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Sunday, 19 Apr 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 9 ways Android Wear is better than the Apple Watch Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 10:20pm
Story [Corrected] Linux AIO Linux Mint Debian Edition 2 Includes Both Cinnamon and MATE Flavors Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 10:07pm
Story PARCC Selects Open Source Platform for Non-Summative Assessments Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 9:19pm
Story Desktop Linux Made Easy Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 9:11pm
Story KDBUS To Be Included In The Linux 4.1 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 8:58pm
Story 3DR's Solo Drone Boasts Dual Linux Computers Running Dronecode Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 7:07pm
Story GNU Linux-libre, Free as in Freedo Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 5:39pm
Story RDO OpenStack Promises Easy, Free Open Source Cloud Computing Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 5:28pm
Story The Culture of Freedom: Free Software, Free Speech Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 5:13pm
Story Review: Sabayon 15.02 KDE Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 5:04pm

Ubuntu 15.10 to Finally Drop Python 2.X Support

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers usually plan beyond what they are working on at any particular moment, and it looks like they are finally taking an important decision regarding the presence of Python 2 libraries and dependencies, which might be solved for the Ubuntu 15.10 launch.

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Basque parliament adapts workflow to eID tool

Filed under
OSS

The Basque Parliament is planning to overhaul its workflow, wishing to increase its use of digital identity and electronic signature solutions. The Basque Parliament is using Sinadura, an open source eID tool developed by Zylk, a Bilbao-based open source IT service provider. The parliament now wants to combine this with more applications, the company says.

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Top 6 Ways To Get Your iTunes Experience On Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

As you’re getting used to Linux (potentially as your new main operating system), you’ll eventually try to find a way to efficiently manage your music. iTunes comes to mind because it’s been the most popular way to manage music over the years, but you’ll quickly find out that iTunes isn’t available natively on Linux. Plus, better ways exist to manage your music now that it’s 2015.

However, that doesn’t automatically mean that you won’t be able to manage your music the way you want to. There’s plenty of other ways to keep tabs on your music library. Here’s six great ways to get it done.

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Also: Ambient Noise Player for Ubuntu Plays Relaxing Sounds to Keep You Creative

Linux-ready smart camera SoC encodes 1080p@70fps video

Filed under
Linux

Allwinner unveiled a Cortex-A7 based SoC for smart connected cameras that integrates its HawkView image signal processor, and supports Linux and “Camdroid.”

Allwinner jumped on the ARM Cortex-A7 spec early, using it for its popular, low-priced system-on-chips like the Allwinner A10, dual-core A20, and quad-core A31. Like the A10, Allwinner’s new “V3″ SoC has a single Cortex-A7 core, in this case clocked to 1.2GHz. However, Like a number of TI’s Linux-focused, DSP-based DaVinci SoCs, the V3 is designed for camera applications. It follows Allwinner V-Series SoCs including the quad-core, Cortex-A7 V10 and Cortex-A8-based V15.

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diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Filed under
Development
Linux

Recently there was some discussion about ways to ease the tired backs of kernel maintainers. Apparently the merge windows are times of great labor, and some folks wanted to alert contributors to some preferable code submission habits.

There were a variety of ideas, and Kevin Cernekee summarized them in patch form, but one key idea was that none of this advice really could be treated as etched into stone. Linus Torvalds and Theodore Ts'o, in particular, pointed out that maintainers all have their own ways of doing things, and that no general rules could be relied on universally to produce repeatable results.

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Also: Linux 4.0 Kernel Will Likely Be Released Next Weekend

Linux 4.0 rc7

Linux 4.0-rc7 Kernel Released

Growing The Linux Talent Pool - 50% Off LFCE Exams

Linus Torvalds explains why he created Git

Git This: World's Favorite Software Development Tool Turns 10

MintBox Mini PC Powered by Linux Mint Finally Released, Already Sold Out

Filed under
Linux

MintBox Mini is a mini-PC designed and built by CompuLab. The new system was just made available and the first batch is already sold out.

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Parsix 7 Morphs GNOME Into a Better Desktop

Filed under
Reviews

Parsix GNU/Linux 7 is a feature-rich rendition of the GNOME desktop that you must take for a spin regardless of how you feel about the GNOME desktop.

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Reasons to Love and Hate elementary OS

Filed under
Ubuntu

elementary OS is definitely one of the stars of the Linux ecosystem right now and with good reason. It's one of the most beautiful operating systems out there, and you would think that that's enough, but there are as many reasons to hate it as there are to love it.

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Compact Cortex-A9 SBC expands on its inner Udoo

Filed under
Android
Linux

Seco has released a commercial SBC spun from the original i.MX6-based open spec Udoo hacker SBC, adding eMMC flash and subtracting Arduino compatibility.

Seco oversees the popular, community-backed Udoo SBC project, but also sells more commercial single board computers under its own name, such as the SECOpITX-GX. While that board was equipped with an AMD G-Series SoC and adopted the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form factor, Seco’s new “SECOSBC-A62″ SBC features a Freescale i.MX6 SoC, and uses a 110 x 86.5mm form factor borrowed from the original Udoo SBC on which it’s based.

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The 78 essential tricks Google thinks every Android user should know

Filed under
Android
Google

If you own an Android phone, that also means you have a Google account. Google would like you to know that this account isn’t just there for show — it’s there to unlock a bunch of cool services on your smartphone. To help out Android newbies, Google has created a whole page dedicated to “78 things you didn’t know you could do with Google” to provide users with the basics they need to help them get the most out of Google’s services.

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How I use Android: Android Wear Engineering Director David Singleton

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Google's own director of engineering for Android Wear gives us a glimpse at what devices he carries, how he sets up his home screens, and what apps he can't live without.

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UbuTab 1TB Tablet Launches in April, But Ubuntu Devs Know Nothing of It

Filed under
Ubuntu

UbuTab is a tablet supposedly built to take advantage of both Android and Ubuntu Touch operating systems and promises some great hardware components. The tablets should start shipping mid-April, but there is a problem. Ubuntu developers have no knowledge about the possible implementation of Ubuntu Touch on the tablet.

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Ubuntu Community Working on Amazing Unity Tweak App for the Phone - Gallery

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are a ton of community projects for Ubuntu Touch, and some of them are really interesting, like the upcoming Unity Tweak app that is being built right now by a developer.

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1+ Year Running Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 2

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Other than the hardware-specific issues, I’ve been amazed by how well Arch Linux works, given that it doesn’t have release cycles, or a big team with a lot of money supporting and marketing it. I’ve heard only 30 developers maintain the core Arch packages, with most of them having a full-time job doing something else! At the same time, it shouldn’t be a total surprise things work so well because free software doesn’t just fall off a turnip truck:

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A better Internet of Things through open source culture

Filed under
OSS

Open source's influence extends far beyond sharing code, but this aspect sometimes goes unappreciated. For example, I previously wrote about how the special way of developing and collaborating associated with open source has come to also reflect many DevOps best practices, from transparency to iterative fast releases. I’d argue that it is many of these same default behaviors that are helping to make the Internet of Things a hot topic today.

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KDE Plasma 5 in openSUSE, a Visual Tour

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

We reported a few days ago that the April update of openSUSE Tumbleweed will switch to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment by default. Today, we have some more news regarding the transition to KDE Plasma 5 in openSUSE.

openSUSE Tumbleweed/Factory is a rolling-release version of openSUSE, where all the new technologies get implemented before they land in the main openSUSE distribution.

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Mozilla Working to Provide Tracking Protection in Firefox, How to Enable It

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

Mozilla is working on a new feature called Tracking Protection that is helping users identify and block websites that collect personal data despite the fact that the browser has the "Do Not Track" policy enabled.

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Sabayon Linux 15.04 Xfce Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Gentoo

At many of our readers’ request, today we start a new series of screenshot tours that will track the changes implemented in the Sabayon Linux distribution, a rolling-release operating system based on Gentoo.

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The Open Source Funding Conundrum

Filed under
OSS

Every time I hear of another great open source project shutting its doors, I hold my breath in hopes it will be forked. Sadly though, this isn't a great plan for all projects. Sometimes these projects are rich in users but poor in developers. In this article, I'll explore this issue and what can be done to keep open source projects funded.

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Linux Australia Hacked and CoreOS Hearts Kubernetes

Filed under
-s

In a post to the Linux-aus mailing list Saturday The Linux Australia Council informed members and conference attendees that due to a server breach personal information could be compromised. The March 22 hack was discovered two days later when steps were taken to "minimize the immediate damage." Elsewhere, CoreOS has joined the race to Kubernetes and folks are still buzzing about the Wired.com quote saying Open Source Windows is a possibility.

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