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Monday, 03 Aug 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Advanced spyware for Android now available to script kiddies everywhere

Filed under
Android
Security
Legal
  • Advanced spyware for Android now available to script kiddies everywhere

    One of the more recent discoveries resulting from the breach two weeks ago of malware-as-a-service provider Hacking Team is sure to interest Android enthusiasts. To wit, it's the source code to a fully featured malware suite that had the ability to infect devices even when they were running newer versions of the Google-developed mobile operating system.

    The leak of the code base for RCSAndroid—short for Remote Control System Android—is a mixed blessing. On the one hand, it provides the blueprints to a sophisticated, real-world surveillance program that can help Google and others better defend the Android platform against malware attacks. On the other, it provides even unskilled hackers with all the raw materials they need to deploy what's arguably one of the world's more advanced Android surveillance suites.

  • Security tool bod's hell: People think I wrote code for Hacking Team!

    A respected security researcher has denied any involvement with Hacking Team after open-source code he wrote was found in smartphone spyware sold by the surveillance-ware maker.

Bodhi Releases Roadmap, Mint 17.2 KDE Upgrade Ready

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Jeff Hoogland today posted some updated information for fans of his Bodhi Linux distributions as well as requesting help testing new desktop Moksha. Elsewhere, Clement Lefebvre today said the upgrade path from 17.0 and 17.1 to 17.2 is now open to all. Also, The Linux Foundation today announced its keynote speakers for upcoming conferences in Dublin and QEMU is the Software Freedom Conservancy's newest member.

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The French want to BAN .doc and .xls files from Le Gouvernement

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
Security

Microsoft could get the boot from the French government if a new recommendation from an official advisor is adopted.

DISIC (Direction interministérielle des systèmes d'information et de communication de l'État) has recommended that French authorities ditch Microsoft Office tools in favour of the Open Document Format (ODF).

DISIC is responsible for harmonising and reducing the costs of all state computers, including government ministries, state and regional departments and local authorities, and sees ODF as the best way to make them all interoperable.

According to sources, an initial draft of the report envisaged outlawing Microsoft’s Open XML altogether, although with some agencies using tools specifically developed for use with Open XML, DISIC relented.

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Android in 2020: How much will it change in five years?

Filed under
Android

The Android of 2015 is a world away from that 2008 version, where the Android Market was in its infancy, there were no native video playback capabilities and the G1 had no multi-touch support. But Google is going to have to keep innovating and improving its mobile OS to keep the lion's share of the smartphone market.

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The Huawei Way: Chinese Telco Ignites Open Source Spark

Filed under
OSS

President of Huawei Central Software Wang Chenglu insists that open source is in the firm’s blood from core business networking (where the firm helped drive the network openness as founding member of OPNFV), to cloud computing and the IoT (where the firm open sourced LiteOS — a lightweight IoT Operating System).

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Canonical Patches Multiple Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu 15.04 and 14.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

After having published details about a new Linux kernel update for its Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system, Canonical has posted two more Ubuntu Security Notices informing users of the Ubuntu 15.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS OSes about the availability of kernel updates for their systems.

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Android auto review: A beautiful, but beta alternative to awful OEM solutions

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Infotainment systems are actually the worst part of a modern car. In fact, a study by Nielsen and SBD Consultancy found the systems in new cars to be the biggest cause of customer complaints. Much like during the beginnings of the modern smartphone, the car infotainment trend takes a bunch of manufacturers that traditionally have only made hardware and asks them to create software. It should be no surprise that they are terrible at it. (And that says nothing of their typical sloth-ish product cycles.)

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Nautilus File Manager Receives Multiple Improvements and Bugfixes for GNOME 3.18

Filed under
GNOME

On July 23, the GNOME Project announced that the third snapshot towards the Nautilus (Files) 3.18 file manager for the upcoming GNOME 3.18 desktop environment was available for download and testing.

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Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Receives a New Linux Kernel Update, Users Urged to Update Now

Filed under
Ubuntu

On July 23, Canonical posted a new Ubuntu Security Notice informing all users of the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system about the immediate availability of a kernel update.

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Linux Foundation offers cheaper courses and certifications for India

Filed under
Linux
OSS

This makes India the first region in which the Linux Foundation will offer country-specific pricing on select training and certification products.

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openSUSE Leap to Arrive Soon with Linux Kernel 4.1, Tumbleweed Gets GNOME 3.16.3

Filed under
SUSE

We reported a while ago that the openSUSE Project is producing a brand-new version of their RPM-based Linux distribution, called Leap, version 42, which will completely change the openSUSE operating system as we know it.

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GNOME's Epiphany Web Browser Adds Navigation Improvements to Web Apps

Filed under
GNOME
Web

The hard working developers behind the highly acclaimed GNOME desktop environment used in numerous distributions of GNU/Linux have just finished a new milestone towards the anticipated GNOME 3.18 release.

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A non-coder CAN contribute to open source

Filed under
OSS

Non programmers can write docs. They can design logos. They can help with user interface design. They can test fixes or new features. They can triage bugs by verifying that the submitted report can be recreated and adding additional details, logs, or config files. Larger projects need some infrastructure support that is more administration and security compliance than Java programmer. Many people who consider themselves non-programmers do have some pretty good scripting skills and can assist with packaging for distributions.

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Creating The Open-Source Community Of Your Dreams

Filed under
OSS

When a company decides to embrace open-source software development, releasing the code under a suitable license is only the tip of the iceberg. The real challenge that companies face is learning how to attract and collaborate with contributors.

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Monoid Is an Open Source Font That's Perfect for Coders

Filed under
OSS

Monoid, designed by Andreas Larsen, is designed to be sleek and precise. Every single character in Monoid’s library has been designed by Larsen to be beyond easy to tell apart, so you don’t ever have to worry about confusing thetas, o’s, O’s, and 0’s (zeros). The font is also monospaced (each character takes up the same width), so it makes it easy to skim your code and spot any errors that might be fudging things up. The spacing between the characters is small, however, so you can fit as much as you need into a line of code. What makes Monoid even better is the fact that it’s alive. Since it’s an open source font, it can be adjusted and perfected over time by the very people that use it. You can check out Monoid at the link below.

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Huge Package Overhaul for Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

Debian and Ubuntu are moving to update all C++ packages with GCC5, which was released in April. GCC stands for Gnu Compiler Collection, and it is used to convert source code to executable code and libraries. These compilers are used to build everything from the Linux kernel to user applications, so it's a far-reaching change.

GCC5 has introduced more fundamental updates than previous versions, as it is the first version to fully support the latest version of C++. This new standard, released in 2011, contains numerous improvements to the previous standard, which dates back to 1998. It gives developers the tools they need to build more stable software rapidly, at all levels of the Linux ecosystem.

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 to Include Calendar App and Dekko Email Client by Default

Filed under
Ubuntu

We reported a few days ago that the next major update for Canonical's mobile operating system, Ubuntu Touch OTA-6, will arrive in approximately 6 weeks, around September 1, 2015 or at the end of August if we're lucky.

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Samsung launches additional information services for Tizen TV

Filed under
Linux

Samsung Electronics have announced the addition of four services that provide real-time on-screen Information on their Tizen based Smart TVs. You can display Information that relates to sports, news, entertainment, and social. The Information is displayed on the right hand side of the screen on a transparent window, and can be accessed via the TV remote when the viewer is watching cable TV or IPTV.

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Software Commons

Filed under
OSS

In this sense, software commons make sense, and because these commons do not effectively exist in some village somewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages, but much rather all over the Internet, they are of primary importance for software and for the world we live in.

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Also: IBM moves open-source business software to the cloud

The real reason Facebook does open source

GNOME 3.17.4

Filed under
GNOME

Hi all,

GNOME 3.17.4 is out. This is a development snapshot, so use it with caution.

Among the new things in this release, you can find improved Wayland hi-dpi
support in mutter, IP addresses for vms in gnome-boxes, MathML support in
orca, performance improvements in tracker, events from different boots in
gnome-logs, a new places view in the GTK+ file chooser, a new application
preview: gnome-todo, and many small improvements and bug fixes all over
the place.

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