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Friday, 23 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games: Valve, Modernisation in Google Summer of Code, Trigger Happy Havoc Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 5:38pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 5:33pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 5:15pm
Story Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 5:08pm
Story Stable kernels 4.9.89, 4.4.123 and 3.18.101 Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 5:05pm
Story Raspberry Pi 3B+ Speeds Up Three Ways Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 5:00pm
Story GNOME: Memory Leak, Continues Integration in Librsvg, GNOME Builder and More Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 4:43pm
Story KDE/Qt: Importance of QA, Qt Champions, Akademy's Keynote Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 4:39pm
Story Server: Docker Turns 5, LFTP, Google Skaffold Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 4:09pm
Story Software: Lector, Yoda, Suplemon, Cockpit, QSoas and More Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2018 - 4:07pm

Browsers: Mozilla and Chrome

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  • Mozilla Presses Pause on Facebook Advertising

    Mozilla is pressing pause on our Facebook advertising. Facebook knows a great deal about their two billion users — perhaps more intimate information than any other company does. They know everything we click and like on their site, and know who our closest friends and relationships are. Because of its scale, Facebook has become one of the most convenient platforms to reach an audience for all companies and developers, whether a multibillion corporation or a not-for-profit.

  • Results of the MDN “Duplicate Pages” SEO experiment

    Following in the footsteps of MDN’s “Thin Pages” SEO experiment done in the autumn of 2017, we completed a study to test the effectiveness and process behind making changes to correct cases in which pages are perceived as “duplicates” by search engines. In SEO parlance, “duplicate” is a fuzzy thing. It doesn’t mean the pages are identical—this is actually pretty rare on MDN in particular—but that the pages are similar enough that they are not easily differentiated by the search engine’s crawling technology.

  • Send, getting better

    Send continues to improve incrementally. Since our last post we’ve added a few requested features and fixed a bunch of bugs. You can now choose to allow multiple downloads and change the password on a file if you need to.

    Send is also more stable and should work more reliably across a wider set of browsers. We’ve brought back support for Microsoft Edge and some older versions of Safari.

  • Chrome 66 Beta: CSS Typed Object Model, Async Clipboard API, AudioWorklet

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 66 on ChromeStatus.

  • Chrome 66 Beta Delivers On Async Clipboard API, Web Locks API

    Following the Chrome 65 release earlier this month, Google developers have now catapulted the Chrome 66 beta.

Devices: Raspberry Pi 3, Ben NanoNote, Artila, webOS

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  • Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Benchmarks

    Last week on Pi Day marked the release of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with a slightly higher clocked Cortex-A53 processors, dual-band 802.11ac WiFi, faster Ethernet, and other minor enhancements over its predecessor. I've been spending the past few days putting the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ through its paces the past few days with an array of benchmarks while comparing the performance to other ARM SBCs as well as a few lower-end Intel x86 systems too. Here is all you need to know about the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ performance.

  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 2)

    Having undertaken some initial investigations into running L4Re and Fiasco.OC on the MIPS Creator CI20, I envisaged attempting to get this software running on the Ben NanoNote, too. For a while, I put this off, feeling confident that when I finally got round to it, it would probably be a matter of just choosing the right compiler options and then merely fixing all the mistakes I had made in my own driver code. Little did I know that even the most trivial activities would prove more complicated than anticipated.

    As you may recall, I had noted that a potentially viable approach to porting the software would merely involve setting the appropriate compiler switches for “soft-float” code, thus avoiding the generation of floating point instructions that the JZ4720 – the SoC on the Ben NanoNote – would not be able to execute. A quick check of the GCC documentation indicated the availability of the -msoft-float switch. And since I have a working cross-compiler for MIPS as provided by Debian, there didn’t seem to be much more to it than that. Until I discovered that the compiler doesn’t seem to support soft-float output at all.

    I had hoped to avoid building my own cross-compiler, and apart from enthusiastic (and occasionally successful) attempts to build the Debian ones before they became more generally available, the last time I really had anything to do with this was when I first developed software for the Ben. As part of the general support for the device an OpenWrt distribution had been made available. Part of that was the recipe for building the cross-compiler and other tools, needed for building a kernel and all the software one would deploy on a device. I am sure that this would still be a good place to look for a solution, but I had heard things about Buildroot and so set off to investigate that instead.

  • Artila Releases New Linux-ready Cortex-A7 System on Module M-X6ULL

    Artila's new SODIMM module based on NXP i.MX6ULL ARM Cortex A7 CPU core operating up to 800MHz speed with Linux OS. The new M-X6ULL is designed to meet the needs of many general embedded applications that require power efficient, high performance and cost optimized solution, as well as embedded systems that require high-end multimedia applications in a small form factor, this cost effective M-X6ULL is ultra-compact in size with the form factor of 68 x 43 mm. In addition, M-X6ULL has 200-pins connectors to allow extension of more I/Os for peripheral signals like two 10/100 Mbps Ethernet, LCD, CAN, UART, USB, SD and I2C.

  • LG is expanding webOS usage with open-source edition to rival Samsung’s Tizen

Krita 4.0.0 Released

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Games: Civilization VI: Rise and Fall and More

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Gaming Open-Source Platform Speeds Development, Requirements Process

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IT development in the federal government has earned its reputation for being a painfully slow process but, the government’s cloud application platform, is helping to change that by standardizing the application lifecycle and helping to document it every step of the way.

The need to document the entire stack of an IT solution in the federal government can run up to 1,000 pages, and that process requires in depth knowledge of thousands of pages of regulations, laws and risk management policies.

Typically, federal agencies have compliance experts who must review this documentation and grant approval or request changes. This can take six to 14 months to get authority to operate (ATO), and then you still need to deploy the application.

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Also: Hortonworks’ Shaun Bierweiler: Open Source Software to Help Advance Federal IT Modernization

Developer survey shows Linux as more popular than Windows

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Every year since 2010, Stack Overflow conducts a developer survey where they ask the developer community about everything from their favorite technologies to their job preferences. The results of the eighth annual survey, held in January 2018, are out and not surprisingly, this year marks the largest number of respondents ever. Over 100,000 developers took the 30-minute survey revealing how they learn new technologies, which tools they use to get their work done, and what they look for while hunting some job.

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Ubuntu Preps to Remove Qt 4 Support from the Archives, Target Ubuntu 19.04

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With Qt 5 being largely adopted by Qt application developers and other major projects, such as the KDE Plasma desktop environment, the Qt 4 technologies are becoming obsolete, so more and more GNU/Linux distributions plan its complete removal from the software repositories.

Debian Project's Qt/KDE teams are already preparing to remove Qt 4 support from the repositories of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series mainly because it's getting harder and harder to maintain it now that it is no longer supported upstream, and may cause lots of problems system-wide.

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GNU/Linux-powered Ataribox

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  • Mysterious ‘Ataribox’ console finally gets a name and pre-order window

    Atari’s new entry into the console market now has an official name: The Atari VCS. The device was originally teased as the “Ataribox” last year during the E3 gaming convention: A new Linux-based system providing all your favorite Atari classics along with games from independent developers. Visually, it’s a throwback to the Atari 2600 console, only with a sleeker, modern look and updated hardware. Atari calls it a “gaming and entertainment platform.”

  • GDC 2018 | The Ataribox is real, and it's more computer than gaming console

    Atari COO Michael Arzt told Tom’s Hardware that the machine will indeed run Linux (or, at least, a derivative of Linux) with its own Atari-themed UI. The device can be controlled through either a classically-styled joystick or a more modern gamepad. Users can also connect a keyboard and mouse through either USB or Bluetooth.

  • The Ataribox is here at GDC, but it's also kind of not (hands-on)

    In fact, Atari execs told us there's no longer a set price or a promised release date for the console -- because many of its key pieces, like its AMD processor and customized Linux operating system, are still coming together.

Security: Syzbot, FOSS Updates, and AMD

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JDK 10 Released

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  • JDK 10: General Availability

    JDK 10, the first release produced under the six-month rapid-cadence release model [1][2], is now Generally Available. We've identified no P1 bugs since we promoted build 46 almost two weeks ago, so that is the official GA release, ready for production use.

  • Java JDK 10 Reaches General Availability With Experimental Java-Based JIT Compiler

    JDK 10 has reached general availability as the first Java release under Oracle's new six-month release model.

    Mark Reinhold of Oracle has announced the availability now of JDK 10 with its official GA release now that no more high priority bugs are present.

  • Java 10 Released With New Features: Download Here

    Ever since its inception, Java has continued to rule the hearts of programmers as one of the most loved and used programming languages around. In 2017, Oracle and Java community decided to move to a new six-month cycle.

    The recently released JDK 10 is the first Oracle release in the new cycle. So, in a way, this implementation of Java Standard Edition (SE) 10 is the beginning of a new era. It follows Java 9, which arrived just six months ago.

Ubuntu: Logic Supply and Linux 4.15/Linux 4.16

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  • Tiny Apollo Lake based mini-PCs run Ubuntu

    Logic Supply unveiled two 116 x 83 x 34mm mini-PCs built around a Celeron N3350: a CL200 with 3x USB ports and a CL210 that doubles memory to 2GB LPDDR4 and 32GB eMMC, and adds a second mini-DP and GbE port.

    Logic Supply announced its smallest mini-PCs to date with CL200 and CL210 models that measure just 116 x 83 x 34mm. The CL200 ships with Ubuntu 16.04 while the more advanced CL210 also offers Windows 10 IoT. Both of these “IoT Edge Device” mini-PCs tap Intel’s dual-core, 1.1GHz Celeron N3350 with 6W TDP from the Apollo Lake generation, and support digital media, data acquisition, automation, and network gateway applications.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Continues Prepping With The Linux 4.15 Kernel

    There were various calls by independent end-users voicing their two cents that Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" should ship with Linux 4.16 instead of Linux 4.15, but that isn't going to happen.

    In several different places the past few weeks I've seen various remarks made of how "Ubuntu 18.04 should ship with Linux 4.16" on the basis of either better Spectre/Meltdown support, Linux 4.16 will be out in time and neither 4.15 or 4.16 are even LTS releases, better hardware support, or users simply wanting all the goodies in Linux 4.16. But that's simply foolish given Ubuntu 18.04 is being a Long Term Support release and how close the timing ends up being as is.

  • Kernel Team summary: March 21, 2018

    On the road to 18.04 we have a 4.15 based kernel in the Bionic repository.

Graphics: mesa 17.3.7, mesa 18.0.0-rc5, VGA_Switcheroo and More

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  • mesa 17.3.7

    Mesa 17.3.7 is now available.

  • Mesa 17.3.7 Released With A Bunch Of Fixes

    While Mesa 18.0 should finally be out on Friday as the major quarterly update to the Mesa 3D drivers, Mesa 17.3.7 is out today and it's a rather big update for being just another point release to last month's 17.3 series.

    Last week marked the release candidate of Mesa 17.3.7 with 50+ changes and then on Monday came a second release candidate given all the extra patches.

  • mesa 18.0.0-rc5

    The fifth and final release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available.

  • Mesa 18.0-RC5 Released, Mesa 18.0 Should Finally Be Out On Friday

    Nearly one and a half months since Mesa 18.0-RC4 and nearly one month since last seeing any Git activity on the "18.0" Mesa Git branch, it's finally been updated today with the availability of Mesa 18.0-RC5.

    Mesa release manager Emil Velikov announced this long-awaited release candidate today. He says this is the fifth and final release candidate. Given the month plus since the last RC, there are many fixes/changes in this release: In fact, more than 80 changes in total for Mesa 18.0-RC5.

  • Improved VGA_Switcheroo Going Into Linux 4.17

    Google's Sean Paul has sent in the final drm-misc-next pull request to DRM-Next of new feature material for the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle.

    Most notable with this final drm-misc-next update is the recent VGA_Switcheroo improvements by Lukas Wunner. This is the device link

  • AMD Posts Open-Source Driver Patches For Vega 12

    It's been a while since last hearing anything about the rumored "Vega 12" GPU but coming out this morning are a set of 42 patches providing support for this unreleased GPU within the mainline Linux kernel.

    Alex Deucher of AMD's Linux driver team sent out the 42 patches this morning providing initial support for Vega 12 within the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver.

  • DXVK Now Has An On-Disk Shader Cache

    DXVK, the exciting project implementing the Direct3D 11 API over Vulkan for Wine gamers, now has an on-disk shader cache.

  • Freedreno's MSM DRM Driver Continues Prepping For Adreno 600 Series Support

    Rob Clark has submitted the MSM DRM driver changes to DRM-Next for the Linux 4.17 kernel for benefiting Qualcomm SoC owners.

    Changes this cycle for the open-source MSM DRM driver include DSI updates, fixing some race conditions, DebugFS enhancements, MDP5 fixes, and refactoring/prep work for the Adreno 600 series support.

  • NVIDIA's Jetson TK1 Is Being EOL'ed Next Month

    Easily one of our favorite ARM single-board computers ever, the Jetson TK1 from NVIDIA, will be facing retirement next month.

    A Phoronix reader has tipped us off that NVIDIA has sent out their EOL notice that shipments of the Jetson TK1 developer kits will be ending by the end of April. Following that, it will just live on until distributors run out of their inventory.

Slax Linux Distribution Begins Planning For Its First 2018 Release

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Arriving last Christmas was a rejuvenated release of Slax, the long-running, lightweight Linux distribution with its development restarting last year and having shifted from being a Slackware derivative to Debian and moving from KDE to Fluxbox+Compton. Those involved are working on a new Slax release for 2018.

Slax lead developer Tomas Matejicek has announced work is underway on the next version of this modern Slax OS with Debian+Fluxbox.

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Original: Work in progress on next version

Games: The Pillars of the Earth, Steam, Mighty Fight Federation, Civilization VI: Rise and Fall

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RawTherapee 5.4 Released

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RawTherapee provides you with a selection of powerful tools with which you can practise the art of developing raw photos. Be sure to read RawPedia to understand how each tool works so that you may make the most of it. A great place to start is the "Getting Started" article. Click on "Main page" in the top-left corner when you have finished reading that article to see all other articles.

If you find a problem, don't keep it to yourself. Find out how to write useful bug reports to get the problem fixed.

Talk with other users and developers in our shared forum. You can also have a live chat using IRC - no installation necessary.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Linux Foundation: Kubernetes/CNCF and OCP

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  • Brings Improvements to Kubernetes Networking with Sixth Release

    An open source project within The Linux Foundation – relentlessly focused on data speed and efficiency supporting the creation of high-performance, flexible, and scalable cloud native infrastructures, today announced the availability of its 18.01 software release. Focused on enhancements to improve Kubernetes Networking, Istio, and cloud native network functions virtualization (NFV), 18.01 is's sixth software release.

  • Kubernetes: the “distributed” Linux of the cloud

    The CNCF Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) voted for Kubernetes to become CNCF’s first project to graduate as it has proven to be mature and resilient enough to manage containers at scale across any industry in companies of all sizes. The CNCF graduation criteria established by the TOC define what is a sustainable, production ready, mature open source project with open governance that you can bet your business on. Just because a project is open source, doesn’t mean that it is high quality and sustainable.

  • LF Networking, OCP collaborate on creating open source SDN, NFV software stacks
  • OCP and Linux Foundation Bring Hardware Together with Software

    Disaggregation of hardware and software has created interest in open source at both layers of networks. But in an acknowledgement that these layers still need to work together, yesterday, the Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) group and the Open Compute Project (OCP) announced they plan to collaborate to harmonize hardware and software.

Ubuntu's Bionic Beaver brings GNOME 3.28, minimal installation, and faster booting (in theory)

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Bionic Beaver. That's right. Canonical has chosen what might well be the greatest name for a desktop release in the history of technology. And, of course, with a name like Bionic Beaver, you'd expect great things to come from this borg-ian, nocturnal, semi-aquatic rodent. With a release date of April 21, 2018, there isn't much time remaining to anticipate what's to come.

Good thing you don't have to wait to find out what new and improved features are on their way. However, is the wait worth it? For the longest time, Ubuntu releases were rather boring, offering next to nothing in the way of improvements. It wasn't until Canonical made the switch from Unity to GNOME that releases were, once again, interesting. Nomenclature aside, Bionic Beaver should not disappoint users. The developers have done a masterful job of creating a release that brings a bit of excitement along for the ride.

Let's take a look at what Bionic Beaver has in store.

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Also: Umm, GNOME Shell Has a Rather Big Memory Leak

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux With Radeon / GeForce GPUs On The Latest 2018 Drivers

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Given how fiercely the latest open-source AMD Linux driver code is running now up against NVIDIA's long-standing flagship Linux GPU driver, you might be curious how well that driver stacks up against the Radeon Software driver on Windows? Well, you are in luck as here are some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 as well as the GeForce GTX 1060 and GTX 1080 Ti while being tested both under Microsoft Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS while using the latest AMD/NVIDIA drivers on each platform.

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