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Friday, 20 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.60 Mate Edition released Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 11:31pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora News Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 11:28pm
Story Egmde in Ubuntu and Making It Look Like Vista 10 Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 10:28pm
Story Graphics: Mesa 18.0.1, AMD's GPUOpen and More Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 10:26pm
Story Security: Cleartext Passwords, Windows Problems, and Meltdown Patches/Performance Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 10:25pm
Story BSD Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 10:19pm
Story Wine Development: Wine-Staging 3.6, DXVK, and API Copyrights Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 9:54pm
Story KDE: KDE Plasma 5.13, Modern KDE Applications on FreeBSD and More Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 9:51pm
Story More on GNOME 3.28.1 Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 9:34pm
Story Ubuntu Spotted in ‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure’ Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2018 - 9:29pm

What is the Difference Between Android and Linux?

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Every now and then a colleague of mine tries to bump Linux’s user count share by arguing that Android can be considered a Linux distro because it uses the Linux kernel.

Let me sort this misunderstanding of whether Android can be considered a Linux distro out once and for all.

If you haven’t read our article on the difference between Unix and Linux you should start from there. I defined what Unix and Linux are, their history, and how they differ. The coax of the matter is that Linux is the kernel which was developed by Linus Torvalds in 1991 based on the MINIX OS.

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ZFS on Linux data loss sparks small, swift upgrade

Filed under
Linux

Maintainers of ZFS on Linux have hustled out a new version after the previous release caused data loss.

ZFS on Linux 0.7.7 only landed on March 21st, but as this GitHub thread titled “Unlistable and disappearing files”, users experienced “Data loss when copying a directory with large-ish number of files.”

The bug meant that attempts copies produced errors that claimed the filesystem was full and resulted in files just not arriving at their intended destinations.

Users verified the problem under a few Linuxes and quickly debated whether to roll back or wait for relief.

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Linux computer maker to move manufacturing to the U.S.

Filed under
Linux

Linux computer manufacturer System76 made its mark in part because of its commitment to open source principles and doing what it believes is right. Last year it released its homegrown Linux, Pop!_OS. In early March, System76 founder Carl Richell tweeted about the company's plans to locate its computer manufacturing factory in Denver, Colorado. By moving its manufacturing from China to the United States, System76 is offering more proof that it's not afraid to buck prevailing tech norms to do things "the System76 way."

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DragonFly BSD 5.2

Filed under
BSD

DragonFly version 5.2 brings Meltdown/Spectre mitigation, significant improvements to HAMMER2, ipfw, and graphics acceleration.

The details of all commits between the 5.0 and 5.2 branches are available in the associated commit messages for 5.2.0rc and 5.2.0.

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KDE and GNOME: Offline Vaults, AtCore, KDE Connect and Nautilus

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Offline Vaults for an extra layer of protection

    I’m slowly returning to KDE development after a few months of being mostly in bugfix mode due to my other-life obligations (more on that later), so I decided to implement a new feature for my youngest project – the Plasma Vault.

    One of the possible attack vectors to your Plasma Vaults is that people could potentially have access to your computer while the vault is open.

    This is not a problem if we consider direct access because it is something that is easily controlled – you see everyone who approaches your computer, but the problem can be remote access.

  • [AtCore] April progress update

    It has been over a month since my last progress update. Here is what I’ve done.

  • KDE Connect desktop 1.3 released
  • KDE Connect 1.3 Gets An Extension For GNOME's Nautilus

    KDE Connect is the nifty KDE project providing allowing communication between your Linux desktop computer and your Android smartphone/tablet via a secure communication protocol. KDE Connect 1.3 is now the latest feature release.

    KDE Connect already allows functionality like viewing/replying to messages from your desktop, sending browser links to your phone, and other data synchronization abilities. With GNOME not having any compelling alternative to KDE Connect, today's v1.3 release adds in a Nautilus extension that allows users to send files to their phone from the GNOME file manager's context menu.

  • Proposal to add an Action-Info Bar to Nautilus

    We are looking into adding an action & info bar to Nautilus. The background about this proposal can be read on the task where we put the main goals, prior art, different proposals and mockups, etc.

    We are not sure whether this is the appropriate solution and whether the implementation we propose is ideal. In order to be more confident, we would like to gather early feedback on the current proposal. Also, we are looking for ideas on how to improve the overall approach.

    The current proposal is being worked in a branch and can be installed via Flatpak clicking here (Note: You might need to install it the the CLI by executing `flatpak install nautilus-dev.flatpak` due to a bug in Software).

Linux 4.17 Change To Allow RTCs To Live Beyond Their Intended Life

Filed under
Linux

The "real-time clock" (RTC) changes usually aren't too notable to the Linux kernel merge windows, but for the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel to prolong their life for decades to come, at least as far as the clock is concerned.

There still is the Year 2038 problem being dealt with across different parts of the Linux kernel as the most pressing and time sensitive Linux "Y2K"-like problem currently being tackled, but real-time clocks are also going to rollover at some point, assuming the hardware lasts that long. Kernel developers auditing the RTC drivers discovered that one RTC expired already in 2017, seven more drivers will expire before Year 2038, another 23 drivers will expire before Year 2069, 72 RTC drivers will expire by Year 2100, and 104 drivers will expire by Year 2106.

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Are You Ready for Lubuntu Next 18.04?

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's still under development but it's lightweight and looks promising. It has some problems but for those love testing, it's very interesting new distro, a new Lubuntu derivative with new user interface and a unique set of applications. And finally, its memory usage is so low, almost similar to Lubuntu 18.04 beta 2 itself (which is only ~230MiB), so Lubuntu Next could be considered as a full-featured Lubuntu alternative within its lightweight league.

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Also: This Week in Lubuntu Development #2

Antergos 18.3 Gnome - Regression celebration

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

Antergos 18.3 is everything that 17.9 is not - in a bad way. My previous encounter with this distro was fairly good. There were issues, but they were not cardinal. This time around, we do gain some on the touchpad front, but everything else is a loss. Network support is bad, Nvidia didn't install outright, we have a font discrepancy between the live session and the installed system, no iPhone support, Steam crashes, and the list goes on. Virtually, everything is worse than it was.

Another thing that pops to mind - Manjaro seems to be holding well. Antergos 18.3 feels like it's been cobbled hastily, with no QA, and the end result is jarring, frustrating and saddening. I mean why? Just a few months ago, I selected this distro as the winner of my best-of-2017 Gnome list, and it really was unique, fun and colorful. The new edition retains the aesthetic spin, but it's more than negatively offset by hardware and software bugs and regressions. Unfortunately this time, I cannot recommend Antergos. 2/10. Hopefully, this is a one-time fluke, and it will go back to being a solid, refreshing alternative in the world painted Ubuntu. To be continued.

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Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

KVM Updates For Linux 4.17 Bring VirtIO GPU Prep For S390, AMD Improvements

Filed under
Linux

The latest feature pull request for the Linux 4.17 kernel are the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) virtualization updates.

On the KVM x86 front for Linux 4.17 are some AMD improvements including pause loop exiting and AMD Core Perf Extensions support. Also in the x86 space is support for VMware magic I/O port and pseudo PMCs, synchronous register access, exposing nVMX capabilities to user-space, support for Hyper-V signaling via EventFD, and other optimizations and nested virtualization improvements.

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Also: x86 Chinese CPU Manufacturer Zhaoxin Has Been Working On Linux Support

Graphics: Vulkan, AMD, Wayland 1.15 and Weston 4.0, NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan CTS 1.1.1 Adds 26,272 New Test Cases

    The Vulkan CTS as the conformance test suite for ensuring drivers are properly and fully implementing the Vulkan graphics and compute API continues getting even more in-depth and attempts to cover as many corner-cases as possible.

  • AMD Posts VP9 VA-API Video Acceleration For Gallium3D

    Hitting the Mesa mailing list today from AMD developers are a set of twenty-two patches providing VP9 video acceleration support via the Gallium3D VA-API state tracker.

    Before getting too excited though, this VP9 GPU-based video acceleration is just for "VCN" hardware. The only "Video Core Next" hardware out at the moment are the Raven Ridge APUs. With the next big Radeon discrete GPU launch though it should be safe to assume it will be VCN-based and thus with VP9 video support.

  • Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0 Officially Released

    Today marks the long-awaited debut of Wayland 1.15 and the Weston 4.0 reference compositor.

  • Mir Wayland Cut/Copy/Paste Support Being Worked On

    When it comes to Mir acting as a Wayland compositor, feature support continues to be extended for making this a more viable offering for those looking to have full Wayland support.

  • NVIDIA dropping support for 32bit Linux this month, also dropping Fermi series support

    If you're an NVIDIA user still on 32bit, you might want to think about finally updating as this month NVIDIA will be moving to only providing critical security updates for 32bit systems.

Security: Updates, Etherpad, Beep, Ubuntu, SourceClear

Filed under
Security

Games: XLEngine, Hand of Fate 2, GZDoom, Adventures of Square, Humble Store

Filed under
Gaming

Top 5 Most Useful Kali Linux Tools for Ethical Hackers

Filed under
Linux

Kali Linux is one of the most loved distros by the ethical hacking and security community because of its pen-testing and exploit tools. It is a free, and open-source Linux-based operating system designed for digital forensics, penetration testing, reversing, and security auditing. Kali allows you to download a range of security-related programs such as Metasploit, Nmap, Armitage, Burp, and much more that can be used to test your network for security loops. It can run natively when installing on a computer’s hard disk, can be booted from a live CD or live USB, or it can run on a virtual machine. Kali Linux has a lot of tools available to learn and practice.

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phpMyAdmin 4.8.0 is Released

Filed under
OSS
  • phpMyAdmin 4.8.0 is released

    Welcome to phpMyAdmin version 4.8.0. We are excited to bring you this updated version with many new features and bug fixes. There are no changes to system requirements.

    A complete list of new features and bugs that have been fixed is available in the ChangeLog file or changelog.php included with this release.

  • phpMyAdmin 4.8 Brings Mobile Interface, 2FA & More

    Over the weekend marked the release of phpMyAdmin 4.8.0 as the latest major update to this widely-used MySQL web-based administration interface.

    The phpMyAdmin 4.8 release brings several security improvements, including support for Google Invisible Captcha, better reCAPTCHA handling, two factor authentication (2FA) and U2F support, removal of PHP eval() usage, and other changes in the name of better security.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux all-in-one: Slimbook Curve comes with your distro of choice pre-installed

    Spanish computer maker Slimbook has unveiled the Slimbook Curve, an all-in-one with a 24-inch curved screen made for GNU/Linux.

  • Slimbook Curve All-In-One Linux PC

    Spanish hardware and PC manufacturer Slimbook has created a new all-in-one Linux PC in the form of the aptly named Slimbook Curve, that features a curved 24 inch IPS display offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels as well as a matte, anti-glare finish. The Slimbook Curve can by installed with a wide variety of different Linux operating systems including No OS, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Ubuntu Mate, Debian, Elementary OS, Linux Mint, OpenSUSE, Antergos, Fedora and KDE Neon.

  • AIMS inverter control via GPIO ports

    I recently upgraded my inverter to a AIMS 1500 watt pure sine inverter (PWRI150024S). This is a decent inverter for the price, I hope. It seems reasonably efficient under load compared to other inverters. But when it's fully idle, it still consumes 4 watts of power.

    That's almost as much power as my laptop, and while 96 watt-hours per day may not sound like a lot of power, some days in winter, 100 watt-hours is my entire budget for the day. Adding more batteries just to power an idle inverter would be the normal solution, probably. Instead, I want to have my house computer turn it off when it's not being used.

'Open' Hardware: FOV AR Headset Dev Kit and RISC-V

Filed under
Hardware
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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2, Replacement for gksu

  • The Unique Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2
    It is the most unique among the Official Flavors in the 18.04. It's the only to bring Chromium browser, and it gives you the unique Budgie Desktop experiences. It is really a good place for everyone who wants new, distinct desktop experience with modern version of software and broad space to explore. And ultimately it is still available for 32 bit, which has been abandoned by Ubuntu original. We will wait until the planned release on April 26.
  • Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Behind communitheme: interviewing Frederik
    My name is Frederik, I live in Germany and I am working as a java software developer in my daily job. I am using Ubuntu since 5 years and quickly started to report bugs and issues when they jumped into my face. Apart from that, I like good music, and beautiful software. I also make my own music in my free time.
  • gksu Removed From Ubuntu, Here's The Recommended Replacement
    gksu is used to allow elevating your permissions when running graphical applications, for example in case you want to run a graphical text editor as root to edit a system file, or to be able to remove or add a file to a system folder.
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Devices: Aaeon, Tizen and Android

OSS Leftovers

  • Open source crucial to Orange as it prepares for ONAP deployment
    Orange has long played a key part in the testing and adoption of ONAP, dating back to when its ECOMP predecessor was created by AT&T as a platform for managing a software-defined network. The move to open source and its development as the ONAP project has made the platform a key component of the new telco open networking movement. But why should other telcos look to ONAP as they embark on their network transformation strategies, and how does it help enable the automated network that will lead to new business opportunities?
  • Lessons from OpenStack Telemetry: Deflation
    At some point, the rules relaxed on new projects addition with the Big Tent initiative, allowing us to rename ourselves to the OpenStack Telemetry team and splitting Ceilometer into several subprojects: Aodh (alarm evaluation functionality) and Panko (events storage). Gnocchi was able to join the OpenStack Telemetry party for its first anniversary.
  • Dev-tools in 2018
    This is a bit late (how is it the middle of April already?!), but the dev-tools team has lots of exciting plans for 2018 and I want to talk about them! [...] We're creating two new teams - Rustdoc, and IDEs and editors - and going to work more closely with the Cargo team. We're also spinning up a bunch of working groups. These are more focused, less formal teams, they are dedicated to a single tool or task, rather than to strategy and decision making. Primarily they are a way to let people working on a tool work more effectively. The dev-tools team will continue to coordinate work and keep track of the big picture.
  • Nonny de la Peña & the Power of Immersive Storytelling
    This week, we’re highlighting VR’s groundbreaking potential to take audiences inside stories with a four part video series. There aren’t many examples of creators doing that more effectively and powerfully than Nonny de la Peña. Nonny de la Peña is a former correspondent for Newsweek, the New York Times and other major outlets. For more than a decade now, de la Peña has been focused on merging her passion for documentary filmmaking with a deep-seeded expertise in VR. She essentially invented the field of “immersive journalism” through her company, Emblematic Group.
  • Collabora Online 3.2 Brings More Powerful Features to LibreOffice in the Cloud
    Michael Meeks of the Collabora Productivity has the pleasure of informing Softpedia today on the availability of Collabora Online 3.2, the second point release of the Collabora Online 3 series that promises yet another layer of new features and improvements to the enterprise-ready, cloud-based office suite. Based on the LibreOffice 6.1 open-source office suite, Collabora Online 3.2 introduces support for creating and inserting charts into Writer and Impress documents, and the ability to validate data in Calc, which might come in handy for engineers who want to do a final assembly inspection on their tablets, as well as to collaborate with their colleagues to ensure all tests are passed by a complete product.
  • Oracle demands dev tear down iOS app that has 'JavaScript' in its name
    Oracle, claims developer Zhongmin Steven Guo, has demanded that Apple remove an app he created because it contains the trademarked term "JavaScript." The app in question, published by Guo's Tyanya Software LLC – which appears to be more a liability shield than a thriving software business – is titled "HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, HTML, Snippet Editor." The name, Guo explains in a Hacker News comment, was chosen in an effort to "game the App Store ranking by adding all the keywords to the app name."
  • FoundationDB is Open Source
    Starting today, FoundationDB starts its next chapter as an open source project! FoundationDB is a distributed datastore, designed from the ground up to be deployed on clusters of commodity hardware. These clusters scale well as you add machines, automatically heal from hardware failures, and have a simple API. The key-value store supports fully global, cross-row ACID transactions. That's the highest level of data consistency possible. What does this mean for you? Strong consistency makes your application code simpler, your data models more efficient, and your failure modes less surprising. The great thing is that FoundationDB is already well-established — it's actively developed and has years of production use. We intend to drive FoundationDB forward as a community project and we welcome your participation.
  • Apple Open Sources FoundationDB, Releases Code On GitHub
    Back in 2015, Apple bought FoundationDB, a NoSQL database company. It created a distributed database of the same name designed to deal with large masses of structured data across clusters of servers. In a recent development, Apple has shared the FoundationDB core and turned it into an open source project.
  • Microsoft offers limited-time 30 percent discount on SQL Server on Linux [Ed: Microsoft is googlebombing Linux again and as I predicted it would be done only to help Microsoft sell malicious proprietary software. Mary Jo Foley is like Microsoft marketing at CBS. In this case she promotes proprietary software. She also says "SQL Server on Linux" (no such thing exists, it's an illusion).]
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: April 20th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC
    Help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. Every Friday we meet on IRC in the #fsf channel on irc.freenode.org. Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.
  • Researchers deliver open-source simulator for cyber physical systems
    Cyber physical systems (CPS) are attracting more attention than ever thanks to the rapid development of the Internet of Things (IoT) and its combination with artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and the cloud. These interacting networks of physical and computational components will provide the foundation of critical infrastructure, form the basis of ‘smart’ services, and improve the quality of life in areas ranging from energy and environment to transportation and healthcare. CPS technologies are already transforming the way people interact with engineered systems in the ‘real’ or ‘physical’ world, just as the internet has transformed the way people interact with information. Yet, due to their complexity, the developers of CPS face a major problem: the lack of simulation tools and models for their design and analysis.
  • Creators face an evolving challenge protecting IP
    The GNU General Public License, under which the operating system Linux and much open-source software is shared, is another example of copyleft. Open-source software, where programs are worked on together by loosely connected developer communities rather than traditional software houses, show one way IP can be shared without stifling innovation. Linux, the mobile operating system Android and the database system MySQL have all achieved widespread adoption, and are continually innovating despite, or perhaps because of, being open source.
  • Emerging Tech Speaker Series Talk with Rian Wanstreet
    This is an opportunity for the open source community, as alternative technologies and platforms are being developed which provide farmers the ability to farm outside of walled gardens. From open source seed initiatives, to open farm technologies, to data platform cooperatives, there is a small, but growing, collaborative movement that recognizes that farmers are at a critical moment: they can help to establish tools that advance freedom, or accept machines that foster dependencies.
  • Williamson Schools to develop open source social studies curriculum
    The open source science curriculum saved the district about $3.3 million. An open source social studies curriculum may post similar savings, with estimates at about $3.5-4 million, Gaddis said.
  • Large Open-Source Data Set Released to Help Train Algorithms Spot Malware
    For the first time, a large dataset has been released by a security firm to help AI research and training of machine learning models that statically detect malware. The data set released by cybersecurity firm Endgame is called EMBER is a collection of more than a million representations of benign and malicious Windows-portable executable files. Hyrum Anderson, Endgame's technical director of data science who worked on EMBER, says: "This dataset fills a void in the information security machine learning community: a benign/malicious dataset that is large, open and general enough to cover several interesting use cases. ... [We] hope that the dataset, code and baseline model provided by EMBER will help invigorate machine learning research for malware detection, in much the same way that benchmark datasets have advanced computer vision research."

Android Leftovers