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Friday, 23 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story BSD: HAMMER2, Split, and ZFS Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 10:58am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 10:50am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 9:11am
Story Ebony and Ivory, icons together in perfect harmony Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 8:09am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 7:17am
Story 2018 Affiliate and Individual Member Election Results Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 6:47am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 6:28am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 2:25am
Story Games and Wine: Dark Old Sun, Surviving Mars, Wine-Staging 3.4, Wine 3.4 Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2018 - 2:24am
Story OSCAL'18 in Albania and Campus Party in Brazil Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2018 - 5:45pm

Events: LF's Open Networking Summit, Free Software Events in Europe in 2018, Belated FOSDEM Coverage

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  • Hands-On Learning at Open Networking Summit for Your SDN/NFV Deployments

    If you are attending ONS, you know the value of open source projects. You know they are going to play a critical role in your ongoing or upcoming SDN/NFV transformation. Open source projects have become very successful in the enterprise space and they are poised to do the same in the communications service provider (CSP) arena.

    That leads to a question—how can you learn more about these projects, determine their value for your specific environment and map out your organization’s next steps? Certainly, you can review online materials on your own. However, if you are like me and learn best when another human being is providing or explaining the material starting with the basics, at an unhurried pace, then the ONAP and OPNFV training sessions offered onsite at Open Networking Summit in Los Angeles are something to consider. These training courses will empower you to integrate open source into your NFV/SDN deployments.

  • Free Software Events in Europe in 2018

    If you know a Free Software and Open Source Software related event in Europe, happening in 2018, that is not yet listed here but that you think is in interest to the FSFE community, please leave it in this pad or contact me directly. All valid events will be imported from here into our wiki calendar.

    Valid events do not need to be a conference, they can be install fests or other activities. But to be in interest for our community, they have to be for the general public and happen in Europe.

  • Avoiding license violations in a large organization

    Over the years, I have heard people from the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) say many times that most free-software license violations are not intentional. Indeed, the SFC's principles of community-oriented enforcement say that "most GPL violations occur by mistake, without ill will". I've always had some difficulty in believing that; after all, how hard can it be to create a GPL repository on GitHub and sync the code into it? But it is also said that managing programmers is like herding cats. It was therefore interesting to hear a large-scale cat herder talk at FOSDEM 2018 about the license violations that occurred in their organization and what he and his colleagues did about it.

    Andreas Schreiber works for DLR, Germany's national aeronautics and space research center. DLR has some 8,000 employees across 40 institutions at 20 sites; of those, around 1,500 work on software development. Schreiber said its annual budget of some €150M for software development makes DLR one of the largest software developers in Germany. However, it is primarily an academic institution. Unlike many large commercial software developers, its software is largely written by people employed because of their expertise in such fields as aeronautics and space transportation, who have no formal computer science background, and often no formal training in software development.


    Schreiber also noted that both NASA and ESA have developed their own open-source licenses, whereas DLR has deliberately chosen not to do that. Given widespread concerns about license proliferation, and that NASA's license is both non-free and GPL-incompatible, this seems a good decision. In addition, in response to a later question, Schreiber said his group has tried mandating licenses for DLR projects, but that just did not work in the DLR culture, where researchers are used to doing what they like, how they like. Imposing a single institutional license would have been difficult; instead, the group provides advice and support, it will even recommend if asked to, but it doesn't mandate.

OpenBSD and FreeBSD

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  • Mike Larkin at bhyvecon 2018: OpenBSD vmm(4) update
  • How we conduct ourselves

    Overall, this self-censorship is a Good Thing™. When interacting with individuals from vastly different cultures, backgrounds or convictions, there are bound to be disagreements or clashes.


    I sincerely hope that I do not need to waste many keystrokes to state how awful this piece of text is. It is actively discriminatory, denies the hardships that some people may face, and censors criticism. It is extremely opinionated in its tone.

    Fortunately, the FreeBSD people had the sense to remove this section.


    But then why don’t the above rules mention anything about making fun of someone’s speech patterns or language skills (or lack thereof)? Surely disallowing those things is extremely relevant in an international community with many non-native speakers of English. As a matter of fact, an even more glaring omission is that it makes no statement on culture, country of origin, or nationality at all.

    Why does “misgendering”—an issue which affects a tiny fraction of the contributors—get a spot on that list, but not prejudice based on one’s skill in English, which affects a vast portion of contributors? Surely this can be included as well? But if we are going there, why not include even more? The Holocaust was a pretty bad thing that happened. Surely Holocaust denial should be somewhere on that list, too. Speaking of murder, perhaps we could also make it extra clear that it is not okay to boast about eating meat and other animal products in order to spite a vegan.


    The answer is not very surprising. The code of conduct is biased. It wears its bias on its sleeve: Feminism. Now, whether you are a feminist or not matters little. What matters is that the code of conduct tells you to practise inhibition around others, but practises none of it itself. I have conservatively marked all feminism-related (and LGBT-related) items with an asterisk. I could have been greedy and marked more items, but this seemed sufficient to me. If you start counting, you will see that give-or-take half of the items have an obvious feminist slant.

Pakistan: Open source technologies to usher in better future

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The Open Source Summit (OSS) 2018 was organized by Bahria University in collaboration with Open Source Foundation of Pakistan (OSFP) to collaborate, share information, learn about the latest technologies and gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions.

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In China right now (Indian press):

  • China launches open-source platform as part of its quest to become AI world leader by 2030
  • China makes open-source platform to boost Artificial Intelligence

    China’s science and technology minister said on Saturday that the government had made an open-source platform to boost the development of artificial intelligence (AI), as part of a plan to make China a world-leader in this field by 2030. He said that offering AI on open-source platforms would help with its scientific development and help it rapidly expand, allowing the creation of a new generation of AI. “Open-source platforms are needed because AI can play a bigger role in development and make it easier for entrepreneurs to have access to resources,” Wan Gang said in a press conference to mark a session of the National People’s Assembly.

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Looks like a Brilliant Upgrade

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I have to say folks, Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 is shaping up to be a one heck of a release.

It’s no secret that I think the nimble GNOME-based Budgie desktop is one of the best alternatives to GNOME Shell or Unity. It is lighter and leaner than either of those, but has a more cohesive and modern design than MATE or XFCE.

Naturally I’m also a fan of Ubuntu Budgie, the official Ubuntu flavor that uses the Budgie desktop by default. It provides all the benefits of Ubuntu and its ecosystem, but feathered beneath a clean, modern looking desktop interface.

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Technical Posts: Master Password in Firefox or Thunderbird, FakeIt, Rspamd, Feh, Vim and More

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  • Master password in Firefox or Thunderbird? Do not bother!

    There is a weakness common to any software letting you protect a piece of data with a password: how does that password translate into an encryption key? If that conversion is a fast one, then you better don’t expect the encryption to hold. Somebody who gets hold of that encrypted data will try to guess the password you used to protect it. And modern hardware is very good at validating guesses.

    Case in question: Firefox and Thunderbird password manager. It is common knowledge that storing passwords there without defining a master password is equivalent to storing them in plain text. While they will still be encrypted in logins.json file, the encryption key is stored in key3.db file without any protection whatsoever. On the other hand, it is commonly believed that with a master password your data is safe. Quite remarkably, I haven’t seen any articles stating the opposite.

  • Power.Fake.It: PowerFake + FakeIt

    As I said in the introduction, PowerFake lacked the features of a complete mocking framework, and I was hoping to be able to integrate it with one or more mocking frameworks. So, I decided to try integrating it with FakeIt as the first target.

  • Install and integrate Rspamd
  • Feh: The Image Viewer For Your Terminal

    The Feh image viewer for Linux is a powerful utility that can display your images in a variety of ways. It runs in the X display server from the command line and uses modes to prepare the layout of one or multiple files. If you are looking for a lightweight image viewer that can be accessed from the terminal, Feh is the one for you.

  • 10 Tips for Using Vim Text Editor

    Vim is one of the best and commonly used text editor and could be used as IDE on Linux and MAC OS X. There are many Vim tips could help you to get your work done much more quicker and efficient if you are using Vim as your text editor. So, let’s check some of Vim Tips that could be helpful for your daily usage.

  • How to Install osTicket on Ubuntu 16.04
  • PHP Arrays Tutorial

Programming: Portable Computing Language (POCL), C, and More

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Updated Oracle Roadmap Points To Post-11.4 Solaris Release Around 2020

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Oracle published a SPARC and Solaris road-map updated for March 2018.

By now you should know about Solaris 11.4 that is currently in public beta.

But their March 2018 road-map update now indicates a "Solaris11.Next" for H2'2018 or H1'2020. Note that it's a "11.Next" and no mention of Solaris 12. It's still not clear if a Solaris 12 will happen given all the rumors following the mass layoffs at Oracle over the past number of months, but at least for now it's looking like it might be a Solaris 11.5 release around the end of next year or in early 2020.

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i3 v4.15 Tiling Window Manager Released

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The i3 tiling window manager reached version 4.15 this weekend. The i3 v4.15 release contains a number of documentation improvements, additions to i3's editor and terminal, new default capabilities, the swap command now works with fullscreen windows, non-integer Xfi DPI values are now rounded, and a wide range of bugs have been fixed.

Read more

Server: Supercomputing, Kubernetes and More

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  • Supercomputing under a new lens: A Sandia-developed benchmark re-ranks top computers

    A Sandia National Laboratories software program now installed as an additional test for the widely observed TOP500 supercomputer challenge has become increasingly prominent. The program’s full name — High Performance Conjugate Gradients, or HPCG — doesn’t come trippingly to the tongue, but word is seeping out that this relatively new benchmarking program is becoming as valuable as its venerable partner — the High Performance LINPACK program — which some say has become less than satisfactory in measuring many of today’s computational challenges.

  • Bright Computing adds support for OpenHPC

    Today Bright Computing announced it has joined the Linux Foundation and will participate in the OpenHPC Community project. The latest release of Bright Cluster Manager provides the ability for Bright customers to easily integrate OpenHPC libraries and packages for use within a Bright cluster.

  • Kubernetes Becomes The First Project To Graduate From The Cloud Native Computing Foundation
  • Usenet, Authentication, and Engineering (or: Early Design Decisions for Usenet)

    A Twitter thread on trolls brought up mention of trolls on Usenet. The reason they were so hard to deal with, even then, has some lessons for today; besides, the history is interesting. (Aside: this is, I think, the first longish thing I've ever written about any of the early design decisions for Usenet. I should note that this is entirely my writing, and memory can play many tricks across nearly 40 years.)

  • The true costs of hosting in the cloud

    Should we host in the cloud or on our own servers? This question was at the center of Dmytro Dyachuk's talk, given during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon last November. While many services simply launch in the cloud without the organizations behind them considering other options, large content-hosting services have actually moved back to their own data centers: Dropbox migrated in 2016 and Instagram in 2014. Because such transitions can be expensive and risky, understanding the economics of hosting is a critical part of launching a new service. Actual hosting costs are often misunderstood, or secret, so it is sometimes difficult to get the numbers right. In this article, we'll use Dyachuk's talk to try to answer the "million dollar question": "buy or rent?"

  • Memcached DDoS Attacks Slow Down as Patching Ramps Up

    Days after the largest distributed denial-of-service attack in internet history, the attack size of memcached DDoS attacks is now on the decline.

    On March 5, Netscout Arbor Networks reported a 1.7-Tbps DDoS attack that was driven by the amplification of misconfigured memcached servers. While there were some initial fears that the attacks would continue to grow in size, the opposite has happened.

    "We're still seeing lots of them, but their average size is considerably smaller due to ongoing cleanup and mitigation efforts," Steinthor Bjarnason, senior network security analyst at Netscout Arbor, told eWEEK.

Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.60 Released

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The Black Lab Linux development team is pleased to bring you the newest release of Black Lab Enterprise Desktop 11.60. This release contains many security updates and application updates. Along with these updates also we have made many fixes. Black Lab Enterprise Desktop is a high performance high availability desktop for software developers, system administrators and power users.

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Mir Enables XDG Shell By Default, Dropping Mir EGL For Ubuntu 18.04

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There is just one month to go until the official debut of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" release and Canonical's Mir team is busy as ever on the home stretch of final changes for this next release.

Some of the Mir team's recent progress with their focus the past few months on Wayland support includes:

- XDG Shell v6 support is now enabled by default. XDG_Shell is the Wayland protocol addition for managing surfaces with window dragging/resizing/stacking and other actions mostly desktop focused.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS “Bionic Beaver” Beta 1 Released For Opt-In Flavors: Download Now

Rejecting Proprietary Slack

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  • Say No to Slack, Say Yes to Matrix

    Of all proprietary chatting systems, Slack has always seemed one of the worst to me. Not only it’s a closed proprietary system with no sane clients, open source or not, but it not just one walled garden, as Facebook or WhatsApp are, but a constellation of walled gardens, isolated from each other. To be able to participate in multiple Slack communities, the user has to create multiple accounts and keep multiple chat windows open all the time. Federation? Self-hosting? Owning your data? All of those are not a thing in Slack. Until recently, it was possible to at least keep the logs of all conversations locally by connecting to the chat using IRC or XMPP if the gateway was enabled.

    Now, with Slack shutting down gateways not only you cannot keep the logs on your computer, you also cannot use a client of your choice to connect to Slack. They also began changing the bots API which was likely the reason the Matrix-to-Slack gateway didn’t work properly at times. The issue has since resolved itself, but Slack doesn’t give any guarantees the gateway will continue working, and obviously they aren’t really interested in keeping it working.

  • On the demise of Slack's IRC / XMPP gateways

    I have grudgingly joined three Slack workspaces , due to me being part of proejects that use it as a communications center for their participants. Why grudgingly? Because there is very little that it adds to well-established communications standards that we have had for long years decades.

    On this topic, I must refer you to the talk and article presented by Megan Squire, one of the clear highlights of my participation last year at the 13th International Conference on Open Source Systems (OSS2017): «Considering the Use of Walled Gardens for FLOSS Project Communication». Please do have a good read of this article.

Sparky 5.3

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There are new live/install iso images of SparkyLinux 5.3 “Nibiru” available to download.
Sparky 5 follows rolling release model and is based on Debian testing “Buster”.

Sparky 5.3 provides fully featured operating system with lightweight desktops: LXQt, MATE and Xfce.

Sparky MinimalGUI (Openbox) and MinimalCLI (text mode) lets you install the base system with a desktop of your choice and a minimal set of applications, via the Sparky Advanced Installer.

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Debian: Stepping down as Debian Account Manager, Corydalis 0.3.0 Release, Debian-Based Siduction

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  • Stepping down as DAM

    After quite some time (years actually) of inactivity as Debian Account Manager, I finally decided to give back that Debian hat. I'm stepping down as DAM. I will still be around for the occasional comment from the peanut gallery, or to provide input if anyone actually cares to ask me about the old times.

  • Corydalis 0.3.0 release

    Without aiming for, this release follows almost exactly a month after v0.2, so maybe a monthly release cycle while I still have lots of things to add (and some time to actually do it) would be an interesting goal.

  • Debian-Based Siduction Linux OS Now Patched Against Meltdown and Spectre Flaws

    The developers of the siduction GNU/Linux distribution announced today the release and general availability of the siduction 2018.2.0 monthly release for February 2018.

    siduction 2018.2.0 is out as the first release of the Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution to ship with the latest Linux 4.15 kernel by default, which includes mitigations against the critical Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that were publicly disclosed in early January, and which put billions of devices at risk of attacks. This release is powered by Linux kernel 4.15.7.

    "Shortly after our last release 2018.1.0 the world made acquaintance with two vulnerabilities that will stay with us for a long time. In mitigating Meltdown & Spectre, siduction was as close to the kernel as possible to be able to get fixes in as soon as they roll out. Kernel 4.15.7 has most of the bases covered, even though there will be more coming with 4.16 expected in April," said the devs.

Neptune 5 Release

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This version marks a new iteration within the Neptune universe. It switches its base to the current Debian Stable "Stretch" version and also changes slightly the way we will provide Updates for Neptune. We will no longer strive to bring in more recent versions of Plasma, Kernel or other software on our own. With Snaps, Flatpaks and AppImages being more and more popular and mature these days we strongly believe these are the ways to go if you want to try out bleeding edge software. We on the other hand strive to provide the most stable and best Desktop user experience out there.

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Graphics: RenderDoc, Intel, DRI, Mesa

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  • RenderDoc 1.0 Graphics Debugger Released

    RenderDoc 1.0 has been released, the open-source standalone graphics debugger that supports frame capturing and introspection of Vulkan, D3D11, D3D12, OpenGL, and OpenGL ES APIs across all major platforms.

  • Intel Developers Prepare More Cannonlake/Icelake Graphics Code For Linux 4.17

    Intel open-source developers are preparing the last of their feature work for the i915 DRM driver with the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle.

    Work already staged in DRM-Next for this Intel Direct Rendering Manager driver in Linux 4.17 includes Cannonlake support being in good shape that it's no longer hidden behind an alpha support flag, initial Intel Icelake graphics support for these "Gen 11" graphics processors, and a lot of other internal code changes/improvements. A final batch of changes is now up for testing that will target DRM-Next for Linux 4.17.

  • New DRI3 v1.1 & v1.2 Bits Now Supported By Mesa

    Of the many features coming to X.Org Server 1.20 there is now Direct Rendering Infrastructure 3 (DRI3) versions 1.1 and 1.2. Mesa has now received its patches for making use of the new functionality.

    Landing in Mesa 18.1-devel Git yesterday was DRI3 v1.2 support within the Vulkan WSI (Windowing System Integration) code used by both RADV and ANV for supporting multiple planes and buffer modifiers.

  • Shared Virtual Memory Support For Nouveau With HMM

    It's been a while since we last have seen any new Heterogeneous Memory Management patches even after its mainline introduction in Linux 4.14. But Jerome Glisse who masterminded HMM at Red Hat is now out with some Shared Virtual Memory (SVM) patches for Nouveau.

  • With Mesa Git You Can Now Run A Completely Open Graphics Stack On The Tegra X1

    With today's Mesa 18.1-devel Git code, the last of the Tegra/Nouveau code has landed where it's now rounded off for offering a completely open-source and accelerated graphics stack that works well on the Tegra210 (Tegra X1) SoC.

    Landing today in Mesa Git is the initial Tegra support for the K1 SoC and newer. There was the commit linked to and then several other related patches arriving in the tree a short time ago. This Tegra support in Mesa is needed for display support while the GPU is driven via the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver as a render node. This code is for the Tegra K1 and newer while it seems the X1 SoC is in best shape right now and there are already users of this code on this SoC running a completely open-source 3D driver stack. On the kernel side, there has already been Tegra DRM support in the mainline kernel.

Fitlet Preloaded With Linux Mint

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  • CompuLab Fitlet 2 Is A Mighty Fine, Low-Power PC Preloaded With Linux Mint

    Over the past decade we have looked at many interesting PCs from CompuLab, a vendor capable of delivering Linux-friendly PCs that are originally designed and often catered to meet demanding industrial requirements. The latest Linux PC we have been putting through its paces the past several weeks has been the Fitlet2, which CompuLab describes as being designed "from the ground-up to minimize size and maximize capabilities, durability and thermal performance." After running our plethora of benchmarks on this mini Linux PC, we can say with confidence they have succeeded in their mission.

  • Airtop2 Inferno Fanless PC Advances With "Natural Airflow" To Cool Core i7 + GTX 1080

    A few weeks back many of you were excited by the prospects of the Airtop2 Inferno PC that is a completely fanless PC with up to a Core i7 CPU and GTX 1080 GPU. This well-built, industrial-grade computer with CompuLab's custom-engineered natural airflow technology is now a step closer to the market.

    While finishing up the Fitlet2 Linux mini PC tests this week for the Apollo Lake powered system, I noticed CompuLab put on KickStarter its much bigger brother, the Airtop2 Inferno.

Wine and Games

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An Early Look At The Linux 4.16 Kernel Performance With AMD EPYC

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A few days back I provided some fresh Linux 4.16 kernel benchmarks compared to recent stable kernel releases while also toggling the KPTI and Retpoline security features on Linux 4.16 Git for seeing the impact of the Spectre and Meltdown mitigation techniques on this latest kernel while using Intel Xeon hardware. For this latest round of tests is a similar comparison while using an AMD EPYC system.

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More in Tux Machines

Logic Supply launches tiny, fanless, Ubuntu-powered PCs

  • Logic Supply launches tiny, fanless, Ubuntu-powered PCs
    Industrial PC maker Logic Supply has been offering small fanless computers for years, but the company says its new CL200 series PCs are its smallest to date. Powered by an Intel Celeron N3350 dual-core processor, the little computer measures just 4.6″ x 3.3″ x 1.3″, making it smaller than a typical Intel NUC computer.
  • Logic Supply CL200 Apollo Lake Mini PC Introduced
    Logic Supply has today unveiled two new additions to their range of small form factor computer systems announcing the launch of the Logic Supply CL200, designed for Internet of things projects and applications and offering users connectivity via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 4G. The CL200 mini PC systems will be available to purchase during Spring 2018 an offer one mini DisplayPort capable of 1080p or 4K resolution, one Gigabit LAN port, and 2 x USB 3.0.
  • Logic Supply Introduces CL200 Computer
    Global computer hardware manufacturer Logic Supply has unveiled their CL200 computer, built to power innovation at the network’s edge. Surrounded by a cast aluminum enclosure, and configurable with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 4G connectivity, the CL200 has been engineered to bring reliability to the Internet of Things.
  • Logic Supply launches CL200 ultra small form factor IoT edge device
    Global computer hardware manufacturer Logic Supply ( has unveiled their CL200 Ultra Small Form Factor computer (, built to power innovation at the network's edge. Surrounded by an ultra-durable cast aluminum enclosure, and configurable with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 4G connectivity, the CL200 has been engineered to bring reliability to the Internet of Things. "IoT and Edge projects require flexibility, connectivity and dependability," said Logic Supply Director of Engineering Michael Kleiner. "The CL200 is our smallest fanless system ever, and represents the nextgeneration of IoT computing by combining connection flexibility and efficient performance in an affordable, highly-reliable platform."

Android tips and tricks: 10 great ways to boost your phone experience

With a few simple tips, you can make your Android smartphone life better. These are some of my favorite ways to block spam, stop unwanted calls from annoying me, and keep an eye on just how much data I'm really using. Read more

Neptune 5: A Practically Perfect Plasma-Based Distro

The integration of the Plasma 5 desktop in Neptune is smooth and smart. I have not liked much of the Plasma development as it exists in other distros. However, in this one the Plasma 5 desktop environment is an inviting alternative to my two favorite choices -- Cinnamon and Xfce. This latest Neptune release offers a computing environment that sits comfortably between both of those desktop options. One notable weakness: If I ever wanted to play any computer games, I would be disappointed with the few meager choices in Neptune's game menu. It offers only GNUDoQ, KBreakout, KMarjongg and KMines. What, not even a solitaire game? Come on! Read more

Android Leftovers