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Sunday, 25 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 4:10am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 4:08am
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 4:04am
Story Microsoft 'Love', Openwashing, and More Layoffs Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 2:48am
Story Ubuntu Phone OTA-13 Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 2:41am
Story Wine-Staging 1.9.19 Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 2:31am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 1:44am
Story Canonical Releases New Linux Kernel Updates for Ubuntu 16.04, 14.04 & 12.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2016 - 11:32pm
Story Solus Users Are the First to Get the Mozilla Firefox 49 Web Browser, Update Now Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2016 - 11:30pm
Story Universal prototyping shield supports numerous Arduino models Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2016 - 11:27pm

KDE Plasma 5.7.5 Is the Last in the Series, Plasma 5.8 LTS to Land October 4

Filed under
KDE

Today, September 13, 2016, the KDE development team proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the last maintenance update to the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment series.

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Elegant and Effective Deepin 15.3 Linux OS Launches with Interface Improvements

Filed under
Development
Linux

Today, September 13, 2016, the development team behind the Deepin Linux operating system were happy to announce the availability of the third maintenance update to the Deepin 15 series.

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More on Ubuntu Takedown

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Another Day, Another Anomaly: Paramount Issues DMCA Takedown On Ubuntu Linux Torrent

    The legacy copyright industries keep insisting that it's "easy" to recognize when something is infringing and thus it's "easy" to stop copyright infringement. They're very, very wrong on both counts for a variety of reasons. We could go into the details for why, but it's easier to just let them show us themselves. Not too long ago we wrote about Warner Bros. issuing DMCA takedown notices on its own sites (and also Amazon and IMDB links for its movies), and now TorrentFreak alerts us to Paramount issuing a DMCA takedown on a torrent of Ubuntu, the popular version of Linux that many people use all the time.

    It's kind of a weird request, and it's not at all clear why it's included in this takedown notice, which is for a variety of movies. In the section on the movie Transformers: Age of Extinction, Paramount (filed by notoriously clueless IP Echelon), it includes a link to a torrent of an Ubuntu iso.

  • Big Content orders old version of Ubuntu to be censored

    While Google is normally pretty good at stopping daft take-down requests from the movie studios, it seems to have missed a doozy.

    Paramount Pictures ordered a takedown of a link to a 32-bit alternate install image Ubuntu 12.04.2 LTS because it apparently infringed on Paramount movie ‘Transformers: Age of Extinction‘.

    The link pointed to a stock and dated old Ubuntu release which has nothing to do with the god awful flick.

Apache News

Filed under
OSS
  • Oracle's NetBeans Headed to The Apache Software Foundation

    Oracle's open-source NetBeans IDE could become the next former Sun Microsystems project to land at the Apache Software Foundation (ASF).

  • Apache Announces Updated Syncope Identity Management Toolset

    In recent posts, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been moving up to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support and more.

    Recently, Apache Bahir became a Top-Level Project (TLP). Now, the foundation has announced that it is making available Apache Syncope 2.0, a digital identity and access management system. Implemented in Java EE technology, Apache Syncope is designed to keep enterprise identity data consistent and synchronized across repositories, data formats, and models.

    "Syncope 2.0.0 is a major milestone for the community," said Francesco Chicchiriccò, Vice President of Apache Syncope, and one of the original creators of the project. "The numbers of this release look great --new features, new components and tools, new contributors, more enterprise appeal, and even more extensibility."

OpenStack, Red Hat, and Rackspace

  • OpenStack Mitaka software arrives as developers tease Newton release

    As vendors scramble to update their OpenStack distributions based on the latest Mitaka release, developers are already teasing what’s in store for the next version of the cloud computing fabric, dubbed OpenStack Newton.

    A number of vendors have already gotten their latest releases based on Mitaka out of the door, including Red Hat Inc. and Rackspace Inc. The latter released its updated private cloud distribution on Monday, labeling it a “managed services” platform rather than just a regular OpenStack platform due to its reference architecture based on the OpenStack-Ansible project that aims to add “security hardening” to the open-source software. Rackspace is clearly gunning for the more security-conscious among the OpenStack crowd, and took pains to emphasize in a whitepaper about the trade-off relating the application of more comprehensive security configurations and potential performance and availability issues.

  • Veritas and Red Hat Collaborate to Support Requirements for Business Critical Applications on OpenStack
  • Rackspace Private Cloud, Based on OpenStack, Arrives in New Version

    OpenStack cloud computing distributions, many of them based on the latest Mitaka build of the OpenStack platform, are proliferating. With so many vendors competing in this arena, market consolidation is also underway.

    Only days ago, Red Hat announced its latest platform: OpenStack Platform 9. Directly on the heels of that, VMware introduced VMware Integrated OpenStack 3. These distributions are based on the OpenStack Mitaka release. Now, Rackspace has rolled out version 13 of Rackspace Private Cloud powered by OpenStack. The new version addresses stability and security requirements for enterprise customers and is based on the Mitaka release.

    Stability and security are points of focus for Rackspace because the OpenStack market is now competitive enough that each vendor participating needs to make clear what the competitive differentiators are. Rackspace is also, as usual, focused on "fanatical support."

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Securing the Programmer

    I have a favorite saying: "If you are a systems administrator, you have the keys to the kingdom. If you are an open-source programmer, you don't know which or how many kingdoms you have the keys to." We send our programs out into the world to be run by anyone for any purpose. Think about that: by anyone, for any purpose. Your code might be running in a nuclear reactor right now, or on a missile system or on a medical device, and no one told you. This is not conjecture; this is everyday reality. Case in point: the US Army installed gpsd on all armor (tanks, armored personnel carriers and up-armored Humvees) without telling its developers.

    This article focuses on the needs of infrastructure software developers—that is, developers of anything that runs as root, has a security function, keeps the Internet as a whole working or is life-critical. Of course, one never knows where one's software will be run or under what circumstances, so feel free to follow this advice even if all you maintain is a toddler login manager. This article also covers basic security concepts and hygiene: how to think about security needs and how to keep your development system in good shape to reduce the risk of major computing security mishaps.

  • Software-Defined Security Market Worth 6.76 Billion USD by 2021
  • Two critical bugs and more malicious apps make for a bad week for Android
  • Let's Encrypt Aiming to Encrypt the Web

    By default, the web is not secure, enabling data to travel in the clear, but that's a situation that is easily corrected through the use of SSL/TLS. A challenge with implementing Secure Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security has been the cost to acquire an SSL/TSL certificate from a known Certificate Authority (CA), but that has changed in 2016, thanks to the efforts of Let's Encrypt.

    Let's Encrypt is a non-profit effort that that was was announced in November 2014 and became a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project in April 2015. Let's Encrypt exited its beta period in April 2016 and to date has provided more than 5 million free certificates.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Linux Foundation and Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Tridgell: ArduPilot and DroneCode
  • ArduPilot and DroneCode

    For the attention of the users, supporters, fans and corporate users of ArduPilot:

    The ArduPilot project is going through a transition. We will no longer be associated with DroneCode and instead will be focused directly on the needs of our users, contributors and partners.

    We had high hopes for DroneCode as a collaborative project. DroneCode was born out of the ArduPilot project and we led the technical collaboration since its inception nearly two years ago. As part of that collaboration we welcomed and nurtured close ties with the PX4 project and worked closely with a number of corporate partners.

    Unfortunately DroneCode has a built-in flaw. The structure and bylaws of DroneCode are built around exceptional power for the Platinum members, giving them extraordinary control over the future of DroneCode. This is a fundamental flaw in a project meant to promote free and open source software as it means that the business interests of a very small number of members can override the interests of the rest of the members and the community.

  • Raspberry Pi VC4 DRM To Get Lower Memory/CPU Overhead On Linux 4.9

    The latest Raspberry Pi VC4 DRM driver changes have now landed in DRM-Next for in turn landing in the mainline kernel when the Linux 4.9 merge window opens in a few weeks.

    The two main feature additions for the VC4 DRM driver are interlaced vblank timing and a memory/CPU overhead reduction when 3D rendering is taking place. The overhead reduction is from not forcing the new binner overflow allocation per-draw. Aside from the VC4 DRM driver work, with Linux 4.9 is where there finally might be mainline support for the Raspberry Pi Zero.

  • OpenDayLight Boron Set to Stabilize Open-Source SDN

    The open-source OpenDayLight Software Defined Networking (SDN) project is set to debut its fifth release this week, codenamed Boron. The Boron release follows the Beryllium update, which debuted in February.

  • Improvements, New Extension Hit Mesa

    There has already been more improvements hitting Mesa Git this week.

    Among the noteworthy recent additions in Mesa Git include:

    - A RadeonSI change not to preload constants at the beginning of shaders. By doing so, very simple tests are seeing improvements -- a big decrease in SGPR spilling for shader-db tests by up to 68%.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

15 Top Open Source Artificial Intelligence Tools

Filed under
OSS

In a recent article, we provided an overview of 45 AI projects that seem particularly promising or interesting. In this slideshow, we're focusing in on open source artificial intelligence tools, with a closer look at fifteen of the best-known open source AI projects.

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Everyone Wins With Open Source Software

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OSS

As open source software matures and is used by more and more major corporations, it is becoming clear that the enterprise software game has changed. Sam Ramji, CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, believes that open source software is a positive sum game, as reflected in his keynote at ApacheCon in Vancouver in May.

Invoking his love of game theory, Ramji stated emphatically that open source software is a positive-sum game, where the more contributors there are to the common good, the more good there is for everyone. This idea is the opposite of a zero-sum game, where if someone benefits or wins, then another person must suffer, or lose.

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Missiles to Legos: 10 reasons to run Linux instead of Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Over the years, I've had my fair share of disagreements with both Linux and Linux users. But as Linux has entered its second quarter century, I've found myself thinking about all the fabulous things that run Linux.

Two years ago, I wrote an article about the five reasons I'd rather run Windows 8 than Linux. While Windows 8 didn't work out all that well, Windows 10 is clearly a barn-burner. Today, in fact, you can find Windows 10 running inside a Raspberry Pi (and it's free for individuals) as well as inside of very inexpensive PCs.

But ever since I threw OctoPrint on a $35 Raspberry Pi and created a 3D printing server, I've felt I've come to terms with Linux. I think we can be friends again.

So I thought, if I can use Linux to build 3D objects, what else would I use Linux for? Here are 10 places where the phrase "I'd rather run Linux than Windows" applies quite nicely.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Canonical Shaky On Sharing

    Remember Canonical, the company that produces the distribution Ubuntu GNU/Linux? They have a hard time even mentioning “Linux” on their website yet they manage to customize the Linux kernel for their distro without actively contributing the modifications to kernel.org.

  • AMD's GPUOpen HIP Project Made Progress Over The Summer

    The HIP project has made good progress over the summer. HIP from AMD's GPUOpen project is part of the puzzle for converting CUDA to portable C++ code. That source code can then run on AMD GPUs while having little to no performance impact, at least according to AMD.

  • A Unity developer is teasing the Vulkan API in the Unity engine [Ed: but it brings in Microsoft Mono]
  • 4 Weeks Left to Gentoo Miniconf

    4 weeks are left until LinuxDays and Gentoo Miniconf 2016 in Prague.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2016
  • New Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk Drone Development Kit Makes Use of Ubuntu Snappy and ROS

    Dubbed Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk, the new development kit is here to help developers create obstacle avoidance and autonomous robots and drones that use the slimmed-down version of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution designed for embedded and IoT (Internet of Things) devices, Ubuntu Snappy Core, as well as ROS (Robot Operating System).

    "Parrot developed S.L.A.M.dunk to be as easy and user-friendly as possible for developers, researchers, integrators, and academics," reads the press release. "All Ubuntu functionalities and benefits from ROS (Robot Operating System) framework are embedded in the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk making it user-friendly. The HDMI port makes it possible to develop directly on the product."

  • Enabling Geocode API for Tizen apps with Tizen studio and Here Maps

    If you’re a deveoper working on the Tizen platform with apps that require location access, then the new Tizen Studio’s Native Geocode API is just what you should be looking for. The API provides coordinates data to your app which can be achieved by following a fairly simple process.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Vim 8.0 released
  • MKVToolNix 9.4.2 Free MKV Manipulation App Improves the AVC and HEVC Readers

    On September 11, 2016, MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus released the first maintenance update to the major 9.4 series, version 9.4.1, with various improvements to the mkvmerge component, and several bug fixes.

    MKVToolNix 9.4.1 is dubbed "Black Rain," and, according to the release notes, it looks like it adds many improvements to the mkvmerge tool, a component that lets users merge MKV files with different audio, video, or subtitle streams. For example, the HEVC parser, MP4 reader, and AAC reader received various fixes.

  • qBittorrent 3.3.7 Free BitTorrent Client Removes KickassTorrents Search Engine

    A new stable version of the open-source, free, and cross-platform qBittorrent BitTorrent client used in Linux, Mac, and Windows computers was released on September 11, 2016.

    qBittorrent 3.3.7 comes one and a half months after the launch of the previous maintenance update, namely qBittorrent 3.3.6, and, according to the release notes, it only adds a single feature, fixes four annoying issues reported by users since then, and updates the search functionality.

  • Orion Is a Qt/QML Twitch desktop Client That I’d Love To Try

    It feels a little bit mean to write about an app that I know most of you won’t get to try anytime soon. But when I saw Orion, a Qt-based Twitch desktop app, surface on Reddit this evening I …I felt like I had to mention it here.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Maps marching towards 3.22

    So, I just rolled the 3.21.92 release of GNOME Maps. This is final beta release before the next stable (3.22.0).

    The most noteworthy change will ofcourse be the new tile provider, replacing the discontinued MapQuest tiles, courtesy of Mapbox!
    We have also backported this to prior stable versions to keep things working in current distribution releases, and for the future we will also have the ability to swich tile sources without patching release versions, as Maps now fetches a service definition file. And maybe (if time and effort permits) we might expand into the territory of client-side rendering of vector data, which opens up some possibilties, such as rendering various layers of interesting stuff such as a specific type of point-of-interests, like "show all restaurants in this area".

  • GUADEC 2017 to take place in Manchester, UK

    It is with great pleasure that the GNOME Foundation announces next year’s GUADEC to be held in Manchester, United Kingdom during the summer of 2017. The GNOME User and Developer European Conference (GUADEC) brings together hundreds of users and developers every year to further the GNOME Project. It is one of the Foundation’s longest-standing and most noteworthy events.

    Manchester is located about 160 miles (260 km) northwest of London, with Manchester Airport providing easy access for international guests, as well as plenty of public transportation. It has a long history of being a place of learning and innovation, with over 20 Nobel Prize winners having worked or studied in Manchester, Chetham’s Library being the oldest public library in the English-speaking world, and notable accomplishments like the splitting of the atom by Ernest Rutherford in the early 1900s.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Nominations Open for 2017 Red Hat Innovation Awards
  • Red Hat Virtualization 4: An Overview

    Red Hat's clearly investing in adding value to the open source KVM (kernel virtual machine) project and integrating virtual machine technology more tightly into other products to make it easier for enterprises to adopt and use the complete Red Hat software environment. Red Hat Virtualization 4 (RHV4) is the next step in that campaign.

  • Red Hat files to sell $368M in stock for employee plan
  • PostgreSQL 9.5: A quick start on Fedora 24

    PostgreSQL is one of the most popular object-relational database management system (shortened to ORDBMS) and is 100% open-source. It is not purely about relations anymore: PostgreSQL is more and more about NoSQL as well. The following article is a short tutorial to set up PostgreSQL 9.5 on Fedora 24, so it can be used for a development environment. For a production deployment, it is recommended to use a different set-up and harden the service.

  • Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F24 Final

    Welcome back to the final installment of Heroes of Fedora 24 – Final edition! The purpose of this post is to recognize the contributors who made a difference in releasing Fedora 24 Final. Below you’ll find stats for Bodhi updates, release-validation tests, and Bugzilla reports. Without further ado, let’s get started!

  • Downgrading Fedora ‘rawhide’ -> Fedora 24
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Phone, Sep 2016 - Vorsprung durch Touch
    The Ubuntu Phone is getting better, and with every new iteration of the OTA, my little BQ Aquaris E4.5 is gaining more speed and functionality. Like in the air force, with an avionics upgrade, which transforms ancient wings into a powerful and modern bird of prey. Only the pace of advancement is lagging behind the market. See what Android and iOS can do, even Windows Phone, and you realize how late and insufficiently meaningful the Ubuntu Phone really is. This has to change, massively. This latest round does bring some fine goods to the table - more speed and stability, better icons, more overall visual polish, incremental improvements in the applications and the scopes. But that's not enough to win the heart of the average user. A more radical, app-centric effort is required. More focus on delivering the mobile experience, be it as it may. Ubuntu cannot revolutionalize that which is already considered the past. It can only join the club and enjoy the benefits of a well-established reality. And that is a kickass app stack that makes the touch device worth using in the first place. Still, it's not all gloomy. E4.5 is a better product now than it was a year ago, fact. Ubuntu Phone is a better operating system than it was even this spring, fact. So maybe one day we will see Ubuntu become an important if not dominant player in the phone and tablet space. It sure is heading in the right direction, my only fear is the availability of resources to pull off this massive rehaul that is needed to make it stand up to the old and proven giants. And that's it really. If you're keen on Linux (not Android) making it in the mobile world, do not forget to check my Ubuntu tablet review! Especially the convergence piece. On that merry note, you do remember that I'm running a wicked contest this year, too? He/she who reads my books might get a chance to win an M10 tablet. Indeed. Off you go, dear readers. Whereas I will now run the same set of tests we did here on the Aquaris tablet, and see how it likes the OTA-12 upgrade. The end.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 - new window snapping feature
  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 is Taking Place In Mid-November
  • Ubuntu Online Summit: 15-16 November 2016

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • 10 Top Open Source Artificial Intelligence Tools for Linux
    In this post, we shall cover a few of the top, open-source artificial intelligence (AI) tools for the Linux ecosystem. Currently, AI is one of the ever advancing fields in science and technology, with a major focus geared towards building software and hardware to solve every day life challenges in areas such as health care, education, security, manufacturing, banking and so much more.
  • List of FLOSS International Conferences September 2016 Materials
  • This Week In Servo 78
    Our overall roadmap is available online and now includes the initial Q3 plans. From now on, we plan to include the quarterly plan with a high-level breakdown in the roadmap page.
  • Firefox 49 Release: Find out what is new
    Firefox 49.0 is the next major stable release of the web browser. Firefox 48.0.2 and earlier versions of Firefox can be updated to the new release.
  • Open-Source Climate Change Data From NASA, NOAA, & Others Available For 1st Time
    Climate change has many components — rising sea levels, alterations in rainfall patterns, and an increase in severe storm activity, among others. Communities around the world are faced with the need to plan for climate change but don’t have the information available to do so effectively.
  • Another Setback for 3D Printed Gun Advocate Cody Wilson as Court of Appeals Rules That National Security Concerns Outweigh Free Speech
    It’s been a long, drawn-out battle, beginning in 2013 when Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, published the open source files for his 3D printed handgun, the Liberator, online. The State Department ordered that he take the files down, and Wilson complied, but not before thousands had downloaded them and spread them elsewhere on the Internet. In 2015, with the help of gun rights organization The Second Amendment Foundation, Wilson filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the State Department had violated not only his Second Amendment but his First Amendment rights. By suppressing his right to share information online, Wilson argued, the State Department was violating his right to free speech.
  • In 3D-Printed Gun Case, Federal Court Permits Speech Censorship in the Name of Alleged National Security
  • Oracle tries playing nice with Java EE rebels
    With Oracle now trying to get back on track with advancing enterprise Java, the company is seeking rapprochement with factions that had sought to advance the platform on their own. The two groups involved are mostly amenable to patching up the relationship. Oracle's Anil Gaur, group vice president of engineering, said this week he had already been in touch with some of the concerned parties. The two factions include Java EE Guardians, led by former Oracle Java EE evangelist Reza Rahman, and Microprofile.io, which has included participation from Red Hat and IBM.

GNU News