Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Netflix and GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:12pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:11pm
Story KDE/Qt Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:10pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:10pm
Story GNOME News: GNOME 3.24 Everywhere Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:09pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:08pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:07pm
Story Linux and FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:07pm
Story Development News: GitLab 9.0, CRAN, and 2038 Bug Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:06pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 11:04pm

How Canonical makes money from Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are three active LTS releases of Ubuntu: 12.04, 14.04 and 16.04. The support for 12.04 is ending this year on April 28, 2017. While Canonical is encouraging users to upgrade to 14.04 or 16.04 LTS, there are still a lot of companies using 12.04.

Customers running critical services on their servers and cloud really don’t like frequent upgrades. They tweak, tune and customize different components of their infrastructure and when you bring in too many changes at the same time with a major release upgrade, something is going to break.

Read more

Why do you use Linux and open source software?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As I mentioned when The Queue launched, although typically I will answer questions from readers, sometimes I'll switch that around and ask readers a question. I haven't done so since that initial column, so it's overdue. I recently asked two related questions at LinuxQuestions.org and the response was overwhelming. Let's see how the Opensource.com community answers both questions, and how those responses compare and contrast to those on LQ.

Read more

Slackel Openbox Plays Hard to Get

Filed under
Reviews

Slackel's Openbox edition is a lightweight operating system that offers reliable performance once you get the box open. It is not an ideal OS for every user, though.

Slackel 6.0.8 Openbox, the latest version of the Greece-based project's lightweight distribution, was released by developer Dimitris Tzemos last fall.

Slackel is a Linux distro that offers several benefits for users who step away from the typical mainstream Debian-based Linux distros. Based on both Slackware and Salix, it offers a few advantages not usually found with the Slackware Linux lineup.

For example, Slackel is fully compatible with both Slackware and Salix software packages. The main difference is it includes the current version of Slackware and the latest version of KDE in the repository.

Read more

Fedora 26 Alpha Delays

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 26 Alpha Has Been Delayed

    Fedora 26 Alpha isn't going to make it out on time and has been delayed, pushing back the final F26 already by a second time.

  • Fedora 26 Alpha Delayed by a Week Due to Late Blockers, Could Launch on March 28

    Red Hat's Jan Kurik has announced today, March 16, 2017, that the upcoming Alpha release of the Fedora 26 Linux operating system has been delayed by one week due to late blockers.

    This is the second delay the Fedora 26 Alpha release received. It was initially scheduled for launch on March 14, and then delayed until March 21, but it seems that the realese on that date won't happen either because during today's Go/No-Go meeting, the Fedora Linux developers have decided that some critical bugs need to be resolved before it hits the streets.

Turtl A Privacy Focused Evernote Note Taking Alternative

Filed under
Linux

Turtl is primarily a note-taking app like Evernote and Google Keep with a high focus on privacy and security. According to their site, “It's a private place to keep your notes, research, passwords, bookmarks, dream logs, photos, documents and anything else you want to keep safe”.

Read<br />
more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Orange Pi PCs get Ubuntu App Store thanks to Canonical

Filed under
Ubuntu

There’s no shortage of small, low-power PC-on-a-module devices designed to piggyback on the success of the Raspberry Pi. But one problem with some of these cheap single board computers is that they don’t have the same kind of user and developer community as the Raspberry Pi, which can make it harder to get official support.

So it’s interesting to see that the makers of the Orange Pi line of products have partnered with Ubuntu Linux maker Canonical to offer an official app store for Orange Pi products running Ubuntu software.

Read more

How an open source Gitter could challenge Slack

Filed under
OSS

It sure sounds like a match made in dev heaven.

Yesterday, GitLab -- maker of an open source competitor to GitHub -- announced it had acquired Gitter, a Slack-like chat service aimed mainly at software developers.

Read more

Do GitHub's updated terms of service conflict with copyleft?

Filed under
GNU
Legal

GitHub's updated terms caused a great deal of concern, but while they are confusing, they do not appear to be incompatible with copyleft. The Free Software Foundation (FSF), though, still recommends using other code hosting sites.

GitHub recently updated their terms of service (ToS). Users of the site are raising many concerns over the new terms, fearing that the ToS could be incompatible with the copyleft licenses on works uploaded to GitHub. In particular, section D of the new terms, which handles rights granted to GitHub and GitHub users, makes many hackers very uncomfortable.

Section D.4 states, "You grant us and our legal successors the right to store and display your Content and make incidental copies as necessary to render the Website and provide the Service. " At first glance that might appear to grant permissions on your work without the concomitant protective guarantees found in copyleft licenses like the GNU General Public License (GPL). Users who care about ensuring that their software never becomes proprietary would not want to give such unconditional permission. And those uploading works that incorporate third-party copylefted code may not even be able to grant such permissions.

But licenses like the GNU GPL already give the necessary permissions to make, use, and modify local copies of a work. Are the new GitHub ToS asking for more than that? It's not fully clear. While the grant language could fit within the scope of the GPL, other words used in the section like "share" or "distribute" could be understood to mean something that wouldn't line up with the GPL's terms.

Read more

[How To] Install Latest NVIDIA Drivers In Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Do you have a Nvidia graphics card on your desktop? That's great until you are in need of the latest drivers especially when you are a gamer. Unlike Windows, Nvidia drivers for Linux desktops are quite hard to come by, and installing the latest drivers on your Linux desktop can be quite an arduous process. Fortunately for Linux users, there are the third party graphics drivers PPA which keeps an updated Nvidia driver for installation. The PPA is currently in testing but you can nonetheless get working Nvidia drivers from here.

Read<br />
more

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Dormant Linux kernel vulnerability finally slayed

    A recently resolved vulnerability in the Linux kernel that had the potential to allow an attacker to gain privilege escalation or cause denial of service went undiscovered for seven years.

    Positive Technologies expert, Alexander Popov, found a race condition in the n_hdlc driver that leads to double-freeing of kernel memory. This Linux kernel flaw might be exploited for privilege escalation in the operating system. The (CVE-2017-2636) bug was evaluated as dangerous with a CVSS v3 score of 7.8, towards the higher end of the scale which runs from 1-10.

  • Another Years-Old Flaw Fixed in the Linux Kernel

    The Linux team has patched a "dangerous" vulnerability in the Linux kernel that allowed attackers to elevate their access rights and crash affected systems.

    The security issue, tracked as CVE-2017-2636, existed in the Linux kernel for the past seven years, after being introduced in the code in 2009.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

LibreOffice 5.3 Office Suite Gets First Point Release with 100 Improvements

Filed under
LibO

Softpedia was informed today by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the first point release to the LibreOffice 5.3 open-source office suite for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows.

LibreOffice 5.3.1 comes one and a half months after the release of LibreOffice 5.3, a major branch that introduced exciting new features for users of the popular office suite. These include the experimental MUFFIN user interface with a Microsoft Office-like Ribbon UI, as well as the first source release of LibreOffice Online.

During these past six weeks, LibreOffice 5.3.1 received two Release Candidate (RC) development versions, which fix about 100 bugs and regressions that have been either discovered by the LibreOffice developers/contributors or reported by users from the previous version.

Read more

Original: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.3.1

Trying Out LLVM 4.0's LLD Linker On Ubuntu 17.04 vs. GNU LD, GNU Gold

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With this week's LLVM 4.0 release making the LLD linker ready for production use on some platforms, namely ELF on x86_64 / AArch64, I decided to finally try it out on one of my test systems. I set LLD as the default linker on an Ubuntu 17.04 system and set off to run some benchmarks.

Read more

NXP’s Cortex-A35 based i.MX8 X chips put safety first

Filed under
Linux

NXP’s i.MX8 X SoCs offer 2-4 Cortex-A35 cores plus Cortex-M4F, Vivante, and Tensilica chips, and safety features like ECC and SER.

At this week’s Embedded World show, NXP Semiconductors N.V. unveiled three dual- and quad-core Cortex-A35 based i.MX8 X SoCs. The new SoCs — the i.MX8 QuadXPlus, i.MX8 DualXPlus, and the i.MX8 DualX — also include Cortex-M4F MCUs, Vivante GPUs, and Tensilica DSPs, and feature ECC memory support, reduced soft-error-rate (SER) technology, and other industrial and automotive safety related features. We saw no mention of OS support, but the original i.MX8 SoCs support Linux, Android, FreeRTOS, QNX, Green Hills, and Dornerworks XEN.

Read more

How to Choose the Best Linux Distro for SysAdmin Workstation Security

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

If you’re a systems administrator choosing a Linux distribution for your workstation, chances are you’ll stick with a fairly widely used distro such as Fedora, Ubuntu, Arch, Debian, or one of their close spin-offs. Still, there are several security considerations you should weigh when picking which distribution is best for your needs.

Read more

Also: Linux Sucks — The Latest And Last From Bryan Lunduke

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.