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Friday, 24 May 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Space Station welcomes free-flying, Ubuntu-powered autonomous robots

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Ubuntu

NASA has deployed three free-flying “Astrobee” robots on the ISS for house-keeping tasks. The bots run Ubuntu/ROS and Android 7.1 on Snapdragon-based Inforce modules and a Wandboard and feature 3x payload bays, 6x cameras, and a touchscreen.

We haven’t heard a news from the IBM Watson connected CIMON social robot since it debuted with a truly strange video last December in which CIMON accused International Sopace Station astronaut Alexander Gerst of being “mean.” However, NASA has now deployed and tested three somewhat similar “Astrobee” robots on the ISS for assisting the astronauts rather than chatting them up.

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Software: ICQ, KDSoap, Nikita and Dockly

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Software

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary

    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here.

    2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.

  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)

    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).

  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree.

    Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Filed under
Development
HowTos

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

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Red Hat

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board.

However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring.

I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now.

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Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

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OSS
  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo.

    Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.

  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop

    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.

  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019

    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Illumos-Powered OmniOS Gets Updated Against MDS / ZombieLoad Vulnerabilities

    While it was just earlier this month that the OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OmniOS saw a big LTS release, it's already been succeeded by a new release given the recent Intel MDS / Zombieload CPU vulnerabilities coming to light.

    There are new spins of OmniOS for all supported releases. These new OmniOS Community Edition releases mitigate against the Multiarchitectural Data Sampling (MDS) vulnerabilities and also bundle in the updated Intel CPU microcode.

  • Hackers Hack A Forum For Hacked Accounts: Here’s How

    A group of hackers failed to deploy security mechanisms to secure the storage where they store hacked accounts and another hacker group hacked it.

    The story is indeed funny and real. Infamous forum named OGUSERS which is popular amongst hackers for obtaining “OG” Instagram, Twitter usernames, hacked accounts of Domino’s Pizza, Steam, PlayStation Network, and other online accounts was hacked by a hacker group and its data was published in another hacker forum.

  • Security Announcement: Disabling SMT by default on affected Intel processors

    This is an important announcement with an upcoming change in the next Core Update of IPFire.

    Because of the recent vulnerabilities in Intel processors, the IPFire team has decided, that - to keep systems as secure as possible - Simultaneous Multi-Processing (SMT) is automatically disabled if the processor is vulnerable to one of the attacks.

    SMT is also called Intel(R) Hyper-Threading Technology and simulates more virtual cores than the system has. This allows to perform faster processing when applications benefit from it. Unfortunately with networking, we benefit from that. Therefore the effect of disabling SMT will be a very signifiant performance impact of around 30% or more. Applications that will be affected in IPFire are the firewall throughput itself as well as other CPU and memory-bound tasks like the web proxy and the Intrusion Prevention System. On systems that are not vulnerable for this attack, SMT is being left enabled. If you still want to disable it, please do so in the BIOS of your firewall.

Red Hat and the rise of RHEL

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Red Hat

If the success of the open source company Red Hat can be ascribed to one thing, it's the Enterprise Linux operating system that it releases

The company recently unveiled the general release of the latest version, RHEL 8, and it serves as a bellwether for how software development has changed over the years.

Developers are now shouldering more operational responsibilities, which is largely due to the rise in the use of containers. This enables teams to use microservices to build applications. With RHEL 8, Red Hat has also placed container tools such as Buildah, Podman and Skopea directly into the operating system.

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Red Hat, Fedora and SUSE/OpenStack

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Rook-Ceph storage Operator now on OperatorHub.io

    We are excited to announce the addition of the Rook-Ceph storage Operator to OperatorHub.io. Operators are design patterns that augment and implement common day one and day two activities with Kubernetes clusters, simplifying application deployments and empowering developers to focus on creation versus remediation. The Rook-Ceph Operator is an upstream effort that Red Hat is leading and is using as part of its work towards Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.

    Developing and deploying cloud-native applications at scale can be complex and challenging. The new Rook-Ceph storage Operator is designed to automate the packaging, deployment, management, upgrading, and scaling of Ceph clusters that provide persistent storage to stateful applications as well as infrastructure services (logging, metrics, registry) in Kubernetes clusters. The release of Rook’s Ceph Operator augments Kubernetes scheduling with a complement of stateful storage services including block, filesystem and object storage.

  • Red Hat Satellite 6.4.3 has been released

    Red Hat Satellite 6.4.3 is generally available. The main drivers for the 6.4.3 release are a Request for Feature Enhancement (RFE) for capsule syncing control as well as general stability fixes.

    The capsule syncing control feature enables the user to have control over when capsule syncs occur. Traditionally the capsule sync occurs automatically after a content view is updated, but some customers may want more granular control over when the synchronization occurs. Satellite 6.4.3 introduces a new setting in Administer —> Settings —> Content —> Sync Capsules after Content View promotion.

  • Contributors are Empowered When They Know the Process

    There is a saying in the legal profession that you should never ask a question you don’t already know the answer to. Despite how this sounds, it is actually a rule most people follow in life. This is the source of that feeling you get when you’re too scared to raise your hand and ask a question. In Open Source we need to make sure that contributors feel like they already “know” the answers, so they will feel confident in making the request.

    As a university lecturer, I always encouraged my students to first think about what they thought the answer was and then ask the question. In some cases, I encouraged them to actually write down what they thought the answer was. In this way, they could judge both their skills and their ability to grow based on what the answer turned out to be. It created an additional feedback loop.

  • Alisha and Shraddha: Positive feedback loops in Fedora

    This post is the second introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Alisha Mohanty and Shraddha Agrawal, who are both working on Fedora Happiness Packets to promote positive feedback loops in the Fedora community.

  • The OpenStack User Survey is now open

    The 2019 OpenStack User Survey is now open and waiting for your input. Whether you’re a user of OpenStack, or an operator utilising it to power your offerings, the OpenStack Foundation (and the rest of the community) want to hear about your usage.

    2018 saw the 11th OpenStack User Survey unveiled at the Berlin OpenStack Summit, giving some fantastic insight into how and where people are using OpenStack across 63 different countries. Usage in Asia surged dramatically in 2018, with 48% of respondents based in that continent, with Europe 2nd at 26% and North America 3rd with 20% of respondents.

Programming: KubeCon, PHP, Python, GitLab, and Rust

Filed under
Development
  • Team OpenCensus or OpenTracing? It'll be neither and both now: Hello, OpenTelemetry

    Something odd happened at KubeCon 2019. Rather than snipe at each other from the safety of Twitter, two very similar open-source projects opted to pool their ideas into one: OpenTelemetry.

    The project is geared towards solving the problem of working out just what the heck is happening in today's microservices or container-based apps. Logging without incurring a chunky overhead both in terms of generating useful telemetry and actually collating the output.

    Distributed tracing is a bit more than fancy logging, as one commentator put it. Think more a transaction log over all the containers, services and components used in an application.

    Two projects emerged to deal with the challenge – OpenCensus from Google and OpenTracing, co-created by Ben Sigelman of Lightstep.

  • PHP 7.4 as Software Collection.

    Version 7.4.0-alpha1 will be soon released. It's now enter the stabilization phase for the developers, and the test phase for the users.

    RPM of this upcoming version of PHP 7.4, are available in remi repository for Fedora 29, 30 and Enterprise Linux 7, 8 (RHEL, CentOS, ...) in a fresh new Software Collection (php74) allowing its installation beside the system version.

    As I strongly believe in SCL potential to provide a simple way to allow installation of various versions simultaneously, and as I think it is useful to offer this feature to allow developers to test their applications, to allow sysadmin to prepare a migration or simply to use this version for some specific application, I decide to create this new SCL.

  • HEIC / HEIF images support

    The HEIF image format (High Efficiency Image File Format) is now widely used, especially since iOS 11, so it make sense to be able to process these images.

  • EuroPython 2019: First batch of accepted sessions
  • Hello CodeGrades!

    This is a blog about CodeGrades, an experiment to help folks learn about programming (initially in Python). We’ll use it to celebrate the successes, learn from the failures and reflect upon the feedback of participants. We’ll also share project news here too.

  • Setting Up GitLab CI for a Python Application

    This blog post describes how to configure a Continuous Integration (CI) process on GitLab for a python application.

  • How OpenTracing & OpenCensus Merger Helps Users Like GitLab

    In this episode of Let’s Talk, Andrew Newdigate – Staff Site Reliability Engineer at GitLab talks about OpenTracing, OpenCensus, and the newly announced OpenTelemetry project.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 287
  • Kushal Das: Game of guessing colors using CircuitPython

Drill: New Desktop File Search Utility That Uses Clever Crawling Instead Of Indexing

Filed under
Software

Drill is a new file search utility that uses "clever crawling" instead of indexing, for Linux, Windows and macOS.

The application can locate files and folders, but it does not search file contents. It's designed for desktops, using a Gtk GUI by default, but there's also a command line frontend available, albeit quite minimal right now (a Ncurses backend is on the todo list as well).

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Amp Up Your Linux Music Library With DeaDBeeF

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

There are a ton of great music players for Linux, and most of them have a pretty strong following. What makes DeaDBeeF stand out? In a word, it’s customization. DeaDBeeF is as close to a DIY music player as you’re going to get without making the jump to the command line.

DeaDBeeF lets you customize the entire layout of your music player, how your library is arranged, and which information is displayed when you play a song. Plus, it’s highly extensible, and there are plenty of excellent plugins that open up even more options for how you can customize and control your listening experience.

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AMD Radeon VII Linux Performance vs. NVIDIA Gaming On Ubuntu For Q2'2019

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It's been three months now since the AMD Radeon VII 7nm "Vega 20" graphics card was released and while we hopefully won't be waiting much longer for Navi to make its debut, for the time being this is the latest and great AMD Radeon consumer graphics card -- priced at around $700 USD. Here are some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon VII on Linux and compared to various high-end NVIDIA graphics cards while all testing happened from Ubuntu 19.04.

Fortunately, the open-source Radeon VII Linux support is in fact in great shape. There was some confusion for some weeks and a lack of benchmarks recently since I had been unable to get my Vega 20 graphics card running reliably. Under different OpenGL/Vulkan workloads and even some desktop tasks, the graphics card would freeze and spewing from dmesg would most often be a load of VMC page faults and other errors stemming from AMDGPU. But after a lot of testing, ultimately it was figured out the graphics card became defective in some manner. The original card was a pre-launch Radeon VII review sample and was my lone Vega 20 GPU but has now been fortunately replaced by AMD. I received a new Radeon VII last week and since then has been under near constant load/testing. This new card has been working out well and I haven't encountered any issues with this retail card, unlike the woes I experienced with the original VII a few weeks after launch. It was a bit surprising the original Radeon VII failed especially without having done any over-clocking to it (granted was pushed very hard for a few weeks with all of my benchmarking workloads), but whatever the case, this retail Radeon VII is working out fine on Ubuntu 19.04 and various kernel/Mesa upgrades.

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An Early Look At Some PHP 7.4 Performance Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The initial PHP 7.4 Alpha 1 release is just two weeks away already... Curious about the performance of this yearly update to PHP7, I ran some benchmarks on the latest development code as of this morning compared to the earlier PHP7 releases and even PHP-8.0 that is in development on Git master.

PHP 7.4 has been working on preloading options, short closures, custom object serialization, FFI work that didn't end up making it for PHP 7.3, the null coalescing assignment operator has been added, and various other changes. The PHP 7.4 alpha releases are supposed to kick off on 6 June while the betas will then fire up starting on 18 July followed by at least six release candidates beginning at the end of August. If all goes well, PHP 7.4.0 will make its debut around the end of November or early December. PHP-7.4 has been branched since January while PHP-8.0 development is on Git master for that next major PHP8 release with JIT functionality and other changes in the works.

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Bringing the Benefits of Linux Containers to Operational Technology

Filed under
Linux
Security

Linux container technology was introduced more than a decade ago and has recently jumped in adoption in IT environments. However, the OT (operational technology) environments, typically made up of heterogenous embedded systems, have lagged in the adoption of container technologies, due to both the unique technology requirements and the business models that relied on proprietary systems. In this article, I explore recent innovation in open-source offerings that are enabling the use of containers in OT use cases, such as industrial control systems, IoT gateways, medical devices, Radio Access Network (RAN) products and network appliances.

Enterprise IT leaders have adopted “cloud-native” computing architectures because of the innovation velocity and cost benefits derived by the approach. To leverage containers, developers segment applications into modular micro-services that enable flexible development and deployment models. These micro-services are then deployed as containers where the service itself is integrated with the required libraries and functions. On containerization, these application components have small footprints and fast speeds of deployment. The applications become highly portable across compute architectures due to the abstraction away from the hardware and the operating system.

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Open-spec Omega2 LTE SBC features Cat 4 and GNSS

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Linux

Onion’s $99, sandwich-style Omega2 LTE SBC for remote sensor applications with a MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Omega2S+ compute module, a Quectel EC25 chipset with LTE Cat 4 and GNSS, plus USB Type-C, microSD, and battery support.

Last December, Onion updated its MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Omega2 board with a similarly OpenWrt-driven Omega2 Pro SBC that increased RAM to 512MB and flash to 8GB and added real-world USB host and micro-USB ports. Now, the company has returned to Crowd Supply with a similarly open source, OpenWrt Linux driven Omega2 LTE model with 4G LTE and GNSS location connectivity. Pricing ranges from $99 for the board alone to $199 for a fully loaded “Ultimate Collection” kit, all with early August shipments.

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openSUSE Community Releases Leap 15.1 Version

Today’s release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings professional users, entrepreneurs and Independent Software Vendors updated support for modern hardware.

The release of Leap 15.1 improves YaST functionality and the installer.

“Continuity and stability are what we are providing users with Leap 15.1,” said Haris Sehic, a member of the openSUSE community. “With Leap 15, we have introduced a huge number of new features and innovations in security, performance and tool/desktop area. Having in mind how stable, efficient and reliable Leap has become, with this release, we managed to keep the level of quality to the point that our private and Small Business users can, actually more than ever, profit from the enterprise background of an openSUSE Linux Distribution. Let’s continue to have a lot of fun!”

Leap releases are scalable and both the desktop and server are equally important for professional’s workloads, which is reflected in the installation menu as well as the amount of packages Leap offers and hardware it supports. Leap is well suited and prepared for usage as a Virtual Machine (VM) or container guest, allowing professional users to efficiently run network services no matter whether it’s a single server or a data center.

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Also: openSUSE Leap 15.1 Officially Released, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 Released - Based Off SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: GCC, C++, Python and PHP

  • AMD GCN GPU Target Continuing To Improve For The GCC 10 Compiler
    With the recent release of the GCC 9 stable compiler there is the initial "AMD GCN" GPU target/back-end merged. However, for this GNU Compiler Collection release the AMD GCN target isn't all that useful but continued work on it gives us hope of seeing it in good shape for next year's GCC 10 release. With the GCC 9.1 release, the AMD GCN back-end can only handle running basic single-threaded programs... Not exactly useful for graphics cards. The GCC 9 code supports targeting the Fiji and Vega 10 GCN instruction set architecture.
  • IBM Begins Plumbing "Future" Processor Into GCC Compiler - POWER10?
    IBM engineers have landed initial support for "-mcpu=future" into the GCC compiler... As they say in the commit message, "a future architecture level, as yet unnamed." This IBM "future" processor is being added to the POWER architecture code succeeding POWER9. More than likely, its the early enablement work for POWER10.
  • Little Trouble in Big Data – Part 1
    A few months ago, we received a phone call from a bioinformatics group at a European university. The problem they were having appeared very simple. They wanted to know how to usemmap() to be able to load a large data set into RAM at once. OK I thought, no problem, I can handle that one. Turns out this has grown into a complex and interesting exercise in profiling and threading. The background is that they are performing Markov-Chain Monte Carlo simulations by sampling at random from data sets containing SNP (pronounced “snips”) genetic markers for a selection of people. It boils down to a large 2D matrix of floats where each column corresponds to an SNP and each row to a person. They provided some small and medium sized data sets for me to test with, but their full data set consists of 500,000 people with 38 million SNP genetic markers!
  • Why precompiled headers do (not) improve C++ compile times
    Would you like your C++ code to compile twice as fast (or more)? Yeah, so would I. Who wouldn't. C++ is notorious for taking its sweet time to get compiled. I never really cared about PCHs when I worked on KDE, I think I might have tried them once for something and it didn't seem to do a thing. In 2012, while working on LibreOffice, I noticed its build system used to have PCH support, but it had been nuked, with the usual poor OOo/LO style of a commit message stating the obvious (what) without bothering to state the useful (why). For whatever reason, that caught my attention, reportedly PCHs saved a lot of build time with MSVC, so I tried it and it did. And me having brought the PCH support back from the graveyard means that e.g. the Calc module does not take 5:30m to build on a (very) powerful machine, but only 1:45m. That's only one third of the time. In line with my previous experience, on Linux that did nothing. I made the build system support also PCH with GCC and Clang, because it was there and it was simple to support it too, but there was no point. I don't think anybody has ever used that for real. Then, about a year ago, I happened to be working on a relatively small C++ project that used some kind of an obscure build system called Premake I had never heard of before. While fixing something in it I noticed it also had PCH support, so guess what, I of course enabled it for the project. It again made the project build faster on Windows. And, on Linux, it did too. Color me surprised.
  • KDAB at CppCon 2019
    CppCon is the annual, week-long face-to-face gathering for the entire C++ community – the biggest C++ event in the world. This year, for the first time, CppCon takes place in the stunning Gaylord Rockies Hotel and Convention Center in Aurora, Colorado, very near Denver International Airport.
  • Clear Linux Discovers Another AVX2/AVX512 Fix/Optimization To Yield Better Performance
    For those running a system with AVX-512 support, Clear Linux builds as of this week should be yielding even better performance on top of their existing AVX2 and AVX-512 optimizations. The Intel developers working on Clear Linux uncovered an issue how the new GCC 9 compiler has been building the important libm math library poorly in AVX2/AVX-512 mode. This poor code compilation yielded slowdowns in various math functions since the switch to the GCC 9 compiler.
  • Building Machine Learning Data Pipeline using Apache Spark
  • It is easier to gather package meta-data from PyPI package ecosystem, once know the right way
  • Python 2.7 vs Python 3.4 ─ What should Python Beginners choose?
  • Be Quick or Eat Potatoes: A Newbie’s Guide to PyCon
  • Remote Development with Wing Pro
    In this issue of Wing Tips we take a quick look at Wing Pro's remote development capabilities.
  • Data School: Data science best practices with pandas (video tutorial)
  • PHP extensions status with upcoming PHP 7.4

PostgreSQL 12 Beta 1 Released!

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces that the first beta release of PostgreSQL 12 is now available for download. This release contains previews of all features that will be available in the final release of PostgreSQL 12, though some details of the release could change before then. In the spirit of the open source PostgreSQL community, we strongly encourage you to test the new features of PostgreSQL 12 in your database systems to help us eliminate any bugs or other issues that may exist. While we do not advise you to run PostgreSQL 12 Beta 1 in your production environments, we encourage you to find ways to run your typical application workloads against this beta release. Read more Also: PostgreSQL 12 Beta Released With Performance Improvements

ZFS On Linux 0.8 Released With Native Encryption, TRIM, Device Removal

The feature-packed and long-desired ZFS On Linux 0.8 release has finally taken place! ZoL 0.8 is out there! ZFS On Linux 0.8 has debuted today as the newest feature release for this ZFS file-system port for Linux systems. ZFS On Linux 0.8 supports up through the latest Linux 5.1 stable series while still working going back to the Linux 2.6.32 kernel days, but the SIMD support isn't available on stock 5.0+ kernels leading to big performance penalties. Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers: Blobs, Snapcraft and Arronax

  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Bundle NVIDIA's Proprietary Driver Packages As Part Of Its ISO
    For Ubuntu 19.10 the developers are adding the NVIDIA driver packages onto the ISO. The NVIDIA binary drivers won't be activated by default, but will be present on the install media to make it easier to enable post-install. The open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" drivers will remain the default for NVIDIA graphics on new Ubuntu installations, but this change is positioning the mainline and legacy NVIDIA proprietary drivers onto the Ubuntu ISO so that they can be easily obtained locally post-install. The main driver here is allowing users to enable the NVIDIA proprietary graphics on Ubuntu even if you don't have an Internet connection. NVIDIA has already okay'ed the distribution of their driver packages with the Ubuntu ISO.
  • Snapcraft parts & plugins
    Last week, we published Introduction to snapcraft, a tutorial that provided a detailed overview of the snap build process. We touched on the concepts like snap ecosystem components, snapcraft command line, snapcraft.yaml syntax, and more. We’d like to expand on the first lesson, and today, we are going to talk about parts and plugins, used in the build process of snaps.
  • Arronax – Graphical Tool to Create Desktop Launcher in Ubuntu
    For those who want to manually create desktop shortcut launcher in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 19.04, Arronax is a good choice with graphical user interface. Other than creating .desktop file via Linux command, Arronax offers a graphical interface to create (and also edit) desktop shortcut for application, executable file, or URL.