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Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Performance Benchmarks Against Other Linux/BSD Distributions Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 5:25pm
Story LinuxCon to Highlight How Linux Has Changed in Its 25 Years Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 5:19pm
Story Android makers try to make their phones eye-catching Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 5:17pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 2:14pm
Story BSD Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 1:24pm
Story Mozilla News Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 1:23pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 10:49am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 10:48am
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 10:47am
Story More reading comprehension issues in Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2016 - 10:26am

An Alternative List Of The Top 3 Linux Distributions For The Everyday Linux User

Filed under
Linux

David has come up with three Linux distributions: Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE and Damn Small Linux.

Ubuntu MATE would definitely be close to reaching my top five and I would recommend Lubuntu for low end computers and older netbooks.

Damn Small Linux might be a bit daunting for non-technical users and for something of that size it might be worth thinking about a Puppy Linux such as Simplicity.

Read more

Tiny Intel “Joule” IoT module runs Ostro Linux on quad-core Atom

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Linux

Intel’s “Joule” IoT module integrates a 64-bit quad-core Atom SoC, up to 4GB RAM and 16GB eMMC, plus BT/WiFi, 4K video, CSI/DSI, GPIO, USB, and UART I/O.

At the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2016 in San Francisco today, Intel unveiled a tiny Joule computer-on-module that targets makers, innovators, and entrepreneurs developing Internet of Things devices. The module will be available in two versions, based on Atom T5700 and T5500 SoCs, and is supported by the Yocto Project-based Ostro Linux distribution, which similarly targets IoT apps.

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GNU/Linux Desktop

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Review: Best New Android Phone

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Here’s what’s really confusing. All three phones have stunning 2560 x 1440-pixel resolution, AMOLED screens that absolutely blow any iPhone display out of the water. (According to the display experts at DisplayMate, the Note 7’s screen is the best smartphone screen ever.) All three also have the same super-speedy quad-core processors, water-resistant designs and superb 12-megapixel cameras.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

New Releases

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Linux Kernel 4.8 Release Candidate Build

    As expected, Linus Torvalds made his Sunday announcement for the second RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Linux 4.8 kernel branch, which is now available for public testing.

    Linux kernel 4.8 entered development last week, when the merge window was officially closed and the first Release Candidate development milestone released to the world. According to Linus Torvalds, the second RC build is here to update more drivers, even more hardware architectures, as well as to fix issues for supported filesystems and add some extra mm work.

  • Elive 2.7.2 Beta Is Out with Spotify Support, Improved Artwork, and Thunar Fixes

    On August 14, 2016, the Elive development team was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of yet another Beta version of the Elive Linux operating system.

    Elive 2.7.2 comes only three weeks after the release of the previous Beta build, version 2.7.1, to implement out-of-the-box support for the popular Spotify digital music service, giving users direct access to millions of songs if they have a paid subscription, and a much-improved artwork, as both the system and icon themes were enhanced.

  • First Beta of Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" Hits the Streets, Based on Ubuntu 14.04.5

    Until today, Black Lab Linux 8.0 "Onyx" has been in the Alpha stages of development and received a total of four Alpha builds that have brought multiple updated components and GNU/Linux technologies, but now the Ubuntu-based operating system has entered a much more advanced development state, Beta, and the first one is here exactly six months after the development cycle started.

    "Today the Black Lab Linux development team is pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8 'Onyx' Beta 1. Bringing us one step closer to our goal of a stable, secure, and long term supported Linux desktop for the masses. 'Onyx' Beta 1 is a culmination of over 6 months of user collaboration and feedback," says Roberto J. Dohnert, Black Lab Software CEO.

  • Maui 1 Screenshot Tour

News About Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Why private clouds will suffer a long, slow death

    Analyst firm Wikibon believes that no vendor is making more than $100 million via OpenStack. If that’s anywhere near true, the sum total of all vendors has to be less than $2 billion.

  • M$ Shoots Foot, Again

    Not being able to sell software unbundled from hardware is a terrible deficit in a world where people are building open servers.

  • Microsoft: Why we had to tie Azure Stack to boxen we picked for you

    Microsoft has explained the rationale behind last month’s announcement that you won’t be allowed to simply download Azure Stack and get going.

    In July Redmond informed fans the only way they’d be able to get Azure in their own data centres would be on hardware of its choosing.

    Specifically, Azure Stack will only come pre-installed on pre-integrated servers from Dell, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and Lenovo. Other OEMs, we’re promised, will follow.

    The Dell, HP and Lenovo will come “sometime” in 2017. Azure Stack had been expected by the end of 2016, but the work with to produce integrated systems will mean a delay.

FOSS and Security

Filed under
OSS
Security
  • Coffee Shop DevOps: How to use feedback loops to get smarter
  • How to design your project for participation

    Working openly means designing for participation. "Designing for participation" is a way of providing people with insight into your project, which you've built from the start to incorporate and act on that insight. Documenting how you intend to make decisions, which communication channels you’ll use, and how people can get in touch with you are the first steps in designing for participation. Other steps include working openly, being transparent, and using technologies that support collaboration and additional ways of inviting participation. In the end, it’s all about providing context: Interested people must be able to get up to speed and start participating in your project, team, or organization as quickly and easily as possible.

  • So long, Firefox Hello!

    After updating my PCLinuxOS install, I noticed that the icon of Firefox Hello had changed: it was read and displayed a message reading "Error!"

    I thought it was a simply login failure, so I logged in and the icon went green, as normal. However, I noticed that Hello did not display the "Start a conversation" window, but one that read "browse this page with a friend".

    A bit confused, I called Megatotoro, who read this statement from Mozilla to me. Apparently, I had missed the fact that Mozilla is discontinuing Hello starting from Firefox 49. Current Firefox version is 48, so...

  • FreeBSD 11.0 Up to Release Candidate State, Support for SSH Protocol v1 Removed

    The FreeBSD Project, through Glen Barber, has had the pleasure of announcing this past weekend the general availability of the first Release Candidate for the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system, due for release on September 2, 2016.

    It appears to us that the development cycle of FreeBSD 11.0 was accelerated a bit, as the RC1 milestone is here just one week after the release of the fourth Beta build. Again, the new snapshot is available for 64-bit (amd64), 32-bit (i386), PowerPC (PPC), PowerPC 64-bit (PPC64), SPARC64, AArch64 (ARM64), and ARMv6 hardware architectures.

  • Open Source//Open Society Conference Live Blog

    This conference offers 2 huge days of inspiration, professional development and connecting for those interested in policy, data, open technology, leadership, management and team building.

  • White House Source Code Policy Should Go Further

    A new federal government policy will result in the government releasing more of the software that it creates under free and open source software licenses. That’s great news, but doesn’t go far enough in its goals or in enabling public oversight.

    A few months ago, we wrote about a proposed White House policy regarding how the government handles source code written by or for government agencies. The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has now officially enacted the policy with a few changes. While the new policy is a step forward for government transparency and open access, a few of the changes in it are flat-out baffling.

  • The Brewing Problem Of PGP Short-ID Collision Attacks
  • Starwood, Marriott, Hyatt, IHG hit by malware: HEI

    A data breach at 20 U.S. hotels operated by HEI Hotels & Resorts for Starwood, Marriott, Hyatt and Intercontinental may have divulged payment card data from tens of thousands of food, drink and other transactions, HEI said on Sunday.

  • Linux TCP Flaw Leaves 80% Android Phones Open To Spying
  • Good morning Android!

Android vs. iPhone for Business Users: 8 Key Points

Filed under
Android
Mac

Which mobile operating system is best for business? We compare iPhone vs. Android in eight different categories, including hardware, apps, storage, customization, security, backup, management and personal assistant.

Read more

Trying to Make Sense of Fuchsia

Filed under
Linux
Google
Gadgets
  • Is Fuschsia Google’s answer to Samsung’s Tizen?

    Google is prepping an open source “Fuchsia” OS that can target IoT, handhelds, and laptops. It uses a new “Magenta” kernel, based on the “LK” project.

    Google has posted GitHub code for an emerging operating system called Fuchsia, designed for a wide range of devices. Like Google’s Android, Chrome OS, and IoT-focused Brillo, Fuchsia is open source — but unlike those platforms, it’s not based on the Linux kernel. Instead, it taps an independent, MIT licensed kernel project called “Little Kernel” (LK), which has been under development for several years.

  • Will Google replace Android with Fuchsia?

    Android is one of the most widely used operating systems in the world. But never let it be said that Google is content to rest on past achievements. The company has been hard at work on a new operating system call Fuchsia, and some are wondering if it will eventually replace Android.

  • Google May Paint IoT Fuchsia

    A team at Google is working on a new operating system called "Fuchsia," but details are sparse. Fuchsia "is a new open source project that is not at all related to Android or Chrome OS," said Google spokesperson Joshua Cruz. He declined to provide further details about Fuchsia, saying only that "we have many revolving open source projects at Google." Fuchsia reportedly already has undergone some testing, and it is booting "reasonably well" on NUCs based on Intel's Skylake and Broadwell processors.

  • Why Google’s new Linux-less Fuchsia operating system is a huge deal

    Google has release all the components of the new operating system in a much more permissible MIT license. The community can try it, contribute to it and reuse it.

    Raspberry Pi 3 users will soon be able to play with Fuchsia, according to Google developer Travis Geiselbrecht, who is working on the project.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Go 1.7 is released

Filed under
Development
Google

Today we are happy to announce the release of Go 1.7. You can get it from the download page. There are several significant changes in this release: a port for Linux on IBM z Systems (s390x), compiler improvements, the addition of the context package, and support for hierarchical tests and benchmarks.

A new compiler back end, based on static single-assignment form (SSA), has been under development for the past year. By representing a program in SSA form, a compiler may perform advanced optimizations more easily. This new back end generates more compact, more efficient code that includes optimizations like bounds check elimination and common subexpression elimination. We observed a 5–35% speedup across our benchmarks. For now, the new backend is only available for the 64-bit x86 platform ("amd64"), but we’re planning to convert more architecture backends to SSA in future releases.

Read more

Also: Go 1.7 Brings s390x Support, Compiler Improvements

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Serving Up Security? Microsoft Patches ‘Malicious Butler’ Exploit — Again

    It’s been a busy year for Windows security. Back in March, Microsoft bulletin MS16-027 addressed a remote code exploit that could grant cybercriminals total control of a PC if users opened “specially crafted media content that is hosted on a website.” Just last month, a problem with secure boot keys caused a minor panic among users.

    However, new Microsoft patches are still dealing with a flaw discovered in November of last year — it was first Evil Maid and now is back again as Malicious Butler. Previous attempts to slam this door shut have been unsuccessful. Has the Redmond giant finally served up software security?

  • PGP Short-ID Collision Attacks Continued, Now Targeted Linus Torvalds

    After contacted the owner, it turned out that one of the keys is a fake. In addition, labelled same names, emails, and even signatures created by more fake keys. Weeks later, more developers found their fake "mirror" keys on the keyserver, including the PGP Global Directory Verification Key.

  • Let's Encrypt: Why create a free, automated, and open CA?

    During the summer of 2012, Eric Rescorla and I decided to start a Certificate Authority (CA). A CA acts as a third-party to issue digital certificates, which certify public keys for certificate holders. The free, automated, and open CA we envisioned, which came to be called Let's Encrypt, has been built and is now one of the larger CAs in the world in terms of issuance volume.

    Starting a new CA is a lot of work—it's not a decision to be made lightly. In this article, I'll explain why we decided to start Let's Encrypt, and why we decided to build a new CA from scratch.

    We had a good reason to start building Let's Encrypt back in 2012. At that time, work on an HTTP/2 specification had started in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), a standards body with a focus on network protocols. The question of whether or not to require encryption (via TLS) for HTTP/2 was hotly debated. My position, shared by my co-workers at Mozilla and many others, was that encryption should be required.

Zenwalk Linux 8.0 - A more Zen Slackware

Filed under
Reviews
Slack

There were a few things I enjoyed about Zenwalk 8.0 and several I did not. Before getting to those, I want to acknowledge that Zenwalk is, in most ways, very much like Slackware. The two distributions are binary compatible and if you like (or dislike) one, you will probably feel the same way about the other. They're quite closely related with similar benefits and drawbacks.

On the positive side of things, I like that Zenwalk trims down the software installed by default. A full installation of Zenwalk requires about two-thirds of the disk space a full installation of Slackware consumes. This is reflected in Zenwalk's focused "one-app-per-task" approach which I feel makes it easier to find things. Zenwalk requires relatively little memory (a feature it shares with Slackware) and, with PulseAudio's plugin removed, consumes very few CPU cycles. One more feature I like about this distribution is the fact Zenwalk includes LibreOffice, a feature I missed when running pure Slackware.

On the other hand, I ran into a number of problems with Zenwalk. The dependency problems which annoyed me while running Slackware were present in Zenwalk too. To even get a working text editor I needed to have development libraries installed. To make matters worse, the user needs a text editor to enable the package manager to install development libraries. It's one of those circular problems that require the user to think outside the box (or re-install with all software packages selected).

Other issues I had were more personal. For example, I don't like window transparency or small fonts. These are easy to fix, but it got me off on the wrong foot with Zenwalk. I do want to acknowledge that while my first two days with Zenwalk were mostly spent fixing things, hunting down dependencies and tweaking the desktop to suit my tastes, things got quickly better. By the end of the week I was enjoying Zenwalk's performance, its light nature and its clean menus. I may have had more issues with Zenwalk than Slackware in the first day or so, but by the end of the week I was enjoying using Zenwalk more for my desktop computing.

For people running older computers, I feel it is worth noting Zenwalk does not offer 32-bit builds. The distribution has become 64-bit only and people who still run 32-bit machines will need to turn elsewhere, perhaps to Slackware.

In the end, I feel as though Zenwalk is a more focused flavour of Slackware. The Slackware distribution is multi-purpose, at least as suited for servers as desktops. Slackware runs on more processor architectures, has a live edition and can dump a lot of software on our hard disk. Zenwalk is more desktop focused, with fewer packages and perhaps a nicer selection of applications. The two are quite similar, but Slackware has a broader focus while Zenwalk is geared to desktop users who value performance.

Read more

Also: New Toolchain on Current

OpenMandriva 3.0, Google Linux Snub, TCP Vulnerability

Filed under
-s

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 was announced Saturday with Linux 4.6.5, Plasma 5.6.5, and systemd 231. An early reviewer said he liked OpenMandriva but Plasma not as much. Elsewhere all anyone can seem to talk about is Google's decision to use something other than Linux to power its next embedded devices and a TCP vulnerability that could allow remote hijacking of Internet traffic. Patrick Volkerding has upgraded the toolchain in Slackware-current and Red Hat security expert said you can't trust any networks anywhere.

Read more

Converged Terminal App Design in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Show Off Converged Terminal App Design

    Reshaping the classic terminal app to fit multi-form factor world isn't easy, but it's the task that the Canonical Design team face as part of their work on Unity 8.

  • Canonical Plans on Improving the Ubuntu Linux Terminal UX on Mobile and Desktop

    Canonical, through Jouni Helminen, announced on August 15, 2016, that they were planning on transforming the community-developed Terminal app into a convergent Linux terminal that's easy to use on both mobile phones and tablets.

    Terminal is a core Ubuntu Touch app and the only project to bring you the popular Linux shell on your Ubuntu Phone or Ubuntu Tablet devices. And now, Canonical's designers are in charge of offering a much more pleasant Linux terminal user experience by making Terminal convergent across all screen formats.

    "I would like to share the work so far, invite users of the app to comment on the new designs, and share ideas on what other new features would be desirable," says Jouni Helminen, Lead Designer at Canonical. "These visuals are work in progress - we would love to hear what kind of features you would like to see in your favorite terminal app!"
    ""

KDE Frameworks Now Requires Qt 5.5 or Later, Build 5.25.0 Updates Breeze Icons

Filed under
KDE

The KDE project announced this past weekend the release of KDE Frameworks 5.25.0, another monthly update to the collection of over 70 add-ons for the Qt5 GUI toolkit and the latest KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

KDE Frameworks 5.25.0 comes in time for the recently released KDE Plasma 5.7.3 maintenance update of the modern and widely used Linux desktop, promising to update many of the core components, including but not limited to Attica, which now follows HTTP redirects, the Breeze icon set with lots of additions, extra CMake modules, KDE Doxygen tools, KXMLGUI, KWindowSystem, and KWidgetsAddons.

KDE apps like KTextEditor, KArchive, and Sonnet received bugfixes and other improvements in the KDE Frameworks 5.25.0. The release also comes with many other updated components, among which Plasma Framework, NetworkManagerQt, KXMLGUI, KCoreAddons, KService, Kross, Solid, Package Framework, KNotification, KItemModels, KIO, KInit, KIconThemes, KHTML, KGlobalAccel, KFileMetaData, and KDeclarative.

Read more

Also: Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.7.3, Mozilla Firefox 48.0 & Wine 1.9.16

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Goes Stable with KDE Plasma 5.6.5 and Linux Kernel 4.6.5

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Booting Lenovo T460s after Fedora 24 Updates
  • Flock 2016
  • Ideas for getting started in the Linux kernel

    Getting new people into OSS projects is always a challenge. The Linux kernel is no different and has it's own set of challenges. This is a follow up and expansion of some of what I talked about at Flock about contributing to the kernel.

    When I tell people I do kernel work I tend to get a lot of "Wow that's really hard, you must be smart" and "I always wanted to contribute to the kernel but I don't know how to get started". The former thought process tends to lead to the latter, moreso than other projects. I would like to dispel this notion once and for all: you do not have to have a special talent to work on the kernel unless you count dogged persistence and patience as a talent. Working in low level C has its own quriks the same way working in other languages does. C++ templates terrify me, javascript's type system (or lack there of) confuses me. You can learn the skills necessary to work in the kernel.

  • Żegnajcie! Fedora Flock 2016 in words

    From August 2 – 5, the annual Fedora contributor conference, Flock, was held in the beautiful city of Kraków, Poland. Fedora contributors from all over the world attend for a week of talks, workshops, collaboration, fun, and community building (if you’re tuning in and not sure what Fedora is exactly, you can read more here). Talks range from technical topics dealing with upcoming changes to the distribution, talks focusing on the community and things working well and how to improve, and many more. The workshops are a chance for people normally separated by thousands of miles to work and collaborate on real issues, problems, and tasks in the same room. As a Fedora contributor, this is the “premier” event to attend as a community member.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

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More in Tux Machines

'Open' Processor

  • 25-core open source chip could pave way for monster 200,000-core PC
    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY BOFFINS have developed a 25-core open source processor that can be scaled to create a monster 200,000-core PC stuffed with 8,000 64-bit chips. The chip is called Piton after the metal spikes driven by rock climbers into mountain sides, and was presented at the Hot Chips symposium on high-performance computing in Cupertino this week.
  • New microchip demonstrates efficiency and scalable design
    Researchers at Princeton University have built a new computer chip that promises to boost performance of data centers that lie at the core of online services from email to social media. [...] Other Princeton researchers involved in the project since its 2013 inception are Yaosheng Fu, Tri Nguyen, Yanqi Zhou, Jonathan Balkind, Alexey Lavrov, Matthew Matl, Xiaohua Liang, and Samuel Payne, who is now at NVIDIA. The Princeton team designed the Piton chip, which was manufactured for the research team by IBM. Primary funding for the project has come from the National Science Foundation, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.
  • Manycore ‘Piton’ Climbs Toward 200,000-Core Peak

Android Leftovers

Lubuntu 16.10 Beta Out Now with Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS and the Latest LXDE Desktop

As part of today's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta launch, Simon Quigley from the Lubuntu Linux team released the first Beta build of the upcoming Lubuntu 16.10 operating system. Read more Also: Ubuntu MATE 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta Removes the Heads-Up Display (HUD) Feature Ubuntu GNOME 16.10 Beta 1 Released with GNOME 3.20 and GNOME 3.22 Beta Apps Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Beta Released, Ubuntu GNOME Has Experimental Wayland

Facebook open sources its computer vision tools