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Tuesday, 31 Mar 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME Shell and Mutter Updated for GNOME 3.14, Nvidia Corruption Fixed Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 10:55pm
Story Five key skills for Linux job seekers Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 10:50pm
Story HP Expands Open Source Cloud Push Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 8:20pm
Story Report: Linux takes leading role in IoT-obsessed market Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 8:07pm
Story Plasma 5.2 Bugfix Update Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 8:03pm
Story Tiny COM adds wireless and storage to i.MX6 Dual SoC Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 7:58pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:49pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:49pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:47pm

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

The Most Important BSD Distributions

Filed under
BSD

Berkeley Software Distribution, abbreviated as BSD, is a UNIX operating system derivative, developed and distributed at the university of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995 by a group of programmers (Bill Joy, Marshall Kirk McKusick, Kenneth Thompson etc…) at the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG).

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The future of big data can only be open source : Scott Yara, president, Pivotal

Filed under
Server
OSS

Pivotal is one of fifteen leading vendors launching a major new open source big data platform to drive enterprise data innovation - president Scott Yara sat down with Information Age to tell us why

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Also: New Open Data Platform will push big data technology through open source, not sales

A Quick Update on OpenStack Congress

Meet Sirius, the open-source Siri clone that runs on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Sirius is an open-source virtual assistant, a bit like Apple’s Siri (pictured above), Google’s Google Now, or Microsoft’s Cortana. But unlike those well-known helpers—and like Linux itself—Sirius is an open platform anyone can use and contribute to, from universities to startups. It’s currently being tested on Ubuntu, and you can download and install it on your own Linux PC today… if you’re particularly adventurous.

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Linux pre-release Testbed continued, adding LMDE 2 Betsy beta

Filed under
Reviews

Installation was easy and uneventful, as is almost always the case with Mint distributions. The best news at this point is that this release is still not cursed with the UEFI installation problem that the Ubuntu-derived Linux Mint distribution has - namely that it uses the same EFI boot directory name as Ubuntu.

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Here’s how you turn a USB charger into a little Linux machine

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Remember Chris Robinson over at NODE? He was the guy who built the handheld Raspberry Pi-powered Linux terminal we wrote about back in January. Now he’s back with an even smaller Linux project for you to make – one built into the body of a USB charger.

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GTC 2015: Nvidia Digits DevBox is a Linux-powered mini supercomputer

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

NVIDIA HAS ANNOUNCED Digits DevBox, a Linux-powered mini supercomputer, at its annual GPU Technology Conference (GTC) in California today.

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7 Reasons Zenwalk Should Now Be On Your Radar

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Slack

Seven years ago this operating system was among the top ten listed on DistroWatch; these days Zenwalk is relatively obscure at 113th place. So not many people noticed when, earlier this year, a new version came out – a prelude to the upcoming 8.0 release. The result is a lightweight Linux setup, compatible with SlackWare packages, that’s fast to set up and comes with a complete suite of software for everyday use.

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Google Targets Digital Signage With Chrome Updates

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Google

Chrome and Chrome OS powering digital signs may not seem like a huge deal in terms of most people’s daily usage, but it’s an angle on Chrome OS outside of education and consumer-focused hardware that may not be readily apparent, but that nonetheless could help push Chrome as a whole forward, and have implications for the consumer track later on.

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Samsung Galaxy S6 Review: In Depth

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Android
Reviews

We review Samsung’s Galaxy S6, its most exciting flagship phone in years, rocking an all-new design, updated fingerprint scanner, awesome camera tech and a lot more besides…

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Linux and Linux 4.0 – the kernel column

Filed under
Development
Linux

Linus Torvalds released the final 3.19 kernel roughly on cue, noting that “nothing all that exciting happened [since the 3.19-rc7 release candidate], and while I was tempted a couple of times to do an rc8, there really wasn’t any reason for it.” As mentioned in last month’s issue, the new kernel includes a number of exciting new features: support for Intel’s MPX Memory Protection Extensions (which we covered in detail previously), a new HSA driver for AMD GPU devices, enhanced RAID 5 and 6 support in Btrfs, and the final promotion of Android’s Binder IPC mechanism out of the kernel’s staging tree. As usual, KernelNewbies have an excellent summary of the various patches with links to commits.

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A Linux distro for education: UberStudent

Filed under
Ubuntu

Built on top of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, UberStudent 4.1 "Epicurus" is a customized distribution designed for secondary and post-secondary education. A blurb on the UberStudent website describes the distribution as "Red Hat for education." I was intrigued by this claim and wondered if some customization on top of Ubuntu could really do for education what Red Hat does for enterprise. So I gave UberStudent a try and was very impressed with what I found.

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Open Source Works. Just Ask Facebook

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OSS

Plenty of companies are now releasing open source projects in the hopes that other companies will help improve their software, but Facebook stands out because its projects actually end up being used by so many others. A startup called Datastax built an entire company to support users of Facebook’s database Cassandra, and now even Apple is exploring the use of Facebook’s ambitious server designs in its data centers.

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Also: Facebook releases open source ORC reader for Presto

7 Leading Applications for GNOME

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GNOME

The GNOME desktop may have declined in popularity, but GNOME technology remains more popular than ever. In fact, if you tally the number of users today on leading desktops, well over a third run applications designed for GNOME. Not even KDE, GNOME's long-time rival, exceeds this popularity.

Part of the popularity of GNOME technology is due to the GTK+ toolkit, one of the first and most mature for free software. In the last few years, KDE's Qt toolkit has come to rival GTK+, but GTK+ remains a frequent choice for developers.

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Seven killer Linux apps that will change how you work

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The sheer number of Linux apps available today is mind boggling and one category in particular has exploded over the last few years … productivity tools. While there are a few well-known apps such as LibreOffice and NeoOffice (both forks of OpenOffice), there are many more tools that will make your work easier. Here are seven killer Linux office productivity apps you may not know about … and note that many of them are also available for OS X and Windows, so if you have to hop between operating systems, you can keep at least a semblance of consistency.

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The Changing Face of Debian

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Debian

Like a rite of spring, the annual campaign for Debian Project Leader has begun. I've been watching these elections since 1999, and reading the platforms of the current three candidates (headlined, inevitably, as apt install dpl-install), I'm reminded about how Debian has evolved over the years.

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Black Lab Pup Is a Tiny and Powerful PC with Black Lab Linux MATE

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Linux

After announcing the unique, one-of-a-kind Black Lab Sphere computer, Black Lab Software was proud to introduce today a new device called Black Lab Pup, which is a mini PC powered by the MATE edition of the Black Lab Linux operating system. Despite its name, Black Lab Pup is not a Puppy Linux-based computer.

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GNOME Shell Gets a Major Update Ahead of GNOME 3.16

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GNOME

The release of the GNOME 3.16 RC (Release Candidate) desktop environment is imminent, with the final version being unveiled next Wednesday, March 25, 2015. Numerous core component, libraries, and applications of the acclaimed and controversial open-source desktop environment have been published in the last 24 hours on GNOME’s FTP site.

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The Return of SCO, a Debian Retrospective, & GNU is 30

Filed under
-s

Last I heard SCO was all but bankrupt, but apparently five years later a claim against IBM for $5 billion is still pending. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield discusses how Debian has changed over the years and if that was for the good. In other gnews, the GNU Manifesto turns 30 this month.

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Fedora Project Brags with GNOME’s Redesigned Notification System in Fedora 22

Filed under
Red Hat

As we’ve reported earlier this month, the GNOME Project is working hard to release the next major release of its GNOME desktop environment. Among the highlights of GNOME 3.16, there’s a redesigned notification system that has been integrated into the existing Calendar apple from the main panel.

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