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Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Development: GCC, KDevelop, and GNOME Beta Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:38am
Story Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:36am
Story Desktop Linux Absent from Zemlin’s LinuxCon Pep Rally Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:30am
Story Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:26am
Story Almost open: BIOS and firmware update tips for Linux users Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:13am
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 10:43am
Story Linux rules the world. Where to next? Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 10:27am
Story The Linux Foundation Gives Microsoft (Paid-for) Keynote Position While Microsoft Extorts (With Patents) Lenovo and Motorola Over Linux Use Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 9:51am
Story Artist Sylvia Ritter Painted All 25 Ubuntu Linux Mascots and They're Astonishing Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 9:10am
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 8:25am

ODF in the Wild, Netrunner Goes Maui, p0wnball Wizard

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-s

Today in Linux news, the Linux Migrant noted two instances of ODF in use out in the real World. The Netrunner operating system has had a rocky existence with its changing bases and format, but apparently not enough. The project has changed again, this time renaming its desktop edition to Maui and currently deciding if the rolling system should continue. Elsewhere, Neil Rickert installed Tumbleweed without an Internet connection and shared all the details. The Register reported that Jersey Jack's The Hobbit pinball game runs on Ubuntu 15.10 and the Free Software Foundation Europe joined The Document Foundation Advisory Board.

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • With Windows 10, Microsoft Blatantly Disregards User Choice and Privacy: A Deep Dive

    Microsoft had an ambitious goal with the launch of Windows 10: a billion devices running the software by the end of 2018. In its quest to reach that goal, the company aggressively pushed Windows 10 on its users and went so far as to offer free upgrades for a whole year. However, the company’s strategy for user adoption has trampled on essential aspects of modern computing: user choice and privacy. We think that’s wrong.

    You don’t need to search long to come across stories of people who are horrified and amazed at just how far Microsoft has gone in order to increase Windows 10’s install base. Sure, there is some misinformation and hyperbole, but there are also some real concerns that current and future users of Windows 10 should be aware of. As the company is currently rolling out its “Anniversary Update” to Windows 10, we think it’s an appropriate time to focus on and examine the company’s strategy behind deploying Windows 10.

  • How Twitter Avoids the Microservice Version of “Works on My Machine”

    Apache Mesos and Apache Aurora initially helped Twitter engineers to implement more sophisticated DevOps processes and streamline tooling, says software engineer David McLaughlin. But over time a whole new class of bespoke tooling emerged to manage deployment across multiple availability zones as the number of microservices grew.

    “As the number of microservices grows and the dependency graph between them grows, the confidence level you achieve from unit tests and mocks alone rapidly decreases,” McLaughlin says, in the interview below. “You end up in the microservice version of “works on my machine.”

  • It's time to say goodbye to Linux 4.6

    If you're using a version of Linux based on the 4.6 series of the kernel, the software's lead maintainer has a message for you: It's time to upgrade.

    Greg Kroah-Hartman on Tuesday announced the arrival of Linux 4.6.7 and made it clear that it will be the last in the kernel's 4.6 series. Version 4.7.1 made its debut on Tuesday as well, and that's where the future lies, Kroah-Hartman said.

  • Linux Foundation touts open-source PNDA for network analytics

    The Linux Foundation has taken another open-source project under its wing, one that’s focused on the architecture, implementation and support of digital networks.

    Called the Platform for Network Data Analytics (or “PNDA” for short), the initiative aims to better integrate and manage massive amounts of network information, and deploy analytics applications and services.

    “PNDA addresses a critical need for a scalable platform that fosters innovation in reactive network analytics for both service providers and enterprises,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation, in a statement.

    To coincide with the announcement, the PNDA community has just shipped out its first version of the software, which is described as a production-ready solution for platforms based on OpenStack.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.18 LTS Has Lots of x86 Improvements, Security Updates and Fixes

    After announcing the end of life for the Linux 4.6 kernel series with the release of Linux kernel 4.6.7 as the last maintenance update, as well as the availability of the first point release of Linux kernel 4.7, Greg Kroah-Hartman now informs us about Linux kernel 4.4.18 LTS.

    Linux kernel 4.4 is an LTS (Long Term Support) one, the latest and most advanced, currently used by many popular GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and all of their derivatives, such as Xubuntu, Kubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu MATE, etc., and the Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" series of distributions.

  • Six Tumbleweed snapshots roll, update systemd, xen, Firefox

    Snapshot 20160808 brought openSUSE Tumbleweed users Plasma 5.72 shortly after last week’s article was published, but it didn’t last long.

  • ArcherMind Joins 96Boards and Launches Deci-Core ARMv8 Product

    Linaro Ltd, the collaborative engineering organization developing open source software for the ARM® architecture, today announced that ArcherMind Technology (Nanjing) Co., Ltd has joined the 96Boards initiative as a Steering Committee Member and Manufacturing Partner and they are preparing the launch of their first 96Boards product.

Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
HowTos

Leftovers: Debian

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Debian

Android Leftovers

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Android
  • Xiaomi China Phone Shipments Fall 38% as Huawei Takes Lead

    Xiaomi Corp., the once-hot Chinese smartphone maker, saw shipments tumble 38 percent in China in the second quarter as Huawei Technologies Co. took over the top spot in the world’s largest market, according to research from International Data Corp.

    Xiaomi shipped 10.5 million smartphones in the quarter, down from 17.1 million in the same period a year earlier. That made the company the fourth-largest competitor in the market behind Huawei, OPPO and Vivo, according to IDC.

  • Android makers stand out with eye-scanners, virtual-reality setups

    Manufacturers are trying to stand out with iris scanners for biometric security, snap-on modules for added features, and other innovations.

  • Judge may order a new Oracle v. Google retrial over evidence unwisely withheld by Google
  • Can Mr. Angry Birds make Nokia take flight again?

    Can the executive who tried (and failed) to make the Angry Birds game franchise into a global powerhouse bring Nokia back from the brink? The Finnish mobile phone company is hoping that former Rovio Entertainment CEO Pekka Rantala can do more to help their once-storied brand take flight than he did for those furious flying cartoons.

    On Monday, HMD Global, the company founded in May to sell Nokia-branded mobile phones and tablets, named Rantala to spearhead a massive re-entry into the global mobile phone market. Rantala, who was named HMD’s chief marketing officer, had stepped down as CEO of Rovio last December after the gaming company failed to capitalize on the immense popularity of one of the earliest and biggest smartphone game successes.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • FrOSCon and the future of private clouds

    This Saturday I'll talk at FrOSConabout the future of private clouds and how Nextcloud is pushing that.

  • Firefox for Linux will soon support Netflix and Amazon videos

    Firefox 49 for Linux, scheduled for a September 2016 release, will add support for DRM-protected HTML5 videos. Netflix, Amazon Prime, and other streaming services will “just work” in Firefox on Linux, just as they do in Google Chrome.

  • Pepperdata: Carving Out a Niche in the Big Data Arena

    In the data analytics and Hadoop arena, the folks at Pepperdata have an interesting story to tell. Pepperdata's cofounders ran the web search engineering team at Yahoo during the development of the first production use of Hadoop and created Pepperdata with the mission of providing a simple way of prioritizing Hadoop jobs to give resources to the ones that need them most, while ensuring that a company adheres to its SLAs.

    The company's software installs in under 30 minutes on an existing Hadoop cluster without any modifications to the scheduler, workflow, or jobs, delivering visibility into Hadoop workloads at the task level. This week, Pepperdata announced that former CTO of Yahoo, Ashfaq Munshi, is taking over as CEO. Here are more details on this company from an interview we did recently with co-founder Chad Carson.

  • Weekly phpMyAdmin contributions 2016-W32

    Tonight phpMyAdmin 4.0.10.17, 4.4.15.8, and 4.6.4 were released and you can probably see that there are quite some security issues fixed. Most of them are not really exploitable unless your PHP and webserver are poorly configured, but still it's good idea to upgrade.

  • Microsoft announce open-source UWP Community Toolkit to make UWP app development easier [Ed: Microsoft is just hilarious. In its propaganda site it is openwashing some of its biggest lock-in (‘community’)]
  • Rust implementation of GNUnet with GSoC - Final-term

    This is the final week of the gnunet-rs project with Google Summer of Code. It has been challenging but also exceptionally rewarding. I hope to explain the final product and then touch on the future work. The repository can be found here, and my previous blog post here.

    During the first half of GSoC working period, I changed the peerinfo service to use asynchronous IO (using gjio). I continued on that path and added two more services to make use of asynchronous IO - identity and GNS. I won't cover the complete API in this blog post since their usage can be found in the documentation comments in the code (cargo doc can be used to generate html docs); there are also a lot of examples. But I will highlight one of them because it demonstrates the strengths of a promise based API.

  • Federal open-source policy isn't open enough, says tech group

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation has praised new federal guidelines aimed at improving the sharing of federally developed software code but complained that the government's 20 percent release goal does not go far enough.

    The policy, announced by U.S. CIO Tony Scott on Aug. 8, seeks to makes federal source code more accessible while increasing sharing across government and reducing duplicative software purchases.

  • From eCars to cybersecurity: standards seen as natural enemy of the tech industry

    Drive an eCar? So you know your AC from your DC, then. What about your CHAdeMO and CCS? Or is yours a Tesla? There are so many standards for EV charging, it's as if the industry wants to make life complicated.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Top 5 open source web servers

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OSS

Statistics show us that well over 80% of web applications and websites are powered by open source web servers. In this article, I look at the most popular open source web servers, and briefly review their history, technology, features, and more. I will also provide some tips so you can easily deploy one of the popular web servers yourself.

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Forget desktop Linux, build your own $40 Android PC

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Android
Linux

I had originally planned to slap some desktop Linux on the Pine 64, but instead I'm sticking with Android. Here's why:

The choice of operating system, outside of political ideology, very much depends on what you are going to do on a system. I am going to use this machine as an entertainment hub, to watch movies, listen to music and do some casual gaming. I'm also going to use it for writing work, and maybe for some light image editing. That’s pretty much it. I may install this PC in my kids' room so they can use it.

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Canonical to Replace Upstart with systemd for Ubuntu 16.10's Session Startup

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Ubuntu

Canonical, through Martin Pitt, has announced plans to move away from using the Upstart init system to start the Ubuntu Linux session, replacing it with the more modern yet controversial systemd.

With every new systemd release, we've found out that the so-called init system can do a lot more than it was initially designed to, slowly taking over many of the "jobs" of a GNU/Linux operating system's internal components, and even worse, replacing them completely.

Upstart is a Canonical/Ubuntu project, an event-based replacement for the traditional init daemon that the company used in almost every Ubuntu Linux release. However, starting with the now-deprecated Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) operating system, Canonical replaced the Upstart init system with systemd, making many users angry.

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What People Don't Get About Open Source

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OSS

Open source is making its way into the mainstream, driven by Linux, OpenStack, SDN, and other cloud, networking and computing. But a lot of people still have misconceptions about the open source process and how it fits into business.

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Linux Lite's Devs Invite Ubuntu and Debian Users to Install the Latest Kernels

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Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Softpedia has been informed by Linux Lite project maintainer Jerry Bezencon about the availability of the latest Linux kernel branches in the repositories of the Ubuntu-based operating system.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux OS Gets Latest KDE Plasma 5.7.3, Mozilla Firefox 48.0

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KDE
Moz/FF

Today, August 17, 2016, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio informed the community about the latest software updates pushed to the Tumbleweed repos during the last few days.

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Nokia Confirms That It Will Announce New Android-Running Devices Later This Year

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Android

Nokia executive Mike Wang has confirmed that that the company is indeed planning to reveal three or four new Nokia-branded devices running Google’s Android mobile operating system, according to Android Authority.

The three or four new device will actually be composed of both smartphones and tablets. Although Nokia will make its official announcements before the end of 2016, the new devices may possibly be launched in 2017. The release date of the new Nokia Android devices will apparently depend on the company’s testing and development.

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Powerful Shotwell Open-Source Image Viewer Adds Option to Filter by Saved Search

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Development
OSS

It appears that the new Shotwell maintainer is doing a great job in keeping the powerful open-source image viewer and organizer up to date with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and also patching bugs reported by users since previous releases.

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You Can Now Download Yet Another Set of Updated Fedora 24 Linux Live ISO Images

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Red Hat

Fedora Ambassador and Fedora Unity Project leader Ben Williams is happy to announce the availability of new, updated Live ISO images of the Fedora 24 GNU/Linux operating system.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • A quick look at using JSX in GNOME

    Thanks to a travel sponsorship from the GNOME foundation, I was able to attend the GTK+ hackfest in Toronto recently. The discussions and energy there inspired me to work on a prototype of something I had been thinking about for a while: using JSX to create GtkWidgets.

  • GSoC: final week and results

    Hello everyone, I’m very glad to announce that my GSoC project about implementing games with multiple medias is being finished this very week. Although the code is still being tested, it won’t have big changes. With that said, I’ll show and explain the results.

  • Using the GtkSourceView API to write scripts that manipulate text

    In the gnome-c-utils repository, I wrote some scripts that use the GtkSourceView library.

    When a script needs to read some text, search something in it, and possibly edit the content, then having a GtkTextBuffer is really convenient.

  • The Meson build system at GUADEC 2016

    For the third year in a row, Centricular was at GUADEC, and this year we sponsored the evening party on the final day at Hoepfner’s Burghof! Hopefully everyone enjoyed it as much as we hoped. Smile

    The focus for me this year was to try and tell people about the work we've been doing on porting GStreamer to Meson and to that end, I gave a talk on the second day about how to build your GNOME app ~2x faster than before.

Fedora/Flock News

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Red Hat
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More in Tux Machines

5 Reasons to Switch to Ubuntu Phone

You’ve had Android phones, and you’ve had iPhones. Buying a smartphone for most people is a polarized, A/B choice. And for some, the experience of choosing a new phone is becoming… jaded. You might think that Android and iOS have the mobile market sewn up, but what if I was to tell you that you don’t need to look at Windows 10 Mobile or BlackBerry as alternatives? Various others are available, but perhaps the most impressive of them all is the Ubuntu Phone, which uses the Ubuntu Touch platform, and can be found on devices such as the Meizu Pro 5. Read more Also: Ubuntu Linux 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta 1 now available for download (don't talk back)

Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years. Read more

Rise of the Forks: Nextcloud and LibreOffice

  • ownCloud-Forked Nextcloud 10 Now Available
  • Secure, Monitor and Control your data with Nextcloud 10 – get it now!
    Nextcloud 10 is now available with many new features for system administrators to control and direct the flow of data between users on a Nextcloud server. Rule based file tagging and responding to these tags as well as other triggers like physical location, user group, file properties and request type enables administrators to specifically deny access to, convert, delete or retain data following business or legal requirements. Monitoring, security, performance and usability improvements complement this release, enabling larger and more efficient Nextcloud installations. You can get it on our install page or read on for details.
  • What makes a great Open Source project?
    Recently the Document Foundation has published its annual report for the year 2015. You can download it as a pdf by following this link, and you can now even purchase a paper copy of the report. This publication gives me the opportunity to talk a bit about what I think makes a great FOSS project and what I understand may be a great community. If it is possible to see this topic as something many people already went over and over again, think again: Free & Open Source Software is seen as having kept and even increased its momentum these past few years, with many innovative companies developing and distributing software licensed under a Free & Open Source license from the very beginning. This trend indicates two important points: FOSS is no longer something you can automagically use as a nice tag slapped on a commodity software; and FOSS projects cannot really be treated as afterthoughts or “nice-to-haves”. Gone are the days where many vendors could claim to be sympathetic and even supportive to FOSS but only insofar as their double-digits forecasted new software solution would not be affected by a cumbersome “community of developers”. Innovation relies on, starts with, runs thanks to FOSS technologies and practices. One question is to wonder what comes next. Another one is to wonder why Open Source is still seen as a complex maze of concepts and practices by so many in the IT industry. This post will try to address one major difficulty of FOSS: why do some projects fail while others succeed.

Red Hat News

  • Red Hat Virtualisation 4 woos VMware faithful
    It is easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn’t forgotten about you. Red Hat Virtualisation (RHV) 4.0 refreshes Red Hat’s open source virtualisation platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat’s product line. It is a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat’s virtualisation efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company’s intention to woo VMware customers.
  • Forbes Names Red Hat One of the World's Most Innovative Companies
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it has been named to Forbes' “World’s Most Innovative Companies” list. Red Hat was ranked as the 25th most innovative company in the world, marking the company's fourth appearance on the list (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Red Hat was named to Forbes' "World's Most Innovative Growth Companies" list in 2011.
  • Is this Large Market Cap Stock target price reasonable for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?