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Saturday, 23 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tex Says It's Ready srlinuxx 2 18/02/2005 - 11:45pm
Story IBM Pledges $100 Million for Linux srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:07pm
Story New Robots More Humanlike srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:22pm
Story Brightest Galactic Flash Ever Detected Hits Earth srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:23pm
Story PCLinuxOS Guided Tour srlinuxx 2 21/02/2005 - 3:00pm
Story A Week with KDE 3.4beta2 srlinuxx 1 21/02/2005 - 4:34pm
Story PCLinuxOS forms alliance with Codeweavers Texstar 1 23/02/2005 - 5:42am
Blog entry Mdk 10.2 beta 3 srlinuxx 2 24/02/2005 - 6:20pm
Story Snapshots of KDE_3.4rc1 srlinuxx 2 28/02/2005 - 6:02am
Story O'Reilly Releases "Linux in a Windows World" srlinuxx 01/03/2005 - 4:13pm

Programming: Qt, Python and PHP

Filed under
Development

Some Incredible Stories Around Tux: Our Lovable Linux Mascot!

Filed under
Linux

Chances are you might have already heard about its origins. But in this article exclusively dedicated to Tux, we are jotting down some interesting stories around the cute little fella with some info that might have gone unknown!

The first discussion about a mascot goes back to the early days of the Linux release, when Linus Torvalds shared his thoughts about choosing one that would gracefully be the torch-bearer of our beloved OS. That’s when many people dived in to contribute with their suggestions for the same.

The first email that cites the discussion of bringing in a Mascot goes back to 1996. It started with a hot debate about choosing creatures such as sharks or eagles which stopped the moment Linus mentioned that he was rather fond of penguins!

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Early Intel i965 vs. Iris Gallium3D OpenGL Benchmarks On UHD Graphics 620 With Mesa 19.1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With yesterday's somewhat of a surprise announcement that Intel is ready to mainline their experimental Iris Gallium3D driver as their "modern" Linux OpenGL driver with numerous design advantages over their long-standing "classic" i965 Mesa driver, here are some fresh benchmarks of that latest driver compared to the current state of their OpenGL driver in Mesa 19.1.

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Events: LibrePlanet, DebConf, Open Infrastructure Summit

Filed under
OSS
  • LibrePlanet 2019: Coming to Cambridge, MA

    On March 23rd and 24th, 2019, the free software community will come together at the Stata Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to learn, exchange ideas, catch up with friends, and plan the future of the movement at the LibrePlanet 2019 conference.
    Registration is open, and we hope you’ll join us!

    Hundreds of people from across the globe will join us at LibrePlanet 2019 in Cambridge, Massachusetts to explore this year's theme, "Trailblazing Free Software." With a new and growing generation of free software enthusiasts, we can take this conference as an opportunity to discuss both the present and the future of the free software movement. Using the Four Freedoms as a litmus test for ethical computing, we ask, "How will free software continue to bring to life trailblazing, principled new technologies and new approaches to the world?"

  • Infomaniak Platinum Sponsor of DebConf19
  • A Mile High In Denver

    The OpenStack Foundation have just released the session agenda for the inaugural Open Infrastructure Summit, which will be taking place in May in Denver, Colorado. As you’ll no doubt already know, the OpenStack Summits are no more, so we’ll instead be getting together to talk about all the different open infrastructure components that businesses are using to build their infrastructures.

    Whether you’re a die-hard OpenStack fan, if Kubernetes is more your bag, maybe Kata Containers floats your boat or if Ceph is more your bag, then there’s something for you in the Mile High City this May.

Fedora 30 Flicker Free boot is now fully testable

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora 30 now contains all changes changes for a fully Flicker Free Boot. Last week a new version of plymouth landed which implements the new theme for this and also includes a much improved offline-updates experience, following this design.

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Also: Fedora 30's Slick Boot Process Is Ready To Go

Best Linux Distros for Beginner

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Best Linux Distros for Beginners. Some of you may disagree, others may have other distros they feel are better suited for newcomers and Linux beginners. That said, these four distros are my top picks based on factors such as ease of use, it’s reliable and hardware detection is solid.

Do you have other distros that you feel are better suited for new Linux users? Hit the comments below (YouTube or Patreon), tell me what you’re thinking makes a better choice and why.

Support the Patreon, now with new Just Ask Matt support options.

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Audiocasts: BSD Now, This Week in Linux and The Linux Link Tech Show (TLLTS)

Filed under
Interviews
  • Old Machine Revival | BSD Now 286

    Adding glue to a desktop environment, flashing the BIOS on a PC Engine, revive a Cisco IDS into a capable OpenBSD computer, An OpenBSD WindowMaker desktop, RealTime data compression, the love for pipes, and more.

  • Episode 55 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we check out some App News for the upcoming OBS Studio 23.0 and the recent release of Taskbook 0.3. We’ll cover some Distro News with Ubuntu 18.04.2, Debian 9.8 and MX Linux 18.1. Then we’ll look at some rather interesting news like a surprise release of Compiz 0.9, Windows Explorer gaining support to access Linux Files, and an electron app that lets you experience what it was like to use Windows 95. We also got some great news for Linux Gaming like Ethan Lee’s Crowdfunding Campaign for improving SDL, Steam Play may be getting support for Easy Anti-Cheat, and Rocket League is about to release a game changing new feature. Later we’ll also cover some rather unfortunate news for users of Docker and LinuxTracker. All that and much more!

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 796

Firebird 4.0 Beta 1 release is available for testing

Filed under
OSS

Firebird Project announces the first Beta release of Firebird 4.0, the next major version of the Firebird relational database, which is now available for testing.

This Beta release arrives with features and improvements already implemented by the Firebird development team, as well as with countless bugfixes. Our users are appreciated giving it a try and providing feedback to the development mailing list. Apparent bugs can be reported directly to the bugtracker.

Beta releases are not encouraged for production usage or any other goals that require a stable system. They are, however, recommended for those users who want to help in identifying issues and bottlenecks thus allowing to progress faster through the Beta/RC stages towards the final release.

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GhostBSD: A Solid Linux-Like Open Source Alternative

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

Overall, aside from the system tools and the installation process, I did not see much not to like in running this BSD operating system. I experienced some annoyance when things failed to work just right, but I felt no frustrations that led me to give up on trying to use GhostBSD or find solutions to mishaps. I could provide a litany of Linux distros that did not measure up that well.

Some lingering problems for which I am still seeking workarounds are why my USB storage drives intermittently are not recognized and fail to mount. Another issue is why some of the preinstalled applications do not fully load. They either do not respond to launching at all, or crash before fully displaying anything beyond a white application window.

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Games: Baba Is You, Snakebird Primer, Hell is Other Demons, Robocraft, Cartacombs, 9 Monkeys of Shaolin and ASTROKILL

Filed under
Gaming
  • Baba Is You, an award winning puzzle game is heading to Linux next month

    Baba Is You, a puzzle game with over 200 levels that won multiple awards is coming to Linux next month and it does look pretty unique.

    Originally created for the Nordic Game Jam 2017 which it won, it also won the Excellence in Design and Best Student Game awards at the Independent Games Festival 2018. It was a finalist for other awards too, so you know it's going to be something good. They've fully confirmed Linux support in their announcements, so it's quite exciting.

  • Casual puzzle game 'Snakebird Primer' is out with Linux support

    For those who like their sweet casual puzzle games, Snakebird Primer has released today with Linux support.

  • Hell is Other Demons looks like a mental bullet-hell platformer coming to Linux

    Hell is Other Demons from Swedish developer Cuddle Monster Games and publisher Kongregate might not be out for a few months yet but it sure does look exciting.

    Only announced yesterday, this bullet-hell action platformer has a seriously good style going for it, plus it mixes in a fantastic sounding synthwave soundtrack to hype up the experience.

  • Robocraft, the fun free customisable robot battler has a huge agility physics overhaul

    This is something Robocraft has needed for a while, as some builds felt a little unfair previously when seriously powered up and also ridiculously fast. Feeling is believing though, they said it themselves you really do have to play it to see just how different it is with this change.

    They also recently introduced a starting "CPU limit" (the overall power of your robot) to the garages where you store them of 750 which is pretty low. They say this is to help newer players start off small and each garage can be upgraded using Robits (which you earn from playing the game), so it gives the feeling of more progression too.

  • Cartacombs, an endless runner-shooter with you sat in a minecart is out

    Cartacombs from YawningDad is a rather simple endless runner-shooter that's now out with Linux support.

  • The good looking beat 'em up 9 Monkeys of Shaolin still coming to Linux, releasing later this year

    While 9 Monkeys of Shaolin did have a pretty big delay, Sobaka Studio have just recently announced a new release date (including Linux support) along with help from Koch Media.

    Originally, it was supposed to release last Fall and they didn't give a reason for the delay but their latest announcement mentions "9 Monkeys of Shaolin will be released in the third quarter of 2019".

  • Impressive space combat sim 'ASTROKILL' has its first major update in a year

    ASTROKILL, the Unreal Engine powered and impressive space combat sim is alive again, with a major update now available for this Early Access game.

    With this fresh update out it brings in an upgraded Unreal Engine to 4.21.1, a completely new HUD with customisable colours, all asteroids and debris have been given a makeover to be more varied and realistic, mission loading time has been reduced, 4K display support, a new objectives system, new objectives in various missions, AI improvements and quite a lot more.

Server: HTTP Clients, IIS DDoS and 'DevOps' Hype From Red Hat

Filed under
Server
  • What are good command line HTTP clients?

    The whole is greater than the sum of its parts is a very famous quote from Aristotle, a Greek philosopher and scientist. This quote is particularly pertinent to Linux. In my view, one of Linux’s biggest strengths is its synergy. The usefulness of Linux doesn’t derive only from the huge raft of open source (command line) utilities. Instead, it’s the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with larger applications.

    The Unix philosophy spawned a “software tools” movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects.

    This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects.

    Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well independently.

    This article looks at 4 open source command line HTTP clients. These clients let you download files over the internet from the command line. But they can also be used for many more interesting purposes such as testing, debugging and interacting with HTTP servers and web applications. Working with HTTP from the command-line is a worthwhile skill for HTTP architects and API designers. If you need to play around with an API, HTTPie and curl will be invaluable.

  • Microsoft publishes security alert on IIS bug that causes 100% CPU usage spikes

    The Microsoft Security Response Center published yesterday a security advisory about a denial of service (DOS) issue impacting IIS (Internet Information Services), Microsoft's web server technology.

  • 5 things to master to be a DevOps engineer

    There's an increasing global demand for DevOps professionals, IT pros who are skilled in software development and operations. In fact, the Linux Foundation's Open Source Jobs Report ranked DevOps as the most in-demand skill, and DevOps career opportunities are thriving worldwide.

    The main focus of DevOps is bridging the gap between development and operations teams by reducing painful handoffs and increasing collaboration. This is not accomplished by making developers work on operations tasks nor by making system administrators work on development tasks. Instead, both of these roles are replaced by a single role, DevOps, that works on tasks within a cooperative team. As Dave Zwieback wrote in DevOps Hiring, "organizations that have embraced DevOps need people who would naturally resist organization silos."

Purism's Privacy and Security-Focused Librem 5 Linux Phone to Arrive in Q3 2019

Filed under
Linux
Security

Initially planned to ship in early 2019, the revolutionary Librem 5 mobile phone was delayed for April 2019, but now it suffered just one more delay due to the CPU choices the development team had to make to deliver a stable and reliable device that won't heat up or discharge too quickly.

Purism had to choose between the i.MX8M Quad or the i.MX8M Mini processors for their Librem 5 Linux-powered smartphone, but after many trials and errors they decided to go with the i.MX8M Quad CPU as manufacturer NXP recently released a new software stack solving all previous power consumption and heating issues.

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Qt Creator 4.9 Beta released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.9 Beta!

There are many improvements and fixes included in Qt Creator 4.9. I’ll just mention some highlights in this blog post. Please refer to our change log for a more thorough overview.

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Hack Week - Browsersync integration for Online

Filed under
LibO

Recently my LibreOffice work is mostly focused on the Online. It's nice to see how it is growing with new features and has better UI. But when I was working on improving toolbars (eg. folding menubar or reorganization of items) I noticed one annoying thing from the developer perspective. After every small change, I had to restart the server to provide updated content for the browser. It takes few seconds for switching windows, killing old server then running new one which requires some tests to be passed.

Last week during the Hack Week funded by Collabora Productivity I was able to work on my own projects. It was a good opportunity for me to try to improve the process mentioned above.

I've heard previously about browsersync so I decided to try it out. It is a tool which can automatically reload used .css and .js files in all browser sessions after change detection. To make it work browsersync can start proxy server watching files on the original server and sending events to the browser clients if needed.

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GNOME 3.32 Desktop Environment Gets a Second Beta Release, RC Lands March 6th

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME 3.32 beta 2 release is here two weeks after the first beta version to add even more improvements and squash as many bugs as possible before the final release hits the streets next month. The second beta release of the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment also marks the beginning of the String Freeze development stage.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Are Steadily Rolling

Filed under
SUSE

The latest snapshot of the week, 20190219, had more than a dozen packages updated. A new Kerberos database module using the Lightning Memory-Mapped Database library (LMDB) has was added with the krb5 1.17 package, which brought some major changes for the administration experience for the network authentication protocol Kerberos. The permissions package update 20190212 removed several old entries and the kernel-space and user-space code package tgt 1.0.74 fixed builds with the newer glibc. A couple xf86 packages were updated. The 1.4.0 version of xf86-video-chips was a bug fix release for X.Org Server. There was an X Server crash bug with the version 1.3 affecting devices older than the HiQVideo generation. The change log said the code may not compile against X Server 1.20 since it no longer supports 24-bit color. A few other YaST packages were updated in the snapshot like yast2-installation 4.1.36, which had an update that saves the used repositories at the end of installation so as not to offer the driver packages again.

The 20190217 snapshot had just three packages updated. The keyboard management library libgnomekbd 3.26.1 fixed a build with new GLib and updated translations. VMcore extraction tool makedumpfile 1.6.5 added some patches, bug fixes and improved support for arm64 systems with Kernel Address Space Layout Randomization (KASLR). The jump in the release of yast2-storage-ng from 4.1.53 to 4.1.59 provided quite a few changes like allowing the partitioner to create block cache (bcache) devices without a caching set and the newest version limits bcache support to x86_64.

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Tiny, $29 IoT gateway SBC packs in WiFi and dual LAN ports

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s open-spec, 60 x 55.5mm “NanoPi R1” SBC runs mainline Linux on a quad -A7 Allwinner H3 and offers GbE and Fast Ethernet ports, WiFi/BT, 3x USB ports, and a standard metal case with antenna.

FriendlyElec has launched a hacker board aimed at low-cost IoT gateway duty. The open-spec, Linux-driven NanoPi R1 combines 10/100 and 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet ports along with 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0. The SBC runs FriendlyCore with Linux-4.14-LTS or OpenWrt on the Allwinner H3 SoC.

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ST Spins Its First Linux-Powered Cortex-A SoC

Filed under
Linux

STMicroelectronics announced its first Cortex-A SoC and first Linux- and Android-driven processor. The STM32MP1 SoC intends to ease the transition for developers moving from its STM32 microprocessor unit (MCU) family to more complex embedded systems. Development boards based on the SoC will be available in April.

Aimed at industrial, consumer, smart home, health, and wellness applications, the STM32MP1 features dual, 650MHz Cortex-A7 cores running a new “mainlined, open-sourced” OpenSTLinux distro with Yocto Project and OpenEmbedded underpinnings. There’s also a 209MHz Cortex-M4 chip with an FPU, MPU, and DSP instructions. The Cortex-M4 is supported by an enhanced version of ST’s STM32Cube development tools that support the Cortex-A7 cores in addition to the M4 (see below).

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More in Tux Machines

qoob – excellent foobar-like music player for Linux

Are you debilitated by the countless music players that use web technologies with a massive RAM footprint? Maybe you want a lean yet slick audio player with a good range of features? You might be interested in qoob. It’s a music player written in the versatile and hugely popular Python programming language. The software uses Qt 5, a cross-platform application framework and widget toolkit for creating classic and embedded graphical user interfaces. qoob is similar to foobar2000, a freeware audio player respected for its highly modular design, breadth of features, and extensive user flexibility in configuration. Unlike foobar, qoob is available for Linux and it’s released under an open source license. Read more

Programming: GStreamer, Rust, Python and More

  • GStreamer 1.15.1 unstable development release
    The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first development release in the unstable 1.15 release series. The unstable 1.15 release series adds new features on top of the current stable 1.16 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework. The unstable 1.15 release series is for testing and development purposes in the lead-up to the stable 1.16 series which is scheduled for release in a few weeks time. Any newly-added API can still change until that point, although it is rare for that to happen. Full release notes will be provided in the near future, highlighting all the new features, bugfixes, performance optimizations and other important changes.
  • GStreamer: GStreamer Rust bindings 0.13.0 release
    A new version of the GStreamer Rust bindings, 0.13.0, was released. This new release is the first to include direct support for implementing GStreamer elements and other types in Rust. Previously this was provided via a different crate. In addition to this, the new release features many API improvements, cleanups, newly added bindings and bugfixes.
  • Niko Matsakis: Rust lang team working groups
    Now that the Rust 2018 edition has shipped, the language design team has been thinking a lot about what to do in 2019 and over the next few years. I think we’ve got a lot of exciting stuff on the horizon, and I wanted to write about it.
  • RVowpalWabbit 0.0.13: Keeping CRAN happy
    Another small RVowpalWabbit package update brings us version 0.0.13. And just like Rblpapi yesterday, we have a new RVowpalWabbit update to cope with staged installs which will be a new feature of R 3.6.0. No other changes were made No new code or features were added.
  • Test automation framework thoughts and examples with Python, pytest and Jenkins
    In this article I'll share some personal thoughts about Test Automation Frameworks; you can take inspiration from them if you are going to evaluate different test automation platforms or assess your current test automation solution (or solutions). Despite it is a generic article about test automation, you'll find many examples explaining how to address some common needs using the Python based test framework named pytest and the Jenkins automation server: use the information contained here just as a comparison and feel free to comment sharing alternative methods or ideas coming from different worlds. It contains references to some well (or less) known pytest plugins or testing libraries too.
  • Basics of Object-Oriented Programming
    In programming, an object is simply a 'thing'. I know, I know...how can you define something as a 'thing'. Well, let's think about it - What do 'things' have? Attributes, right? Let's take a Song for example. A song has attributes! It has a Title, an Artist, a Genre, etc. How about a Dog - A dog has four legs, a color, a name, an owner, and a breed. Though there are millions Dogs with countless names, owners, etc, the one thing that ties them all together are the very fact that every single one can be described as a Dog. Although this may seem like a not-very informative explanation, these types of examples are what ultimately made me understand Object-oriented programing. The set of activities that an object can perform is an Object's behavior. A dog can bark, wag it's tail, sit, and even shake if it's owner trains them. In the same way, a programmer can create an object and teach it tricks in order to achieve certain goals. In Ruby(my first programming language), EVERYTHING is an object. This means that every piece of code you encounter can perform certain tricks at your command, some are built into Ruby while others can be created at your disposal. Let's look at a common element in programming, a simple string. As you can see, after the string is defined, I'm able to call different 'methods' or functions on the string I created. Ruby has several built in methods on common objects(ie strings, integers, arrays, and hashes.
  • Hello pytest-play!
    pytest-play is a rec&play (rec not yet available) pytest plugin that let you execute a set of actions and assertions using commands serialized in JSON format. It tries to make test automation more affordable for non programmers or non Python programmers for browser, functional, API, integration or system testing thanks to its pluggable architecture and third party plugins that let you interact with the most common databases and systems.
  • Nikola v8.0.2 is out!
    Nikola is a static site and blog generator, written in Python. It can use Mako and Jinja2 templates, and input in many popular markup formats, such as reStructuredText and Markdown — and can even turn Jupyter Notebooks into blog posts! It also supports image galleries, and is multilingual. Nikola is flexible, and page builds are extremely fast, courtesy of doit (which is rebuilding only what has been changed).
  • Mu!
    In the past several days, I innaugurated a private Fediverse instance, "Mu", running Pleroma for now. Although Mastodon is the dominant implementation, Pleroma is far easier to install, and uses less memory on small, private instances. By doing this, I'm bucking the trend of people hating to run their own infrastructure. Well, I do run my own e-mail service, so, what the heck, might as well join the Fediverse. So far, it was pretty fun, but Pleroma has problem spots. For example, Pleroma has a concept of "local accounts" and "remote accounts": local ones are normal, into which users log in at the instance, and remote ones mirror accounts on other instances. This way, if users Alice@Mu and Bob@Mu follow user zaitcev@SLC, Mu creates a "remote" account UnIqUeStRiNg@Mu, which tracks zaitcev@SLC, so Alice and Bob subscribe to it locally. This permits to send zaitcev's updates over the network only once. Makes sense, right? Well... I have a "stuck" remote account now at Mu, let's call it Xprime@Mu and posit that it follows X@SPC. Updates posted by X@SPC are reflected in Xprime@Mu, but if Alice@Mu tries to follow X@SPC, she does not see updates that Xprime@Mu receives (the updates are not reflected in Alice's friends/main timeline) [1]. I asked at #pleroma about it, but all they could suggest was to try and resubscribe. I think I need to unsubscribe and purge Xprime@Mu somehow. Then, when Alice resubscribes, Pleroma will re-create a remote, say Xbis@Mu, and things hopefully ought to work. Well, maybe. I need to examine the source to be sure.
  • Django ORM optimization story on selecting the least possible
    This an optimization story that should not surprise anyone using the Django ORM. But I thought I'd share because I have numbers now! The origin of this came from a real requirement. For a given parent model, I'd like to extract the value of the name column of all its child models, and the turn all these name strings into 1 MD5 checksum string.
  • Reasons Mitogen sucks
    I have a particular dislike for nonspecific negativity, where nothing can be done to address its source because the reasons underlying it are never explicitly described. In the context of Mitogen, there has been a consistent stream of this sort originating from an important camp in public spaces, and despite efforts to bring specifics out into the open, still it continues to persist. For that reason I'd like to try a new strategy: justify the negativity and give it a face by providing all the fuel it needs to burn. Therefore in this post, in the interests of encouraging honesty, I will critique my own work.
  • The North Star of PyCascades, core Python developer Mariatta Wijaya, receives the 2018 Q3 Community Service Award
    At Montreal PyCon 2015, Guido Van Rossum delivered the closing keynote during which Guido issued a public ask, “I want at least two female Python core developers in the next year ... and I will try to train them myself if that's what it takes. So come talk to me." Consequently, Mariatta did just that, she reached out to Guido after PyCon 2016 to learn more about starting in Python core development. Mariatta recalls, “I hadn’t contributed to open source [yet] and I wanted to know how to start”. Guido recommended some ways for Mariatta to start including reviewing the dev guide, looking at open issues and joining and introducing herself on the Python dev mailing list .
  • Episode #118: Better Python executable management with pipx

NVIDIA: GTX 1660 and Linux

  • NVIDIA have released the 418.43 driver, includes support for the just released GeForce GTX 1660
    Two bits of NVIDIA news for you today, not only have they released a new stable driver, they've also put out their latest GPU with the GTX 1660. First up, the new stable driver 418.43 is out which you can find here. It follows on from the 418.30 beta driver, released last month. The big new feature of the driver is initial support for G-SYNC Compatible monitors! So those of you with a FreeSync monitor should be able to use it (if you weren't already using the beta driver). This new driver also adds in support for the just released GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, the GeForce RTX 2070 with Max-Q Design and the GeForce RTX 2080 with Max-Q Design. There's also NVIDIA optical flow support, NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.0, support for stereo presentation in Vulkan and more.
  • NVIDIA 418.43 Stable Linux Driver Released, Includes GTX 1660 Ti Support
    As expected given today's GeForce GTX 1660 Ti launch, NVIDIA has released a new Linux graphics driver supporting the 1660 Ti as well as the RTX 2070 with Max-Q Design and RTX 2080 with Max-Q Design, among other changes. This is actually the first stable release in the NVIDIA 418 series for Linux users and succeeds last month's NVIDIA 418.30 Linux driver beta. Most of the changes in today's NVIDIA 418.43 driver release were previously found in the 418.30 version, just now made official with this stable driver debut plus adding in the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card support.
  • NVIDIA 390.116 Legacy & 410.104 Long-Lived Linux Drivers Released
    In addition to NVIDIA christening the 418 driver series as stable today with the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti release, they also issued updates for their 390 legacy driver series as well as the 410 long-lived driver release series. The NVIDIA 390.116 driver is out for those still using NVIDIA Fermi graphics cards on Linux. This update is the first in a while and has a number of fixes to the Linux driver, on the FreeBSD side there is now 12.0 support, support for the Linux 5.0 kernel, X.Org Server 1.20 fixes, and other random fixes collected in the past few months. For those using this NVIDIA legacy driver can find out more information via this DevTalk thread.
  • GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Launch Today - Supported By The NVIDIA Linux Driver, No Nouveau Yet
    After weeks of leaks, the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is expected to be formally announced in just a few hours. This is a ~$300 Turing graphics card but without any ray-tracing support as so far has been common to all Turing graphics cards. The GTX 1600 series family is expected to expand as well in the weeks ahead.

Betty – A Friendly Interface For Your Linux Command Line

All Linux experts might already know this statement “Command line mode is more powerful than GUI” but newbies are scared about CLI. Don’t think that working on Linux CLI is difficult as everything is opensource nowadays and you can get it in online whatever you want. If you have any doubt just google it and you will get many suggestion, select the suitable one and move forward. If you are looking for some virtual assistant tool instead of google. Yes, there is a tool is available for this and the tool name is Betty which helps you to get the information right from your terminal. Do you want to try? if so, go through the entire article for details. Read more