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Monday, 17 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Openwashing: Bloomberg, Pimcore, Microsoft, Facebook and More Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2018 - 10:13am
Story Programming: Fuchsia SDK, Python, PGI, JFrog, Microsoft as 'Authority' and Fun Maze Generator Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2018 - 10:11am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2018 - 9:54am
Story How I Quit Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Amazon Roy Schestowitz 2 16/12/2018 - 9:08am
Story Devices/Embedded: Omega2 Pro, Power of Zephyr RTOS, ELC Europe Roy Schestowitz 1 16/12/2018 - 8:57am
Story Brave browser switches to Chromium code base Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2018 - 8:45am
Story We need Sustainable Free and Open Source Communities Roy Schestowitz 1 16/12/2018 - 8:36am
Story Tesla Model 3 hack puts YouTube and Ubuntu on the dash Roy Schestowitz 4 16/12/2018 - 8:23am
Story Happy birthday, qutebrowser! Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2018 - 8:15am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/12/2018 - 7:56am

Top Lightweight Linux Distributions for 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Modern Linux distros are designed to attract a large number of users having machines equipped with the latest hardware. As they’re designed by keeping the modern hardware in mind, they might be a bit too excessive for the old computers. Thankfully, we don’t have to worry about it because experts have been tweaking things to bring out some trimmed and light weighted distros.

We still have so many lightweight distros available at our hands, from beginner to advance; from gamers to hackers. It can be a headache to decide which distro will be most compatible with the job you need to perform. Worry not! We’ve filtered the top lightweight Linux distributions for 2019.

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Best 10 Laptops for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

We’re almost at the end of 2018 with festive season around the corner. If you are looking to buy a new laptop for yourself or gift it to someone then this article is for you. Linux is a flexible operating system and it can accommodate itself on any machine and alongside Windows too. Also Linux doesn’t need high-end computer hardware to run properly, hence if you have old laptops, they can also benefit from Linux.
So today we are going to have in-depth look at best 10 laptops available in market which can be used to run Linux operating system. Not all the laptops listed here have dedicated hardware required by Linux, but they will be able to run Linux directly or alongside Windows or Mac.

Many users moving towards Linux as it is more free, secure and reliable operating system as compared others. In addition to this Linux is best platform to work on personal projects and programming tasks.

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Best Alternatives to Red Hat Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

The recent news of IBM’s purchase of Red Hat sent a ripple through the global open source community, sparking fear that it will eventually push either entire Red Hat or at least some of its parts to the scrap heap.

But we’re not here to make educated guesses about the future of the beloved Linux distribution. Instead, we’re here to list the top 5 best alternatives to Red Hat Linux that you can try right now to see what other options are out there.

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4 of the Best Alternatives to Skype on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Microsoft has never taken Linux seriously when it comes to their products. They don’t see it as a gain. The only real reason that Linux even has a Skype client is because before Microsoft purchased it there was a client. If you’re a Linux user, you need to get away from this service as soon as possible.

Microsoft has shown in the past that they have no interest in supporting Linux, and that fact is even more solidified with the latest update to the platform. Every alternative on this list is a great alternative and worthy of taking the place Skype has in your life on the Linux platform.

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180+ Benchmarks On Debian GNU/Linux 9.6 Against Debian Buster Testing

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

There is the release of Debian 10 "Buster" to look forward to (hopefully) next year for succeeding Debian 9 "Stretch" that debuted back in 2017. Curious about the current performance of Debian Buster, I ran 183 benchmarks on Debian 9.6 stable against the current Debian Buster Testing images for seeing how the performance compares.

On an AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX box with 32GB of RAM, Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD and Radeon RX 580 graphics, I compared the current performance of Debian 9.6 to the latest Debian Testing images. Obviously when the Debian 10.0 release nears I will be testing it on a more diverse selection of hardware while for this benchmarking comparison was just using this Threadripper 2 + Radeon RX 580 Polaris system.

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California launches open-source code site

Filed under
OSS

An open collaboration between agencies, industry partners and civic technologists, Code California aims to take advantage of agency-developed open source code that can be reused across state government. Developed by the California Department of Technology, the program plans to increase security and efficiency by decreasing duplicative acquisitions and vendor lock-in. Making open source software publicly available to developers can also contribute to more stable and secure products, the state said in the site's accompanying playbook.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • #RecruitmentFocus: Open source skills in high demand

    The unemployment rate in South Africa rose to 27.5% in the third quarter of 2018, while the demand for skills remains high - leaving an industry conundrum that is yet to be solved. According to SUSE, partnerships that focus on upskilling graduates and providing real-work skills, as well as placement opportunities - could be exactly what the industry in looking for.

  • Stable: not moving vs. not breaking

    There are two terms that brings a heavy controversy in the Open Source world: support and stable. Both of them have their roots in the “old days” of Open Source, where its commercial impact was low and very few companies made business with it.

    You probably have read a lot about maintenance vs support. This controversy is older. I first heard of it in the context of Linux based distributions. Commercial distribution had to put effort in differentiating among the two because in Open SOurce they were used indistictly but not in business. But this post is about the adjectivet stable…

  • Cameron Kaiser: A thank you to Ginn Chen, whom Larry Ellison screwed

    Periodically I refresh my machines by dusting them off and plugging them in and running them for a while to keep the disks spinnin' and the caps chargin'. Today was the day to refurbish my Sun Ultra-3, the only laptop Sun ever "made" (they actually rebadged the SPARCle and later the crotchburner 1.2GHz Tadpole Viper, which is the one I have). Since its last refresh the IDPROM had died, as they do when they run out of battery, resetting the MAC address to zeroes and erasing the license for the 802.11b which I never used anyway. But, after fixing the clock to prevent GNOME from puking on the abnormal date, it booted and I figured I'd update Firefox since it still had 38.4 on it. Ginn Chen, first at Sun and later at Oracle, regularly issued builds of Firefox which ran very nicely on SPARC Solaris 10. Near as I can determine, Oracle has never offered a build of any Firefox post-Rust even to the paying customers they're bleeding dry, but I figured I should be able to find the last ESR of 52 and install that. (Amusingly this relic can run a Firefox in some respects more current than TenFourFox, which is an evolved and patched Firefox 45.)

  • Protecting the world’s oceans with open data science

    For environmental scientists, researching a single ecosystem or organism can be a daunting task. The amount of data and literature to comb through (or create) is often overwhelming.

    So how, then, can environmental scientists approach studying the health of the world’s oceans? What ocean health means is a big question in itself—oceans span millions of square miles, are home to countless species, and border hundreds of countries and territories, each of which has its own unique marine policies and practices.

    But no matter how daunting this task may seem, it’s a necessary and vital one. So in 2012, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Conservation International publicly launched the Ocean Health Index (OHI), an ambitious initiative to measure the benefits that oceans provide to people, including clean water, coastal protections, and biodiversity. The idea was to create an annual assessment to document major oceanic changes and trends, and in turn, use those findings to craft better marine policy around the world.

Openwashing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

The Last Independent Mobile OS

Filed under
OS
Linux

The year was 2010 and the future of mobile computing was looking bright. The iPhone was barely three years old, Google’s Android had yet to swallow the smartphone market whole, and half a dozen alternative mobile operating systems—many of which were devoutly open source—were preparing for launch. Eight years on, you probably haven’t even heard of most of these alternative mobile operating systems, much less use them. Today, Android and iOS dominate the global smartphone market and account for 99.9 percent of mobile operating systems. Even Microsoft and Blackberry, longtime players in the mobile space with massive revenue streams, have all but left the space.

Then there’s Jolla, the small Finnish tech company behind Sailfish OS, which it bills as the “last independent alternative mobile operating system.” Jolla has had to walk itself back from the edge of destruction several times over the course of its seven year existence, and each time it has emerged battered, but more determined than ever to carve out a spot in the world for a truly independent, open source mobile operating system.

After years of failed product launches, lackluster user growth, and supply chain fiascoes, it’s only been in the last few months that things finally seem to be turning to Jolla’s favor. Over the past two years the company has rode the wave of anti-Google sentiment outside the US and inked deals with large foreign companies that want to turn Sailfish into a household name. Despite the recent success, Jolla is far from being a major player in the mobile market. And yet it also still exists, which is more than can be said of every other would-be alternative mobile OS company.

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How I Quit Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Amazon

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
Sci/Tech

It was just before closing time at a Verizon store in Bushwick, New York last May when I burst through the door, sweaty and exasperated. I had just sprinted—okay I walked, but briskly—from another Verizon outlet a few blocks away in the hopes I’d make it before they closed shop for the night. I was looking for a SIM card that would fit a refurbished 2012 Samsung Galaxy S3 that I had recently purchased on eBay, but the previous three Verizon stores I visited didn’t have any chips that would fit such an old model.

When I explained my predicament to the salesperson, he laughed in my face.

“You want to switch from you current phone to an... S3?” he asked incredulously.

I explained my situation. I was about to embark on a month without intentionally using any services or products produced by the so-called “Big Five” tech companies: Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. At that point I had found adequate, open source replacements for most of the services offered by these companies, but ditching the Android OS, which is developed by Google, was proving difficult.

Most of the tech I use on a day-to-day basis is pretty utilitarian. At the time I was using a cheap ASUS laptop at work and a homebrew PC at my apartment. My phone was a Verizon-specific version of the Samsung Galaxy J3, a 2016 model that cost a little over $100 new. They weren't fancy, but they’ve reliably met most of my needs for years.

For the past week and a half I had spent most of my evenings trying to port an independent mobile OS called Sailfish onto my phone without any luck. As it turned out, Verizon had locked the bootloader on my phone model, which is so obscure that no one in the vibrant Android hacking community had dedicated much time to figuring out a workaround. If I wanted to use Sailfish, I was going to have to get a different phone.

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RISC-V Will Stop Hackers Dead From Getting Into Your Computer

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
Security

The greatest hardware hacks of all time were simply the result of finding software keys in memory. The AACS encryption debacle — the 09 F9 key that allowed us to decrypt HD DVDs — was the result of encryption keys just sitting in main memory, where it could be read by any other program. DeCSS, the hack that gave us all access to DVDs was again the result of encryption keys sitting out in the open.

Because encryption doesn’t work if your keys are just sitting out in the open, system designers have come up with ingenious solutions to prevent evil hackers form accessing these keys. One of the best solutions is the hardware enclave, a tiny bit of silicon that protects keys and other bits of information. Apple has an entire line of chips, Intel has hardware extensions, and all of these are black box solutions. They do work, but we have no idea if there are any vulnerabilities. If you can’t study it, it’s just an article of faith that these hardware enclaves will keep working.

Now, there might be another option. RISC-V researchers are busy creating an Open Source hardware enclave. This is an Open Source project to build secure hardware enclaves to store cryptographic keys and other secret information, and they’re doing it in a way that can be accessed and studied. Trust but verify, yes, and that’s why this is the most innovative hardware development in the last decade.

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ONAP Myths Debunked

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation’s Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) is well into its third 6-month release (Casablanca came out in Dec ’18), and while the project has evolved since it’s first release, there is still some confusion about what it is and how it’s architected. This blogs takes a closer look at ONAP, under-the-hood, to clarify how it works.

To start, it is important to consider what functionality ONAP includes. I call ONAP a MANO++, where ONAP includes the NFVO and VNFM layers as described by ETSI, but goes beyond by including service assurance/automation and a unified design tool. ONAP does not include the NFVI/VIM or the NFV cloud layer. In other words, ONAP doesn’t really care whether the NFV cloud is OpenStack, Kubernetes or Microsoft Azure. Nor does ONAP include VNFs. VNFs come from third-party companies or open source projects but have VNF guidelines and onboarding SDKs that ease the deployment. In other words, ONAP is a modular platform for complete Network Automation.

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Kdenlive 18.12 and KDE Frameworks Update

Filed under
KDE
  • Kdenlive 18.12 release and some news

    After the bug squashing day an interested developer joined the the team and is fixing MOVIT (GPU effects) support. We are very happy to see more people interested in contributing code to the project.

  • Achievement of the Week

    This week I gave KDE Frameworks a web page after only 4 years of us trying to promote it as the best thing ever since cabogganing without one. I also updated the theme on the KDE Applications 18.12 announcement to this millennium and even made the images in it have a fancy popup effect using the latest in JQuery Bootstrap CSS. But my proudest contribution is making the screenshot for the new release of Konsole showing how it can now display all the cat emojis plus one for a poodle.

Vulkan Leftovers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.2 Released Along With RGP 1.4

    In addition to AMD's year-end Radeon driver updates issued today, their GPUOpen crew has also carried out some new open-source software releases.

    Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.2 is available for helping Vulkan game/app developers better manage their vRAM behavior. The VMA 2.2 release brings full-fledged memory defragmentation support, a buddy algorithm for custom pools, new functions around sparse memory handling, and other fixes and optimizations.

  • Khronos Seeking Feedback On KTX2 Specification For Storing Textures For OpenGL/Vulkan

    The Khronos Group is looking for feedback on its KTX2 specification that is used for storing textures for OpenGL (including GLES) and Vulkan while being a simple format and an extension of the original KTX with improvements for Vulkan and other graphics APIs.

Debian Work by Norbert Preining, Ben Hutchings and Raphaël Hertzog

Filed under
Debian

GDB Picks Up Support For OpenRISC Linux Debugging

Filed under
Development
GNU

The GNU Debugger (GDB) now has support for OpenRISC Linux debugging.

Should you be interested in OpenRISC as this alternative to RISC-V as an open-source RISC-based CPU instruction set, there is initial support for Linux debugging Linux user-space debugging and core dump analysis to complement its previous bare metal debugging support. This capability is loosely based on GDB's existing RISC-V and NIOS2 support.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.20--rc76

Well, that's more like it. This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope the trend continues. The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem fixes, core fixes, test updates..) Read more Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

Android Leftovers

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator. It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root. Read more