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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Server Administration Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:54pm
Story Kernel Space/Linux Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:54pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:53pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:53pm
Story SUSE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:52pm
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:51pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:51pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:49pm
Story Events: GNU Health and SIGGRAPH Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:49pm
Story LLVM and DragonFlyBSD Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2016 - 11:48pm

Coin-sized COM could be world’s smallest Raspberry Pi clone

Filed under
Linux

ArduCam unveiled a 24 x 24mm module with the ARM11-based core of the original Raspberry Pi, available with 36 x 36mm carriers with one or two camera links.

The promised second-generation version of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module featuring the same quad-core, 64-bit Broadcom BCM2837 SoC as the Raspberry Pi 3 will be out within a few months, according to a recent PC World interview with Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Eben Upton. Meanwhile, if you’re looking for a smaller computer-on-module version of the Raspberry Pi and are willing to settle for the old ARM11 foundation available on the current Raspberry Pi Compute Module, ArduCam could have you covered sooner.

Read more

Fedora-based Korora 24 'Sheldon' Linux distro now available -- 32-bit ISO dead

Filed under
Red Hat

While there are many Linux-based operating systems to choose from nowadays, not all of them are great. Quite frankly, there are probably only a handful of distributions that I would truly recommend.

My absolute favorite Linux-based operating system is Fedora, but understandably, it is not ideal for all beginners. While I like the focus on free software only, some folks need some non-free stuff. Adding repos and setting up some of this software can be tricky for some. Luckily, Korora is a distro that takes the work out of setting up Fedora for beginners. Today, it achieves version 24, code-named 'Sheldon'.

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Can you name these Linux distributions?

Filed under
Linux

Linux is turning 25 this year. Since its inception in 1991, what started as a "modest new OS" has ballooned into a juggernaut with 258 distributions.

To celebrate Linix's big birthday, I have gathered together 25 pictorial representations of Linux distributions. Given a visual clue and a very brief description, how many of the Linux distributions represented here can you identify?

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 RC1 arrives!!

Filed under
MDV

Good news from OpenMandriva Community!

A while after Beta2 we are glad to announce OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 RC1 release.

Work for the RC1 has further improved stability and performance. We have now support for the Japanese and Chinese languages so we would really welcome any feedback from those who speak them.

Read more

Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 RC1 Released

Big Data/Hadoop

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Apache Foundation Crucial to Hadoop, Big Data’s Success

    Looking back at 10 years of Hadoop, project co-founder and Cloudera Chief Architect Doug Cutting can see two primary factors in the success of open source big data technology: a heap of luck and the Apache Foundation’s unique support.

  • TP empowers Singapore students with big data analytics skills

    Temasek Polytechnic (TP), Singapore and Cloudera have teamed on cultivating the next generation of data professionals through the Cloudera Academic Partnership (CAP) program.

  • TP, Cloudera to help S'pore students prepare for big data-related roles

    Temasek Polytechnic (TP) and Cloudera are working together to cultivate the next generation of data professionals through the Cloudera Academic Partnership (CAP) program. Through this program, students from Temasek Polytechnic’s School of Informatics & IT (IIT) have access to the latest Apache Hadoop curriculum, software and skills training for the Hadoop platform.

  • Empowering Growth Hackers with Big Data

    Growth hacking often leverages customer data in the experimentation process, in the form of A/B testing. The goal is to use big data to gain a better understand of the customer, via a complete view across every touch point of the organization, in order to enable an optimal customer experience. Growth hackers—who can be anyone from marketing professionals to product manager and engineers—are seeking insights to help optimize marketing campaigns across channels, increase customer loyalty and retention, and enhance the customer experience.

Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open-Source Farming Machine Plants And Waters Seeds

    While it is nice to have access to produce that is not in season, the unseen use of pesticides and other harmful additives is a difficult problem to avoid.

  • California dreaming: DIY, open-source SoCs with RISC-V

    With its customizable, open-source SoCs built on the free and open RISC-V instruction set architecture, SiFive, a San Francisco start-up, is poised to reverse the industry’s rising licensing, design and implementation costs.

    With on the one hand Moore’s Law ended or approaching the end and on the other, vast investments required for to develop a modern, high-performance chip, it looks impossible for smaller system designers to join the traditional economic model of chip building. However, the body of software and tools available from the open-source community under the guidance of the RISC-V Foundation, can substantially cut the cost of developing custom silicon. System designers can use the SiFive Freedom platforms to focus on their own differentiated processor without having the overhead of developing a modern SoC, fabric or software infrastructur

  • Lawn Da Vinci Open Source RC Lawnmower (video)

    If you find the prices of the current range of robotic lawnmowers just a little too high for your budget, you might be interested in a new open source remote control lawnmower which has been created called the Lawn Da Vinci.

    Okay so it’s not completely autonomous but you can still add a little extra fun to those lawn mowing days, with the addition of a little remote control to the humble petrol powered lawnmower.

  • A open source toolkit for building your own home

    The evidence is overwhelming that large scale collaboration leads to superior technology. FOSS showed us the way and now free and open source hardware is rapidly gaining traction. There is a growing list of open source hardware projects, which are bringing millions (billion?) of dollars of value to the world. Now a new initiative from the Open Building Institute (OBI) is adding "house" to the list of killer open hardware apps.

  • Open Source Hardware: What It Means and Why It Matters

    You've heard of open source software. But what about open source hardware? Here's an overview of what open source hardware is, what the challenges are and why open hardware is poised to grow in importance as the Internet of Things (IoT) continues to boom.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Has open source become the default business model for enterprise software?

    The announcement this week that Splice Machine is open-sourcing its product has become just the latest reminder that -- in emerging technology markets -- open source is increasingly the rule, not the exception.

    Open-source software is one of those overnight successes that's been a decade and more in the making. It's a far cry from the early aughts when Red Hat and JBoss blazed a trail that still has doubters. Arguably, there's still the issue of whether Red Hat, a publicly-traded, open source company, is a Unicorn from a different twist. Nonetheless, today, when we get acquainted to a new startup, one of the first questions that we pop is whether they're open source.

  • Spark-powered Splice Machine goes open source

    Splice Machine, the relational SQL database system that uses Hadoop and Spark to provide high-speed results, is now available in an open source edition.

    Version 2.0 of Splice Machine added Spark to speed up OLAP-style workloads while still processing conventional OLTP workloads with HBase. The open source version, distributed under the Apache 2.0 license, supplies both engines and most of Splice Machine's other features, including Apache Kafka streaming support. However, it omits a few enterprise-level options like encryption, Kerberos support, column-level access control, and backup/restore functionality.

  • 3 lessons from Gratipay's take-what-you-want compensation experiment

    This is the second in a two-part series on hiring and compensation practices in open organizations. In Want the best employees? Let them hire themselves, I introduced the concept of open hiring with examples from Drupal (the well-known CMS) and Gratipay (a payments start-up and open organization; I'm the founder). We saw how open source thinking about onboarding best practices can lead naturally to including new collaborators in money distribution.

  • Healthcare colored with blockchain’s open-source foundation

    Technological change forces economic growth. Technology extends the science of discovery and produces artifacts used in everyday life. It’s the small technical discoveries that make larger scientific endeavors possible. It's also these seemingly unrelated breakthroughs that make their way into our daily lives.

​The best Linux laptop: The 2016 Dell XPS 13

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Make no mistake about it. The 2016 Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop is wonderful. It's fast, its display is gorgeous, and, at less than three pounds, you can carry and code with it anywhere. But, oh, that price tag!

Read more

Also: Hands-on with the Linux-ready Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition

ZTE ZMAX PRO is a premium Android smartphone with a shockingly low $99 price

Filed under
Android

Inexpensive Android smartphones are nothing new. Getting premium quality phones at a low price is fairly new, however. While some folks hail these respectable wallet-friendly devices as a win for consumers, others -- such as yours truly -- view it as a race to the bottom which could ultimately harm the Android market overall.

Today, ZTE announces the ZMAX PRO Android smartphone. This device is chock full of premium features, such as an octa-core Snapdragon 617 processor, 2GB of RAM, expandable storage, and a fingerprint reader. The truly amazing aspect, however, is the price -- a shockingly low $99.

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Respinning Linux

Filed under
Linux

It started back in 2009, the first year of Lynn Bender’s fantastic brainstorm “Linux Against Poverty.” Lynn’s idea and subsequent involvement with our organization, then named The HeliOS Project, would infuse our effort with an energy and inventory we still rely on today.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft Releases Patch to Block Linux from Running on the Original Surface RT [Ed: but Microsoft loves Linux]

    The Register claims that MS16-094 fixes a loophole that allowed users to install other operating systems on Windows RT devices, including here Linux. With Windows RT becoming an OS with no future, many have looked into ways to install a different operating system on the Surface RT, but most attempts failed because of the locked bootloader and the other security systems that Microsoft put in place.

  • Hardware Design for Linux Engineers by Grant Likely

    At the Embedded Linux Conference, Grant Likely -- who is a Linux kernel engineer, and maintainer of the Linux Device Tree subsystem used by many embedded systems -- described his embedded hardware journey in a presentation called “Hardware Design for Linux Engineers” -- or as he put it, “explaining stuff I only learned six months ago.”

  • Hello!

    Machinery is a command line application for creating descriptions of Linux systems and working with them.

  • Opera Software’s $1.2 Billion Takeover by a Chinese Group Has Failed

    A $1.24 billion agreed takeover of Norwegian online browser and advertising company Opera Software by a Chinese consortium of internet firms has failed, Opera said on Monday, after warning last week the deal had yet to win regulatory approval.

    As an alternative, the consortium, which includes search and security business Qihoo 360 Technology and Beijing Kunlun Tech, a distributor of online and mobile games, will take over certain parts of Opera’s consumer business for $600 million, Opera said in a statement.

    Regulatory approval had not been received in time of a final deadline for the deal last Friday, the chairman of Opera Software said on Monday.

  • Opera sells open-source Chromium browser for $600m to Chinese bods
  • Opera agrees to sell its browser business to group of Chinese buyers for $600 million
  • Chinese takeover of Norway's Opera fails, alternative proposed
  • Chinese Consortium's $1.2 Billion Deal to Buy Opera's Ad Business Falls Through
  • Chinese US$1.2B takeover of Norway's Opera fails
  • Ten minute hacks: Hacking airplane headphones
  • And the winner is….

    We have completed the artwork contest and would like to extend our thanks to everyone that took part, there were some excellent pieces submitted and choosing the winners was a tough task.

    We would like to congratulate Jacques Daugeron on winning the background contest, the runners up will be available in the extra theme package as well.

    Here is the signature background for Mageia 6, it will be included in the next updates to the theme packages.

  • Breeze everywhere

    The first half of this year, I had the chance to work on icon and design for two big free-software projects.

    First, I’ve been hired to work on Mageia. I had to refresh the look for Mageia 6, which mostly meant making new icons for the Mageia Control Center and all the internal tools.

  • Ubuntu Demo Wireless Convergence on Bq M10 Tablet

    A video demoing wireless convergence on the Bq M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet has been shared by Canonical today.

    Ubuntu phone fans will know that wireless display technology was made available to users of the Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu phone in last month’s OTA-11 update.

    But for its latest over-the-air update Ubuntu is bringing it to the Bq Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition slate, which went on sale earlier in the year.

    “Our latest OTA-12 has just landed and we’re excited that you can now wirelessly connect your M10 tablet to a monitor,” Canonical say in the description accompanying the video.

    OTA 12 is, at the time of writing, scheduled to begin phased roll out from July 27, so don’t panic if you don’t get the update just yet!

  • Rugged, fanless computer runs Ubuntu on Haswell

    Perfectron’s rugged “SR10M” system offers a 4th Gen Core CPU, four GbE ports, stackable expansion, -40 to 70° operation, and MIL-STD-810G ruggedization.

    The SR10M is the latest in Perfectron’s Stackrack series of rugged, MIL-STD-rated stackable embedded computers equipped with Intel Haswell CPUs and designed primarily for military vehicles. The SR10M is built around an OXY5737A EBX form-factor single board computer (see farther below) equipped with the quad-core, 2.4GHz (3.4GHz turbo) Intel Core i7-4700EQ of the fourth “Haswell” generation of Core CPUs. It also offers an Intel QM76 chipset.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • System Shock Remaster Linux Demo Released, System Requirements Shared

    Earlier this year a Kickstarter campaign was started to develop a System Shock remaster from the ground up. Not only has that campaign been fully funded now, it has 10 days to reach its stretch goal of $1.1 million that would allow developers to create a Linux and Mac OS port of the game. Right now the game is above $1 million so the campaign only has to raise less than $0.1 million to make this port a reality.

  • Gallium3D Optimizations Published For BioShock Infinite

    Marek Olšák of AMD has been working on some Gallium3D optimizations for boosting the performance of the popular BioShock Infinite game on Linux.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Neon OS, a review

    After hopping between Red Hat Linux, CentOS, Fedora, and Ubuntu LTS over the past decade, I recently decided to give KDE Neon a shot.

    The potential of a cutting edge desktop environment on a stable 16.04 Ubuntu base really attracted me, the first because I'm a stickler for a good GUI based UX, and the latter because most current software is built against RHEL/Ubuntu.

    However I should preface this by saying that I spend more time on Windows than the GNU/*nix based OS's combined, and so my perspective in this review may be different than how you feel.

  • System Settings help needed

    First of all I need help, but before you help me I’d like to show you what a user without development skills can do to make plasma better.

    I already post about the system settings redesign and cause developer are busy with other tasks, I reviewed the existing modules and update them to fit (more) our vision. I know it’s not how I would prefere in the end but I did the changes without development skills (no compiling, no new code). I use qt-creator for edit the ui files and play around with qml.

    The Mouse cursor theme was updated, by move the buttons to bottom as in most other kcm’s. The height of the resolution depandant button will be change soon. (left plasma 5.7 right 5.8)

  • Current status for mailrendering in kube & kmail
  • From LaTeX to ConTeXt

    Every year I start to create a new book, every year I delete the book folder because I think it’s going into the wrong direction, and ths year is no different, I’m starting to write a book about Qt5 programming with C++11, I hope this time things can go different. And what I usually do is setup my LaTeX enviroment (kile, texlive, a few libraries and all that) – but I was hitting a UTF8 issue that \includepackage[utf8 or utf8-x][inputenc] didn’t solved… And if you are not well versed in Tex debugging things can go hairwire in just no time.

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Korora 22 Is About to Reach EOL

    As Korora uses Fedora as the base for our distribution and thus follow the Fedora Project's life cycle, Korora 22 Selina will reach it's End Of Life status on 22nd July.

  • Fedora APAC budget FAD

    Last week I attended the Fedora APAC budget planning FAD for FY’18. Ie. planning for Fedora activities that we expect to conduct between Mar 2017 – Feb 2018 and requisite budget for the same. Last year with Fedora.next reforms, we adopted a new approach to regional budget planning with an aim to increase transparency in the process. In this, each geographical region(ex. APAC) elects three delegates who handle major regional responsibilities. The Treasurer manages regional finance. The Logistician takes care of swag/media/banner production, dispatch and general coordination for Fedora presence at various events. And the Storyteller would collate information about regional events/activities and their impact/benefits to the Fedora project and report the same to the Fedora Community Action and Impact Lead(FCL) and the Fedora Council.

  • Design Prototypes - Week 2
  • FESCo Elections: Interview with Dominik Mierzejewski (rathann)

    I have a degree in software engineering. For over 12 years, I’ve worked as a Unix system administrator, with a short stint as a software engineer. Currently, I work for Citi as a senior IT infrastructure analyst. My primary responsibility at work is expert-level support of a heterogeneous environment consisting of RHEL, Solaris and AIX systems, both physical and virtual machines. Working at Citi while simultaneously being a Fedora developer allowed me to see both ends of the distribution development process and made me appreciate the excellent work of Fedora contributors even more. My past jobs include development of a particle detector model at CERN and system and network administration at the supercomputing centre of the University of Warsaw.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Why we use OpenBSD at VidiGuard

    At VidiGuard, we care a lot about physical security. In fact, it’s our job. But equally important to physical security is the security of our customers’ data. We also need a robust, reliable platform that can run with minimal interaction. To make both of those happen, we employ OpenBSD in our on-premise equipment and our data infrastructure. Why OpenBSD?

  • Building a home firewall: review of pfsense

    For some time now, I’ve been running OpenWRT on an RT-N66U device. I initially set that because I had previously been using my Debian-based file/VM server as a firewall, and this had some downsides: every time I wanted to reboot that, Internet for the whole house was down; shorewall took a fair bit of care and feeding; etc.

    I’ve been having indications that all is not well with OpenWRT or the N66U in the last few days, and some long-term annoyances prompted me to search out a different solution. I figured I could buy an embedded x86 device, slap Debian on it, and be set.

  • LLVM 3.9 Has Been Branched, LLVM 4.0 Will Be Up Next

    Right on schedule the LLVM 3.9 code was branched today in preparation for its formal release next month.

    LLVM 3.9 is another six-month feature update to the LLVM compiler stack. We'll have more on its features and performance in the weeks ahead, in addition to the LLVM Clang benchmarks we already do daily with it at LinuxBenchmarking.com.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • The Slashdot Interview With Larry Wall

    I run firefox on Linux, and chrome on my ancient Google phone, but I'm not a browser wonk. Maybe I'll have more opinions on that after our JS backend is done for Perl 6...

  • Pulp 2.8.6 Generally Available

    This release includes a small number of fixes to severe bugs in Pulp Platform, the RPM plugin, and the Docker plugin.

  • 11 Programming Languages For DevOps Success

    DevOps uses languages for software development and languages for deployment automation. If you want to be successful with either side of DevOps, these languages will help.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Mageia 6 Wallpaper, OpenMandriva 3 RC, Desktop Blunders

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news the Mageia project announced the winner of their artwork contest for upcoming version 6 as well as some of the other being included. OpenMandriva 3.0 Release Candidate 1 is available for download although the project has yet to announce it and Korora 22 is nearing the end of support. Matt Hartley identified the top six Linux desktop blunders and several Linux reviews caught my eye today.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • iTWire - Microsoft to reduce global workforce
  • Microsoft Faces Two Lawsuits For Aggressive Windows 10 Upgrade Campaign
    The series of lawsuits against Microsoft doesn’t seem to terminate sooner.
  • Controlling access to the memory cache
    Access to main memory from the processor is mediated (and accelerated) by the L2 and L3 memory caches; developers working on performance-critical code quickly learn that cache utilization can have a huge effect on how quickly an application (or a kernel) runs. But, as Fenghua Yu noted in his LinuxCon Japan 2016 talk, the caches are a shared resource, so even a cache-optimal application can be slowed by an unrelated task, possibly running on a different CPU. Intel has been working on a mechanism that allows a system administrator to set cache-sharing policies; the talk described the need for this mechanism and how access to it is implemented in the current patch set.
  • Why Blockchain Matters
    If your familiarity with Bitcoin and Blockchain is limited to having heard about the trial of Silk Road’s Ross Ulbricht, you can be forgiven -- but your knowledge is out of date. Today, Bitcoin and especially Blockchain are moving into the mainstream, with governments and financial institutions launching experiments and prototypes to understand how they can take advantage of the unique characteristics of the technology.
  • Our Third Podcast, with Cybik, is Out Now
    Cybik comes back on how he came to know and use Linux in the first place, his gaming habits, how he got involved into the Skullgirls port, and shares with us his outlook on the Linux gaming landscape. The podcast is just an hour long and you can either download it below, and use our RSS feed (that has the additional benefit of making it easy for you to get new episodes from now on):
  • GSoC: final race and multi-disc implementation
    It’s been a while since I wrote a post here. A lot has happened since then. Now Gnome-games fully supports PlayStation games, with snapshoting capabilities. The next thing I’m working on is multi-disc support, specially for PlayStation titles. So far, there’s a working propotity although a lot needs to be re-engineered and polished. This last part of the project has involved working both in UI, persistance and logic layers.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 11
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 22 commits, with 6199 lines added and 1763 lines removed.
  • [Solus] Replacement of Release Schedule
    In the not so distant past, Solus followed a static point release model. Our most current release at this time is 1.2, with a 1.2.1 planned to drop in the near future. However, we also recently announced our move to a rolling release model. As such, these two schools of thought are in contradiction of one another.
  • First release of official ArchStrike ISO files! [Ed: last week]
  • July ’16 security fixes for Java 8
    On the heels of Oracle’s July 2016 security updates for Java 8, the icedtea folks have released version 3.1.0 of their build framework so that I could create packages for OpenJDK 8u101_b13 or “Java 8 Update 101 Build 13” (and the JRE too of course).
  • Pipelight update
    I decided to do an update of my “pipelight” package. I had not looked at it for a long time, basically because I do not use it anymore, but after I upgraded my “wine” package someone asked if I could please write up what could be done for wine-pipelight. As you know, pipelight is a Linux plugin wrapper for Mozilla-compatible browsers which lets you install and use Windows plugins on Linux. This configuration enables you to access online services which would otherwise be unavailable to you on a Linux platform. The pipelight plugin wrapper uses wine to load the Windows software.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Current Analyst Ratings
  • Friday Session Wrap for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora @ EuroPython 2016 - event report
  • Android 7.0 Nougat could be release as soon as next month
  • Android gains anti-spam caller ID feature
  • Amazon Cloud Revenue Hits $2.9B
  • ServerMania – Discover High Availability Cloud Computing, powered by OpenStack
    Cloud computing is fast growing in the world of computer and Internet technology, many companies, organizations and even individuals are opting for shared pool of computing resources and services. For starters, Cloud computing is a type of Internet-based computing where users consume hosted services on shared server resources. There are fundamentally three types of cloud computing available today: private, public and hybrid cloud computing.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Student survey data shows Open Source training uptake amongst women and young people remains extreme
    Future Cert, the UK and Ireland representative for the LPI (Linux Professional Institute), is calling for more awareness of Open Source software training amongst the under 21s and especially women, which the industry is so desperately in need of. New figures from a recent Future Cert student survey reveals that the number of women and young people taking LPI Certification in Open Source computing remains extremely low. Of those questioned, 98% were male, and just 2% were female, taking an LPI exam. This figure is significantly less than an already low figure of around 15% to 17% of women in IT careers in general. It raises the question, what does the industry need to do to make an Open Source career attractive to women?
  • Quality in open source: testing CRIU
    Checkpoint/Restore In Userspace, or CRIU, is a software tool for Linux that allows freezing a running application (or part of it) and checkpointing it to disk as a collection of files. The files can then be used to restore and run the application from the point where it was frozen. The distinctive feature of the CRIU project is that it is mainly implemented in user space. Back in 2012, when Andrew Morton accepted the first checkpoint/restore (C/R) patches to the Linux kernel, the idea to implement saving and restoring of running processes in user space seemed kind of crazy. Yet, four years later, not only is CRIU working, it has also attracted more and more attention. Before CRIU, there had been other attempts to implement checkpoint/restore in Linux (DMTCP, BLCR, OpenVZ, CKPT, and others), but none were merged into the mainline. Meanwhile CRIU survived, which attests to its viability. Some time ago, I implemented support for the Test Anything Protocol format into the CRIU test runner; creating that patch allowed me to better understand the nature of the CRIU testing process. Now I want to share this knowledge with LWN readers. [...] The CRIU tests are quite easy to use and available for everyone. Moreover, the CRIU team has a continuous-integration system that consists of Patchwork and Jenkins, which run the required test configurations per-patch and per-commit. Patchwork also allows the team to track the status of patch sets to make the maintainer's work easier. The developers from the team always keep an eye on regressions. If a commit breaks a tree, the patches in question will not be accepted.
  • Open-source Wire messenger gets encrypted screen-sharing
    Chat app Wire has been rapidly adding feature as of late as it looks to gain some traction against the myriad of competitors out there. The latest trick in its arsenal is screen sharing. Now you can click on the new screen-sharing button to, well, share your screen during a call (if you’re on a desktop, that is). It works during group chats too and, as with all Wire communications, is encrypted end-to-end. Wire believes it’s the first messaging app to include end-to-end encryption.
  • SPI board election results are available
    Software in the Public Interest (SPI) has completed its 2016 board elections. There were two open seats on the board in addition to four board members whose terms were expiring. The six newly elected members of the board are Luca Filipozzi, Joerg Jaspert, Jimmy Kaplowitz, Andrew Tridgell, Valerie Young, and Martin Zobel-Helas. The full results, including voter statistics, are also available.
  • SFK 2016 - Call for Speakers
    Software Freedom Kosova is an annual international conference in Kosovo organized to promote free/libre open source software, free culture and open knowledge, now in its 7th edition. It is organized by FLOSSK, a non governmental, not for profit organization, dedicated to promote software freedom and related philosophies.
  • Microsoft's Next Open Source Target Could Be PowerShell: Report
  • Open-source drug discovery project advances drug development
  • The First-Ever Test of Open-Source Drug-Discovery
  • Open-Source Drug Discovery a Success
  • CNS - Open-Source Project Spurs New Drug Discoveries
    Medicines for Malaria Venture, a nonprofit group based in Geneva, Switzerland, distributed 400 diverse compounds with antimalarial activity — called the Malaria Box — to 200 labs in 30 nations in late 2011. The findings from subsequent studies and analyses were published Thursday in the journal PLOS Pathogens. Distributing the Malaria Box to various labs enabled scientists to analyze the compounds and develop findings that have led to more than 30 new drug-development projects for a variety of diseases. As a stipulation to receiving the samples, the various research groups had to deposit the information from their studies in the public domain.
  • Wire and Launchkit go open source, a water flow monitoring system, and more news
  • Apache, astsu, Biscuit, Python, Puppet 4, systemd & more!
  • The Onion Omega2: The Latest Router Dev Board
  • Build a $700 open source bionic prosthesis with new tutorial by Nicolas Huchet of Bionico
    The 3D printing community has already successfully taken over the market for cosmetic prostheses, as fantastic initiatives like E-NABLE have proven. But the world of bionics is a different place and just a handful of makers have gone there with any form of success, such as the very inspiring Open Bionics. But even 3D printed bionic prostheses are definitely within our reach, as French open source fanatic Nicolas Huchet of Bionico has proven. Though by no means a making expert himself, he 3D printed his own open source bionic hand during a three month residency at FabLab Berlin and has now shared all the files – including an extensive tutorial – online. This means you can now 3D print your very own bionic prosthesis at home for just $700.
  • BCN3D Technologies develops open source 3D printed 'Moveo' robotic arm for schools
    Designed from scratch and developed by BCN3D engineers in collaboration with the Generalitat de Catalunya’s Departament d’Ensenyament (Department of Education), the BCN3D Moveo is an Arduino Mega 2560-powered, 3D printed robotic arm which could enable schools and colleges in Spain and elsewhere to teach students the basics of robotics, mechanical design, and industrial programming. When the Departament d’Ensenyament approached BCN3D one year ago regarding the possibility of an educative robotics project, the tech organization jumped at the chance to get on board.

Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more