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Thursday, 30 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Five Linux networking commands to help with network connectivity issues

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Linux

Linux is everywhere and nearly all Linux distros need network connections to offer their services. Network connection failures is one of the major headaches if you are using a Linux based PC or a system. Because if your network fails, all other services will fail and you will be left with a dud system. For this reason, the administrator must have the appropriate tools and commands to analyze and troubleshoot network connectivity.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Intel x86s hide another CPU that can take over your machine (you can't audit it)

    Recent Intel x86 processors implement a secret, powerful control mechanism that runs on a separate chip that no one is allowed to audit or examine. When these are eventually compromised, they'll expose all affected systems to nearly unkillable, undetectable rootkit attacks. I've made it my mission to open up this system and make free, open replacements, before it's too late.

  • Let’s Encrypt Accidentally Spills 7,600 User Emails

    Certificate authority Let’s Encrypt accidentally disclosed the email addresses of several thousand of its users this weekend.

    Josh Aas, Executive Director for the Internet Security Research Group (ISRG), the nonprofit group that helped launch the CA, apologized for the error on Saturday. In what Let’s Encrypt dubbed a preliminary report posted shortly after it happened, Aas blamed the faux pas on a bug in the automated email system the group uses.

  • phpMyAdmin Project Successfully Completes Security Audit

    Software Freedom Conservancy congratulates its phpMyAdmin project on succesfuly completing completing a thorough security audit, as part of Mozilla's Secure Open Source Fund. No serious issues were found in the phyMyAdmin codebase.

  • StartCom launches a new service - StartEncrypt

    StartCom, a leading global Certificate Authority (CA) and provider of trusted identity and authentication services, announces a new service – StartEncrypt today, an automatic SSL certificate issuance and installation software for your web server.

today's howtos

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HowTos

Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
  • Vimperator interface for Firefox Part 1

    Vimperator is a plugin for Firefox that completely overhauls the GUI to behave like Vim making your mouse unneeded for most web sites. If this was not available I would be attempting to create something much like it.

  • Contextual Identities on the Web

    We all portray different characteristics of ourselves in different situations. The way I speak with my son is much different than the way I communicate with my coworkers. The things I tell my friends are different than what I tell my parents. I’m much more guarded when withdrawing money from the bank than I am when shopping at the grocery store. I have the ability to use multiple identities in multiple contexts. But when I use the web, I can’t do that very well. There is no easy way to segregate my identities such that my browsing behavior while shopping for toddler clothes doesn’t cross over to my browsing behavior while working. The Containers feature I’m about to describe attempts to solve this problem: empowering Firefox to help segregate my online identities in the same way I can segregate my real life identities.

  • Multi-process Firefox and AMO

    In Firefox 48, which reaches the release channel on August 1, 2016, mullti-process support (code name “Electrolysis”, or “e10s”) will begin rolling out to Firefox users without any add-ons installed.

  • Fix Firefox resource URI leak

    Any website can access a selection of Firefox resource files to find out more about the web browser that is used to connect to the site.

  • Baby Steps: Slowly Porting musl to Rust

    TLDR: I’m toying with writing a C standard library in Rust by porting musl-libc over function-by-function.

elementaryOS News

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GNU
Linux
  • Snap? Flatpak? Deb?

    First off, this post is all my personal thoughts and opinions; while I am involved with elementary OS, this doesn’t necessarily represent the thoughts of anyone else or of elementary itself.

  • Loki Beta is Here

    This release brings tons of fixes and new features for both users and developers. Over 20 blueprints were implemented and over 800 issues closed. Time to break it all down and reveal what the future holds for the next version of elementary OS!

  • elementaryOS 0.4 Loki Beta Available For Testing

    elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" beta was released today, and it includes over 800 closed issues and 20 implemented blueprints.

Development News (mostly Python)

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Development
  • Python 3.6 and 3.7 release cycles

    Ned Deily, who is the release manager for the upcoming Python 3.6 release and will "probably be the 3.7 release manager", led a session at the 2016 Python Language Summit to review and discuss the release cycle for the language. There have been some changes for 3.6 compared to the 3.5 cycle and there may be opportunities to make some additional changes for 3.7 and beyond.

  • PyCharm and type hints

    A mini-theme at this year's Python Language Summit was tools that are using the PEP 484 type hints. In the final session on that theme, Andrey Vlasovskikh, the community lead for the PyCharm IDE, described that tool's support for type hints.

  • An introduction to pytype

    Google's pytype tool, which uses the PEP 484 type hints for static analysis, was the subject of a presentation by one of its developers, Matthias Kramm, at the 2016 Python Language Summit. In it, he compared several different tools and their reaction to various kinds of type errors in the code. He also described pytype's static type-inference capabilities.

  • The state of mypy

    At last year's Python Language Summit, Guido van Rossum gave an introduction to "type hints", which are an optional feature to allow static checkers to spot type errors in Python programs. At this year's summit, he discussed mypy, which is one of several static type checkers for Python. It is being used by Dropbox, Van Rossum's employer, on its large Python codebase—with good results.

  • Python's GitHub migration and workflow changes

    Brett Cannon gave an update on the migration of Python's repositories to GitHub and the associated workflow changes at the 2016 Python Language Summit. The goal is modernize the development process; right now that process is "old school", which is "good or bad depending on who you ask". After looking at the options, GitHub seemed to be the best choice for housing the repositories; PEP 512 lays out the options and rationale for those interested. LWN looked at some of the discussion surrounding the move back in December 2014.

  • 20 Most Important Programming Languages In The World

    If we make a list of the most important programming languages, we’ll come across two categories. There are many vintage programming languages that just won’t die and continue to be used in their respective field. Along with them, there are some newer programming languages that have managed to make their mark upon the tech world.

A Week in Qt/KDE/Randa

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KDE

ReactOS 0.4.1 review - Cold fusion

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OS
Reviews

Duke Nukem, Half-Life 3, ReactOS. What do they all have in common? An extremely long development time. In this article, we will focus on the last, a project that started in 1996 as an attempt to provide a free, Windows-compatible operating system to the masses.

Fast forward 20 years, ReactOS is a living, breathing entity, having recently reached a semi-mature 0.4.1 release. Lots of stuff has been happening under the hood, enough to warrant some real-life testing. Anyhow, here be Dedoimedo's first stab at this interesting little system.

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Today and Yesterday in Techrights

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News

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 6 Best Email Clients for Linux Systems

    Email is an old way of communication yet, it still remains the basic and most important method out there of sharing information up to date, but the way we access emails has changed over the years. From web applications, a lot of people now prefer to use email clients than ever before.

  • 10 Best File Managers for Linux Systems

    File management is so important on a computer that users always want to have a simple and easy to use file manager or file browser. But sometimes having a feature rich and highly configurable file manager for performing both simple tasks such as searching, copying, moving, creating and deleting files, and complex operations such as remote access of files and SHH connections is very vital.

  • 5 Best Web Photo Gallery Solutions

    There are many web services that allow users to upload pictures to a hosting site. The image host stores the images on its servers, and shows the individual different types of code to allow others to view that image. Popular examples include Flickr, Instagram, Imgur, Photobucket, SmugMug and Snapfish.

    Most of these solutions provide free storage space, with more features available if you are willing to pay for a premium account. However, there are problems with these solutions. Leaving aside privacy and ownership issues, these services typically do not provide good integration with other platforms. There is a simple alternative which gives you more control and flexibility - self-hosted open source gallery software.

  • 5 reasons why VirtualBox has a place in the data center

    At first blush you might think VirtualBox or any type II hypervisor has no place in the data center, but that assumption would be wrong. Let me see if I can change your mind by laying out reasons why I believe VirtualBox does have a place in the data center.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Graphics Performance With Radeon Software, AMDGPU-PRO, AMDGPU+RadeonSI

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I published some Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Linux gaming benchmarks using the GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 graphics cards. Those numbers were interesting with the NVIDIA proprietary driver but for benchmarking this weekend are Windows 10 results with Radeon Software compared to Ubuntu 16.04 running the new AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver as well as the latest Git code for a pure open-source driver stack.

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5 Reasons to Install Linux on Your Laptop

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Linux

You can choose something other than MacOS or Windows 10 when it comes to an operating system for your computer. If you’re prepared to be a little more adventurous, Linux has plenty of great features that will save you time and make working a little less dull. The best part is that Live Installations allow you to try out the software before you wipe your entire hard drive.

Linux comes in various flavors called distros (distributions) and it’s up to you to determine which one you opt for. Ubuntu is by far the most popular desktop distro and is a good place to start for beginners, so we’ve focused on that one here, but once you’ve grasped the basics feel free to explore the pros and cons of some others out there.

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LibreOffice News

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LibO
  • Faster Rendering Appears To Be Coming For LibreOffice

    Some rendering speed improvements have been worked on recently for the LibreOffice open-source office suite and are now present in LO Git.

  • Document Liberation Project: progress so far in 2016

    If you haven’t heard of the Document Liberation Project (DLP) before, we made a short video explaining what it does and why it’s important. In summary: it supports development of software libraries to read documents from many (usually proprietary) applications. If you’ve ever opened a file generated by Apple Pages, WordPerfect or Microsoft Works in LibreOffice, you’ve benefitted from the hard work of the DLP team. And DLP libraries are used in many other prominent FOSS tools such as Inkscape and Scribus as well.

Red Hat Canonical Package Wars Claims Another Victim

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-s

TechRights.org's Dr. Roy Schestowitz blogged today that Red Hat was "bashing the media" for covering Canonical's Snap packaging. In related news, Matthias Klumpp has suspended development of Limba, a cross-platform package management system similar to Flatpak, in deference to Snap and Flatpak. On Snap, Christine Hall touched on a thought that needs to be reported as well. On the other side of town, Dominique Leuenberger shared a bit of Tumbleweed news and Mike Saunders posted on the progress of the Document Liberation Project.

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Open source wins over France’s urban planners

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OSS

Marseille, France’s second largest city, and OpenMarie, a community of city administrations working on open source software, are boosting the development of OpenADS, a software solution for managing building and zoning permits. Last week, the two started the OpenADS working group, to bring together the many public administrations that use the software, and to manage the development roadmap.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Microsoft Tax Doesn't Really Exist [Ed: This article is wrong. The Microsoft tax does exist, based on leaked documents in Techrights.]

    When you are considering a switch to a computer with Linux pre-installed, you may be surprised to discover that the hardware is about the same price as a comparable Windows machine. You may have heard of something called the "Microsoft Tax" which refers to the extra price you pay for the cost of Windows on a computer that you buy with the intention of installing Linux on it. As a result, you may think that you should pay less for an equivalent computer with Linux pre-installed. After all, Linux is free and Windows sells for hundreds of dollars. But you don't. That's because the so-called Microsoft Tax doesn't really exist. It's a myth.

  • Entroware have released another beast of a Laptop, worth looking into
  • Acer's CXI2 Chromebox Now Has Upstream Coreboot Support

    Acer's CXI2 Chromebox line-up is now supported by mainline Coreboot.

    The CXI2 has been using Coreboot similar to other Chromebook/Chromebox devices, but wasn't supported by mainline Coreboot. That changed yesterday with the code now working its way into mainline Git.

  • Samsung's Purchase of Joyent Unlocks Cloud Infrastructure, and More
  • Containers are on fire as enterprises ramp up adoption

    Container technology is rapidly transforming the way enterprises develop and deliver applications, and adoption is set to ramp up spectacularly in the next year, even as obstacles towards adoption persist.

  • Nearly Two-Thirds of IT Users Plan to Mainstream Containers in a Year, Global Survey Reveals
  • OSVR's new headset, DeepMind learns gaming, and new Linux releases

    In this week's edition, we take a look at a new headset from OSVR, Google's DeepMind playing Montezuma's Revenge for rewards, and two new games out for Linux.

  • Videos: MontanaLinux CentOS Remix

    As you may know, I've been remixing Fedora for several years for my own personal use... called MontanaLinux. I've also been remixing CentOS and Scientific Linux and thought I'd write a little bit about it.

    The main reason I created the EL7 remixes is because I have a few older HP Proliant servers at work that have the CCISS Raid Controller and Red Hat dropped support for those in RHEL 7. Also, I originally included both GNOME and KDE as part of it but have since decided to make it leaner by switching to XFCE 4.12 that is available in EPEL... and of course it includes all of the available updates as of build time.

  • Linux + Windows : Robolinux 8.5 LTS Arrives With Stealth VM For Running Windows

    Robolinux is a unique Linux distribution that comes with a stealth VM for deep Windows integration. The latest release of this operating system i.e. Robolinux 8.5 LTS “Raptor” is now available for download. This release–featuring Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, and LXDE versions–comes with Steam for Linux client for seamless gaming.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/24

    It has been a very busy week, but it has shown how much enthusiasm every contributor puts into Tumbleweed. There have been again 4 snapshots released (0609, 0611, 0612 and 0613) and this marks the end of ‘Tumbleweed being built using GCC 5’. As usual, one end is just the beginning of something new: starting with Snapshot 0614 (or any higher number, in case openQA won’t agree) the entire distribution is built using GCC 6 as compiler.

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Receives Buy Rating from RBC Capital
  • Ubuntu Touch OS with Continuum like Convergence Feature Coming Soon to OnePlus 3

    Ubuntu’s Touch OS powered smartphone have slowly started becoming a reality since the last few years. Meizu MX4 was one of the powerful Ubuntu powered phones launched till date. That aside there are a few other devices that support Ubuntu Touch OS thanks to ports like these. Canonical’s Ubuntu OS however has succeeded to get a head start in the smartphone mainly due to the lack of features over an Android or iOS device.

  • T-Shirt Sale June 15th-21st

    From June 15th-21st you can get a 15% discount on a Bodhi Linux branded T-Shirt with the code TSHIRT16 on our Merchandise store.

  • elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ Beta Released — Download The Most Beautiful Linux Distro

    elementary OS is a very popular and one of the most beautiful Linux distros out there. The upcoming version of the OS i.e. elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’, is coming in next few months. The first beta of this open source operating system is already here and you can download it right now to get started with testing.

  • Mygica Media Streamer First Impressions

    Some of it was streamed from my other Linux computers...

  • Microsoft's Office Plans Are a Confusing Mess

    Last week, I tried to get a subscription to Microsoft Office. I expected to simply find an Office license that included what I needed for a simple price. Instead, I discovered that Microsoft’s Office licenses are infuriatingly complex, making it nearly impossible for anyone to get what they need without overspending.

  • Why LinkedIn Will Make You Hate Microsoft Word

    IF Microsoft has its way, the vast membership of LinkedIn, the business networking site with more than 433 million members, will be instantly available to you while you use Microsoft products like Outlook or Skype. How many of LinkedIn’s members do you want to consult while also using Excel or typing away in Word? Microsoft is betting it’s a lot; this is part of its rationale for its $26.2 billion acquisition of LinkedIn, announced on Monday.

    The companies’ chief executives, Satya Nadella of Microsoft and Jeff Weiner of LinkedIn, explained their reasons for the deal in a PowerPoint presentation distributed to investors. In the center of a graphic titled, “A professional’s profile everywhere,” was a picture of an anonymous LinkedIn “professional” with arrows pointed outward to seven Microsoft products.

  • Microsoft buys Wand to improve chat capabilities

    Satya Nadella wasn't kidding when he said earlier this year that he believed in using chat as a platform for computing. Microsoft just bought Wand, a chat app for iOS, to further that vision.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla involves the community in its “open-source” rebrand

Mozilla is bending the terms of the rebrand with a “branding without walls” open-source initiative. Read more

RPi 3 add-on loads up on sensors, wireless radios

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Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.12 Snaps Creator with New Parts Ecosystem, More

Today, June 29, 2016, Canonical has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the highly anticipated Snapcraft 2.12 Snappy creator tool for the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Read more

AMDGPU-PRO Driver 16.30 Officially Released with Support for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Today, June 29, 2016, AMD released the final version of the AMDGPU-Pro 16.30 graphics driver for GNU/Linux operating systems, bringing support for new technologies like the Vulkan API. Read more