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Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Mozilla: Surveys, WebRender, Firefox 61, Response to EFail/EFFail

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • What’s Your Open Source Strategy? Here Are 10 Answers…

    Mozilla is a radically open and participatory project. As part of the research we compiled into turning openness into a consistent competitive advantage, we identified that the application of open practices should always be paired with well-researched strategic intent. Without clarity of purpose, organizations will not (and nor should they) maintain long-term commitment to working with community. Indeed, we were not the first to observe this.

  • curl user survey 2018

    The curl user survey 2018 is up. If you ever use curl or libcurl, please donate some of your precious time and provide your answers!

    The curl user survey is an annual tradition since 2014 and it is one of our primary ways to get direct feedback from a larger audience about what's good, what's bad and what to focus on next in the curl project. Your input really helps us!

  • WebRender newsletter #19

    I skipped a newsletter again (I’m trying to put publish one every two weeks or so), sorry! As usual a lot of fixes and a few performance improvement, and sometimes both the same time. For example the changes around image and gradient repetition were primarily motivated by bugs we were encountering when dealing with repeated backgrounds containing very large amounts of repetitions, and we decided to solve these issues by moving all images to the “brush” infrastructure (bringing better batching, faster fragment shader and the ability to move more pixels out of the alpha pass), and optimize the common cases by letting the CPU generate a single primitive that is repeated in the shader. I don’t always properly highlight fixes that benefit performance but they are here.

  • GSConnect, Mozilla Firefox 61, Scientific Linux 7.5, GNOME and Nautilus

    The Mozilla team has been hard at work to address all of the known problems plaguing their bookmark sync functionality. A new engine has been developed to address these issues which landed in the latest Nightly build.

  • Cameron Kaiser: Secure mail on Power Macs is not a good idea

Security: Smears Against FOSS From Microsoft-Connected Black Duck, EFAIL/EFF, and Ubuntu's Blob 'Store'

Filed under
Security

Ubuntu News: Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu Make, Weekly Newsletter Issue 527

Filed under
Ubuntu

Kali Linux vs Ubuntu – Which Distro is Better for Hacking?

Filed under
Development
Ubuntu

Kali Linux is the most popular penetration testing and hacking Linux distroibution and Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution. Since it is kind of common knowledge that Linux is a more convenient OS to use for hacking than Windows, the next question is a no-brainer; which Linux distro is the best to use for hacking?

But what is hacking anyway? And why does it matter which distribution is being used? Let’s get to it.

Read more

GSoC and GNOME

Filed under
Google
GNOME
  • GSoC 2018 with GNOME: Internationalization of Fractal (part 1)

    It is the beginning of the coding period and I will first work on investigating on implementing the internationalization of Fractal and then find a way to do it. At this moment, internationalization support in Rust is limited and new, so no GTK application written in Rust have implemented it yet. And it is very exciting to work on this with this perspective, furthermore because I will write some blogposts that will try to explain how to do it and I hope it could help other people to do so!

  • Implementation of the PartialEq trait for Message
  • Improving the development experience for GNOME Settings

    After Bastien and Rui announced that they were stepping down from maintainership of GNOME Settings, I went ahead and volunteered to take care of it. This was not a random act, though; for quite some time, I’ve been adding and changing code all around. I was pretty involved in moving to the new layout, and with the help of other contributors, implemented the redesigns of various panels. Clearly, I have a technical debt to the app.

    Adding to that, assuming maintainership over it also aligns well with the goals of my employer, Endless, and gives a nice upstream/downstream overlap. With that, I can spend a bigger chunk of my work time on upstream tasks. Moreover, it allows us to have a stronger relationship with the GNOME community — after all, it allows me to bridge the insights and knowledge we gain from our users to a wider community.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 at GNOME

    Hi! I am Aditya Manglik from Wien, a.k.a. carpediem on IRC. Currently I am pursuing a Bachelor’s thesis in Deep Learning from TU Wien. I am interested in software, operating systems and AI. Travel, hiking and football occupy rest of the time.

    I started with Linux ~7 years ago when my Windows desktop failed to boot because of a curious experiment accident with system32 files. Looking back at that moment, I am glad for the few hours of initial pain which was worth several years of sanity. Since then I have been working with Linux as the primary platform. I like Open Source Software because it’s much more fun to break and fix something, which really helps understand what’s happening in the machine. I used to like C/ C++ quite a bit, but you can probably throw any language and I am happy to learn it.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

The Performance Of Clear Linux With GCC 8

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel's Clear Linux operating system has been among the first notable Linux distributions upgrading to the recently-released GCC 8.1 as the default system compiler and then proceeding to rebuild its packages against this annual update to the GNU Compiler Collection. Here are some before/after benchmarks of their GCC 8 deployment for those interested.

GCC 8 offers many compiler improvements from tentative C17 and C++20/C++2A support to newer CPU support and performance optimizations. In fact, our tests have found for some significant compiler boosts on Intel Skylake hardware but there are also benefits for AMD Ryzen and other CPU microarchitectures.

Read more

Open source vs free software: what's the difference?

Filed under
GNU
OSS

February 2018 marked the 20th anniversary of the official recognition of open source software. However, the debate regarding the differences, if any, between 'open source' and 'free' software continues unabated.

Richard Stallman, who is credited with developing the concept of 'free software' in the 1980s, says the term 'free software' has nothing to do with cost. For him, free software is a social movement, a philosophy, while open source is a development methodology.

Read more

Termux turns Android into a Linux development environment

Filed under
Android
Linux

Termux is an Android terminal emulator and Linux environment. What that means in practice is that you can install Termux on most Android devices and do almost anything you would do in a full Linux development environment on that device. That all sounds cool, but you're probably asking yourself, "why would I want to code on my phone on a touch screen? That just sounds awful." Start thinking more along the lines of tablets paired with a keyboards or Chromebooks that can now run Android applications. These are very cheap devices that can now be used to introduce people to Linux hacking and development. I know many of us in the Linux community started out by installing Linux on an old PC.

Read more

Top 8 open source AI technologies in machine learning

Filed under
OSS

Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies are quickly transforming almost every sphere of our lives. From how we communicate to the means we use for transportation, we seem to be getting increasingly addicted to them.

Because of these rapid advancements, massive amounts of talent and resources are dedicated to accelerating the growth of the technologies.

Here is a list of 8 best open source AI technologies you can use to take your machine learning projects to the next level.

Read more

Software: Calamares on Krypton, Tuptime, jm-shell

Filed under
Software
  • Calamares on Krypton

    Calamares is a Linux system installer (and some day, a FreeBSD system installer, but that is a long way off) which is distro- and desktop-independent. OpenSUSE Krypton is a live CD and installer for the latest-and-greatest .. but it already has an installer, so why try Calamares on it?

    Well, sometimes it’s just to show that a derivative could be made (there is one, called GeckoLinux), or to experiment with tools and configurations.

    Calamares has a script called deploycala.py, which like every gaping huge security hole is expected to be downloaded from the Calamares site, then run. It is recommended to only use this in a VM, with a live CD / ISO image running. What the script does is install a basic dev environment for Calamares, install up-to-date dependencies, and then it builds and installs Calamares. That then gives you a way to experiment, installing with Calamares from an already-set-up live CD.

  • Tuptime – A Tool To Report The Historical And Statistical Running Time Of Linux System

    Beginning of this month we written an article about system uptime that helps user to check how long your Linux system has been running without downtime? when the system is up and what date. This can be done using 11 methods.

    uptime is one of the very famous commands, which everyone use when there is a requirement to check the Linux server uptime.

  • jm-shell – A Highly Informative and Customized Bash Shell

    jm-shell is a free open source, small, highly informative and customized Bash shell, that gives you a great wealth of information about your shell activity as well as certain useful system information such as system load average, battery status of laptops/computers and much more.

    Importantly, unlike Bash which only stores unique commands in a history file, for searching previously run commands – jm-shell records each and every shell activity in a log file.

Security: EFF Repeated and Refuted, Canonical Removes More Blobs, More Updates

Filed under
Security

IWD 0.2 Released for Linux, Microsoft Desperate to Stop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • IWD 0.2 Released For Advancing Intel's Linux WiFi Daemon

    Last week marked the release of IWD 0.2, the second public release of this WiFi daemon for Linux systems destined as a replacement for WPA Supplicant.

    It was back at the end of 2016 that the code was made public while now there is finally the second version release. IWD 0.2 brings support for several new features as well as several bug fixes.

  • Microsoft's Linux Adoption: How Things Change [Ed: Surely Matt Hartley understands how Embrace, Extend, Extinguish works, no? Seems so...]

    When Microsoft began promoting themselves as the company that "Loves Linux," some Linux community members were skeptical. Some even believed that Microsoft's move to embrace Linux was based on the once tried and true “embrace, extend, extinguish” approach to technology we've seen in the past. And this concern is based on a hisory of the past use of this strategy.

    While it's a valid to worry about Microsoft's motivation behind their self-claimed embrace of Linux, I think Microsoft's motivation is more selfish than a desire to extinguish Linux would suggest. Based on their activity with cloud computing and more recently, the Internet of Things (IoT), I believe Microsoft is looking to utilize technology that has proven itself in those fields - Linux is that technology.

    Linux is a means to an end for Microsoft. It allows the software giant to participate with greater efficiency by utilizing existing toolsets. The official reasoning that Microsoft offers is Linux and open source in general provides a great ecosystem. An ecosystem Microsoft is now (apparently) motivated to give back code to. My own concern, however, is how much of this code being given back upstream is good for the community.

     

    The concern that I have is I believe the code being sent upstream must always benefit Microsoft directly or indirectly in some way. I haven't seen any examples of Microsoft providing code that benefits projects that are unrelated to their own efforts. Perhaps I missed something along the way, but due to their anti-FoSS history, it's unreasonable to expect Microsoft to give back to projects that might not benefit them directly or indirectly. And yes, Microsoft's sponsorship of various Linux conventions is an example of indirect benefit to Microsoft.

OSS: Open OnDemand, LikeCoin, Mozilla Development

Filed under
OSS
  • Ohio Supercomputer Center upgrades open-source HPC access portal

    Developers of the Ohio Supercomputer Center's innovative web-based portal for accessing high performance computing services have recently upgraded its capabilities.

    OSC recently announced the release of Open OnDemand 1.3, the first version using its new RPM Package Manager, or Red Hat Package Manager, a common standard for distributing Linux software.

    Open OnDemand is an open-source version of OSC OnDemand, the center's online, single-point-of-entry application for HPC services. Open OnDemand is a project funded by the National Science Foundation to develop a widely shareable web portal that provides HPC centers with advanced web and graphical interface capabilities.

  • LikeCoin, a cryptocurrency for creators of openly licensed content

    Conventional wisdom indicates that writers, photographers, artists, and other creators who share their content for free, under Creative Commons and other open licenses, won't get paid. That means most independent creators don't make any money by publishing their work on the internet. Enter LikeCoin: a new, open source project that intends to make this convention, where artists often have to compromise or sacrifice in order to contribute, a thing of the past.

    The LikeCoin protocol is designed to monetize creative content so creators can focus on creating great material rather than selling it.

  • The Cherry on Top: Add Value to Existing Risk Management Activities With Open Source Tools

    Telling people about the virtues of open source security tools is like selling people on ice cream sundaes: It doesn’t take much of a sales pitch — and most people are convinced before you start.

    It’s probably not surprising that most security professionals are already using open source solutions to put a cherry on top of their existing security infrastructure. From Wireshark to OpenVAS and Kali Linux, open source software is a key component in many security practitioners’ arsenal.

  • Deep Dive: New bookmark sync in Nightly

    For the last two years, the Firefox Sync team has been hard at work improving bookmarks on all our platforms. Last year, we added support for uploading bookmarks to Firefox for iOS, and made change tracking more durable on Android. Today, we’d like to tell you about our latest project to overhaul bookmark sync in Firefox for Desktop.

  • Firefox 61 Beta 6 Testday, May 18th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, May 18th, we are organizing Firefox 61 Beta 6 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Accessibility Inspector: Developer Tools, Audio Context using sampleRate and Web Compatibility.

Linux Foundation and ONF on Free Software in Networking

Filed under
OSS
  • The edge defines experience, but can’t be done without open source – ONF

    For years the industry has been focusing on the core network, but the tides are beginning to turn, with the edge taking centre stage. While this is a promising development, the economics are simply not supporting the ambition.

    “Edge processing is vital,” said Timon Sloane, VP of Marketing & Ecosystem at ONF. “When we started talking about this it was a novel idea, but the industry is just catching on now. The subscriber edge is where experience is created.”

    This focus on the edge of the network is a huge opportunity, but also presents a massive problem. The core network is easy. It is one place, easy to manage, but the edge consists of thousands of sites which are usually located within three miles of the customer. Most of the time these sites are windowless, concrete bunkers, with little or no lighting, representing 80% of operator CAPEX. Upgrading these sites is critical to the performance of the network, but is a time consuming and expensive job.

  • The First 10 Years of Software Defined Networking

    In 2008, if you wanted to build a network, you had to build it from the same switch and router equipment that everyone else had, according to Nick McKeown, co-founder of Barefoot Networks, speaking as part of a panel of networking experts at Open Networking Summit North America.

    Equipment was closed, proprietary, and vertically integrated with features already baked in, McKeown noted. And, “network management was a dirty word. If you wanted to manage a network of switches, you had to write your own scripts over a lousy, cruddy CLI, and everybody had their own way of doing it in order to try to make their network different from everybody else’s.”

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More in Tux Machines

MX Tools - A year later, the toolbox got better

Roughly fourteen full phases of the moon ago, I wrote an article on MX Tools, a unique and useful bunch of dedicated utilities packaged with the MX Linux distribution. This toolbox offered the ordinary (or new) MX Linux user a chance to perform some common configuration tasks with easy and elegance. In general, MX-16 was a great player, and the recent MX-17 is even better - and at a first glance, so is the new version of MX Tools bundled with the system. Good stuff. So I set about testing, to see what has changed, and in what way this set of utilities has improved, if at all. But I'm positive. Let us commence. [...] MX Tools turned out to be a predictable gem, just as I'd expected. Well, I'm cheating, because I wrote this article after some rather thorough testing. But then, if you look across the wider spectrum of Linux home distributions, there aren't that many unique players with distinctive features. Quite often, it's the rehash of old and familiar with some extra color, polish and rebranding. MX Linux goes the extra mile (or kilometer, if you will) in making the newbie experience meaningfully different. Future improvements could potentially include an interactive walkthrough - so users will be actively prompted and helped along in their tasks. Then of course, there's the matter of visual appearance, in the UI itself. But in general, MX Tools TNG is better than we had before. More elegant, more streamlined, better looking, and most importantly, more practical. This is a good and useful toolbox, and it makes a solid distro even more appealing. Well worth testing. So do it. And take care. Read more

The story of Gentoo management

I have recently made a tabular summary of (probably) all Council members and Trustees in the history of Gentoo. I think that this table provides a very succinct way of expressing the changes within management of Gentoo. While it can’t express the complete history of Gentoo, it can serve as a useful tool of reference. What questions can it answer? For example, it provides an easy way to see how many terms individuals have served, or how long Trustee terms were. You can clearly see who served both on the Council and on the Board and when those two bodies had common members. Most notably, it collects a fair amount of hard-to-find data in a single table. Read more

Success for net neutrality, success for free software

We've had great success with the United States Senate voting in support of net neutrality! Congratulations and thank you to everyone in the US for contacting your congresspeople, and all of you who helped spread the word. However, it's not over yet. Here are more actions you can take if you're in the United States. Now that the (CRA) has passed the Senate, it moves to the House of Representatives. Just as we asked you to call your senators, now it's time to call your House representatives. Find their contact info here and use the script below to ask them to support the reinstatement of net neutrality protections. The timing hasn't been set for future votes and hearings yet, but that's no reason to wait: make sure your representatives know how you feel. Read more Also: GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 18 new GNU releases!

today's leftovers

  • 10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream – For The Record
    10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream. Yeah, the title is totally link-bait. However, it’s worth noting that I actually deliver what the title describes and then some. Linux is awesome, but sadly, most people haven’t heard of it. Here’s why.
  • Linux Works For You
    Linux allows YOUR computer to work for you, not against you. Wearing this shirt/hoodie demonstrates to all who see it that you are not a slave to your PC. You are in control and Linux is the reason for this.
  • Robin "Roblimo" Miller
    The Linux Journal mourns the passing of Robin Miller, a longtime presence in our community.
  •  
  • Pidgin / Libpurple SkypeWeb Plugin Sees New Stable Release
    SkypeWeb is a plugin that allows using Skype in Pidgin / libpurple chat clients. The plugin can be used to send instant messages and participate in group chats, but it does not yet support voice / video calling.
  • Feral's GameMode May Soon Have Soft Real-Time Capabilities
    Feral Interactive's Linux system tuning daemon, GameMode since being introduced earlier this year has primarily offered the ability to easily change the CPU scaling governor when gaming but not much more. Though a new feature is now in the works for GameMode.
  • Mini DebConf Hamburg
    Last week I attended the MiniDebConfHamburg. I worked on new releases of dracut and rinse. Dracut is an initramfs-tools replacement which now supports early microcode loading. Rinse is a tool similar to debootstrap for rpm distributions, which now can create Fedora 28 environments aka chroots.
  • Android and Automotive Grade Linux battle, as car becomes a data center
    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system-on-chip (SoC) to run in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chipmakers in this fast growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving operating system scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant. However, given the complementary strengths of Android and Linux, it looks more likely that both will be deployed by many automobile makers in hybrid packages, so that they can take advantage of Android’s huge app ecosystem, encouraging plenty of third party enhancements, as well as harnessing the independence and enterprise scale of Linux. As cars become mini-data centers or edge compute…
  • Vending machine boardset works with UP or UP Squared boards
    Aaeon’s “AIOT-MSSP01” is a vending machine boardset powered by a PIC32 MCU that’s optimized to work with the UP or UP Squared SBCs. It offers vending-friendly I/O like MDB, EXE, and DEX, as well as motor controllers and 6x USB ports. The AIOT-MSSP01 is an industrial-grade vending machine controller (VMC) solution designed to run 24/7 “without a glitch,” says Aaeon. The boardset is optimized for use with the UP or UP Squared SBCs, but works with standard PCs and “most computer boards on the market.” There’s no mention of OS support for the connected computer, but the UP SBCs support Linux, Android, and Windows.