes Rianne Schestowitz 12/11/2017 - 4:52pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2017 - 4:36pm
Story Samsung’s Linux on Galaxy software will bring full-fledged Ubuntu desktop to your phone (with an external display) Rianne Schestowitz 12/11/2017 - 8:00am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2017 - 10:01pm
Story Audio/Video: Unleaded Hangout, Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2017 - 10:00pm
Story Linux Bugs and Features Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2017 - 9:58pm
Story Software: Kdenlive, ucaresystem, FFmpeg, Calibre, NetworkManager Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2017 - 9:55pm

From lab to libre software: how can academic software research become open source?

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

Academics generate enormous amounts of software, some of which inspires commercial innovations in networking and other areas. But little academic software gets released to the public and even less enters common use. Is some vast "dark matter" being overlooked in the academic community? Would the world benefit from academics turning more of their software into free and open projects?

I asked myself these questions a few months ago when Red Hat, at its opening of a new innovation center in Boston's high-tech Fort Point neighborhood, announced a unique partnership with the goal of tapping academia. Red Hat is joining with Boston-area computer science departments—starting with Boston University—to identify promising software developed in academic projects and to turn it into viable free-software projects. Because all software released by Red Hat is under free licenses, the partnership suggests a new channel by which academic software could find wider use.

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Parrot 3.9 “Intruder” Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Released With New Features — Download Here

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

In mid-October, The Parrot Project announced that it’s going to be releasing the latest Parrot Security 3.9 operating system for ethical hacking and penetration testing in the upcoming weeks. The team also released its beta release for testers. After the wait of a couple of weeks, the final Parrot 3.9 release is here.

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SFLC Files Bizarre Legal Action Against Its Former Client, Software Freedom Conservancy

Filed under
GNU
Legal

About a month ago, the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC), the not-for-profit law firm which launched Conservancy in 2006 and served as Conservancy's law firm until July 2011, took the bizarre and frivolous step of filing a legal action in the United States Patent and Trademark Office seeking cancellation of Conservancy's trademark for our name, “Software Freedom Conservancy”. We were surprised by this spurious action. In our eleven years of coexistence, SFLC has raised no concerns nor complaints about our name, nor ever asked us to change it. We filed our formal answer to SFLC's action yesterday. In the interest of transparency for our thousands of volunteers, donors, Supporters, and friends, we at Conservancy today decided to talk publicly about the matter.

SFLC's action to cancel our trademark initiated a process nearly identical to litigation. As such, our legal counsel has asked us to limit what we say about the matter. However, we pride ourselves on our commitment to transparency. In those rare instances when we initiated or funded legal action — to defend the public interest through GPL enforcement — we have been as candid as possible about the circumstances. We always explain the extent to which we exhausted other possible solutions, and why we chose litigation as the last resort.

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Mageia 6 review - Very refreshing

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

Mageia 6 is a very interesting, unique distro. It comes with a load of good stuff, including proprietary graphics drivers out of the box even in the live session, user data import, Windows data import, multimedia and smartphone support, a smart control center with a load of powerful features, and still more. The approach to the user experience is different from most other systems, and I am really happy to see that. The copypasta drill you see elsewhere is getting boring fast. It's also emotionally grinding. This is cool.

On the other hand, not everything is perfect. There's an old vs new clash of technologies and styles, hardware support can be better, Samba printing is missing, the package manager is a bit clunky, and performance is really among the least favorable I've seen in a long time. All in all, definitely recommended, but you might struggle with some of the special quirks. Or you might actually find them endearing. Either way, 8/10, and I'm glad to have revived the Mageia experience. Well worth testing.

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Servers: Containers, SDNs, VMs

Filed under
Server
  • The New Cloud Foundry Container Runtime: Just the Facts

    The Cloud Foundry Container Runtime is the new name for Kubo, which is Kubernetes running on BOSH. In today’s episode of The New Stack Makers, TNS founder Alex Williams caught up with Cloud Foundry Foundation Chief Technology Officer Chip Childers to learn more about Cloud Foundry’s plans for this new runtime, with Childers highlighting how BOSH is serving the needs of today’s developers.

  • Google Says It's Cut Cloud SDN Andromeda's Latency by 40 Percent
  • Google Improves Latency 40% Within its Software-Defined Networking
  • What is virtualization?

    No advance in information technology in the past six decades has offered a greater range of quantifiable benefits than has virtualization. Many IT professionals think of virtualization in terms of virtual machines (VM) and their associated hypervisors and operating-system implementations, but that only skims the surface. An increasingly broad set of virtualization technologies, capabilities, strategies and possibilities are redefining major elements of IT in organizations everywhere.

Kernel and Graphics: Thunderbolt, Nouveau and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Foundation Unveils Plans for Machine Learning Project
  • Thunderbolt 3 firmware updates

    I joined Red Hat's Desktop Hardware Enablement team almost a year ago. One of the things that I have been looking into recently is Thunderbolt 3. With kernel 4.13 we got a completely new kernel interface for interacting with it from userspace (the work was done by Intel). One of the two big things this interface provides is updating the firmware (the non-volatile memory, or NVM in short) of the host controller and attached thunderbolt devices. With help from Dell's Mario Limonciello, Intel's Yehezkel Bernat, and of course our own Richard Hughes I created a thunderbolt 3 plugin for fwupd, which device and host firmware updates should show up in GNOME Software (or any other fwupd userspace clients) and updating them should be a breeze. The code landed already in fwupd 0.9.7.

  • PGI Compiler 17.10 Released With CUDA 9.0 Support, OpenMP 4.5 Additions

    The NVIDIA-owned PGI has announced their latest monthly update to their proprietary CPU/GPU compiler stack for Windows, Linux, and macOS systems.

    PGI 17.10 is now available, including its free PGI Community Edition Version 17.10 update. The PGI compiler stack remains geared for HPC applications and supports Fortran/C/C++ and supports multi-core CPUs and NVIDIA GPUs with OpenACC, OpenMP, and CUDA offloading.

  • R600 Gallium3D Receiving Some New Improvements By David Airlie

    In between hacking on the RADV Vulkan driver, managing DRM-Next, and his other activities at Red Hat, David Airlie has now sent landed some improvements to the aging R600 Gallium3D driver and more improvements are on the way.

    Yesterday were several new R600 commits for this driver that supports from the ATI Radeon HD 2000 series through the AMD Radeon HD 6000 series graphics processors.

  • Nouveau DRM Changes Queued For Linux 4.15

    The Nouveau DRM kernel driver changes have now been submitted and pulled into DRM-Next for Linux 4.15.

    This open-source NVIDIA driver for Linux 4.15 includes Pascal temperature support, improved BAR2 handling, faster suspend process, a rework of the MMU code and proper support for Pascal's new MMU layout, the MMU changes allow for improving the user-space APIs at a later date, and various fixes.

Slax Is Planning A Return, But Will No Longer Be Slackware-Based

Filed under
Slack

Longtime Linux users will likely recall the Slax distribution from back in the day that was Slackware-based, shipped with KDE, and offered a pretty nice live OS experience while being highly modular and made it easy to re-spin derivatives. Now it's coming back in new form.

Slax creator Tomáš Matějíček has been working on a new Slax release after being on a nearly half-decade hiatus. But in this renewed Slax, Slackware is no longer being used as a base but instead Debian. Tomas said he's moving to Debian out of "laziness" with Debian offering a much better and easier starting experience than Slackware in its current state. Debian's extensive package archive is another reported reason for choosing it.

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Tor Improvements and Bugfix

Filed under
Security
Web
  • Next-Gen Algorithms Make Tor Browser More Secure And Private, Download The Alpha Now

    Tor, the anonymity network was in need of an upgrade, as the world started raising concerns about its reliability. It was this year only when a hacker managed to take down almost 1/5th of the onion network.

    The possible applications of Tor have reached far ahead than calling it a grey market for drugs and other illegal things. It’s already actively used for the exchange of confidential information, file transfer, and cryptocurrency transactions with an expectation that nobody can track it.

  • TorMoil Vulnerability Leaks Real IP Address from Tor Browser Users

    The Tor Project has released a security update for the Tor Browser on Mac and Linux to fix a vulnerability that leaks users' real IP addresses.

    The vulnerability was spotted by Filippo Cavallarin, CEO of We Are Segment, an Italian company specialized in cyber-security and ethical hacking.

  • Critical Tor flaw leaks users’ real IP address—update now

    Mac and Linux versions of the Tor anonymity browser just received a temporary fix for a critical vulnerability that leaks users' IP addresses when they visit certain types of addresses.

    TorMoil, as the flaw has been dubbed by its discoverer, is triggered when users click on links that begin with file:// rather than the more common https:// and http:// address prefixes. When the Tor browser for macOS and Linux is in the process of opening such an address, "the operating system may directly connect to the remote host, bypassing Tor Browser," according to a brief blog post published Tuesday by We Are Segment, the security firm that privately reported the bug to Tor developers.

Games: F1 2017, Distant Star: Revenant Fleet, Human: Fall Flat, Natural Selection 2, Dota 2 Vulkan

Filed under
Gaming

The November 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the November 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

​The 10 best ways to secure your Android phone

Filed under
Android

The most secure smartphones are Android smartphones. Don't buy that? Apple's latest version of iOS 11 was cracked a day -- a day! -- after it was released.

So Android is perfect? Heck no!

Android is under constant attack and older versions are far more vulnerable than new ones. Way too many smartphone vendors still don't issue Google's monthly Android security patches in a timely fashion, or at all. And, zero-day attacks still pop up.

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34-Way Graphics Card Comparison On Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

As part of marking AMD's open-source driver strategy starting 10 years ago, among other articles, over the past week I posted an 18-way Radeon graphics card comparison on Ubuntu 17.10 while upgrading to the latest drivers. Taking those numbers further and putting them into more perspective, here is now a brief 34-way comparison with the NVIDIA GeForce counterparts added in.

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Radeon RADV vs. NVIDIA Vulkan Performance For F1 2017 On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Since yesterday's release of F1 2017 on Linux, it's been a very busy benchmarking session and these are just the first of the Radeon Vulkan tests to come of F1 2017. More will be coming over the weekend, including a larger GPU comparison. These are simply the latest results as of Friday afternoon; testing was also compounded by re-testing the NVIDIA GPUs too after Feral discovered a settings issue in their test script. For this article the selection of graphics cards tested were:

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Ubuntu 17.10 quick screenshot tour

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.10 is the newest version of this world famous Linux distribution, and this one is especially interesting because Canonical decided to dump its controversial Unity baby and use GNOME desktop environment instead.
It means that there are no longer separate Ubuntu and Ubuntu GNOME distributions. They are now the same. Linux notes from DarkDuck has reviewed the Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 not that long ago.
Let's now have a quick whistle stop tour on Ubuntu 17.10 with GNOME desktop environment.

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PinguyOS Tosses Everything at the Desktop

Filed under
OS

For the longest time, naysayers were fairly intent on shutting down anyone who believed the Linux desktop would eventually make serious headway in the market. Although Linux has yet to breach 5 percent of that market, it continues to claw its way up. And with the help of very modern, highly efficient, user-friendly environments, like PinguyOS, it could make even more headway.

If you’ve never heard of PinguyOS, you’re in for a treat — especially if you’re new to Linux. PinguyOS is a Linux distribution, created by Antoni Norman, that is based on Ubuntu. The intention of PinguyOS is to look good, work well, and — most importantly — be easy to use. For the most part, the developers have succeeded with aplomb. It’s not perfect, but the PinguyOS desktop is certainly one that could make migrating to Linux a fairly easy feat for new users.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Darling ('Wine' for OS X) and Games Leftovers

Linux 4.13.14, 4.9.63, 4.4.99, and 3.18.82