Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 25 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

OSS: Blockchain, DeepBrain, Redox OS, OpenBuilds, Red Hat Summit and FOSSASIA

  • It's About Time DApps Unlocked the Mass-Market Momentum for Blockchain
    There’s more to Blockchain technology than Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. At its fundamental level, Blockchain technology engenders trusts in inherently trustless environments. Protocol blockchains such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, EOS, GoChain, Steem and xDai have provided a launchpad for developers to work on DApps. DApps are typically open source applications not owned by anyone, immune from downtimes; and that cannot be shut down by a government or its agencies. The rapid proliferation of Decentralized Applications (DApps) powered a bull run in cryptocurrencies in 2017. Right now, there are more than 2000 DApps designed to solve specific market problems across industries such as health, data storage, finance, gaming, and governance.
  • DeepBrain Chain outlines release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta in progress report
    DeepBrain Chain detailed the release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta of its AI Training Net, which allows users to rent computing power to train artificial intelligence algorithms. DeepBrain Chain claimed numerous feature inclusions and and improvements, many pertaining to the scheduling and activation of tasks. In DBC 0.3.6.0, if an AI training task has been stopped a specified period of time, its storage will be deleted automatically. However, the task can be restarted at any time before deletion. If a node has been restarted, reactivation of any previous training tasks will require manual user authorization. [...] A decision was made recently by the community concerning the open source licensing of DeepBrain Chain’s code. Over 55 percent of the members polled voted to not make the code fully open source by the end of March.
  • Redox OS 0.5.0
    It has been one year and four days since the last release of Redox OS! In this time, we have been hard at work improving the Redox ecosystem. Much of this work was related to relibc, a new C library written in Rust and maintained by the Redox OS project, and adding new packages to the cookbook. We are proud to report that we have now far exceeded the capabilities of newlib, which we were using as our system C library before. We have added many important libraries and programs, which you can see listed below.
  • Redox OS 0.5 Released With New C Library Written In Rust
    It's been just over one year since the previous release of Redox OS while today this Rust-written operating system has finally been succeeded by Redox OS 0.5.  It's taken a while since the previous release of Redox OS as they have been focusing their attention on Relibc, a C library implementation written within the Rust programming language. Relibc is now used as the operating system's default C library.
  • Get Moving with New Software from OpenBuilds
    If you’re reading Hackaday, you’ve probably heard of OpenBuilds. Even if the name doesn’t sound familiar, you’ve absolutely seen something on these pages that was built with their components. Not only is OpenBuilds a fantastic place to get steppers, linear rails, lead screws, pulleys, wheels, and whatever else you need to make your project go, they’re also home to an active forum of people who are passionate about developing open source machines. As if that wasn’t enough reason to head over to the OpenBuilds website, [Peter Van Der Walt] recently wrote in to tell us about some new free and open source software he and the team have been working on that’s designed to make it easier than ever to get your creations cutting, lasing, milling, and whatever else you could possibly imagine. If you’ve got a machine that moves, they’ve got some tools you’ll probably want to check out.
  • Dive into developer-focused sessions at Red Hat Summit
    Red Hat Summit is just around the corner, and it’s shaping up to be best Red Hat developer event ever. This year, attendees will get to choose from more than 300 sessions, not to mention booth presentations, parties, labs, and training. To help you cut through the clutter, we’ve created a list of developer specific activities and sessions that will help you shape your Red Hat Summit experience. Most of these sessions are part of the Cloud-Native App Dev track, with a few other sessions that we think will appeal to you as a developer. For more information on these sessions, visit the Red Hat Summit session listing page and sort by “cloud-native app dev” track.
  • 10th year of FOSSASIA
    This FOSSASIA was special as it marked its 10th year! It was quite impressive to witness a FOSS conference to continue growing this long with growing community. The four day conference schedule was packed with various interesting talks, workshops, hackathon and other engaging activities.

Reducing sysadmin toil with Kubernetes controllers

Kubernetes is a platform for reducing toil cunningly disguised as a platform for running containers. The element that allows for both running containers and reducing toil is the Kubernetes concept of a Controller. [...] The canonical example of this in action is in how we manage Pods in Kubernetes. A Pod is effectively a running copy of an application that a specific worker node is asked to run. If that application crashes, the kubelet running on that node will start it again. However, if that node crashes, the Pod is not recovered, as the control loop (via the kubelet process) responsible for the resource no longer exists. To make applications more resilient, Kubernetes has the ReplicaSet controller. The ReplicaSet controller is bundled inside the Kubernetes controller-manager, which runs on the Kubernetes master node and contains the controllers for these more advanced resources. The ReplicaSet controller is responsible for ensuring that a set number of copies of your application is always running. To do this, the ReplicaSet controller requests that a given number of Pods is created. It then routinely checks that the correct number of Pods is still running and will request more Pods or destroy existing Pods to do so. By requesting a ReplicaSet from Kubernetes, you get a self-healing deployment of your application. You can further add lifecycle management to your workload by requesting a Deployment, which is a controller that manages ReplicaSets and provides rolling upgrades by managing multiple versions of your application's ReplicaSets. Read more

Android Leftovers

Server: IBM, LAMP and Kubernetes

  • A HATS For Many Occasions
    IBM gives customers plenty of options when it comes to its Rational Host Access Transformation software, including several modes of operation, different runtime options, and support for different operating systems in screen modernization engagements. With last week’s launch of HATS version 9.7, the development and deployment options got even wider. Regardless of which downstream options a HATS customer ultimately chooses, it all starts out basically the same on the front side of the sausage machine: Customers come to HATS because they have a 5250 (or 3270 or VT100) application that they want to transform, but they don’t want to go through the hassle, expense, and risk of modifying the IBM i, z/OS, or Unix application’s source code.
  • Six top skills that you should acquire in 2019
    There is a growing demand for the fullstack development skill set, which is the ability to develop tech both on the front-end/client side and back-end/server side. As you can’t learn all, select combinations like MEAN or LAMP stack.
  • Kubernetes and the Enterprise
    The reason we were having this conversation was around SUSE’s Cloud Application Platform (CAP). This is our Kubernetes focused Cloud Foundry distribution. And as part of the Kubernetes focus, we have been supporting and running SUSE CAP on Azure’s AKS for the last year or so. The conversation continued with observations that Kubernetes was clearly the future across IT. Yet to date, Cloud Foundry still has a good following with the large enterprise. And the thinking was that the Cloud Foundry approach really helped the large enteprise work with their applications, even if the applications were purely ‘container’ applications. Cloud Foundry makes the container-side of managing your ‘container’ application transparent. This approach ultimately lowers the tasks, breadth of tooling, and knowledge you have to surround Kubernetes with. It was with this thought, that a light-bulb went on.

FOSS in Healthcare: NYU, NHSX, Visikol, Clubfoot Brace, Optical Cardiography

Filed under
OSS
  • NYU open-sources breast cancer screening model trained on over 200,000 mammography exams

    Breast cancer is the second leading cancer-related cause of death among women in the U.S. It’s estimated that in 2015, 232,000 women were diagnosed with the disease and approximately 40,000 died from it. And while diagnostic exams like mammography have come into wide practice — in 2014, over 39 million breast cancer screenings were performed in the U.S. alone — they’re not always reliable. About 10 to 15 percent of women who undergo a mammogram are asked to return following an inconclusive analysis.

    That’s why researchers at New York University are investigating an AI-driven technique that promises much higher precision than today’s tests. In a newly published paper on Arxiv.org (“Deep Neural Networks Improve Radiologists’ Performance in Breast Cancer Screening“), they describe a deep convolutional neural network — a class of machine learning algorithm commonly used in image classification — that notches an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.895 in predicting the presence of a cancerous breast tumor. Moreover, they claim that when averaged with the probability of malignancy predicted by a radiologist from the AI system’s results, the AUC is higher than either method achieves separately.

    [...]

    The team began by sourcing a data set comprising 229,426 digital screening mammography exams (1,001,093 images) from 141,473 patients, each of which contained at least four images corresponding to the four views typically used in mammography screenings (right craniocaudal, left craniocaudal, right mediolateral oblique, and left mediolateral oblique). They extracted labels from 5,832 exams with at least one biopsy performed within 120 days of the screening mammogram, and then recruited a team of radiologists — all of whom were provided supporting pathology reports — to indicate where the biopsies were taken “at the pixel level.”

  • Will this new openness to open source heed past lessons?

    NHSX has listed open source as one of its priorities. For Ewan Davis, there is a keen sense of déjà vu – and a desperate desire for the many lessons of the past to be heeded.

    Open source seems to be back on the NHS agenda, courtesy of NHSX. The body lists one of its responsibilities as: “Making sure that all source code is open by default so that anyone who wants to write code for the NHS can see what we need.”

    As a new organisation NHSX has no corporate memory and so I thought it might be helpful to share my observations on what happened last time the NHS got excited about open source.

    It started when Tim Kelsey (peace be upon him) – then NHS England national director for patients and information – went on a trip to the USA. He saw the open source EHR VistA operating in the US Veterans Administration, decided it would be good for the NHS, and wrote it into Tech Fund 1 like Brighton through a stick of rock.

    I got involved, working for NHS England with guys from World VistA and OSERA to establish what would be needed to localise VistA for the NHS. We came up with a plan but the cost was more than NHS England was willing to pay. NHS VistA was doomed.

    Our work did lead to the creation of an open source programme within NHS England, though, which rapidly absorbed and refactored Tim’s next idea: Code4Health.

  • Visikol Releases Open Source 3Screen™ Python Library for Training Convolutional Neural Networks for Use in Digital Pathology

    Over the last two years, Visikol has leveraged its internal 3Screen™ image analysis software to provide its pharmaceutical Clients with unprecedented insights from their tissues. As a leader in the image analysis space, Visikol not only provides best-in-class services to its Clients, but also periodically makes useful 3Screen™ tools available to the academic community. To help the academic community with more easily adopting neural networks in image analysis, Visikol is launching a Python library to assist with training.

  • Cost Sensitivity Analysis Performed for 3D Printed, Open Source Infant Clubfoot Brace

    Congential talipes equinovarus (CTEV), perhaps better known as clubfoot, is one of the most common congenital physical deformities, as it occurs at least once every 1,000 births. In countries like the US, CTEV is diagnosed at birth and treated while the patient is still a young child, using a method of weekly manipulation and casting, followed by an Achilles tenotomy. Then a foot abduction orthosis (FAO) is worn until the patient is about four years old so that the deformity will not reoccur. Unfortunately, these types of treatment options are not as readily available, or affordable, in developing countries like East Africa, where clubfoot can occur up to eight times every 1,000 births.

  • Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography
  • Open-source solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity

    An international research team from the George Washington University, U.S., and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Russia, has developed an open-source solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity. The technique involves monitoring multiple parameters at once -- for example, both electrical excitation and the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. This technique is a useful tool for enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms behind cardiac arrhythmias. The 3D models of the mapping system components and the source code for data analysis are openly available, enabling other research groups to benefit from the new solution. The study was published in Scientific Reports.

  • Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography

Events: Percona, SUSECON and an Outline of Yesterday's LibrePlanet Conference

Filed under
OSS
  • Percona Reveals Full Conference Session Schedule for Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019
  • SUSE and Partners to Showcase Open Source Business Technologies that Transform at SUSECON in Nashville

    SUSE® today announced sponsors, keynotes and breakout session details for its upcoming SUSECON 2019 global end-user conference, to be held April 1-5 in Nashville, Tennessee. With its theme "My kind of open," SUSECON showcases SUSE's dedication to collaboration and choice for partners, customers and community members. That openness shows in the latest software-defined infrastructure and application delivery solutions that are flexible enough to be deployed anywhere and are fueling digital transformation and business growth.

  • LibrePlanet Day 1: Trailblazing free software together

    On day one of LibrePlanet 2019, we welcomed 264 attendees to the Stata Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Techology (MIT). The LibrePlanet conference has now entered its second decade, and as software infiltrates more and more of daily life, there are many new and important ethical, social, legal, and technological questions to answer. Today's sessions examined the theme of "Trailblazing Free Software" from many different angles, addressing how we can apply the practical advantages of free software while maintaining and defending the indispensable principles behind it.

    LibrePlanet 2019 kicked off on Saturday, March 23rd with a moving, urgent keynote by Tarek Loubani, an emergency physician who splits his time between Canada and the Gaza Strip, focusing on the production and proliferation of free medical devices. Loubani's work involves gaining self-sufficiency and local independence for medical systems through the use of free techniques.

    Dr. Loubani described his journey from seeing change as the work of superheroes to a point of understanding change as built by millions of "tiny ants," working collaboratively to improve how we live. Beginning with stethoscopes, Dr. Loubani and other determined medical professionals and designers created free designs to 3D print cheap but high-quality medical devices, which can save lives in Gaza and other war-torn regions around the world. While many of the stories he told were tragic, Dr. Loubani's talk ended on a hopeful note, celebrating the dignity and ingenuity of the Palestinian people, and connecting it to the vibrancy and importance of the free software movement.

Jack Dorsey's Money for FOSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Jack Dorsey: Square Will Pay Bitcoin Devs To Build Open-Source Ecosystem

    In a move which underscored the tech mogul’s appreciation of both cryptocurrency and freely accessible innovation, Dorsey said he will hire “3-4 crypto engineers and 1 designer” to contribute to crypto full time – and pay them in BTC.

  • Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Launches Open-Source Bitcoin Dev Team

    On March 20th, Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter & Square, announced that $32 billion payments company Square is planning on hiring up to five individuals to develop “open source contributions to the Bitcoin and crypto ecosystem.”

    Up to four of the possible open positions are for engineers–particularly those who have prior experience in building blockchains. One of the positions is for a designer. Each of the positions is full-time, and the new hires will either work at Square’s San Francisco headquarters or remotely. And hey, they can even be paid in Bitcoin.

  • Improving Bitcoin: Jack Dorsey Announces Open-Source Initiative Square Crypto

    Jack Dorsey—the CEO of Twitter and Square, announced “Square Crypto”—a team Dorsey is assembling to work full-time on improving the Bitcoin...

6 Best Free Linux Desktop Search Engines

Filed under
Software

Desktop search is a software application which searches the contents of computer files, rather than searching the internet. The purpose of this software is to enable the user to locate information on their computer. Typically, this data includes emails, chat logs, documents, contact lists, graphics files, as well as multimedia files including video and audio.

Searching a hard disk can be painfully slow, especially bearing in mind the large storage capacities of modern hard disks. To ensure considerably better performance, desktop search engines build and maintain an index database. Populating this database is a system intensive activity. Consequently, desktop search engines will carry out indexing when the computer is not being used.

One of the key benefits of this type of software is that it allows the user to locate data stored on their hard disk almost instantaneously. They are designed to be fast. They are not integrated with a different application, such as a file manager.

Such software performs in a similar way to Windows Search and Spotlight in Mac OS X. All of the applications featured in this article are released under a freely distributable license

Read more

Also: Roadmap for Teleirc v1.4

Security: Fizz, Ghidra, NPK and Nitrokey Fido U2F

Filed under
Security
  • 'Critical' Denial-of-Service Bug Patched in Facebook Fizz

    A critical denial-of-service (DoS) vulnerability was found in Facebook Fizz, the social media giant's open source implementation of the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol, Semmle reports.

  • Facebook patches denial-of-service flaw in its open-source Fizz TLS implementation

    Facebook last month patched a critical denial-of-service vulnerability in Fizz, its open-source implementation for Transport Layer Security protocol TLS 1.3, researchers have reported.

    Unauthenticated remote attackers could exploit the flaw to create an “infinite loop,” causing the web service to be unavailable for other users and thus disrupting service, according to a March 19 blog post from Semmle, whose researcher Kevin Backhouse uncovered the issue.

    And because Facebook made Fizz’s source code available for public use last August, other web services can potentially be attacked this way as well if they fail to apply secure updates.

  • NSA Opts for Open-Source Sleuthing of Cyber Threats

    Cyber security is taking an open-source step forward with the National Security Agency's release of tools designed to reverse-engineer malware that holds people and companies hostage when their systems become infected.

    Unveiled at the recent RSA security conference in San Francisco, the NSA's Ghidra application for disassembling machine-instruction code covers a spectrum of operating systems and chip architectures for data centers and devices alike. By making the tool an open source kit, the Defense Department's top secret data intelligence agency is enlisting private developers to help it fight cyber crime.

  • Coalfire Labs Develops Open Source Password Cracking Tool

    Coalfire, a trusted provider of cybersecurity advisory and assessment services, announced today that the Coalfire Labs Research and Development (R&D) team released NPK, an open source tool that provides unprecedented password cracking capabilities to break the security surrounding hashed passwords.

    The distributed hash-cracking platform is built entirely of serverless components in Amazon Web Services (AWS) including Cognito, DynamoDB, and S3. It leverages the exceptionally powerful GPU instances in AWS to bring staggering hash cracking performance to a price tier in reach of a weekend tinkerer. It was designed for easy deployment and flexible usage.

  • Nitrokey Fido U2F Review & Rating

    The Nitrokey Fido U2F security key delivers two-factor authentication for the most popular sites on the web, and does so with impressive open-source bona fides.

Cloudera's Commitment to FOSS

Filed under
OSS
  • DataWorks Summit 2019: Cloudera allays post-merger fears with ‘100% open-source’ commitment

    The 'new' Cloudera has committed to becoming a fully open-source company, having followed an open-core model prior to its $5.2 billion merger with former rival Hortonworks.

    All 32 of the current open source projects found between both Hortonworks and Cloudera's legacy platforms will remain available as cloud-based services on its new jointly-developed Cloudera Data Platform (CDP).

  • Q&A: Cloudera’s Fight Back Begins in 3, 2, 1… [Q&A: Cloudera CMO Mick Hollison on Cloud Rivals, Open Source Licencing and More...]

    Post-merger your companies are providing over 30 open source-based products and keeping both Hortonworks and Cloudera iterations of tools. Are you focussed enough?

    It’s certainly a very valid question. I think it’s more focused than it’s ever been. This whole galvanising concept of an enterprise data cloud is really pulling it all together.

    Once all of the open source components are delivered as cloud-based services, you quit worrying so much about which open source project you picked; you let the customers make those decisions. And honestly even for them it’s delivered as a service.

    They just know that it’s a service that provides them with a data warehousing capability a service that provides them with a data engineering or data pipeline capability.

Chrome OS to bring Android VPN support for Linux apps on Chromebooks

Filed under
OS
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
Security

Back in February, I noted that the Chromium team was working to add VPN support in Linux containers running on Chromebooks. Now there appears to be a second VPN option in the works: As spotted by 9to5 Google, there’s an effort to extend any Android-based VPN apps to Linux.

Read more

Also: Guide to reasonable privacy on Android

Programming: Python Stigma, Wing Python IDE 7.0 RC1 and the Nonsensical New (Sponsored) 'Study' From RedMonk

Filed under
Development
  • Deconstructing xkcd.com/1987/

    To me, the point of this xkcd comic is for Randall to be self-deprecating and point out how he let the Python situation on his computer get out of hand. Unfortunately people don't always pick up on this and instead decide to point at this picture and say, "see, Python is messed up!" But if you take the time to really look at the comic you will notice that pretty much none if it is directly Python's own fault (not knowing what pip is pointing at is pretty much the only thing you could point at and say is still the Python community's fault).

  • Wing Python IDE 7.0 Release Candidate 1

    The first release candidate of Wing Python IDE version 7 is now available through our Early Access Program.

    This release improves the array and data frame viewer, solves several issues in Python code intelligence, fixes VI mode jj and jk, fixes whole file PEP8 reformatting, and makes about 12 other improvements.

  • Microsoft's TypeScript programming language rising fast, almost makes top 10 [Ed: According to a Microsoft site ("RedMonk uses code repositories hosted on GitHub"), Microsoft is on the rise. Lousy research. Delete GitHub as it helps Microsoft craft propaganda. This kind of thing has been done for years. Anti-GPL FUD, claims that Microsoft is top contributor to FOSS and so on. As if GitHub is the same thing as FOSS. GitHub itself is proprietary. RedMonk itself lists Microsoft as a client. The author of this article habitually bashes Linux (for years) and the site is Microsoft-sponsored (through ads). Fernando Cassia said: "If shell and powershell are "programming languages" I'm an astronaut. It's hard to take any analysis based on raw github categories too seriously. I'm not sure JVM languages with a non-JVM counterpart are counted for instance. Is jruby counted in the same category as Ruby?"]

    RedMonk uses code repositories hosted on GitHub and discussions on Stack Overflow to rank programming languages.

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 63

Filed under
KDE

It’s time for week 63 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative. These things are getting so huge I’m going to have to start splitting them up into multiple posts, because KDE contributors just don’t stop fixing and improving things! Expect more to come soon, but for now, here’s what we’ve got for you...

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Netgate® Advances TNSR™ Open Source Secure Networking with Release 19.02
  • Using an OpenBSD Router with AT&T U-Verse

    I upgraded to AT&T's U-verse Gigabit internet service in 2017 and it came with an Arris BGW-210 as the WiFi AP and router. The BGW-210 is not a terrible device, but I already had my own Airport Extreme APs wired throughout my house and an OpenBSD router configured with various things, so I had no use for this device. It's also a potentially-insecure device that I can't upgrade or fully disable remote control over.

    Fully removing the BGW-210 is not possible as we'll see later, but it is possible to remove it from the routing path. This is how I did it with OpenBSD.

  • Report: EU to reject ban on Huawei [iophk: "for a minuscule fraction of the price, the countries could add wireless to openbsd and have done with the question permanently"]

    Citing four unnamed sources familiar with the decision, the outlet reported that Andrus Ansip, the European Commission’s digital chief, will present his recommendation next week.

    The proposal will reportedly advise member states to adopt the EU’s cybersecurity guidelines to coordinate and share information on their wireless networks.

    According to Reuters, the plan would be to allow countries to decide for themselves whether to ban Huawei.

  • Exclusive: EU to drop threat of Huawei ban but wants 5G risks monitored - sources

    European digital chief Andrus Ansip will present the recommendation on Tuesday. While the guidance does not have legal force, it will carry political weight which can eventually lead to national legislation in European Union countries.

  • Cybercriminals target the UK police force with ransomware [iophk: "Windows endangers whole countries, divest from proprietary software now; however, using Twitter in place of a public form of communication is stupid and probably illegal."]

    The organisation represents 119,000 police officers across England and Wales, and revealed it had been hit by ransomware in a statement on Twitter, complete with the thoroughly uncatchy #PFEWCyberAttack hashtag. The attack was reported on March 11, within the three days required under European law.

  • DARPA takes on election security with open source

    The defense research agency is exploring the feasibility of locking down election systems with open-source software and secure hardware.

  • DARPA to Develop $10 Million Open Source Voting System

    The US election might be different in 2020 thanks to a project by DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), the US Department of Defense research division, aiming at bullet-proofing voting machines by moving away from proprietary software that can’t be properly evaluated for bugs, writes Motherboard.

Linux To Add Support For The MOTU 8Pre Digital Audio Workstation Hardware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The MOTU 8Pre is a Firewire-connected device for digital audio workstations to be able to connect eight microphone inputs. The hardware itself is more than one decade old and in fact the manufacturer already discontinued the product, but with Linux 5.2 the kernel will be supporting this device.

SUSE developer and Linux sound subsystem maintainer Takashi Sakamoto queued the support this week for supporting the MOTU 8Pre FireWire digital audio workstation device. Details on the support can be found via the enablement patch.

Read more

HowTos and Programming

Filed under
Development
HowTos

10 Best lightweight browsers for Linux or Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

Web Browsers, the day when they started making our lives easier by allowing us to crawl the internet to today’s world; they have been gone through numerous technological advancements. Browsers are quite advance to handle high-end graphics, online videos, apps and more without the help of third-party software. But this also has made them heavy in terms of consuming hardware resources, means more RAM and storage space. Such kind of browsers works well on good system configuration machines, however, Linux operating systems those are running on old PC or laptops or low configuration systems require light browsers with a minimal approach to work fast.

Mainstream browser or shall I say the dominated one: Google Chrome that Linux users refrain themselves from instaling it on their machines is rather resourced consuming browser. This is the main reason why most of the Linux OS like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Centos and more come with Firefox Mozilla but somewhere it still not that much lightweight as we need it to be. So, I have done some research and gathered some lightweight Linux browsers.

Read more

Webauthn in Linux with a TPM via the HID gadget

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Account security on the modern web is a bit of a nightmare. Everyone understands the need for strong passwords which are different for each account, but managing them is problematic because the human mind just can’t remember hundreds of complete gibberish words so everyone uses a password manager (which, lets admit it, for a lot of people is to write it down). A solution to this problem has long been something called two factor authentication (2FA) which authenticates you by something you know (like a password) and something you posses (like a TPM or a USB token). The problem has always been that you ideally need a different 2FA for each website, so that a compromise of one website doesn’t lead to the compromise of all your accounts.

Enter webauthn. This is designed as a 2FA protocol that uses public key cryptography instead of shared secrets and also uses a different public/private key pair for each website. Thus aspiring to be a passwordless secure scalable 2FA system for the web. However, the webauthn standard only specifies how the protocol works when the browser communicates with the remote website, there’s a different standard called FIDO or U2F that specifies how the browser communicates with the second factor (called an authenticator in FIDO speak) and how that second factor works.

It turns out that the FIDO standards do specify a TPM as one possible backend, so what, you might ask does this have to do with the Linux Gadget subsystem? The answer, it turns out, is that although the standards do recommend a TPM as the second factor, they don’t specify how to connect to one. The only connection protocols in the Client To Authenticator Protocol (CTAP) specifications are USB, BLE and NFC. And, in fact, the only one that’s really widely implemented in browsers is USB, so if you want to connect your laptop’s TPM to a browser it’s going to have to go over USB meaning you need a Linux USB gadget. Conspiracy theorists will obviously notice that if the main current connector is USB and FIDO requires new USB tokens because it’s a new standard then webauthn is a boon to token manufacturers.

Read more

OpenStreetMap and Deborah Nicholson win 2019 FSF Awards

Filed under
GNU

This year the FSF awarded OpenStreetMap and the award was accepted by Kate Chapman, chairperson of the OpenStreetMap Foundation and co-founder of the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT).

OpenStreetMap is a collaborative project to create a free editable map of the world. Founded by Steve Coast in the UK in 2004, OpenStreetMap is built by a community of over one million community members and has found its application on thousands of Web sites, mobile apps, and hardware devices. OpenStreetMap is the only truly global service without restrictions on use or availability of map information.

Read more

RPi Zero W based robot kits offer pan-tilt cam, GPS, and ToF sensing

Filed under
Linux

The $120 to $165 “SparkFun Autonomous Kit for Sphero RVR” extends the $250 Sphero RVR robot with an Raspberry Pi Zero W, a pan-tilt camera, GPS, and an optional ToF distance sensor.

SparkFun Electronics recently completed a successful Kickstarter project for its Sphero RVR, a four-wheeled tank-treaded robot that offers optional programming via a Raspberry Pi, Arduino, or BBC micro:bit. The robot is now publicly available for pre-order at $250 and SparkFun has announced two SparkFun Autonomous Kits for the Sphero RVR that add pan-tilt camera and location capabilities to the robot based on a Raspberry Pi Zero W.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Updating a group of packages on Gentoo
  • Men Of War Guide
  • Falkon 3.1.0 released

    New Falkon version is now out.

  • Xilinx Moving Ahead With Plans To Upstream Their Alveo PCIe Accelerator Driver

    A few weeks back I wrote about Xilinx looking at contributing their Alveo FPGA accelerator drivers to the mainline Linux kernel. They are continuing to work on that goal and pushed out their latest kernel driver patches this week for these Alveo PCIe accelerator cards. 

    The Xilinx Alveo PCIe accelerator driver for Linux is already used in production by customers albeit now the company is comfortable with the idea of upstreaming the work into the mainline kernel. These accelerators can ultimately run C/C++/OpenCL using their specialty compiler or programmed using RTL. Xilinx Alveo is marketed for machine learning, video transcoding/processing, genomics, financial computations, database searching, and related big data fields.

  • Fabian Affolter: Chemnitzer Linux Tage 2019

    Once again, Robert and I went to Chemnitz. We don’t wanted to break with the tradition of having a Fedora Project booth at the Chemnitzer Linux Tage. Robert is representing the Fedora Project at CLT for over a decade now.

    To show the visitors a running Fedora installation Raphael decided to take a larger screen, mounted it on a stand and placed a Raspberry Pi behind it. Pretty straight-forward setup but there is always an issue with the VESA connection on the back of the screen.

  •  

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS: Blockchain, DeepBrain, Redox OS, OpenBuilds, Red Hat Summit and FOSSASIA

  • It's About Time DApps Unlocked the Mass-Market Momentum for Blockchain
    There’s more to Blockchain technology than Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. At its fundamental level, Blockchain technology engenders trusts in inherently trustless environments. Protocol blockchains such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, EOS, GoChain, Steem and xDai have provided a launchpad for developers to work on DApps. DApps are typically open source applications not owned by anyone, immune from downtimes; and that cannot be shut down by a government or its agencies. The rapid proliferation of Decentralized Applications (DApps) powered a bull run in cryptocurrencies in 2017. Right now, there are more than 2000 DApps designed to solve specific market problems across industries such as health, data storage, finance, gaming, and governance.
  • DeepBrain Chain outlines release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta in progress report
    DeepBrain Chain detailed the release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta of its AI Training Net, which allows users to rent computing power to train artificial intelligence algorithms. DeepBrain Chain claimed numerous feature inclusions and and improvements, many pertaining to the scheduling and activation of tasks. In DBC 0.3.6.0, if an AI training task has been stopped a specified period of time, its storage will be deleted automatically. However, the task can be restarted at any time before deletion. If a node has been restarted, reactivation of any previous training tasks will require manual user authorization. [...] A decision was made recently by the community concerning the open source licensing of DeepBrain Chain’s code. Over 55 percent of the members polled voted to not make the code fully open source by the end of March.
  • Redox OS 0.5.0
    It has been one year and four days since the last release of Redox OS! In this time, we have been hard at work improving the Redox ecosystem. Much of this work was related to relibc, a new C library written in Rust and maintained by the Redox OS project, and adding new packages to the cookbook. We are proud to report that we have now far exceeded the capabilities of newlib, which we were using as our system C library before. We have added many important libraries and programs, which you can see listed below.
  • Redox OS 0.5 Released With New C Library Written In Rust
    It's been just over one year since the previous release of Redox OS while today this Rust-written operating system has finally been succeeded by Redox OS 0.5.  It's taken a while since the previous release of Redox OS as they have been focusing their attention on Relibc, a C library implementation written within the Rust programming language. Relibc is now used as the operating system's default C library.
  • Get Moving with New Software from OpenBuilds
    If you’re reading Hackaday, you’ve probably heard of OpenBuilds. Even if the name doesn’t sound familiar, you’ve absolutely seen something on these pages that was built with their components. Not only is OpenBuilds a fantastic place to get steppers, linear rails, lead screws, pulleys, wheels, and whatever else you need to make your project go, they’re also home to an active forum of people who are passionate about developing open source machines. As if that wasn’t enough reason to head over to the OpenBuilds website, [Peter Van Der Walt] recently wrote in to tell us about some new free and open source software he and the team have been working on that’s designed to make it easier than ever to get your creations cutting, lasing, milling, and whatever else you could possibly imagine. If you’ve got a machine that moves, they’ve got some tools you’ll probably want to check out.
  • Dive into developer-focused sessions at Red Hat Summit
    Red Hat Summit is just around the corner, and it’s shaping up to be best Red Hat developer event ever. This year, attendees will get to choose from more than 300 sessions, not to mention booth presentations, parties, labs, and training. To help you cut through the clutter, we’ve created a list of developer specific activities and sessions that will help you shape your Red Hat Summit experience. Most of these sessions are part of the Cloud-Native App Dev track, with a few other sessions that we think will appeal to you as a developer. For more information on these sessions, visit the Red Hat Summit session listing page and sort by “cloud-native app dev” track.
  • 10th year of FOSSASIA
    This FOSSASIA was special as it marked its 10th year! It was quite impressive to witness a FOSS conference to continue growing this long with growing community. The four day conference schedule was packed with various interesting talks, workshops, hackathon and other engaging activities.

Reducing sysadmin toil with Kubernetes controllers

Kubernetes is a platform for reducing toil cunningly disguised as a platform for running containers. The element that allows for both running containers and reducing toil is the Kubernetes concept of a Controller. [...] The canonical example of this in action is in how we manage Pods in Kubernetes. A Pod is effectively a running copy of an application that a specific worker node is asked to run. If that application crashes, the kubelet running on that node will start it again. However, if that node crashes, the Pod is not recovered, as the control loop (via the kubelet process) responsible for the resource no longer exists. To make applications more resilient, Kubernetes has the ReplicaSet controller. The ReplicaSet controller is bundled inside the Kubernetes controller-manager, which runs on the Kubernetes master node and contains the controllers for these more advanced resources. The ReplicaSet controller is responsible for ensuring that a set number of copies of your application is always running. To do this, the ReplicaSet controller requests that a given number of Pods is created. It then routinely checks that the correct number of Pods is still running and will request more Pods or destroy existing Pods to do so. By requesting a ReplicaSet from Kubernetes, you get a self-healing deployment of your application. You can further add lifecycle management to your workload by requesting a Deployment, which is a controller that manages ReplicaSets and provides rolling upgrades by managing multiple versions of your application's ReplicaSets. Read more

Android Leftovers

Server: IBM, LAMP and Kubernetes

  • A HATS For Many Occasions
    IBM gives customers plenty of options when it comes to its Rational Host Access Transformation software, including several modes of operation, different runtime options, and support for different operating systems in screen modernization engagements. With last week’s launch of HATS version 9.7, the development and deployment options got even wider. Regardless of which downstream options a HATS customer ultimately chooses, it all starts out basically the same on the front side of the sausage machine: Customers come to HATS because they have a 5250 (or 3270 or VT100) application that they want to transform, but they don’t want to go through the hassle, expense, and risk of modifying the IBM i, z/OS, or Unix application’s source code.
  • Six top skills that you should acquire in 2019
    There is a growing demand for the fullstack development skill set, which is the ability to develop tech both on the front-end/client side and back-end/server side. As you can’t learn all, select combinations like MEAN or LAMP stack.
  • Kubernetes and the Enterprise
    The reason we were having this conversation was around SUSE’s Cloud Application Platform (CAP). This is our Kubernetes focused Cloud Foundry distribution. And as part of the Kubernetes focus, we have been supporting and running SUSE CAP on Azure’s AKS for the last year or so. The conversation continued with observations that Kubernetes was clearly the future across IT. Yet to date, Cloud Foundry still has a good following with the large enterprise. And the thinking was that the Cloud Foundry approach really helped the large enteprise work with their applications, even if the applications were purely ‘container’ applications. Cloud Foundry makes the container-side of managing your ‘container’ application transparent. This approach ultimately lowers the tasks, breadth of tooling, and knowledge you have to surround Kubernetes with. It was with this thought, that a light-bulb went on.