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Wednesday, 29 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linus Torvalds Announces Linux Kernel 4.7 Release Candidate 4, Go Test It Now

Filed under
Linux

Just a few minutes ago, Linus Torvalds announced the general availability of the fourth RC (Release Candidate) version of the upcoming Linux 4.7 kernel.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

vagrant-hostmanager-1.8.2, Virt-Manager 1.4, GNU Guile 2.1.3, GNU Screen v.4.4.0

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Software

BusyBotNet is a Fork of Busybox with Security Tools

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OSS
Security

Busybox provides a lightweight version of common command line utilities normally found on “big” Linux into a single binary, in order to bring them to embedded systems with limited memory and storage. As more and more embedded systems are now connected to the Internet, or as they are called nowadays the Internet of Things nodes, adding security tools, such as cryptographic utilities, could prove useful for administrators of such system, and so BusyBotNet project wsa born out of a fork of Busybox.

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Antergos Spins New ISOs, The Last Time Pushing 32-bit Media

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GNU
Linux

Antergos 2016.06.18 has been released as a re-spin of this Arch-based Linux distribution.

Antergos 2016.06.18 has a number of fixes and package updates over their earlier ISOs. The fixes do include addressing some issues with UEFI and its installer.

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Also: ISO Refresh 2016.06.18

A conversation with Salvatore Sanfilippo, creator of the open-source database Redis

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Interviews
OSS

In case you haven’t heard, Redis is one of the most widely used databases in the world. It’s one of the most popular software projects on GitHub, right up there with tools from Facebook and Google.

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The next wave in software is open adoption software

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OSS

There’s a big shift happening in how enterprises buy and deploy software. In the last few years, open technology — software that is open to change and free to adopt — has gone from the exception to the rule for most enterprises.

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Ubuntu phone is not yet ready for prime time

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Ubuntu

Phones that run Canonical's Ubuntu Phone operating system have been around for more than a year but given that they appear to be predominantly aimed at European markets, they are a rare sight in Australia.

One cannot blame Canonical, the company behind the phone, for Australia is a very small market and one that tends to follow American trends.

The first Ubuntu phones were released in February 2015 and came in for some criticism because they were under-powered, being a modified version of the Aquaris E4.5. With a 4.5-inch, 540x960 resolution display, a 1.3GHz quad-core MediaTek Cortex A7 processor, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage, they were not much to write home about.

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FreeBSD 11.0 Alpha 4 Released

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BSD

The fourth alpha release of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 is now available for testing.

FreeBSD 11.0 Alpha 4 ships the very latest fixes for this major BSD update. FreeBSD 11.0 is scheduled to be officially released in early September with the code freeze happening last week, the beta builds beginning in July, and release candidates in August. The FreeBSD 11.0 schedule can be found via FreeBSD.org.

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SourceForge Seeks a Return to Relevancy

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Development
OSS

The new owners of SourceForge, once the primary code repository for open source projects, work to make good on a promise to restore a reputation that was tarnished by its former owners.

It’s been about 2 1/2 years since GIMP began what became something of a mass exodus of large open source projects away from SourceForge, which at one time had been the go-to code repository for open source projects.

The site’s reputation began to wane almost immediately after it was purchased from Geeknet in September, 2012, by Dice Holdings in a deal that included Slashdot and Freecode/Freshmeat. In July, 2013, Dice introduced DevShare, an optional profit sharing feature that included closed-source ad-supported content in the binary Windows installers and gave projects agreeing to use the feature a portion of the revenue.

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Solus 1.2 Shannon Released

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GNU
Linux

We are proud to announce the release of Solus 1.2, the second minor release in the Shannon series of releases. Solus 1.2 builds upon the groundwork of 1.1 and 1.0, with continued improvements to Budgie, a huge focus on software optimizations, in addition to laying the framework for providing a performant gaming experience. Solus 1.2 furthers us on our journey to realizing the future of home computing.

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Zenwalk 8.0 final release candidate - RC2

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Slack

This pre-release ISO should be at 99% the stable target, you will get latest Libreoffice 5.1.3, latest Chromium 51, Mplayer 1.3, ffmpeg 3.0.1, latest Slackware current system (many upstream packages updated) featuring the Linux kernel 4.4.13, and a new desktop layout for XFCE 4.12.

Lately, system tools have been heavily improved to fully integrate Policykit privileges elevation features, enabling the unprivileged user to tweak many system parameters that require root ownership : you can now change your user password from the XFCE Panel by just entering your previous password, you can set the Xorg keyboard layout without root privileges, set your locale, set the login manager settings, set system clock, etc...). All these features can of course be hardened with Policykit to disallow automatic privileges elevation for users.

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5-Way Mesa 12.1-dev + Linux 4.7 Git Radeon Comparison

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the massive Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Graphics Performance With Radeon Software, AMDGPU-PRO, AMDGPU+RadeonSI article, I immediately started work on my next article... In preparation for a hardware launch Linux testing later this month, I started testing my collection of AMD cards on Linux 4.7 and Mesa 12.1-dev. Here are some of those results if you are curious, including performance-per-Watt metrics.

The cards tested so far this weekend on this bleeding-edge driver stack were the R9 270X, R9 285, R9 290, R7 370, and R9 Fury. Mesa 12.1-dev was from Git yesterday using the Padoka PPA and also built with LLVM 3.9 SVN. The Linux 4.7 kernel was from Git in the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA this week.

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Samsung Tizen Based Air Purifier AX7500 & AX5500 Launched

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Linux

Samsung have announced a couple of Air purifiers as part of their 2016 range with model numbers AX7500 and AX5500. These are not your everyday ordinary Air purifiers as they have been designed to evaluate and purify the air in an Intelligent manner. This is another example of Samsung implementing Tizen in their home appliances.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux plus CP/M plus assembly equals LASM

    The TRS-80 Model II support in Kermit is missing hardware flow control support however which means that it’s very prone to dropping characters. I started to look into what it might take to add hardware flow control and this sent me down a rabbit hole of trying to figure out how the TRS-80 hardware works, how the Z80 SIO works, learning Z80 assembly, and of course, how the heck you even build CP/M Kermit 4.11 from source.

  • TheAlternative.ch - LinuxDays FS16 - The Power of Linux
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 0 — The adventure begins

    Last summer, I wrote an article series called "Kicking Google out of my life." It was an attempt to remove all Google services entirely from my daily usage for 30 days—a surprisingly daunting challenge for someone who had become deeply dependent on Google. I was mostly successful. I chronicled my experience—detailing how I approached replacing Google services with non-Google variants—and in the end, my life was better for it.

  • Deutsche Bank moves blockchain project out of proof of concept stage and voices concerns with the distributed ledger technology

    Deutsche Bank has moved its blockchain project out of the proof of concept stage, according to the bank’s head of disruptive technologies, who also warned that the distributed ledger blockchain technology is still five to ten years from widespread use.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Yearly EBIT At $288.0481 Millions
  • Share Performance Review for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Were Analysts Bullish Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) This Week?
  • Austin inadvertently promotes open-source ride-sharing

    The idea is to undermine the monopolies of companies like Uber, Lyft, Airbnb and the like with a genuinely cooperative, horizontal and P2P model directly controlled by the users themselves, and cut out the corporate middleman altogether. Advocates for this model have coined the term “Platform Cooperativism” for it (if you search the #PlatformCooperativism hashtag on Twitter, you’ll find links to a lot of great articles on it).

  • RFC: a new solution to Input Method + Keyboard Layout

    This is not related to KDE itself, but I’d like to hear some opinion from keyboard layout users, especially from those who use more than one keyboard layout.

    Right now I’m designing a new feature for fcitx (for people who doesn’t know it, it’s an input method framework under Linux), currently called “input method group”. The goal of this feature is to solve the conflict between keyboard layout and input method (mostly conceptually) . It can also solve some other problem, but the original goal is about keyboard layout.

  • New SELinux shirts are available
  • Venerable Conficker Worm Survives on Obsolete Legacy Systems [Ed: Microsoft Windows.]

    he 8-year-old worm continues to infect in some corners of the Internet, highlighting the difficulty in eradicating more virulent programs.
    On Oct. 23, 2008, Microsoft revealed a critical flaw that could allow an attacker to remotely compromise and infect Windows XP, Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 systems.

    It took only a week for the Internet's seedier element to create the first malware based on the vulnerability. While initial attacks targeted specific companies and infected fewer than a dozen systems a day, the situation was much worse a month later when an unknown malware developer released a self-propagating worm.

Server Administration

Filed under
Server
  • Containers 2.0: Why unikernels will rock the cloud

    Clouds have come to dominate the mindset of IT. The promises of business agility, maximized resource utilization, and flexible infrastructure have grabbed the imaginations of CIOs across the world. The opportunity to immediately adjust your infrastructure to the needs of your business is seen as a route to success.

  • Most Enterprises to Mainstream Containers Within a Year

    Docker and other application container platforms are already changing the way enterprises develop and deliver applications. Over the next year, container adoption will really ramp up, according to new report from the Cloud Foundry Foundation, Hope Versus Reality: Containers in 2016.

    Currently, 16 percent of organizations are already using containers in production, noted Abby Kearns, vice president of Industry Strategy at the Cloud Foundry Foundation. But ClearPath Strategies, the research firm that conducted the survey on behalf of the Foundation, asked participants about their plans, she started "seeing an interesting shift in those looking to move into production," she told Datamation.

  • Microsoft Azure Brings CoreOS Linux to China

    China will soon be enjoying the open source operating system CoreOS Linux thanks to Microsoft Azure as 21Vianet becomes the first ever officially supported cloud provider in the country.

    In a press release posted on their official website, Linux announced that the CoreOS would soon be made available for Chinese computer users together with Microsoft's cloud operating service, Azure.

Krita Funding

Filed under
KDE
  • GSoC 2016: Soft proofing, Gamut alarms and looks update.

    Partially, this week was spent on me recuperating from my exam-week and the Krita Kickstarter. After that, delving into the jungle that is Pigment, which is Krita’s colour management library, for abstracting the caching and handling of colour managed colours. It’s a bit of a jungle of templates and class inheritance. This part is where living at my mentor for a week was helpful, as communicating some of the problems I bumped into(mostly confusing class names and how to avoid having to rewrite the caching graph), would’ve been too difficult to do over IRC.

  • The 2016 Kickstarter

    This year's kickstarter fundraising campaign for Krita was more nerve-wracking than the previous two editions. Although we ended up 135% funded, we were almost afraid we wouldn't make it, around the middle. Maybe only the release of Krita 3.0 turned the campaign around. Here's my chaotic and off-the-cuff analysis of this campaign.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • New APT signing key for code.liw.fi/debian
  • More work on aptitude

    The last few months have been a bit of a crazy period of ups and downs, with a tempest of events beneath the apparent and deceivingly calm surface waters of being unemployed (still at it).

  • Snaps - A Good Way to Test the Latest Apps

    If you've been following the latest Ubuntu news around the traps, you've probably heard about Canonical's "Snappy" system. We actually did an article on Snappy back in late 2014 when the project had just started to surface. As of the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS release, the core program 'snapd' is included out of the box, allowing you to install 'Snaps' right away.

  • Linux App Distribution Gets A Little Easier With 'Snap'
  • Community Appreciation Day

    Today is Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day, but this year I am going to expand my appreciation beyond the boundaries of the Ubuntu Community to include anyone in open source that has impacted my journey in open source.

Distributions Introduced

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GNU
Linux

today's howtos

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HowTos
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

GeckoLinux 421 Plasma and SUSE Hack Week

  • GeckoLinux 421 Plasma review - It ain't no dragon
    I heard a lot of good praise about this little distro. My inbox is flooded with requests to take it for a spin, so I decided, hey, so many people are asking. Let us. The thing is, openSUSE derivatives are far and few in between, but the potential and the appeal are definitely there. Something like CentOS on steroids, the way Stella did once, the same noble way Fuduntu tried to emancipate Fedora. Take a somewhat somber distro and pimpify it into submission. GeckoLinux is based on openSUSE Leap, and I chose the Plasma Static edition. There's also a Rolling version, based on Tumbleweed, but that one never worked for me. The test box for this review is Lenovo G50. But wait! Dedoimedo, did you not recently write in your second rejection report that GeckoLinux had failed to boot? Indeed I did. But the combo of yet another firmware update on the laptop and a fresh new download fixed it, allowing for a DVD boot. Somewhat like the painful but successful Fedora exercise back in the day. Tough start, but let's see what gives.
  • La Mapería
    It is Hack Week at SUSE, and I am working on La Mapería (the map store), a little program to generate beautiful printed maps from OpenStreetMap data.
  • HackWeek XIV @SUSE: Tuesday

From Vista 10 to Linux Mint

  • Microsoft Scared into Changes, 5 Reasons to Ditch
    Following a small claims court judgment against them, Microsoft announced they would be making declining their Windows 10 upgrade easier. Why not just switch to Linux as Daniel Robinson highlighted five reasons you should. My Linux Rig spoke to Christine Hall of FOSS Force about her "Linux rig" today and Bryan Lunduke had some thoughts on Canonical's collaboration myth. Dedoimedo reviewed GeckoLinux 421 and Gary Newell tested Peppermint 7 on his new Lenovo Ideapad.
  • After Multi-Month Tone Deaf Shitshow, Microsoft Finally Lets Users Control Obnoxious Windows 10 Upgrade
    Microsoft's decision to offer Windows 10 as a free upgrade to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 made sense on its surface. It was a nice freebie for users happy to upgrade, and an effective way to herd customers on older Windows iterations onto the latest platform to help consolidate support expense. But Microsoft's upgrade in practice has seen no shortage of criticism from users annoyed by a total lack of control over the update, and Microsoft's violent tone deafness in response to the complaints. For example a Reddit post from an anti-poaching organization made the rounds earlier this year after the 17 GB automatic Windows 10 update resulted in huge per megabyte charges from their satellite broadband ISP. Microsoft's response to these complaints? Ignore them. As complaints grew, Microsoft finally provided a way to fully disable the forced upgrade, but made sure it involved forcing users to modify the registry, something Microsoft knew full well less technical users wouldn't be comfortable attempting to hurdle. [...] Things have been escalating ever since, often to comedic effect. But this week things changed somewhat with the news that Microsoft has struck a $10,000 settlement with a California woman who sued the company after an ill-timed Windows 10 upgrade brought her office computers to a crawl. The woman took Microsoft to court after support failed to help resolve the issue, a spokesman saying Microsoft halted its appeal of the ruling "to avoid the expense of further litigation."
  • Microsoft pays $10,000 to unwilling Windows 10 updater
  • The Linux Setup - Christine Hall, FOSS Force
    On my main desktop, I use Linux Mint 17.1, Rebecca. My main laptop, a 64-bit machine, is running Mint 17.2 Rafaela. The laptop got updated from Rebecca so I could write a review, but the desktop never got upgraded because it’s a 32-bit machine and would require another download, which I haven’t had the time to do. I have another laptop running Bodhi, which might be my favorite distro, but I can be more productive with Mint.
  • Linux Mint 18 Finally Arrives — Download Cinnamon and MATE Edition ISO Files Here
    The wait for the summer’s hottest Linux distro is over and you can finally download the release version of Linux Mint 18 “Sarah”. Often called the best Linux distribution for desktop PCs, Mint 18 comes loaded with new features and Linux 4.4 LTS Kernel.

AMD and Linux

  • The Updated AMD Polaris Firmware Blobs Needed For RX 480 Support Land
    One day ahead of the Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" launch, the necessary firmware updates for the production graphics card support have landed in linux-firmware.git.
  • AMD RX 480 released, AMD will possibly open up Radeon Software
    The next generation of AMD GPU's have launched, and it begins with the AMD RX 480. Benchmarks are now out there along with plenty of info. I don't have the card myself as I have no contacts at AMD, but luckily Phoronix managed to bag a card and he's done plenty of testing as you can imagine. I will be referencing the green site due to other sites obviously focusing on Windows.