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Has Microsoft Changed?

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft’s billion-dollar PR department would like everyone to know that they have shed their old ways and evolved into a hip and woke gentle giant, but have they really?

There is currency in being viewed this way in the public eye and public relations department would like you to believe this about X company because of the trust it fosters. Further, it is also the job of any public relations team to distract us from such and many others that contradict said narrative. In PR and good ol’ fashion propaganda alike, such tactics are referred to as spin. And when a company such as Microsoft employs a former marine and Defense Information School alumni to spin their web, facilitate their social wetwork, and maintain dossiers on journalists (an act of intimidation), it may be wise to remain skeptical.

As such and rather than focusing on the ambiguous notion of change popularized by zealous employees raving in unison with fan sites shilled by PC ads masquerading as media outlets, it may be wise to highlight a few mainstay behaviors that Microsoft of old has been notorious for and see if they are existent today instead. From there, we can decide for ourselves whether Microsoft is truly the woke, edgy and reformed tech company that their PR and marketing departments would love everyone to believe or if they’re the same law firm with a software problem that they’ve always been with some minor aesthetic changes.

[...]

It often goes overlooked, but legal departments can carry as much or more weight than the office of the CEO and this is certainly not an exception for a company founded by the son of a prominent attorney. However, it’s also overlooked how much lawyers generally suck at change; go work for a few law firms if you doubt this. That said and despite Microsoft’s hip new CEO, Brad Smith, one of the largest individual shareholders of Microsoft, has been working within their office of the general counsel since the ‘90s, was named their general counsel towards the conclusion of their embarrassing anti-trust case with the US, and is now their Chief Legal Officer. As a consequence of their legal victories and the billions in revenue made possible through Brad Smith’s leadership, it is almost irrational to think that Microsoft’s legal department has changed as they have no incentive to do this.

When considering Brad Smith’s clear specialty in the realms of damage control and anti-competition, even approached by Facebook recently, it is difficult to say whether Microsoft has changed much or if they just have the best (dirtiest?) lawyer in the room. After all and just as you tend to stop having to call your traffic attorney as much when you slow down and stop speeding, Microsoft wouldn’t need the Jose Baez of anti-competition on their payroll if they weren’t up to the same antics that got them in trouble in the first place.

As a result of this, Microsoft Licensing, still overseen by the aforementioned Brad Smith, is still a complex, ever-changing labyrinth that is streamlined to ensnare businesses and add cost at every interchange. Even Azure, the lynchpin of their future, is a licensing hellscape of sorts that appears to borrow heavily from these same practices.

Although Microsoft claims to be an equal opportunity company that is in the court of women now, 99% of sexual harassment and gender discrimination claims made by highly educated and accomplished women with everything to lose have been found to be meritless and are snuffed out by their HR and employee relations investigations team (ERIT) which Brad Smith also oversees. For what it’s worth, Kathleen Hogan, VP of HR at Microsoft, would like you to know that only 10% of discrimination and 50% of harassment claims are found to be hogwash, which is still garbage.

[...]

Despite their layoffs, aesthetic changes, and acquisitions though, Microsoft still appears to be employing the same people that they always have, especially within their highest ranks. In turn, these same people appear to be employing the same sort of employee required to build the same core suite of products that necessitate the same partner distribution network, the same marketing ploys, the same lock-in nature, and the same legal clout that they have been dependent on for decades to make this all possible, leaving little else to be changed beyond the paint on the walls.

Read more

Server: SUSE, IBM, Google and TriggerMesh

Filed under
Server
  • Is open source lock-in possible? [Ed: Well, it is possible, but a lot cheaper to exit and a lot less likely, too]

    Earlier this week, open source software company SuSE announced that it is strengthening its presence in the Asia-Pacific region following its acquisition by growth investor EQT from Micro Focus.

    Well-known for its SuSE Linux distro that got me into Linux during my student years, SuSE is now Europe’s leading Linux distribution, thanks in part to its German roots, but faces strong competition from its bigger US rival Red Hat.

    The two open source software companies have similar offerings, starting with Linux for the infrastructure piece, to container orchestration and OpenStack in the platform layer. But unlike Red Hat, which has Red Hat Ansible under its fold, SuSE does not appear to have a commercial version of the Ansible open source automation tool.

  • SUSE contrasts proprietary VMware with its open-source offering

    Open source company SUSE has taken a pot-shot at cloud infrastructure and business mobility vendor VMware, contrasting the latter's proprietary, closed-source offering with the OpenStack Cloud that it sells.

    A blog post by Ryan Hagen, consulting manager, Global SUSE Services, said that VMware owned the virtualisation market and had used its dominance "to proliferate into other parts of the data centre and create a very sticky situation that you have no way to escape".

  • Here’s how CIOs can address server, open source bottlenecks while implementing AI

    Updated PowerAI toolkit for POWER9 is now available for the first time on Red Hat, including Tensorflow, Caffe, Torch, Theano, and more of the open source community’s most popular deep learning frameworks accessible with an intuitive GUI interface. This makes PowerAI the first commercially supported AI software offering for Red Hat.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Sandboxed API

    This week’s highlighted open-source project aims to make it less burdensome to create sandboxes of C/C++ libraries.

    Google’s Sandboxed API (SAPI) was made open-source earlier this week. In addition, it also made its core sandboxing project, Sandbox2, available as part of the Sandboxed API.

    SAPI works by creating an almost-identical stub API after security policies are set up and library interfaces are created. The API forwards calls to the real library running in a sandboxed environment by using a custom RPC layer.

  • Safely play around with new software in Google’s open source Sandboxed API

    Software isolation isn’t a punishment; it’s a way to make sure your shiny new program that you picked up off of the internet plays nicely with your system and isn’t riddled with malware. Thanks to the newly open sourced Sandboxed API, developers can test out new options without putting their system at risk.

    Sandboxed API (SAPI) automatically generates sandboxes for C/C++ libraries. Security is not an afterthought with this project; each SAPI library utilizes a tightly defined security policy. While it’s only designed to handle part of a binary, the Sandboxed API can be used to try out a library or some other bit of code with an unknown security posture.

  • As Next ’19 approaches, Google confronts strategic challenges in the cloud

    Google has become one of the top-tier cloud vendors, with a key role in driving cloud-native open-source initiatives to ubiquitous adoption among enterprises and solution providers everywhere. It also remains a pacesetter in the core innovations behind cloud-native computing — especially in the Kubernetes container orchestration layer, the Istio mesh fabric and the Knative serverless abstraction layer.

  • TriggerMesh Releases Open Source Knative Event Sources for Multi-Cloud Environments

    TriggerMesh has released their latest open-source project, Knative Lambda Sources (KLASS). KLASS are event sources that can be used to trigger Knative functions in Kubernetes clusters. This enables AWS events to be consumed within a multi-cloud or on-premise environment. This release follows the release of Knative Lambda Runtimes which further enhance the TriggerMesh cloud platform.

    Knative Lambda Sources (KLASS, pronounced class) allow Knative event sources for AWS services. Written as Go event consumers and packaged as container sources which make use of CloudEvents. At the time of writing, KLASS supports events from Code Commit, Cognito, DDB, IOT, Kinesis, S3, SNS, and SQS.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Brand-New Videos Look at KDE Plasma 5.15 and KDE Neon Installation

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KDE

Devices: Game Boy and OpenMV

Filed under
Development
Hardware
  • Game Boy Recreated in Verilog

    With the wide availability of Raspberry Pi hardware and pre-baked Linux distros with emulators ready to go, making a retro handheld is easier than ever. Emulation isn’t the only way to go about playing old games however. [Wenting Zhang] decided to instead recreate the Nintendo Game Boy in Verilog, and has documented the effort.

    The project runs on a Spartan 6 FPGA. [Wenting] first developed the hardware to use a DualShock controller for input, and output video to a regular LCD monitor. However, work is now underway to produce a handheld VerilogBoy. This will feature a 320×320 LCD screen, with pixels being quadrupled from the original Game Boy 160×144 resolution, with some pixels to spare. [Wenting] is also looking at porting the code to some Pano Logic units, which we’ve discussed before. The thin clients pack FPGA hardware and lots of IO ports that make them perfect for such a project.

  • OpenMV: Low-cost, open-source platform enables disparate embedded vision applications

    Making embedded machine vision applications more accessible is the ultimate goal of OpenMV, a project responsible for developing multiple iterations of open-source, low-cost embedded camera platforms.

    OpenMV began in 2013, when Ibrahim Abdelkader, Vice President and Co-Founder, sought a better, cheap serial camera module than what was available to him. The desired result was a small, expandable machine vision module that cost less than $100. Eventually, OpenMV moved to a Hackaday Project, then to a Kickstarter project, then—when Kwabena Agyeman, President and Co-Founder joined in 2015—an operating business.

    [...]

    “With the kernel, you can send a script of Python code, and it parses, compiles, and executes that code. All our functions are written in C, then they have a Python module created for them that you can call using the MicroPython interpreter. The reason having Python is helpful is that our firmware is about 2 MB now, and it takes a good minute or so to load the firmware,” he says.

Ubuntu 19.04 Updates - 7 Things To Know

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.04 is scheduled to arrive in another 30 days. I've been using it for the past week or so, and even as a pre-beta, the OS is pretty stable and not buggy at all. Here are a bunch of things you should know about the yet to be officially released Ubuntu 19.04.

Read more

Security: Privacy, GitHub 'Leaks', Network Security, Android and More

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Security
  • Ways to safeguard your privacy on the Net
  • Over 100,000 GitHub repos have leaked API or cryptographic keys
  • What Is Network Security? Types of Network Security - EC-Council Official Blog

    Over the past decade, the world has become more interconnected, with the advancement of new networking technologies. Similarly, our dependency on the Internet has reached an unimaginable level. A huge amount of personal, commercial, and confidential data is stored on either private or openly accessible networks. The significance of this intellectual data reflects the importance of network security in our lives. The probable threats to this data are sometimes not easy to detect or prevent. Conversely, the victims face a tough time in terms of time spent to recover the compromised data and money lost due to financial theft.

  • An Android Vulnerability Went Unfixed for Over Five Years
  • Meet the new generation of white hats

    The people who contribute and help maintain open source projects are pretty passionate about being proactive members of the community. They believe in helping to make the projects better and stronger for others to use. These discoveries have wide-reaching effects since open source projects easily find their way into large commercial products that depend on open source projects to help solve problems and add features that in-house developers would have to otherwise write themselves.

    Getting involved in finding vulnerabilities in open source projects can also be a great way for new researchers who are hoping to enter the security field can enhance their resume, which in turn will help them in the job hunt down the line.

  • 5 essential router security settings you need to check now

    The bad news: most people don’t give a second thought to their routers. This lack of know-how puts a lot of households in a dangerous position. The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has issued an alert about Russian state-supported hackers carrying out attacks against a large number of home routers in the U.S.

Linux Foundation: CommunityBridge, Continuous Delivery Foundation and Zowe

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • CommunityBridge gives better visibility into open source code [Ed: CommunityBridge gives Microsoft more control]

    “The Linux Foundation has done a fantastic job at bringing a diverse ecosystem on to one platform designed to mutualize resources,” said Eiso Kant, co-founder, and CEO of source{d}. “We’re thrilled to collaborate with the Open Source community and surface insights everyone needs to better manage, develop or contribute to their respective project codebases.”

    As a recent example, source{d} analyzed the Kubernetes project reporting that as it nears 2 million lines of code (including all languages and generated files), the 4-year-old open source project is showing many signs of maturity. The velocity of commits for the core Kubernetes project seemed to be slowing down as the community focus moves to infrastructure testing, cluster federation, Machine Learning, and HPC (High-Performance Computing) workloads management. With just under 16,000 methods, the Kubernetes API also seems to be stabilizing despite its high level of complexity.

  • The Continuous Delivery Foundation - what will it bring to DevOps?
  • Inside the new Continuous Delivery Foundation

    Does the world need yet another open source foundation? That is a question that was posed to the founding members of the CDF - the Continuous Delivery Foundation - which recently formed as an addition to the roster of sub-groups beneath the Linux Foundation.

    Skeptics might be brought over by the fact that Jenkins, Jenkins X, Netflix and Google's Spinnaker and Google's Tekton projects have all found themselves at the heart of the initiative, which is aimed at "developing, nurturing, and promoting open source projects, best practices and industry specifications" related to continuous delivery - in other words, speedy software cycles that are at the heart of the devops motto to 'fail fast'.

  • Open Source Project Fosters Data Teamwork Best Practices
  • Mainframe DevOps Using Zowe Open Source

    This session will demonstrate how to use the Zowe open source framework to extend modern devops tooling and practices to the mainframe and to enhance the mainframe developer experience. A follow-up to the overview session, the hosts will drill into the Zowe architecture while demoing key capabilities including the command line interface (CLI) and API Mediation Layer.

FOSS in Healthcare: NYU, NHSX, Visikol, Clubfoot Brace, Optical Cardiography

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OSS
  • NYU open-sources breast cancer screening model trained on over 200,000 mammography exams

    Breast cancer is the second leading cancer-related cause of death among women in the U.S. It’s estimated that in 2015, 232,000 women were diagnosed with the disease and approximately 40,000 died from it. And while diagnostic exams like mammography have come into wide practice — in 2014, over 39 million breast cancer screenings were performed in the U.S. alone — they’re not always reliable. About 10 to 15 percent of women who undergo a mammogram are asked to return following an inconclusive analysis.

    That’s why researchers at New York University are investigating an AI-driven technique that promises much higher precision than today’s tests. In a newly published paper on Arxiv.org (“Deep Neural Networks Improve Radiologists’ Performance in Breast Cancer Screening“), they describe a deep convolutional neural network — a class of machine learning algorithm commonly used in image classification — that notches an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.895 in predicting the presence of a cancerous breast tumor. Moreover, they claim that when averaged with the probability of malignancy predicted by a radiologist from the AI system’s results, the AUC is higher than either method achieves separately.

    [...]

    The team began by sourcing a data set comprising 229,426 digital screening mammography exams (1,001,093 images) from 141,473 patients, each of which contained at least four images corresponding to the four views typically used in mammography screenings (right craniocaudal, left craniocaudal, right mediolateral oblique, and left mediolateral oblique). They extracted labels from 5,832 exams with at least one biopsy performed within 120 days of the screening mammogram, and then recruited a team of radiologists — all of whom were provided supporting pathology reports — to indicate where the biopsies were taken “at the pixel level.”

  • Will this new openness to open source heed past lessons?

    NHSX has listed open source as one of its priorities. For Ewan Davis, there is a keen sense of déjà vu – and a desperate desire for the many lessons of the past to be heeded.

    Open source seems to be back on the NHS agenda, courtesy of NHSX. The body lists one of its responsibilities as: “Making sure that all source code is open by default so that anyone who wants to write code for the NHS can see what we need.”

    As a new organisation NHSX has no corporate memory and so I thought it might be helpful to share my observations on what happened last time the NHS got excited about open source.

    It started when Tim Kelsey (peace be upon him) – then NHS England national director for patients and information – went on a trip to the USA. He saw the open source EHR VistA operating in the US Veterans Administration, decided it would be good for the NHS, and wrote it into Tech Fund 1 like Brighton through a stick of rock.

    I got involved, working for NHS England with guys from World VistA and OSERA to establish what would be needed to localise VistA for the NHS. We came up with a plan but the cost was more than NHS England was willing to pay. NHS VistA was doomed.

    Our work did lead to the creation of an open source programme within NHS England, though, which rapidly absorbed and refactored Tim’s next idea: Code4Health.

  • Visikol Releases Open Source 3Screen™ Python Library for Training Convolutional Neural Networks for Use in Digital Pathology

    Over the last two years, Visikol has leveraged its internal 3Screen™ image analysis software to provide its pharmaceutical Clients with unprecedented insights from their tissues. As a leader in the image analysis space, Visikol not only provides best-in-class services to its Clients, but also periodically makes useful 3Screen™ tools available to the academic community. To help the academic community with more easily adopting neural networks in image analysis, Visikol is launching a Python library to assist with training.

  • Cost Sensitivity Analysis Performed for 3D Printed, Open Source Infant Clubfoot Brace

    Congential talipes equinovarus (CTEV), perhaps better known as clubfoot, is one of the most common congenital physical deformities, as it occurs at least once every 1,000 births. In countries like the US, CTEV is diagnosed at birth and treated while the patient is still a young child, using a method of weekly manipulation and casting, followed by an Achilles tenotomy. Then a foot abduction orthosis (FAO) is worn until the patient is about four years old so that the deformity will not reoccur. Unfortunately, these types of treatment options are not as readily available, or affordable, in developing countries like East Africa, where clubfoot can occur up to eight times every 1,000 births.

  • Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography
  • Open-source solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity

    An international research team from the George Washington University, U.S., and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Russia, has developed an open-source solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity. The technique involves monitoring multiple parameters at once -- for example, both electrical excitation and the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. This technique is a useful tool for enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms behind cardiac arrhythmias. The 3D models of the mapping system components and the source code for data analysis are openly available, enabling other research groups to benefit from the new solution. The study was published in Scientific Reports.

  • Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography

Events: Percona, SUSECON and an Outline of Yesterday's LibrePlanet Conference

Filed under
OSS
  • Percona Reveals Full Conference Session Schedule for Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019
  • SUSE and Partners to Showcase Open Source Business Technologies that Transform at SUSECON in Nashville

    SUSE® today announced sponsors, keynotes and breakout session details for its upcoming SUSECON 2019 global end-user conference, to be held April 1-5 in Nashville, Tennessee. With its theme "My kind of open," SUSECON showcases SUSE's dedication to collaboration and choice for partners, customers and community members. That openness shows in the latest software-defined infrastructure and application delivery solutions that are flexible enough to be deployed anywhere and are fueling digital transformation and business growth.

  • LibrePlanet Day 1: Trailblazing free software together

    On day one of LibrePlanet 2019, we welcomed 264 attendees to the Stata Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Techology (MIT). The LibrePlanet conference has now entered its second decade, and as software infiltrates more and more of daily life, there are many new and important ethical, social, legal, and technological questions to answer. Today's sessions examined the theme of "Trailblazing Free Software" from many different angles, addressing how we can apply the practical advantages of free software while maintaining and defending the indispensable principles behind it.

    LibrePlanet 2019 kicked off on Saturday, March 23rd with a moving, urgent keynote by Tarek Loubani, an emergency physician who splits his time between Canada and the Gaza Strip, focusing on the production and proliferation of free medical devices. Loubani's work involves gaining self-sufficiency and local independence for medical systems through the use of free techniques.

    Dr. Loubani described his journey from seeing change as the work of superheroes to a point of understanding change as built by millions of "tiny ants," working collaboratively to improve how we live. Beginning with stethoscopes, Dr. Loubani and other determined medical professionals and designers created free designs to 3D print cheap but high-quality medical devices, which can save lives in Gaza and other war-torn regions around the world. While many of the stories he told were tragic, Dr. Loubani's talk ended on a hopeful note, celebrating the dignity and ingenuity of the Palestinian people, and connecting it to the vibrancy and importance of the free software movement.

Jack Dorsey's Money for FOSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Jack Dorsey: Square Will Pay Bitcoin Devs To Build Open-Source Ecosystem

    In a move which underscored the tech mogul’s appreciation of both cryptocurrency and freely accessible innovation, Dorsey said he will hire “3-4 crypto engineers and 1 designer” to contribute to crypto full time – and pay them in BTC.

  • Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Launches Open-Source Bitcoin Dev Team

    On March 20th, Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter & Square, announced that $32 billion payments company Square is planning on hiring up to five individuals to develop “open source contributions to the Bitcoin and crypto ecosystem.”

    Up to four of the possible open positions are for engineers–particularly those who have prior experience in building blockchains. One of the positions is for a designer. Each of the positions is full-time, and the new hires will either work at Square’s San Francisco headquarters or remotely. And hey, they can even be paid in Bitcoin.

  • Improving Bitcoin: Jack Dorsey Announces Open-Source Initiative Square Crypto

    Jack Dorsey—the CEO of Twitter and Square, announced “Square Crypto”—a team Dorsey is assembling to work full-time on improving the Bitcoin...

6 Best Free Linux Desktop Search Engines

Filed under
Software

Desktop search is a software application which searches the contents of computer files, rather than searching the internet. The purpose of this software is to enable the user to locate information on their computer. Typically, this data includes emails, chat logs, documents, contact lists, graphics files, as well as multimedia files including video and audio.

Searching a hard disk can be painfully slow, especially bearing in mind the large storage capacities of modern hard disks. To ensure considerably better performance, desktop search engines build and maintain an index database. Populating this database is a system intensive activity. Consequently, desktop search engines will carry out indexing when the computer is not being used.

One of the key benefits of this type of software is that it allows the user to locate data stored on their hard disk almost instantaneously. They are designed to be fast. They are not integrated with a different application, such as a file manager.

Such software performs in a similar way to Windows Search and Spotlight in Mac OS X. All of the applications featured in this article are released under a freely distributable license

Read more

Also: Roadmap for Teleirc v1.4

Security: Fizz, Ghidra, NPK and Nitrokey Fido U2F

Filed under
Security
  • 'Critical' Denial-of-Service Bug Patched in Facebook Fizz

    A critical denial-of-service (DoS) vulnerability was found in Facebook Fizz, the social media giant's open source implementation of the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol, Semmle reports.

  • Facebook patches denial-of-service flaw in its open-source Fizz TLS implementation

    Facebook last month patched a critical denial-of-service vulnerability in Fizz, its open-source implementation for Transport Layer Security protocol TLS 1.3, researchers have reported.

    Unauthenticated remote attackers could exploit the flaw to create an “infinite loop,” causing the web service to be unavailable for other users and thus disrupting service, according to a March 19 blog post from Semmle, whose researcher Kevin Backhouse uncovered the issue.

    And because Facebook made Fizz’s source code available for public use last August, other web services can potentially be attacked this way as well if they fail to apply secure updates.

  • NSA Opts for Open-Source Sleuthing of Cyber Threats

    Cyber security is taking an open-source step forward with the National Security Agency's release of tools designed to reverse-engineer malware that holds people and companies hostage when their systems become infected.

    Unveiled at the recent RSA security conference in San Francisco, the NSA's Ghidra application for disassembling machine-instruction code covers a spectrum of operating systems and chip architectures for data centers and devices alike. By making the tool an open source kit, the Defense Department's top secret data intelligence agency is enlisting private developers to help it fight cyber crime.

  • Coalfire Labs Develops Open Source Password Cracking Tool

    Coalfire, a trusted provider of cybersecurity advisory and assessment services, announced today that the Coalfire Labs Research and Development (R&D) team released NPK, an open source tool that provides unprecedented password cracking capabilities to break the security surrounding hashed passwords.

    The distributed hash-cracking platform is built entirely of serverless components in Amazon Web Services (AWS) including Cognito, DynamoDB, and S3. It leverages the exceptionally powerful GPU instances in AWS to bring staggering hash cracking performance to a price tier in reach of a weekend tinkerer. It was designed for easy deployment and flexible usage.

  • Nitrokey Fido U2F Review & Rating

    The Nitrokey Fido U2F security key delivers two-factor authentication for the most popular sites on the web, and does so with impressive open-source bona fides.

Cloudera's Commitment to FOSS

Filed under
OSS
  • DataWorks Summit 2019: Cloudera allays post-merger fears with ‘100% open-source’ commitment

    The 'new' Cloudera has committed to becoming a fully open-source company, having followed an open-core model prior to its $5.2 billion merger with former rival Hortonworks.

    All 32 of the current open source projects found between both Hortonworks and Cloudera's legacy platforms will remain available as cloud-based services on its new jointly-developed Cloudera Data Platform (CDP).

  • Q&A: Cloudera’s Fight Back Begins in 3, 2, 1… [Q&A: Cloudera CMO Mick Hollison on Cloud Rivals, Open Source Licencing and More...]

    Post-merger your companies are providing over 30 open source-based products and keeping both Hortonworks and Cloudera iterations of tools. Are you focussed enough?

    It’s certainly a very valid question. I think it’s more focused than it’s ever been. This whole galvanising concept of an enterprise data cloud is really pulling it all together.

    Once all of the open source components are delivered as cloud-based services, you quit worrying so much about which open source project you picked; you let the customers make those decisions. And honestly even for them it’s delivered as a service.

    They just know that it’s a service that provides them with a data warehousing capability a service that provides them with a data engineering or data pipeline capability.

Chrome OS to bring Android VPN support for Linux apps on Chromebooks

Filed under
OS
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
Security

Back in February, I noted that the Chromium team was working to add VPN support in Linux containers running on Chromebooks. Now there appears to be a second VPN option in the works: As spotted by 9to5 Google, there’s an effort to extend any Android-based VPN apps to Linux.

Read more

Also: Guide to reasonable privacy on Android

Programming: Python Stigma, Wing Python IDE 7.0 RC1 and the Nonsensical New (Sponsored) 'Study' From RedMonk

Filed under
Development
  • Deconstructing xkcd.com/1987/

    To me, the point of this xkcd comic is for Randall to be self-deprecating and point out how he let the Python situation on his computer get out of hand. Unfortunately people don't always pick up on this and instead decide to point at this picture and say, "see, Python is messed up!" But if you take the time to really look at the comic you will notice that pretty much none if it is directly Python's own fault (not knowing what pip is pointing at is pretty much the only thing you could point at and say is still the Python community's fault).

  • Wing Python IDE 7.0 Release Candidate 1

    The first release candidate of Wing Python IDE version 7 is now available through our Early Access Program.

    This release improves the array and data frame viewer, solves several issues in Python code intelligence, fixes VI mode jj and jk, fixes whole file PEP8 reformatting, and makes about 12 other improvements.

  • Microsoft's TypeScript programming language rising fast, almost makes top 10 [Ed: According to a Microsoft site ("RedMonk uses code repositories hosted on GitHub"), Microsoft is on the rise. Lousy research. Delete GitHub as it helps Microsoft craft propaganda. This kind of thing has been done for years. Anti-GPL FUD, claims that Microsoft is top contributor to FOSS and so on. As if GitHub is the same thing as FOSS. GitHub itself is proprietary. RedMonk itself lists Microsoft as a client. The author of this article habitually bashes Linux (for years) and the site is Microsoft-sponsored (through ads). Fernando Cassia said: "If shell and powershell are "programming languages" I'm an astronaut. It's hard to take any analysis based on raw github categories too seriously. I'm not sure JVM languages with a non-JVM counterpart are counted for instance. Is jruby counted in the same category as Ruby?"]

    RedMonk uses code repositories hosted on GitHub and discussions on Stack Overflow to rank programming languages.

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 63

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KDE

It’s time for week 63 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative. These things are getting so huge I’m going to have to start splitting them up into multiple posts, because KDE contributors just don’t stop fixing and improving things! Expect more to come soon, but for now, here’s what we’ve got for you...

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Netgate® Advances TNSR™ Open Source Secure Networking with Release 19.02
  • Using an OpenBSD Router with AT&T U-Verse

    I upgraded to AT&T's U-verse Gigabit internet service in 2017 and it came with an Arris BGW-210 as the WiFi AP and router. The BGW-210 is not a terrible device, but I already had my own Airport Extreme APs wired throughout my house and an OpenBSD router configured with various things, so I had no use for this device. It's also a potentially-insecure device that I can't upgrade or fully disable remote control over.

    Fully removing the BGW-210 is not possible as we'll see later, but it is possible to remove it from the routing path. This is how I did it with OpenBSD.

  • Report: EU to reject ban on Huawei [iophk: "for a minuscule fraction of the price, the countries could add wireless to openbsd and have done with the question permanently"]

    Citing four unnamed sources familiar with the decision, the outlet reported that Andrus Ansip, the European Commission’s digital chief, will present his recommendation next week.

    The proposal will reportedly advise member states to adopt the EU’s cybersecurity guidelines to coordinate and share information on their wireless networks.

    According to Reuters, the plan would be to allow countries to decide for themselves whether to ban Huawei.

  • Exclusive: EU to drop threat of Huawei ban but wants 5G risks monitored - sources

    European digital chief Andrus Ansip will present the recommendation on Tuesday. While the guidance does not have legal force, it will carry political weight which can eventually lead to national legislation in European Union countries.

  • Cybercriminals target the UK police force with ransomware [iophk: "Windows endangers whole countries, divest from proprietary software now; however, using Twitter in place of a public form of communication is stupid and probably illegal."]

    The organisation represents 119,000 police officers across England and Wales, and revealed it had been hit by ransomware in a statement on Twitter, complete with the thoroughly uncatchy #PFEWCyberAttack hashtag. The attack was reported on March 11, within the three days required under European law.

  • DARPA takes on election security with open source

    The defense research agency is exploring the feasibility of locking down election systems with open-source software and secure hardware.

  • DARPA to Develop $10 Million Open Source Voting System

    The US election might be different in 2020 thanks to a project by DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), the US Department of Defense research division, aiming at bullet-proofing voting machines by moving away from proprietary software that can’t be properly evaluated for bugs, writes Motherboard.

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Linux Tests Of The QNINE M.2 NVMe SSD Enclosure To USB-C Adapter

In the past few months a number of M.2 NVMe SSD to USB adapters have been appearing on the market. Curious about the performance potential on Linux of an NVMe SSD drive attached to a USB 3.1 connection, I recently picked up a QNINE NVMe solid-state drive enclosure for benchmarking. The QNINE NVMe SSD enclosure is an M.2 NVMe to USB-C/USB-3.1 adapter that retails for about $40 USD from the likes of Amazon. Only Windows and macOS support is mentioned, but the drive was detected just fine and working under Linux. This QNINE adapter is just one of many M.2 NVMe to USB-C adapters on the market and most in the $40~60 USD price range. Read more

Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available

The new software release, Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available! This time, the name for Sailfish OS 3.0.2 update was inspired by one of our sailor’s favorite locations: Oulanka National Park. Oulanka is a national park in Lapland and Northern Ostrobothnia regions of Finland, covering 270 km². This park is known in Finland by adventurers due to it is famous trekking route, Karhunkierros, a four day – eighty kilometer route – located in Oulanka and accessible all year round. Oulanka was the first of the two Finnish national parks to become part of World Wide Fund for Nature’s PAN Parks. Read more

Games: Google Stadia, Forge and Fight, Relic Hunters Legend, Port Valley

  • Google Stadia Gaming Platform Needs Min 25Mb/s Internet Speed
    Google has released the specifications of its upcoming game streaming platform known as Google Stadia. The game streaming platform from the tech giant will use custom made processor and an ultra-fast graphics card in its forthcoming console. While the CPU will be a 2.7GHz x86 custom-made chip with hyper-threading and 9.5 MB L2+L2 cache, AMD will handle the graphical duties with a 10.7 Teraflops GPU with 56 compute units and HMB2 memory. Stadia machine will have 16GB of RAM along with 484GB/s of high transfer speed. Additionally, an SSD will be used for maximum performance to increase the load-time.
  • Forge and Fight might be the most hilarious prototype I've played recently
    Always keen to see what new types of experiences developers are looking to offer, I often try out game prototypes. Forge and Fight is one where you make your own weapon and it's pretty amusing. Since it's a prototype, it's obviously quite basic. However the promise with this one is very clear! Pick a handle and then basically stick anything on it and swing it around at your enemies! How about a fancy looking sword? Sure you could do that—or you could swing around multiple Scythes attached by a chain link with a flamethrower, a couple of spike balls and a boxing glove because why the hell not.
  • The shoot and loot RPG 'Relic Hunters Legend' is looking good in the latest trailer
    ...it's coming to Linux and certainly still seems to be that way as the trailer even has the Linux "tux" logo included and the current FAQ clearly mentions Linux as a platform...
  • Port Valley, a "not so classic" point & click adventure now has a Linux demo
    From developer WrongPixel, Port Valley is an in development point & click adventure that's "not so" classic apparently. Honestly, I had never heard of this before or at least I don't remember hearing about it at all. Turns out a few days ago it gained a Linux demo and it does seem to work quite nicely. Seems like a very interesting point and click game, one the developer said is only aiming to borrow some mechanics from the past while showing the genre "still has a lot to say".