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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 12:46pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 12:27pm
Story KDE in Slackware, Cutelyst 1.4.0 Ready Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 8:51am
Story GNOME 3.24's Mutter and GNOME Shell Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 8:20am
Story FOSS in surveillance/data collection Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 8:16am
Story CruxEX 3.3 (CRUX 3.3) Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 8:10am
Story KDE Applications 17.04 Schedule Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 7:59am
Story Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Officially Released with Linux Kernel 4.8 from Ubuntu 16.10 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 7:51am
Story Enlightenment 0.21.6 Desktop Environment Adds New Wayland Improvements, Bugfixes Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 7:45am
Story Leftovers: GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 12:11am

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

Programming and Security News

Filed under
Development
Security
  • RSPIRV: Google's Rust Implementation Of SPIR-V

    Google developers have been working on a number of open-source projects in the Vulkan space and one of their latest is SPIR-V processing with Rust.

    RSPIRV is another project under the Google umbrella on GitHub. RSPIRV is a Rust implementation of SPIR-V module processing functionalities. SPIR-V, of course, being the intermediate representation/language used by Vulkan as well as OpenCL 2.1+ and can also be used in OpenGL.

  • Optimize PHP with finely tuned IT resources and settings

    More than 90% of PHP-based websites still use PHP version 5. Of those websites, less than one quarter run the latest supported version, PHP 5.6. Despite the release of PHP 7 in December 2015, which has been documented and benchmarked as up to two times faster than PHP 5.6, the adoption rate is only around 3% among websites that use the language. The first step -- before optimizing PHP using the following tips -- is to upgrade to version 7.

  • Node for Java Developers

    The biggest audience for my Node.js workshops, courses and books (especially when I’m teaching live) is Java developers. You see, it used to be that Java was the only language professional software developers/engineers had to know. Not anymore. Node.js as well as other languages like Go, Elixir, Python, Clojure, dictate a polyglot environment in which the best tool for the job is picked.

  • Morocco's First Open Source ERP Uses Java EE 7!
  • Hazelcast's Parallel Streaming Engine Targets Java/Big Data Programmers

    In-memory data grid (IMDG) specialist Hazelcast Inc. yesterday launched a new distributed processing engine for Big Data streams. The open-source, Apache 2-licenced Hazelcast Jet is designed to process data in parallel across nodes, enabling data-intensive applications to operate in near real-time.

  • On new zlib breaking perl
  • anytime 0.2.1
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Capsule8 Launches Linux-Based Container Security Platform

    Cybersecurity startup Capsule8 this week announced that it has raised US$2.5 million to launch the industry's first container-aware, real-time threat protection platform designed to protect legacy and next-generation Linux infrastructures from existing and potential attacks.

    CEO John Viega, CTO Dino Dai Zovi and Chief Scientist Brandon Edwards, all veteran hackers, cofounded the firm. They raised seed funding from Bessemer Venture Partners, as well as individual investors Shandul Shah of Index Ventures and ClearSky's Jay Leek.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • halting problem :: Epoxy

    Epoxy is a small library that GTK+, and other projects, use in order to access the OpenGL API in somewhat sane fashion, hiding all the awful bits of craziness that actually need to happen because apparently somebody dosed the water supply at SGI with large quantities of LSD in the mid-‘90s, or something.

    As an added advantage, Epoxy is also portable on different platforms, which is a plus for GTK+.

    Since I’ve started using Meson for my personal (and some work-related) projects as well, I’ve been on the lookout for adding Meson build rules to other free and open source software projects, in order to improve both their build time and portability, and to improve Meson itself.

    As a small, portable project, Epoxy sounded like a good candidate for the port of its build system from autotools to Meson.

  • Meson Build System Takes 45% Less Time Than Autotools For Epoxy

    GNOME developers continue investing in the Meson Build System and the results continue to be much faster than Autotools and generally other build systems too.

    GNOME developer Emmanuele Bassi shared his latest findings after bringing Meson over to libepoxy, the library for abstracting some of the OpenGL / OpenGL ES differences and setup behavior across windowing systems and other environments.

  • A new way of writing Gtk+ applications

    I love working with Gtk+ - it is a great GUI toolkit with a good developer experience. But React has totally changed how GUI apps are written.

  • [Vide] [GNOME 3.24] User Accounts - Feb 10
  • GNOME MPV is a Sleek GTK+ Frontend for mpv

    I recently blogged about my love affair (of sorts) with mpv, the nimble, open-source media player based on mplayer.

    Stock mpv is, for those used to all-singing and all-dancing video players, a little… austere. GNOME MPV is an attractive GTK+ front-end to mpv.

    If you find mpv too minimal, gnome-mpv is sure to help.

Nouveau: Mesa 13.0 vs. 17.0 vs. 17.1-devel OpenGL Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Having now published RADV/RadeonSI Mesa 17.0 benchmarks and Intel i965/ANV Mesa 17.0 benchmarks compared to Mesa 13.0 and 17.1-devel, here are now benchmarks of the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver for seeing how this open-source NVIDIA 3D driver performs on the imminent Mesa 17.0 release.

With Mesa 17.0, OpenGL 4.3 is still exposed by NVC0 even though it implements all the OpenGL 4.5 extensions, it doesn't yet pass the GL CTS. But at least with Mesa 17.0, NVIDIA Maxwell support goes from OpenGL 4.1 to 4.3. There are also other new features to Mesa 17.0.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Mirai Botnet Spreads With Help From Infected Windows Computers
  • Lovely. Now someone's ported IoT-menacing Mirai to Windows boxes

    The Mirai malware that hijacked hundreds of thousands of IoT gadgets, routers and other devices is now capable of infecting Windows systems.

  • Finding Ticketbleed

    Ticketbleed (CVE-2016-9244) is a software vulnerability in the TLS stack of certain F5 products that allows a remote attacker to extract up to 31 bytes of uninitialized memory at a time, which can contain any kind of random sensitive information, like in Heartbleed.

  • Cybersecurity firms pilloried by GCHQ technical director over “witchcraft”

    “we are allowing massively incentivised companies to define the public perception of the problem”.

  • Wire’s independent security review

    Ever since Wire launched end-to-end encryption and open sourced its apps one question has consistently popped up: “Is there an independent security review available?” Well, there is now!

    Kudelski Security and X41 D-Sec published a joint review of Wire’s encrypted messaging protocol implementation. They found it to have “high security, thanks to state-of-the-art cryptographic protocols and algorithms, and software engineering practices mitigating the risk of software bugs.”

  • Practical Steps for Protecting IoT Devices

    The security of IoT devices is a high priority these days, as attackers can use Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks to target them and wreak havoc on a system.

    “Due to the sheer volume of unconnected devices, it can take hours and often days to mitigate such an attack,” says Adam Englander, who is a Senior Engineer of the LaunchKey product at iovation.

  • IoT Cybersecurity Alliance Will Collaborate on Standards, Education

    A new IoT Cybersecurity Alliance formed by AT&T, IBM, Palo Alto Networks, Symantec, and Trustonic promises to help solve one of the most critical elements of the Internet of Things (IoT) — security. The group says its goal is to work on IoT security standards as well as raise awareness about the topic.

    There are numerous IoT-related associations working to promote different segments of IoT and streamline the fragmentation that exists in the industry. However, this is the first group to focus solely on security. AT&T, which was an early advocate for IoT, said it has seen a 3,198 percent increase in attackers scanning for vulnerabilities in IoT devices.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Sandstorm is returning to its community roots

    Most people know Sandstorm as an open source, community-driven project aiming to enable self-hosting of cloud services and to make it possible for open source web apps to compete with today’s cloud services.

  • AT&T open sourced the heart of their network
  • OPNFV Nearing Commercial Deployment

    It also signals a stage where the OPNFV Project's software platform could be ready for commercial deployment -- dates for which the organization is not setting directly. "We'll defer to the vendors on that," says Heather Kirksey, OPNFV director. But she expects to start collecting deployment data this year. Queries to a couple of the involved vendors have not yet produced responses, but stay tuned.

  • ‘Night in the Woods’ Improving Games by Open Sourcing Code

    Game software developer Jon Manning has created a very well-done 60-second promo for his upcoming talk at the Games Developer Conference in San Francisco, Feb 27-March 3, 2017 – Making Night-in-the-Woods Better with Open Source.

  • Lessons from a brief career in open source

    I wasn't making much headway in the cybersecurity field or in computer forensics. However, I did notice that many postings used words like "Linux" and "open source." I thought that might be a better path to take. So, I enrolled in several free, online courses to improve my skills and to build my credentials. You can find free courses at Cybrary.it, edX.org, and others. I have since been certified in Linux, Java, HTML, e-marketing, Google Analytics, and even FEMA emergency response.

  • FOSS February: A month to celebrate open source

    Open source remains a competitive means of distribution—one that delivers exceptional software to new and devoted users. Despite this, open source, its methodologies, practices, code, and the communities behind them, can be overlooked or misunderstood if they are inadequately communicated. As a professional in tech marketing in the open source space, I often find that my conversations begin by highlighting the key takeaways of open source before I can begin to graze the surface of product-specific impact.

    Open source software has come a long way over the past several years, primarily due to the contributions of active open source communities. Still, convincing an enterprise’s influencers, IT leaders, and developers of the merits of open source remains a challenge in certain spaces. While it is important that organizations take an honest, objective look at the total cost of ownership of any solution, open source or commercial, it became clear to me that impressions of open source were not always reflective of the extraordinary work and talent that can be found in the space.

  • Integrating LibreOffice OnLine into your web app

    I've returned from FOSDEM 2017, where I talked about LibreOffice Online that we develop here at Collabora and how to integrate it with your own web service.

  • [Video] FOSDEM 2017 - Resurrecting dinosaurs, what can possibly go wrong?
  • GUADEC 2017: Friday 28th July to Wednesday 2nd August in Manchester, UK

    The GUADEC 2017 team is happy to officially announce the dates and location of this year’s conference.

    GUADEC 2017 will run from Friday 28th July to Wednesday 2nd August. The first three days will include talks and social events, as well as the GNOME Foundation’s AGM. This part of the conference will also include a 20th anniversary celebration for the GNOME project.

  • New Benchmarks Show Big Increases in Spark Graph Processing

    Companies focused on Big Data have remained very focused on Apache Spark, an open source data analytics cluster computing framework originally developed in the AMPLab at UC Berkeley. According to Apache, Spark can run programs up to 100 times faster than Hadoop MapReduce in memory, and ten times faster on disk. When crunching large data sets, those are big performance differences.

    The race is also on to speed up Spark-driven workloads. Now, Diablo Technologies and Inspur Systems have announced the release of benchmark data showcasing the benefits of the Memory1 solution for Apache Spark workloads. By increasing the cluster memory size with Memory1, Diablo and Inspur claim they were able to cut processing times for graph analytics by half or more.

  • HackerOne Professional, Free for Open Source Projects

    For some time now I have been working with HackerOne to help them shape and grow their hacker community. It has been a pleasure working with the team: they are doing great work, have fantastic leadership (including my friend, Mårten Mickos), are seeing consistent growth, and recently closed a $40 million round of funding. It is all systems go.

  • Three new FOSS umbrella organizations in Europe

    Last year, three new umbrella organizations for free and open-source software (and hardware) projects emerged in Europe. Their aim is to cater to the needs of the community by providing a legal entity for projects to join, leaving the projects free to focus on technical and community tasks. These organizations (Public Software CIC, [The Commons Conservancy], and the Center for the Cultivation of Technology) will take on the overhead of actually running a legal entity themselves.

    Among other services, they offer to handle donations, accounting, grants, legal compliance, or even complex governance for the projects that join them. In my opinion (and, seemingly, theirs) such services are useful to these kinds of projects; some of the options that these three organizations bring to the table are quite interesting and inventive.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • {New] Green Recorder
  • The Mach-O Transition: Darling in the Past 5 Years

    Darling has been under development for almost five years now, which invites the questions — what has happened over the past years, are we getting anywhere and when will we get there.

  • The Inkscape 0.92 release

    On January 4, the Inkscape project released the latest stable version of its open-source vector-graphics editor. Version 0.92 adds a new tool for creating flexible color gradients that can vary with almost arbitrary complexity and it adds new capabilities to many of its existing drawing tools. There are new features to be found in the set of bundled extensions and path effects, as well as important updates to font features and to the application's ability to tune the XML objects in a scalable vector graphics (SVG) file. There are also some changes to how Inkscape handles some core document properties, however — changes that are mandatory if Inkscape is to fully support the SVG specification, but that might trip up unsuspecting users.

    The 0.92 release was accompanied by a detailed set of release notes on the Inkscape wiki. The project has long required developers who check in new features to document those features in the upcoming release-notes page, an admirable practice that other free-software projects would do well to consider. If anything, the wiki page for a new release can veer toward being overly detailed but, on the other hand, there is never a last-minute scramble to write release notes from memory and risk accidentally leaving out something important.

  • Komorebi - Awesome Wallpapers Manager for Linux
  • Screenlets (Desktop Widgets) Fixed For Ubuntu 16.04, Available In PPA

    The Screenlets package was removed from the official Ubuntu 16.04 (and newer) repositories because it no longer worked, however, Hrotkó Gábor fixed various issues that prevented the application and some of its widgets from working, and uploaded a new version to the official Screenlets PPA, for Ubuntu 16.04.

    While the PPA doesn't officially support it, you can also use it in Ubuntu 16.10.

  • Top 7 Tools that can automate Linux Admin Task

    Puppet is an open source tool designed to make automation and reporting much easier for system administrators. It is basically a configuration management software that helps in configuring and maintaining your servers and other systems in your network. Generally, Server administrators spend a lot of time doing the same task again and again daily. They always wanted to automate these tasks, so as to get more time to work on other projects or learn new concepts and scripting languages. Tasks can be automated by writing scripts, but in companies with a larger network, scripts don’t come in handy.

  • Where has my disk space gone? Flame graphs for file systems

    My laptop was recently running low on available disk space, and it was a mystery as to why. I have different tools to explore the file system, including running the "find / -ls" command from a terminal, but they can be time consuming to use. I wanted a big picture view of space by directories, subdirectories, and so on.

  • LosslessCut Is An Easy To Use Video Cutter (Cross-Platform)

    According to its GitHub page, LosslessCut doesn't re-encode or decode the videos, making it very fast and especially useful for large videos.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Google

GNU/FSF

Filed under
GNU
  • grep-3.0 released [stable]
  • grep-2.28 released

    This is to announce grep-2.28, a stable release. Thank you especially to Paul Eggert and Norihiro Tanaka for all of their improvements, both in the grep repository and via gnulib.

  • The GNU C Library version 2.25 is now available
  • Meet the GNU Health team at SCALE15x !
  • Looking for Work after 25 Years of Octave

    TL;DR: Reflecting on the last 25 of Octave, it's been a great experience. I would love to continue as the Octave BDFL but I also need to find a way to pay the bills.

    It's hard to believe that almost 25 years have passed since I started the Octave project. It's been a great experience. I've met many interesting and talented people along the way. I'm grateful for everyone[1] who has made Octave the successful project that it is today. There is no way that the project would be as successful as it is without their many contributions.

    As I've said many times, I thought the project would last a year or two. I never intended for it to be a career, but now it is hard to imagine doing anything else. There are still many projects I would like to tackle. I want to continue refactoring the interpreter so that it is easier to understand, simpler to work with, and more reliable. I want to improve the performance of the interpreter and make the GUI more useful. I'd love to be able to devote my full attention and energy to these projects for as long as I am able.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.9.1 - Here is the First Bugfix Release
  • How to Activate the Global Menu in Kde Plasma 5.9
  • Kde Plasma 5.9 is Finally Available in Arch Linux

    As an Arch Linux and Kde lover, I’m pleased to let you know that the new Kde Plasma 5.9 is finally available into the stable repository.

  • A Short KDE Plasma 5.9 Review in February 2017

    The KDE Network Manager settings got a new look. Surprise for VPN users, now you have a beautiful & user-friendly VPN client in KDE built-in.

  • Concept X for Plasma Mobile

    This week the Plasma team is sprinting and maybe the time to discuss Plasma Mobile’s UI is coming! Andrea Del Sarto and me didn’t join the sprint this year, but we wanted to contribute with our ideas, trying to inspire future works

  • KDE at FOSDEM and Plasma Sprint 2017 Pics

    We’ve had a busy weekend at FOSDEM in Brussels for the last two days and now I’ve travelled into my fifth country of the trip picking up a few hackers on the way for the KDE Plasma Sprint which is happening all this week in Stuttgart, do drop by if you’re in town.

  • Made with Krita 2016: The Artbooks Have Arrived!

    Made With Krita 2016 is now available! This morning the printer delivered 250 copies of the first book filled with art created in Krita by great artists from all around the world. We immediately set to work to send out all pre-orders, including the ones that were a kickstarter reward.

  • Native look and feel

    We know that many Qt users want controls styled with a native look-and-feel. But offering that on platforms with no public styling API, is hard. A classic approach is to take snapshots of the native controls, tweak them, and use them as foreground or background in our own controls. Which is somewhat OK for static appearances. But when animations and transitions are involved, static pixmaps will only take you half the way. And since an OS can change style from one update to the next, taking snapshots runtime is risky. Using pre-grabbed snapshots is also something we don’t do because of legal considerations.

  • Glowing Qt Charts

    Have you ever had the need to visualize data graphically and add some ‘wow’-effect to it? I’m currently helping out with the development of a demo application, where we have some charts to visualize data received from sensors. Naturally, the designer wants the charts to be visually appealing.

  • Plasma Sprint: KDE neon Docker Images Now Support Wayland

    The KDE neon Docker Images are the easiest and fastest way to test out KDE software from a different branch than your host system.

    Coming live from the Plasma Sprint sponsored by Affenfels here in Stuttgart, the KDE neon Docker images now support Wayland. This runs on both X and Wayland host systems. Instructions on the wiki page.

  • Does KDE.org look funny to you?

    Our stalwart KDE homepage, which has been with us for several years, has, after serving us well, finally been retired.

    The new KDE.org homepage, using the new theme “Aether”, is only the first step of a much longer journey to unify the disparate KDE websites. KDE.org and its surrounding network is made of many parts: forums, wikis, feed aggregates, custom solutions, etc; beyond the homepage each of these will need to be updated. It will be a long road, but the modernization is due.

  • Wallpaper, Wallpapers, Website!
  • Plasma Vault is evolving

    While the rest of the Plasma team is sprinting in Germany, I’m unfortunately tied down to my chair at home and trying to sprint as well.

  • Kanboard to Phabricator

    A while ago KDE migrated our todo management from Kanboard to Phabricator to reduce the amount of software our System Administrators have to manage and maintain. In KDE neon we did this move already ahead of time so I happened to have a primitive migration script at hand, ultimately making me the person to auto migrate everyone’s todos.

  • FOSDEM 2017 & the QtWayland Compositor Framework

    This will be a rather short blog post but since I completely missed to making it before this year’s FOSDEM, just let me give you a short hint to my current talk: This year, for the first time, I submitted a talk to the Embedded & Automotive DevRoom. If you think that this sounds crazy, actually, what we see on modern embedded devices, like in cars or in even bigger machines, this tends gain a similar complexity like the good old Linux desktop environments. In terms of multiple processes, window compositing and UI requirements, a lot of such demands are already on the table…

Kdenlive 16.12.2 released

Filed under
KDE

The second maintenance release of the 16.12 series is out, part of KDE Applications 16.12.2.

This release fixes startup crashes with some graphic cards, as well as some fixes to MOVIT (GPU effect processing) and minor stability issues. The Appimage version as well as our PPA’s were updated, check our download section for instructions. An updated Windows version will be released in the next days. This is a relatively small update since all our efforts are currently focused on the timeline refactoring branch which will bring professional grade new features and more stability. Stay tuned for more news!

Read more

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Neon to Support Snap Apps in Plasma Discover

    Ubuntu-based KDE Neon is one the Linux distros we’re most excited for this year — and with good reason. The distro combines the stability of Ubuntu’s latest LTS foundations with the latest (and, if you want it, bleeding edge) KDE applications and Plasma desktop releases.

  • Adoption of Flatpak vs Snap

    Given these results alone, I’m quite frankly pretty puzzled how the jury could still be out and that’s completely ignoring the centralized nature of Snap. Distributing AppImages via Steam makes more sense than Snap (Steam has the same centralized nature as Snap). Not only does every somewhat mainstream distribution ship Steam in some non-free repo, it would also allow us to distribute applications to Windows and macOS.

  • The State Of Flatpak vs. Snaps On Various Linux Distributions

    Motivated by KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps and this lengthy, contentious forum thread, a KDE contributor has taken a closer look at the Flatpak versus Snaps versions available in different Linux distributions.

    KDE contributor Markus Slopianka sought to clarify the adoption of Flatpak vs. Snap in modern Linux distributions. He looked at the state of Snap and Flatpak in the releases of Arch, Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Mageia, openSUSE, and Ubuntu.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 5 of the Best Calendar Apps for Linux

    Finding a good calendar app for Linux is not as easy as, say, music or text editing software where there are several good options. That’s not to say there are no good options for calendar apps on Linux – you just have to do a bit more digging to find the right app.

    We’ve already done the heavy lifting for you, so here are five calendar applications in no particular order that can help you manage your schedule and give you good value on your Linux desktop.

  • Released Vivaldi Web Browser Stable 1.7 With Built-in Screenshot & All Tab Mute Options

    Everybody knows about a brand new web browser Vivaldi. Vivaldi is a feature-rich, modern web browser based on Chromium / Blink. Which was developed by Vivaldi Technologies, a company founded by Opera Software co-founder and former CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner and Tatsuki Tomita.

  • FFmpeg 3.2.4 "Hypatia" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Available for Download

    Just days after the release of the FFmpeg 3.2.3 maintenance update, the open-source multimedia framework received another point release, versioned 3.2.4, which appears to be a small one patching a handful of issues.

    FFmpeg 3.2.4 is the fourth update to the FFmpeg 3.2 "Hypatia" stable series, and it's here to address a total of five reported bugs, including the clearing of ref_counts on redundant slices for h264_slice, a heap allocation wrap in both mov_read_uuid and mov_read_hdlr, a logic error pictordec, and setup of codecpar in add_codec().

  • Calibre 2.79 eBook Manager Adds Interactive Pop-Up for Connected Android Devices

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal announced today, February 10, 2017, the immediate availability for download of the Calibre 2.79 open-source ebook library management software for all supported platforms.

    Calibre 2.79 is here two weeks after the release of version 2.78, which introduced support for the newest Kobo firmware and many bug fixes. It's also a small release that only introduces a pop-up message to inform users when an Android device is connected.

  • A Lightweight Screen Recorder for Linux

    Want to record your Ubuntu desktop for a screencast, video tutorial, or bug report? I highly recommend giving Green Recorder a shot. Green Recorder is a minimal yet perfectly functional desktop screen recorder app for Ubuntu.

  • If You Remember Using These 5 Linux Apps, You’re Officially Old

    And after thinking about it for a while I figured I’d tap it out into a post because I reckon a few of the names that follow will bring back a memory or two for some of you too.

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • GNU/Linux Now Accepted

    I don’t know much about Southern USA, but in Canada I taught in many remote schools in the North and over a decade or so, it became unsurprising to find one or more students in my classes who had experienced desktop GNU/Linux. They may not have known much about it but they weren’t put off by it. It just worked for them. Usually, they had been in a big city school somewhere and brought the knowledge back with them. That familiarity helped ease student populations to accept GNU/Linux.

  • Hasta la vista, Vista

    Microsoft will stop all support for Windows Vista in two months, ending the problem-plagued operating system's usefulness when it issues final patches on April 11.

    The OS won't be missed: According to analytics vendor Net Applications, which estimated user share by counting unique visitors to tens of thousands of websites, Vista ran on less than 1% of all personal computers powered by Windows last month. Still, even that small percentage translated into approximately 14 million PCs when using Microsoft's claim that 1.5 billion devices run Windows.

  • Linux flagship Munich's U-turn: Install Windows 10 everywhere by end of 2020 [Ed: An attack by Microsoft-connected Accenture in Munich shows that Microsoft VERY much hates GNU/Linux]

    According to Kirschner, Munich's IT problems are not so much down to the use of free software as they are the result of poor management and organizational structure, a view backed up by Accenture's study.

  • Munich Said To Be Moving Away From Linux/LiMux, Back To Microsoft

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

SemiCode OS Might Be Your Next Development Platform

Filed under
GNU
Linux

One thing about Linux is that it’s very coder-friendly. Why? Simple: Nearly any developer can have every tool they need at their fingertips with ease and little to no cost. Tools like gcc, make, Bluefish, Atom, vi, emacs… the list goes on and on and on.
Many of these tools are ready to serve, via a quick install from either your package manager or by downloading them, individually, from their respected websites. But what if you wanted all of those tools, at the ready, on a single, programmer-friendly platform? If the thought of having every tool you need to develop, pre-installed on a Linux distribution, appeals to you, there’s a new platform in the works that might fit your needs to perfection. That distribution is SemiCode OS.

Read more

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today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more