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Sunday, 08 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Games: Wine 5.0 Code Freeze, The Humble Choice and Tropico 6

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Gaming
  • Wine 5.0 Code Freeze To Begin Next Week

    As expected by Wine's annual release cadence, next week Wine 5.0 will enter its code freeze followed by release candidates until this next stable Wine release is ready to ship around early 2020.

    Wine project leader Alexandre Julliard shared that following next week's development release will mark the expected code freeze season for Wine 5.0. Wine 4.22 will be out one week from today and the last point by which Wine developers can land any features they want to see in this annual stable release. Following that will be weekly Wine 5.0 release candidates until the 5.0.0 release is ready to ship, likely in January or February.

  • The Humble Choice game bundle subscription has launched replacing Humble Monthly

    Humble Bundle have today replaced their Humble Monthly subscription service with Humble Choice, offering subscription tiers and more.

  • The Llama of Wall Street has invaded Tropico 6 in a new DLC out now, plus a free update

    Limbic Entertainment and Kalypso Media today released the first expansion to the humurous city building sim Tropico 6, along with a free update for everyone.

    Firstly, the Seguridad Social update is free for everyone who owns Tropico 6 and adds in a new Warehouse building, a sandbox map 'Rio', and a community-requested Social Security edict, which helps prevent in-game student and retiree NPCs from going broke. There's also quite a healthy amount of bug fixing in this update.

Audiocasts/Shows: Kubernetes Podcast, Linux Headlines and Marcel Gagne

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • When you're in the release team, you're family: the Kubernetes 1.16 release interview

    It is a pleasure to co-host the weekly Kubernetes Podcast from Google with Adam Glick. We get to talk to friends old and new from the community, as well as give people a download on the Cloud Native news every week.

    It was also a pleasure to see Lachlan Evenson, the release manager for Kubernetes 1.16, win the CNCF “Top Ambassador” award at KubeCon. We talked with Lachie when 1.16 was released, and as is becoming a tradition, we are delighted to share an abridged version of that interview with the readers of the Kubernetes Blog.

    If you’re paying attention to the release calendar, you’ll see 1.17 is due out soon. Subscribe to our show in your favourite podcast player for another release interview!

  • 2019-12-06 | Linux Headlines

    The W3C puts forward WebAssembly as an official standard, Azure Sphere gains support for Ubuntu developers, CodeWeek reports back in with this year’s results, and Manjaro has some exciting news for PinePhone backers.

  • Playing "Teeny Titans 2"

    I love "Teen Titans GO," even if I am a grown up adult human male with teenagers. So, when I saw this in my Play Store suggested list, I could not resist. I mean, come on! So, I downloaded it, installed it, and began playing. 

Proprietary Dangers: Microsoft Entrapment and Open Automation Software

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Microsoft

Ubuntu: AWS, Podcast, Robotics and Snapcraft

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Blog: Introducing the Ubuntu AWS Rolling Kernel

    The linux-aws 4.15 based kernel, which is the default kernel in the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS AMIs, is moving to a rolling kernel model.

    [...]

    The Ubuntu rolling kernel model provides the latest upstream bug fixes and performance improvements around task scheduling, I/O scheduling, networking, hypervisor guests and containers to our users. Canonical has been following this model in other cloud environments for some time now, and have found it to be an excellent way to deliver these benefits while continuing to provide LTS level stability.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E35 – Feud

    This week we’ve been talking to the BBC about Thinkpads and Ubuntu goes Pro. We round up the news from the Ubuntu community and discuss our picks from the wider tech news.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 35 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • The State of Robotics – November 2019

    November, for robotics, was a good month. We’re seeing new things develop, current projects finish and more cute animals in our future. So who can complain? The news we’re covering here are things that have crossed our path and that we’ve found interesting. If you have suggestions for next months post or your own projects you would like us to highlight, don’t hesitate to get in touch. Send an email and a brief summary to robotics.community@canonical.com and we can start the discussion. As ever we want this to be a highlight reel for cool robot stuff because we like cool robot stuff. Happy December everyone.

  • Simplifying hardware management during Linux development

    Every few months we release a Snapcraft update, with improvements to both Linux development, and snap user experience. Last week, we released Snapcraft 3.9, and this blog post will focus on the remote build feature that is now a fully accessible preview.

    Let’s dig deeper into why you need to try remote build, and how you can use it today.

Security: Cyber Security Today, Opportunistic Wireless Encryption (OWE) and Latest Patches

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Security
  • Cyber Security Today – An email gift card scam, please stop re-using passwords and more open data found on Amazon storage

    Welcome to Cyber Security Today. It’s Friday December 6th. I’m Howard Solomon, contributing reporter on cyber security for ITWorldCanada.com.

  • NetworkManager Adds Support For Enhanced Open / Opportunistic Wireless Encryption

    Opportunistic Wireless Encryption (OWE) provides a means of encrypting wireless data transfers without having any secret/key. Opportunistic Wireless Encryption is advertised as Wi-Fi Certified Enhanced Open.

    This OWE / "Enhanced Open" standard is now supported by NetworkManager for allowing supported devices connecting to Linux systems to make use of this means of opportunistic encryption. The Wi-Fi CERTIFIED Enhanced Open has been around just since summer of 2018 to better secure open WiFi networks. More details on the standard can be found via Wi-Fi.org.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (libav), Fedora (kernel, libuv, and nodejs), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (firefox and java-1.7.1-ibm), SUSE (clamav, cloud-init, dnsmasq, dpdk, ffmpeg, munge, opencv, and permissions), and Ubuntu (librabbitmq).

Nordic Semi nRF52832 Powered PineTime Dev Kit is Now Available for $24.99

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

PineTime was announced as a $25 smartwatch & companion for PinePhone Linux smartphone which itself sells for $150.

Read more

Programming: Vagrant, CSV to JSON and Python Bits

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Development
  • A beginner's guide to using Vagrant

    Vagrant describes itself as "a tool for building and managing virtual machine environments in a single workflow. With an easy-to-use workflow and focus on automation, Vagrant lowers development environment setup time, increases production parity, and makes the 'works on my machine' excuse a relic of the past."

  • Convert CSV to JSON with miller
  • New Project, Who Dis? - Building SaaS #38

    In this episode, we started a brand new project! I had some internet troubles so this “stream” is actually a local recording from my computer. We created a new Django project from scratch and set up Heroku to handle deployments.

    In spite of the streaming trouble, we were able to get a bunch done. We started the project from scratch so we made a repository on GitHub with some .gitignore settings tailored for Python projects.

  • RunSnakeRun for Python3 Out

    So I finally pushed out the Python3/wxPython Pheonix compatible release of RunSnakeRun. The Python3 version has to run Python2 in order to load Python2 pstats dumps, and Meliae doesn't AFAIK support Python3 yet, so I expect I'll just drop support for it eventually. The code is now living on GitHub rather than Launchpad.

  • Angular 9 CRUD Tutorial: Consume a Python/Django CRUD REST API

    This tutorial is designed for developers that want to use Angular 9 to build front-end apps for their back-end REST APIs. You can either use Python & Django as the backend or use JSON-Server to mock the API if you don't want to deal with Python. We'll be showing both ways in this tutorial.

  • Django: Angular 9/8 Tutorial By Example: REST CRUD APIs & HTTP GET Requests with HttpClient

    In this Angular 9 tutorial, we'll learn to build an Angular 9 CRUD example application going through all the required steps from creating/simulating a REST API, scaffolding a new project, setting up the essential APIs, and finally building and deploying your final application to the cloud.

Red Hat: Containers and Kubernetes, Systemd Everywhere, AMQ Streams on OpenShift and System Administrators

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Containers and Kubernetes can be essential to a hybrid cloud computing strategy

    Hybrid cloud is gaining ground among enterprises that want to expand computing resources with public cloud infrastructure while still using their on-premise, data center environments. Adding public cloud can mean more elasticity, scalability, and even faster time to market. But if you want to improve the chances that your hybrid cloud can deliver on its promise, you need to think about adding containers to the mix.

    Linux containers provide a way to encapsulate application code in a way that makes the code more portable and faster to deploy. More and more organizations are using containers as part of the infrastructure for microservices-based, cloud-native applications.

    Containers can be portable across environments such as Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and consistent, so they can speed application delivery times and make it easier for teams to collaborate, even if those teams are working in different deployment environments. And they can serve as a bridge between your data center and public cloud environments.

  • Systemd-homed Looks Like It Will Merged Soon For systemd 245

    Announced back in September at the All Systems Go event in Berlin was systemd-homed as a new effort to improve home directory handling. Systemd-homed wants to make it easier to migrate home directories, ensure all user data is self-contained, unify user-password and encryption handling, and provide other modern takes on home/user directory functionality. That code is expected to soon land in systemd.

    Systemd-homed was talked about by Lennart as being ready for versions 244 or 245. Now that systemd 244 shipped at the end of November, systemd-homed is looking like it will soon land in Git.

  • Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 3

    In the previous articles in this series, we first covered the basics of Red Hat AMQ Streams on OpenShift and then showed how to set up Kafka Connect, a Kafka Bridge, and Kafka Mirror Maker.

  • What personality trait most defines a sysadmin?

    When you think of a system administrator, who do you think of?

    Chances are, most of us have taken a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test at some point in our careers. For me, my results typically come up as INTJ, and I've always thought the traits associated with that type (introversion, intuition, thinking, judging) have aligned with my interest in technology and the kind of work I enjoy.

    But that doesn't mean that those are the only characteristics that make a good sysadmin. Far from it. A successful team is made up of a diversity of skills, viewpoints, and personal characteristics.

  • How to identify a strong sysadmin job applicant

    When a company looks for new resources with skills in a specific focus area—especially in IT—the challenge is on. Why? Because only a few in the company, if any, have even a vague notion of how to verify the skills they are looking for. The work of a system administrator is a key function, and if it goes wrong, the very existence of the company is at stake (something I’ve been unfortunate to witness when called in on an emergency rescue effort).

Fedora 31 Elections Results

Filed under
Red Hat

The Fedora 31 election cycle has concluded. Here are the results for each election. Congratulations to the winning candidates, and thank you all candidates for running in this election!

Council

One Council seat was open this election. A total of 243 ballots were cast, meaning a candidate could accumulate up to 729 votes (243 * 3).

# votes Candidate
520 Dennis Gilmore
259 Alberto Rodríguez Sánchez
237 John M. Harris, Jr.

FESCo

Five FESCo seats were open this election. A total of 273 ballots were cast, meaning a candidate could accumulate up to 2184 votes (273 * 8).

# votes Candidate
1490 Miro Hrončok
1350 Kevin Fenzi
1115 Zbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek
879 Fabio Valentini
877 David Cantrell
868 Justin Forbes
813 Randy Barlow
534 Pete Walter

Read more

Also: Fedora program update: 2019-49

GNU: Guile 2.9.6 (Beta) and GCC 10's C++20 "Spaceship Operator"

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Guile 2.9.6 (beta) released

    We are delighted to announce GNU Guile 2.9.6, the sixth beta release in preparation for the upcoming 3.0 stable series. See the release announcement for full details and a download link.

    This release fixes bugs caught by users of the previous 2.9.5 prerelease, and adds some optimizations as well as a guile-3 feature for cond-expand.

  • GCC 10's C++20 "Spaceship Operator" Support Appears To Be In Good Shape

    The C++20 spaceship operator support was merged in early November for GCC 10. The commits this week meanwhile allow the operator to be used with std::pair and std::array, among other related commits in recent weeks.

    See the GCC C++ status page for the state of C++20/C++2A with GCC 10. Most C++20 functionality is already in place even on GCC 8/9 but some pieces remain around atomic compare-and-exchange with padding bits, modules support, coroutines, using enum, and more implicit moves.
    14 Comments

Curl Milestone and New Feature

Filed under
Software
  • A 25K commit gift

    The other day we celebrated curl reaching 25,000 commits, and just days later I received the following gift in the mail.

  • curl speaks etag

    That’s a quote from the mozilla ETag documentation. The header is defined in RFC 7232.

    In short, a server can include this header when it responds with a resource, and in subsequent requests when a client wants to get an updated version of that document it sends back the same ETag and says “please give me a new version if it doesn’t match this ETag anymore”. The server will then respond with a 304 if there’s nothing new to return.

    It is a better way than modification time stamp to identify a specific resource version on the server.

GNOME and KDE: GNOME 3, LaTeX or ConTeXt in GNOME, Outreachy, LAS 2019 and Plasma Mobile

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • GNOME 3 won’t unlock

    Every couple days something on my RHEL 7 box goes into a swapstorm and uses up all the memory. I think it’s Firefoxe, but I never figured out why, generally I have four different Firefoxes running with four different profiles, so it’s hard to tell which one’s failing (if it even is that). Anyway, sometimes it makes the screen lock crash or something, and I can’t get in, and I can never remember what process you have to kill to get back in, so here it is: gnome-shell. You have to killall -9 gnome-shell, and it lets you back in. Also killall -STOP firefox and killall -STOP "Web Content" are handy if the swapstorm is still under way.

  • LaTeX or ConTeXt for writing documents

    If I wanted to re-implement GNOME LaTeX, it would target the ConTeXt language instead. If there are any ConTeXt user reading this, I would be interested to know what application you use for writing ConTeXt documents, and what features are important to you.

  • GNOME Outreachy 2019

    The Outreachy program provides internship to work in Free and Open Source Software. This year I've proposed two projects as part of the GNOME project and we've two interns working for three months, so we'll have a lot of improvements in the following months!

    I'll be mentoring these interns, so I will need to spend some time helping them to work on the existing codebase, but it worth it, if this makes more people to collaborate in free software development and if this help us to improve some useful apps.

    These two projects are Fractal and the GNOME translation editor. You can take a look to the list of outreachy interns.

  • Barcelona: LAS 2019

    This November I was in Barcelona for the Linux App Summit 2019. It was awesome \o/. I really liked that the conference was a joint event by GNOME and KDE, I met so many cool new people. During the conference I volunteered to show the “time left” signs to speakers, and helped out at the registration desk.

    Aside from normal conference stuff I also managed to do quite a bit of hacking during the week. I made my first contribution to Gnome Initial Setup, and cleaned up Teleport a bit so I can hopefully get a new release out soon.

    I’m bad at taking pictures, so here’s a picture of a tree in the middle of the stairs on the slopes of Mount Montjuic.

  • Plasma Mobile: weekly update: part 9-10

    Calindori, the calendar application, now offers a flat event view which allows to show all events in single card list view. The events are sorted by start date.

Screencasts and Shows: SparkyLinux 2019.12, Linux Mint 19.3 Beta, Destination Linux and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • SparkyLinux 2019.12 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at SparkyLinux 2019.12.

  • Linux Mint 19.3 "Tricia" Beta First Impressions

    Linux Mint 19.3 is coming soon! In this video I take a quick look at the beta that was recently released, in preparation for the review I'll be uploading as soon as the final version is released.

  • Destination Linux 150 - Librem 5, Zorin OS, Private Internet Access, UBports, Fedora, Bitwarden

    Topics covered in this episode:

    ZorinOS Privacy Concerns
    Ubuntu Touch Runs On Raspberry Pi
    Librem 5 Birch Has Shipped
    Fedora Users Concerned GNOME Software Proprietary Software
    Linux Powered Handheld Returns

  • Linux Apps I Use Daily

    In this video, I go over all the Linux distributions and apps that I use every single day. I could not imagine my life without any of this software.

  • 411 DevSecOps: Karthik Gaekwad | Jupiter Extras 37

    Ell and Wes sit down with Karthik Gaekwad to sort through the buzzword bingo and explain what DevSecOps is, what it isn’t, and why security should be part of the full lifecycle of your apps.

  • Imaginary Turkey | User Error 80

    Talking to ourselves, delicious family meals, and the complexities of modern work.

    Plus inexpensive acquisitions, the price we put on security, and popey refusing to answer the simplest of questions.

  • LHS Episode #315: The Weekender XXXVIII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

Terminal File Manager nnn Adds Session Management, Rclone Cloud Storage Integration

Filed under
Software

nnn is a very fast file manager created to work seamlessly with desktop environments and GUI utilities. The ncurses based keyboard-driven terminal application should run smoothly on the Raspberry Pi, Termux on Android, Linux, macOS, BSD, Cygwin and WSL.

Besides basic file manager features (with tabs/contexts, bookmarks, search, and so on), the tool also various handy utilities like a disk usage analyzer (block/apparent), a fuzzy application launcher, batch renamer, and more. It's also extensible via a plugin system, and comes with many built-in plugins. For navigation, nnn supports navigate-as-you-type with directory auto-select. Search-as-you-type is also supported.

Other features include SSHFS mounts support, support for navigating using the mouse, batch operations on selections, multiple sorting options and a lot more.

Read more

Low-cost, 802.11ac mesh router runs on OpenWrt

Filed under
Linux

FreeMesh Wireless has launched a “WE1326 LTE FreeMesh Router” that runs OpenWrt on a dual-core MediaTek MT7621AT with 802.11ac, 4x GbE, WAN, USB, and a SIM slot for 4G. It costs $150 with two FreeMesh nodes.

FreeMesh Wireless has begun selling a $150, OpenWrt based mesh router designed for residential or SOHO environments, billed as “the only open source mesh package.” The hackable software is based on secure 802.11s multi-hop and 802.11r Fast BSS Transition (FT) technologies, which add mesh capability to the 802.11ac router.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Raptor Computing Is Working On More AMD Radeon Driver Improvements For POWER

Similar to 64-bit ARM (AArch64) improvements we've seen with time for the Radeon Linux driver, Raptor's Timothy Pearson has been working to improve the Radeon support for PowerPC or more specifically POWER9. While NVIDIA offers a POWER9 graphics driver for IBM POWER servers, AMD Radeon graphics jive much better with Raptor's target customers thanks to the open-source driver stack -- allowing a fully open-source graphics/compute stack with the AMD hardware sans the closed-source microcode required by the GPUs, but much better than the completely closed-up NVIDIA driver stack. Read more

Using Menus For Command Line Programs and Scripts

THE holidays are coming (Christmas approaching), so I've taken advantage of some spare time to menu-ise commands that I use frequently. Those commands aren't the mere opening of an application and they often require dealing with input and output (in the command line). So I've created menu.sh and used dialog to craft the following menu, e.g. for operations associated with Techrights. I invoke this menu with the click of one button (of the mouse).

Rianne has a similar menu for commands she often runs (which are long and would otherwise need pasting or typing in length). Her menu looks something like this:

Rianne's menu

Here's the code (bash file) that renders the menu above (it's really that simple!):

#!/bin/bash

HEIGHT=15
WIDTH=40
CHOICE_HEIGHT=4
BACKTITLE="Aloha, Rianne"
TITLE="Rianne @ Ted"
MENU="Choose one of the following options:"

OPTIONS=(1 "Start VPN"
         2 "REDACTED"
         3 "REDACTED"
	4 "REDACTED"
	5 "REDACTED"
	6 "REDACTED"
	7 "REDACTED"
)

CHOICE=$(dialog --clear \
                --backtitle "$BACKTITLE" \
                --title "$TITLE" \
                --menu "$MENU" \
                $HEIGHT $WIDTH $CHOICE_HEIGHT \
                "${OPTIONS[@]}" \
                2>&1 >/dev/tty)

clear
case $CHOICE in
        1)
            echo "You chose Option 1"
sh ~/vpn.sh ;;

        2)
            echo "You chose Option 2"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        3)
            echo "You chose Option 3"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        4)
            echo "You chose Option 4"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        5)
            echo "You chose Option 5"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        6)
            echo "You chose Option 6"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;
        7)
            echo "You chose Option 7"
REDACTED COMMAND ;;

esac

Hopefully this inspires other people out there to do the same. It takes a while to set up, but it's a big time saver over the long run.

Android Leftovers

10 Years of Using Linux: How It Was Before, And How it Became

2020 Marks my 10 years of using Linux, a decade of my life that I also spent in supporting, promoting and developing free software both in my local community and globally. But the Linux ecosystem today was nothing like 10 years ago, and we are here today to take a look at the past and how both the Linux ecosystem and other open source software developed through the decade. If you asked anyone who used Linux in 2010, what was your biggest issue? They would tell you: Drivers. Back then, drivers for literally everything on Linux were not that good, and in a lot cases didn’t even exist. Read more