Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tex Says It's Ready srlinuxx 2 18/02/2005 - 11:45pm
Story IBM Pledges $100 Million for Linux srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:07pm
Story New Robots More Humanlike srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:22pm
Story Brightest Galactic Flash Ever Detected Hits Earth srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:23pm
Story PCLinuxOS Guided Tour srlinuxx 2 21/02/2005 - 3:00pm
Story A Week with KDE 3.4beta2 srlinuxx 1 21/02/2005 - 4:34pm
Story PCLinuxOS forms alliance with Codeweavers Texstar 1 23/02/2005 - 5:42am
Blog entry Mdk 10.2 beta 3 srlinuxx 2 24/02/2005 - 6:20pm
Story Snapshots of KDE_3.4rc1 srlinuxx 2 28/02/2005 - 6:02am
Story O'Reilly Releases "Linux in a Windows World" srlinuxx 01/03/2005 - 4:13pm

GNOME Foundation to Receive $1M from Anonymous Donor over Next Two Years

Filed under
GNOME

The donation was made by an anonymous person, though the money will be received by the GNOME Foundation over the next couple of years. Honored by this gesture, the team pledges to use the money to hire more developers and streamline their operations to improve the GNOME desktop environment.

"We are honored by the trust given to us and will work hard to justify that trust. This particular donation will enable us to support the GNOME project more widely, and tackle key challenges that the free software community faces," said Neil McGovern, Executive Director of GNOME Foundation.

Read more

UP Core Plus SBC launches with Cyclone 10 and Myriad 2 AI add-ons

Filed under
Linux

Aaeon has launched an “UP AI Edge” family of products that builds on a new Apollo Lake based “UP Core Plus” SBC with stacking AI companion boards based on the Movidius Myriad 2 or Intel Cyclone 10GX plus add-ons including a quad-GbE board and a camera.

Aaeon Europe quickly met its modest $11K Kickstarter goal for the new UP AI Edge ecosystem, which builds on its UP board products and community. The centerpiece is a new UP Core Plus SBC, although the official, Ubuntu-equipped UP AI Edge development package uses the larger, more feature-rich UP Squared SBC.

Read more

MX Tools - A year later, the toolbox got better

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Roughly fourteen full phases of the moon ago, I wrote an article on MX Tools, a unique and useful bunch of dedicated utilities packaged with the MX Linux distribution. This toolbox offered the ordinary (or new) MX Linux user a chance to perform some common configuration tasks with easy and elegance.

In general, MX-16 was a great player, and the recent MX-17 is even better - and at a first glance, so is the new version of MX Tools bundled with the system. Good stuff. So I set about testing, to see what has changed, and in what way this set of utilities has improved, if at all. But I'm positive. Let us commence.

[...]

MX Tools turned out to be a predictable gem, just as I'd expected. Well, I'm cheating, because I wrote this article after some rather thorough testing. But then, if you look across the wider spectrum of Linux home distributions, there aren't that many unique players with distinctive features. Quite often, it's the rehash of old and familiar with some extra color, polish and rebranding. MX Linux goes the extra mile (or kilometer, if you will) in making the newbie experience meaningfully different.

Future improvements could potentially include an interactive walkthrough - so users will be actively prompted and helped along in their tasks. Then of course, there's the matter of visual appearance, in the UI itself. But in general, MX Tools TNG is better than we had before. More elegant, more streamlined, better looking, and most importantly, more practical. This is a good and useful toolbox, and it makes a solid distro even more appealing. Well worth testing. So do it. And take care.

Read more

The story of Gentoo management

Filed under
Gentoo

I have recently made a tabular summary of (probably) all Council members and Trustees in the history of Gentoo. I think that this table provides a very succinct way of expressing the changes within management of Gentoo. While it can’t express the complete history of Gentoo, it can serve as a useful tool of reference.

What questions can it answer? For example, it provides an easy way to see how many terms individuals have served, or how long Trustee terms were. You can clearly see who served both on the Council and on the Board and when those two bodies had common members. Most notably, it collects a fair amount of hard-to-find data in a single table.

Read more

Success for net neutrality, success for free software

Filed under
GNU

We've had great success with the United States Senate voting in support of net neutrality! Congratulations and thank you to everyone in the US for contacting your congresspeople, and all of you who helped spread the word.

However, it's not over yet. Here are more actions you can take if you're in the United States.

Now that the (CRA) has passed the Senate, it moves to the House of Representatives. Just as we asked you to call your senators, now it's time to call your House representatives. Find their contact info here and use the script below to ask them to support the reinstatement of net neutrality protections.

The timing hasn't been set for future votes and hearings yet, but that's no reason to wait: make sure your representatives know how you feel.

Read more

Also: GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 18 new GNU releases!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream – For The Record

    10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream. Yeah, the title is totally link-bait. However, it’s worth noting that I actually deliver what the title describes and then some. Linux is awesome, but sadly, most people haven’t heard of it. Here’s why.

  • Linux Works For You

    Linux allows YOUR computer to work for you, not against you. Wearing this shirt/hoodie demonstrates to all who see it that you are not a slave to your PC. You are in control and Linux is the reason for this.

  • Robin "Roblimo" Miller

    The Linux Journal mourns the passing of Robin Miller, a longtime presence in our community.

  •  

  • Pidgin / Libpurple SkypeWeb Plugin Sees New Stable Release

    SkypeWeb is a plugin that allows using Skype in Pidgin / libpurple chat clients. The plugin can be used to send instant messages and participate in group chats, but it does not yet support voice / video calling.

  • Feral's GameMode May Soon Have Soft Real-Time Capabilities

    Feral Interactive's Linux system tuning daemon, GameMode since being introduced earlier this year has primarily offered the ability to easily change the CPU scaling governor when gaming but not much more. Though a new feature is now in the works for GameMode.

  • Mini DebConf Hamburg

    Last week I attended the MiniDebConfHamburg. I worked on new releases of dracut and rinse. Dracut is an initramfs-tools replacement which now supports early microcode loading. Rinse is a tool similar to debootstrap for rpm distributions, which now can create Fedora 28 environments aka chroots.

  • Android and Automotive Grade Linux battle, as car becomes a data center

    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system-on-chip (SoC) to run in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chipmakers in this fast growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving operating system scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant. However, given the complementary strengths of Android and Linux, it looks more likely that both will be deployed by many automobile makers in hybrid packages, so that they can take advantage of Android’s huge app ecosystem, encouraging plenty of third party enhancements, as well as harnessing the independence and enterprise scale of Linux. As cars become mini-data centers or edge compute…

  • Vending machine boardset works with UP or UP Squared boards

    Aaeon’s “AIOT-MSSP01” is a vending machine boardset powered by a PIC32 MCU that’s optimized to work with the UP or UP Squared SBCs. It offers vending-friendly I/O like MDB, EXE, and DEX, as well as motor controllers and 6x USB ports.

    The AIOT-MSSP01 is an industrial-grade vending machine controller (VMC) solution designed to run 24/7 “without a glitch,” says Aaeon. The boardset is optimized for use with the UP or UP Squared SBCs, but works with standard PCs and “most computer boards on the market.” There’s no mention of OS support for the connected computer, but the UP SBCs support Linux, Android, and Windows.

GNOME and KDE: Boxes + Flatpak, GNOME 3.29.2, KDE Promo, LXQt, and Plasma 5 on Slackware

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Boxes + Flatpak

    It might seem at first sight that Boxes is a simple application, and that is partially true if you ignore the deep stack under the hood responsible for making virtualization simple™. The various modules (some of them gigantic such as qemu, libvirt, freerdp…) need to be setup in perfect harmony for us to boot a whole operating system with its essential functionalities.

  • OpenSUSE 15 Leap Released, Facebook and Google Already Face GDPR Complaints, GNOME 3.29.2 and More
  • Promo Sprint Report: What We Did and How You Can Help Us

    February was a big month for the Promo team - we held a long-awaited sprint in Barcelona, Spain from the 16th to 18th. The aim of the sprint was to look at information we had collected over the prior years, interpret what it meant, and use it to discuss and plan for the future. The activities we came up with should help us accomplish our ultimate goal: increasing KDE's visibility and user base.

    Nine members of the team made it to Barcelona: Aleix Pol, Ivana Isadora Devčić, Jure Repinc, Kenny, Łukasz Sawicki, Lydia Pintscher, Neofytos Kolokotronis, Paul Brown, and Rubén Gómez. We met at Espai 30, an old factory converted into a social center for the neighborhood. Coincidentally, that is one of the places where the Guifi.net project started -- rather fitting for a meeting that comprised Free Software and communication.

    [...]

    That last thing is important because the Promo team must discover what technologies people use, how they use them, and what they like and dislike about them to be able to market KDE products. We decided to take a step back and work on a market research project that will provide us with solid information on which to base our actions.

  • LXQt 0.13 Arrives with Minor Improvements

    LXQt 0.13 is available to download. It's the latest version of the LXQt desktop, which aims to provide an elegant, resource friendly 'next-gen' LXDE.

  • [Slackware] May update for Plasma5

    On with the show.

    After recompiling LibreOffice and VLC to compensate for the recent poppler update in Slackware-current, my next target was – naturally – my Plasma5 package set. The KDE-5_18.05 release of ‘ktown‘ for Slackware-current offers the latest KDE Frameworks (5.46.0), Plasma (5.12.5) and Applications (18.04.1) on top of Qt5 5.9.5 (I decided to wait with an update to Qt5 5.11.0).
    You can and should check out the README file for more details and for installation/upgrade instructions.

Software: Electronic Books, Zammad, BTFS and Containers

Filed under
Software
  • Best Free Linux e-book Tools – Updated (2018)

    An electronic book (commonly abbreviated e-book) is a text and image-based publication which can be read on a computer or other digital devices such as an e-book reader.

    The rise of multimedia digital downloads in recent years has been truly extraordinary. The impact has been so great in respect of digital music downloads. Digital music accounted for half of the all the revenue generated by the music industry in 2016 and amounted to a total of 7.8 billion U.S. dollars that year. Over the years, many music labels stopped releasing singles on a physical format. We do not foresee that major book publishing companies will abandon paperbacks. However, the expansion of digital downloads equally applies to books. The biggest booksellers have reported that they sell more digital books than paperbacks.

  • Zammad – An Open Source Help Desk and Support Ticket System

    Zammad is a free open source, fully featured web based ticketing system for helpdesk or customer support. It ships in with a multitude of features for handling customer communication through various channels such as social networks (Facebook and Twitter), live chat, e-mails as well as telephone. It has an API for integrating your telephone system into in and outgoing calls.

  • BTFS – A Bittorrent Filesystem Based On FUSE

    The torrents have been around for a long time to share and download data from the Internet. There are plethora of GUI and CLI torrent clients available on the market. Sometimes, you just can not sit and wait for your download to complete. You might want to watch the content immediately. This is where BTFS, the bittorent filesystem, comes in handy. Using BTFS, you can mount the torrent file or magnet link as a directory and then use it as any read-only directory in your file tree. The contents of the files will be downloaded on-demand as they are read by applications. Since BTFS runs on top of FUSE, it does not require intervention into the Linux Kernel.

  • Living in a Docker world

    Once upon a time, I worked at a startup that was looking to “Dockerize” its backend infrastructure. This developed into a running joke where the programmers on the team would ask me if I knew what Docker was, and I would say:

    “Yes, it’s like a boat.”

    This would frustrate the programmers, which was my intention. They would howl about how wrong I was, and they could never quite calm down enough to clarify how Docker wasn’t like a boat.

  • Systemd Introduces "Portable Services" Functionality, Similar To Containers

    The past several months Lennart Poettering has been working on a "portable services" concept and that big ticket new feature has now landed in Systemd. Portable services are akin to containers but different.

    Portable Services is a big addition to systemd at around six thousand new lines of code for this init system and also brings the new portablectl utility.

OSS, Openwashing and More

Filed under
OSS
  • Speak at Open Source Summit Europe – Submit by July 1

    Open Source Summit Europe is the leading technical conference for professional open source. Join developers, sysadmins, DevOps professionals, architects and community members, to collaborate and learn about the latest open source technologies, and to gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions.

  • MariaDB launches Oracle compatible enterprise open source database

    Enterprise computing has often been reliant on proprietary database architecture, but this can be both complex and costly, putting up a barrier to innovation.

    Now open source database specialist MariaDB is launching its latest enterprise offering with Oracle compatibility. This allows existing Oracle Database users to reuse existing code and established skill sets when migrating applications or deploying new ones.

    MariaDB TX 3.0 introduces built-in, system-versioned tables, enabling developers to easily build temporal features into applications. This eliminates the need to manually create columns, tables and triggers in order to maintain row history, freeing DBAs to simply create new tables with system versioning or alter existing tables to add it, streamlining the process significantly. Developers can query a table with standard SQL to see what data looked like at a previous point in time, such as looking at a customer's profile history to see how preferences have changed over time.

  • MariaDB TX 3.0 Delivers First Enterprise Open Source Database to Beat Oracle, Microsoft and IBM

    MariaDB® Corporation today announced the release of MariaDB TX 3.0, the first enterprise open source database solution to deliver advanced features that, until now, required expensive, proprietary and complex databases.

  • 5 Open-Source SQL IDEs for You to Learn and Explore

    If you’ve done a lot with SQL, you’ve probably used some form of SQL IDE to help you complete that work. Yes, it’s possible to do everything in SQL from the command line; but creating or even maintaining databases and tables that way is an exercise in masochism. There are some nice commercial IDEs such as dbArtisan and SQL Server’s Management Studio, but IDEs is one area where open-source can do just as well (or in some cases, even better).

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Branches & Now Under Feature Freeze, LibreOffice 6.2 On Master

    LibreOffice has reached its hard feature freeze and branching period with the first beta release being imminent.

    As of yesterday is now the libreoffice-6-1 branch for continued with on this next open-source office suite while the Git master code is tracking what will later become LibreOffice 6.2.

  • Securing Third-Party and Open Source Code Components: A Primer [Ed: Citing, as usual, firms that try to sell their proprietary software by badmouthing FOSS]

    The increasing popularity of open source code continues to be a boon for developers across the industry, allowing them to increase efficiency and streamline delivery. But there are security risks to be considered when leveraging open source and commercial code components, as each carries with it a significant risk of becoming the enemy within, creating a vulnerability in the program it helps build.

  • FOSSID Awarded Grant for Artificial Intelligence in Open Source Auditing by Sweden's Government Agency for Innovation
  • Intel AI Lab open-sources library for deep learning-driven NLP

    The Intel AI Lab has open-sourced a library for natural language processing to help researchers and developers give conversational agents like chatbots and virtual assistants the smarts necessary to function, such as name entity recognition, intent extraction, and semantic parsing to identify the action a person wants to take from their words.

    Just a few months old, the Intel AI Lab plans to open-source more libraries to help developers train and deploy artificial intelligence, publish research, and reproduce the latest innovative techniques from members of the AI research community in order to “push AI and deep learning into domains it’s not a part of yet.”

  • 'monitor mode for iwm(4)'
  • FSFE Newsletter - May 2018

    Following a more than a decade long tradition, the FSFE once again led its annual Free Software Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW) in Barcelona, Spain, as a meeting point for world-leading legal exper...

  • 24 best free security tools

Firefox 63 Plans and Mozilla's Error Code Plans

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 63 to Get Improved Tracking Protection That Blocks In-Browser Miners

    Mozilla developers are working on an improved Tracking Protection system for the Firefox browser that will land in version 63, scheduled for release in mid-October.

    Tracking Protection is a feature that blocks Firefox from loading scripts from abusive trackers. It was first launched with Firefox's Private Browsing mode a few years back, but since Firefox 57, released in November 2017, users can enable it for normal browsing sessions at any time.

  • Firefox 63 To Block Cryptojackers With Advanced Tracking Protection

    It has been reported by Bleeping Computer, a security blog, that Firefox 63 will be launched with an improved tracking protection system to ward off the threats and security concerns posed by in-browser miners.

    With the surge in incidents involving mining malware trying to use your CPU power to perform some CPU-intensive calculations for their own benefit, many browsers have raised their guards by providing additional security features. (You can read more about blocking cryptocurrency mining in your browser in our earlier published article.)

  • What’s the 411 on 404 messages: Internet error messages explained

    Nothing’s worse than a broken website. Well, maybe an asteroid strike. Or a plague. So maybe a broken website isn’t the end of the world, but it’s still annoying. And it’s even more annoying not knowing what those weird error messages mean. That’s why we’ve decoded the most common HTTP error messages.

OpenStack News/Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Security
  • Canonical founder calls out OpenStack suppliers for ‘lack of focus’ on datacentre cost savings

    The OpenStack supplier community’s reluctance to prioritise the delivery of datacentre cost savings to their users could prove “fatal”, says Canonical co-founder Mark Shuttleworth.

  • OpenStack in transition

    OpenStack is one of the most important and complex open-source projects you’ve never heard of. It’s a set of tools that allows large enterprises ranging from Comcast and PayPal to stock exchanges and telecom providers to run their own AWS-like cloud services inside their data centers. Only a few years ago, there was a lot of hype around OpenStack as the project went through the usual hype cycle. Now, we’re talking about a stable project that many of the most valuable companies on earth rely on. But this also means the ecosystem around it — and the foundation that shepherds it — is now trying to transition to this next phase.

  • Free OpenStack Training Resources
  • How the OpenStack Foundation Is Evolving Beyond Its Roots

    The OpenStack Foundation is in a period of transition as it seeks to enable a broader set of open infrastructure efforts than just the OpenStack cloud project itself.

    In a video interview at the OpenStack Summit here, OpenStack Foundation Executive Director Jonathan Bryce and Chief Operating Officer Mark Collier discussed how the open-source organization is still thriving, even as corporate sponsorship changes and attendance at events declines.

    At the event, Collier said there were approximately 2,600 registered attendees, which is nearly half the number that came to the OpenStack Boston 2017 event. OpenStack's corporate sponsorship has also changed, with both IBM and Canonical dropping from the Platinum tier of membership.

Security: Updates, Browsers, Red Hat and Routers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Ryzom falling: Remote code execution via the in-game browser

    Ryzom’s in-game browser is there so that you can open links sent to you without leaving the game. It is also used to display the game’s forum as well as various other web apps. The game even allows installing web apps that are created by third parties. This web browser is very rudimentary, it supports only a bunch of HTML tags and nothing fancy like JavaScript. But it compensates for that lack of functionality by running Lua code.

    You have to consider that the Lua programming language is what powers the game’s user interface. So letting the browser download and run Lua code allows for perfect integration between websites and the user interface, in many cases users won’t even be able to tell the difference. The game even uses this functionality to hot-patch the user interface and add missing features to older clients.

  • For Red Hat, security is a lifestyle, not a product

    Red Hat has a sterling reputation in Linux security circles. That means the company has a workable process for preventing problems and responding to them. Even if you don't use Linux, the Red Hat security approach has a lot going for it, and some of its practices might be worth adopting in your own shop.

  • How insecure is your router?

    Your router is your first point of contact with the internet. How much is it increasing your risk?

    [...]

    I'd love to pretend that once you've improved the security of your router, all's well and good on your home network, but it's not. What about IoT devices in your home (Alexa, Nest, Ring doorbells, smart lightbulbs, etc.?) What about VPNs to other networks? Malicious hosts via WiFi, malicious apps on your children's phones…?

    No, you won't be safe. But, as we've discussed before, although there is no such thing as "secure," it doesn't mean we shouldn't raise the bar and make it harder for the Bad Folks.™

FOSS as a Part of a Corporate Sustainability Plan

Filed under
OSS

In 1983 the United Nations convened a commission of 22 people to investigate the question of the worldwide environmental and social impact of human development. Four years later, in 1987, the commission released Our Common Future, more commonly known as the Brundtland Report in honour of Gro Harlem Brundtland, chairperson of the commission. This report detailed the very real socio-environmental issues facing humanity. One of its recommendations was for governments, organizations and companies to start engaging in what it called sustainable development. That is, "...development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs".

Since then there's been steep growth in the number of corporations that maintain and operate according to a corporate sustainability plan. These plans encompass environmental as well as social aspects of doing business. They encompass actions within an organization—such as natural resource usage, diversity and inclusion, and fair treatment of employees—as well as those external to the organization—such as the sustainability operations of their entire supply chain as well as the overall impact the corporation has on the Earth and its inhabitants.

Read more

Release of PostgreSQL 11 Beta 1

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • PostgreSQL 11 Beta 1 Released!

    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces that the first beta release of PostgreSQL 11 is now available for download. This release contains previews of all features that will be available in the final release of PostgreSQL 11, though some details of the release could change before then.

    In the spirit of the open source PostgreSQL community, we strongly encourage you to test the new features of PostgreSQL 11 in your database systems to help us eliminate any bugs or other issues that may exist. While we do not advise for you to run PostgreSQL 11 Beta 1 in your production environments, we encourage you to find ways to run your typical application workloads against this beta release.

  • PostgreSQL 11 Beta 1 Released With JIT Compilation, More Performance Tuning

    The first beta of PostgreSQL 11.0 is now available for testing.

    Just yesterday we happened to be talking about the new features coming for PostgreSQL 11 and today happened to mark the beta availability. PostgreSQL 11 is bringing continued performance optimizations, better handling of large data sets, usability improvements. initial JIT compilation support by making use of LLVM, and more.

A free e-learning tool for creating digital content

Filed under
Software

It's common to see a software app stand still—no new versions, no updates. Eventually, it gets overtaken by advancing technology and its user base drifts away. Open source software is not immune to this fate, but it is easier to revive than commercial software, where optimistic accountants cling to the hope that it still holds financial value.

eXeLearning (also called eXeLearn, or eXe), an open source XHTML editor that was created with support from Auckland University of Technology, University of Auckland, and Tairawhiti Polytechnic, achieved a measure of popularity among its target audience. The introduction to the version 1 manual described it as "an authoring environment to assist teachers and academics in the design, development, and publishing of web-based learning and teaching materials without the need to become proficient in HTML or complicated web-publishing applications." Despite a few annoying glitches, I liked and recommended that program. However, development stalled around 2010 and eXeLearning fell off my recommended list. eXeLearning is back on my list now.

Read more

Graphics: Vega and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vega 20 GPU Support & VCN Clock/Power Gating Sent In For Linux 4.18

    Last week was the main AMDGPU features update for Linux 4.18 via DRM-Next while today a secondary pull request of further feature work has been submitted.

    Last week's AMDGPU update included Vega M GPU support for Kabylake G hardware, reserving the initial scan-out buffer prior to the driver initialization for a more seamless console to driver experience, Raven Ridge GFXOFF support, various Vega 10 updates, and more.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.02 Linux Driver Brings New Vulkan Extensions

    The NVIDIA 396.24.02 Linux driver is available today and while it's a beta update, it ends up being quite an exciting release thanks to new Vulkan extensions.

    The newly-supported Vulkan extensions for the Linux driver build include VK_KHR_draw_indirect_count, VK_EXT_global_priority, and VK_KHR_get_display_properties2.

  • Vulkan 1.1.76 Released With KHR_draw_indirect_count & KHR_get_display_properties2

    Vulkan 1.1.76 has just been released ahead of the US Memorial Day weekend with new extensions to excite Vulkan developers.

    The two new extensions in Vulkan 1.1.176 are VK_KHR_get_display_properties2 and VK_KHR_draw_indirect_count, both of which are notable additions.

  • Vulkan Adds An Exception To Address Wine's Code License Incompatibility

    The Vulkan's documentation/generator being re-licensed from an MIT-style license to the Apache 2.0 license had caused problems for the Wine project supporting newer than Vulkan 1.0.51, but fortunately that issue has been resolved.

    The previous re-licensing of Vulkan-Docs has caused some problems for the LGPL-licensed Wine code, as we've covered previously, but that technicality has now been addressed with The Khronos Group adding an exception to their license to benefit the Wine project and others using code generated from the Vulkan vk.xml reference file so as not to have (L)GPL and Apache licenses clash.

TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 Is the First Laptop Preloaded with openSUSE Leap 15

Filed under
SUSE

The OpenSuSE Project announced today that openSUSE Leap 15 is available for download as 64-bit installation images, which users would need to write on USB flash drives or DVDs to install the operating system on their personal computers. However, the openSUSE Leap 15 operating system also comes preloaded with the TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 laptop we reviewed last year and Linode cloud images.

"Today’s public release of Leap 15 aren’t only released as DVD and Network ISO: Linode and hardware vendor TUXEDO Computers have cloud images through of Leap ready, too. While the brand new TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 is immediately available with Leap 15 preinstalled and ready-to-run, Linode has Leap available for all infrastructure needs," said openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio in today's announcement.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Librem 13: A few problems

I bought my old Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon (1st gen.) when I entered grad school for my Master's program, in 2012. And after six years, the Thinkpad still ran well, but it was getting old, so I figured it was time for a change. I went back and forth about what kind of system should replace my laptop. I don't travel that much, so I figured a desktop would be better. And I could get a bigger screen. After going back and forth on the decision, I decided to get a laptop. I don't often travel with a laptop, but when I do, I prefer to use my primary system so I don't have to keep things synced. Of course, I wanted my system to run Linux. Purism is aimed at the Linux laptop market, and I wanted to support that. So I bought a Librem 13. I've had it now for about a week, and I love it now. But I'll be honest, I didn't love it right out of the box. I'd like to note two issues for folks who are thinking about getting a Librem laptop, so you aren't surprised like I was. Read more

Linux 4.17-rc7

So this week wasn't as calm as the previous weeks have been, but despite that I suspect this is the last rc. This week we had the whole "spectre v4" thing, and yes, the fallout from that shows up as part of the patch and commit log. But it's not actually dominant: the patch is pretty evenly one third arch updates, one third networking updates, and one third "rest". The arch updates are largely - although not exclusively - spectre v4. The networking stuff is mostly network drivers, but there's some core networking too. And "the rest" is just that - misc drivers (rdma, gpu, other), documentation, some vfs, vm, bpf, tooling.. The bulk of it is really pretty trivial one-liners, and nothing looks particularly scary. Let's see how next week looks, but if nothing really happens I suspect we can make do without an rc8. Shortlog appended as usual. Go out and test. Read more

Today in Techrights

Libre Hardware

  • Flash your Libre Firmware with a Libre Programmer
    Whether or not you personally agree with all the ideals of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), you’ve got to give them credit: they don’t mess around. They started by laying the groundwork for a free and open source operating system, then once that dream was realized, started pushing the idea of replacing proprietary BIOS firmware with an open alternative such as Libreboot. But apparently, even that’s not enough, as there’s still more freedom to be had. We’re playing 4D Libre Chess now, folks. [...] Luckily, the FSF has just awarded the Zerocat Chipflasher their “Respects Your Freedom” certification, meaning every element of the product is released under a free license for your hacking enjoyment.
  • Coreboot Picks Up Support For Another Eight Year Old Intel Motherboard
    If by chance you happen to have an Intel DG41WV motherboard, it's now supported by mainline Coreboot so you can free the system down to the BIOS. The DG41WV motherboard comes from the LGA-775 days with an Intel G41 Eaglelake chipset back when DDR3-1066 was great, motherboards topped out with 4GB of RAM, four USB 2.0 ports were suitable, and motherboard PCBs were much less fashionable. The DG41WV was a micro-ATX board and a decent choice for the times to pair with a CPU like the Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad.