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Sunday, 04 Oct 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ScudCloud, Slack Client For Linux Install In Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora Mohd Sohail 30/09/2015 - 3:12am
Story Microsoft's “embrace, extend, extinguish” Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 1:36am
Story GNU/Linux in Palau and India Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 1:35am
Story Red Hat Upgraded Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 1:19am
Story Doors opening for open source data visualization tools Rianne Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 12:51am
Story Maintaining momentum in an open-source community Rianne Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 12:45am
Story Pivotal goes after Oracle and 'the traditional database' with open source HAWQ Rianne Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 12:43am
Story The Open Source Interface Conundrum: Will Linux Ever Be Touch-Ready? Rianne Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 12:40am
Story An inside look at open source at Twitter Rianne Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 12:24am
Story GNOME 3.18 Open-Source Linux Desktop Gets a Makeover Rianne Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 12:20am

NeoKylin is the Linux OS China built to look like Windows XP

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When Microsoft finally announced that official support for Windows XP was coming to an end, China wasn't happy. At the time, Windows accounted for 91 percent market share on the desktop, compared to seven percent for OS X and just over one percent for Linux. Calling it "fairly expensive," China wasn't too keen to upgrade to Windows 8 either, or pay for extended support like the US Navy has.

To solve these issues, and "wean its IT sector off Western software," China decided to create its own OS. At first, this involved partnering with Canonical to create Ubuntu Kylin, a heavily localised version of Ubuntu for the Chinese market. However, since then the government has been championing a new OS, one that's entirely home grown, and one that's eerily familiar to millions of users.

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No, XFS won’t steal your money

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That handy link & footnote leads us to Wikipedia, which explains that “XFS middleware” refers to CEN/XFS, which is not in any way related to the XFS filesystem, or Linux, and is in fact Microsoft specific:

CEN/XFS or XFS (eXtensions for Financial Services) provides a client-server architecture for financial applications on the Microsoft Windows platform.

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Red Hat To Be First $2 Billion Open Source Company

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Red Hat

Red Hat reports 13% growth in the second quarter, improved cloud and emerging technology sales, and an expanded revenue estimate for third quarter.

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Shell Scripting Boot Camp

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Spend enough time on the command line and you’ll eventually want to do many tasks…that take some intricate commands…repeatedly. A good example of this, is making thumbnails of photos. Basically, our workhorse of this script is not ImageMagick (which provides convert, identify and mogrify), but the for loop in bash itself. Ready?

today's leftovers

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Android Leftovers

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OSS Leftovers

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  • systemd.conf close to being sold out!

    systemd.conf 2015 is close to being sold out, there are only 14 tickets left now. If you haven't bought your ticket yet, now is the time to do it, because otherwise it will be too late and all tickets will be gone!

  • ScyllaDB Database Emerges Out of Cloudius Systems

    Avi Kivity is well-known in the open-source and Linux communities as the original lead developer of the widely deployed KVM hypervisor. In 2012, Kivity started a company called Cloudius Systems, which develops the OSv operating system for the cloud. Today, Cloudius is being rebranded and refocused under the name ScyllaDB.

  • LibreOffice 5.0.2 to Get Improved 3D OpenGL Transitions

    The Document Foundation has released the second Release Candidate for LibreOffice 5.0.2, the upcoming maintenance version for the 5.0 branch of the office suite.

  • GitLab one-ups GitHub with open source enterprise code hosting

    With a new version of its product in the offing and $4 million in Series A funding in its pocket, GitLab -- creator of an open source alternative to code-hosting nexus GitHub -- is setting out to expand its reach with enterprise customers.

  • Celebrate Software Freedom Day today!
  • 30 Years of GNU and Software Freedom Day

    It’s 30 years of GNU — 30 years of freedom and 30 years of owning one’s computers. I can’t imagine a life where I don’t have control over the software I run. I’m going to be eternally thankful to RMS and Linus for starting the mass movements that have not only transformed an entire industry, but also shaped my thinking and my career.

  • GNU Parallel 20150922 ('Aylan Kurdi') released [stable]
  • Beginning the search for ZeMarmot

    We have started a dozen days of research for “ZeMarmot” Open Movie. By this, we mean we are going for a trip to the Alps, where we we will stalk cool marmots! Our goal is to get photos, videos and sounds, of marmots, other animal and awesome mountain landscapes. These will be used for reference for the animation film, to study marmot behavioral patterns, movements, get ideas, and so on.

  • Open Source Hardware Certification Announced

    This certification process means creators must register their project, but it’s free to enter. In the first proposal for the Open Hardware Certification, there was discussion about distinct levels of certification, like ‘Open Bronze’. ‘Open Silver’ and ‘Open Gold’. This was ultimately not implemented, and there is only one level of the Open Hardware Certification.

  • Braintree Founder Unveils Open Source Playbook For Science Investors
  • Antwerp and Birmingham aim to innovate transport

    OpenTransportNet aims to change the way Europe’s public administrations create and manage transport services. The consortium wants to make geospatial information easily accessible and encourage anyone to use it, and create new, innovative services.

  • Open-source ‘Tree of Life’ includes all known life on Earth

    Combing through records spanning over 3.5 billion years, scientists 11 institutions have complied a ‘tree of life’ that includes the approximately 2.3 million known species of animals, plants, fungi, and microbes.

Security Research and Jailbreaking

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  • Tech Allies Lobby to Keep U.S. Rule From Fettering Security Research

    When the U.S. Department of Commerce proposed a rule to regulate the international trade and sharing of "intrusion software," worried security firms immediately went on the defense.

    Industry giants, such as Symantec and FireEye, teamed up with well-known technology firms, such as Cisco and Google, to criticize the regulations. The proposed rules, published in May, would cause "significant unintended consequences" that would "negatively impact—rather than improve—the state of cyber-security," Cisco stated in a letter to the Commerce Dept.'s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS).

  • XcodeGhost apps haunting iOS App Store more numerous than first reported

    Security researchers have both good and bad news about the recently reported outbreak of XcodeGhost apps infecting Apple's App Store. The bad: the infection was bigger than previously reported and dates back to April. The good: affected apps are more akin to adware than security-invading malware.

  • Wanted alive: $1m for an iOS 9 bug to hijack, er, jailbreak iThings

    Exploit traders Zerodium will pay a million dollars to anyone who finds an unpatched bug in iOS 9 that can be exploited to jailbreak iThings – or compromise them.

    The $1m (£640,000) bounty will be awarded to an individual or team that provides a working exploit to achieve remote code execution on an iOS device via the Safari or Chrome browsers or through an SMS/MMS message.

    This exploit could be combined with other exploitable vulnerabilities to perform an untethered jailbreak on an iPhone or iPad, allowing fans to install any applications they want on their gadgets – particularly software not available on Apple's App Store.

Open source software could help India, Open Source in Cars

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  • Open source software could help India save Rs 8,254 crore in education alone: Study

    Use of free and open source software could help India save more than Rs 8,300 crore in government expenses on education and police only, says a new study, vindicating the Centre's move to promote such software as part of its Digital India initiative.

    Schools and other institutions could save an estimated Rs 8,254 crore by adopting free and open source software (FOSS) while police departments could save about Rs 51.20 crore, said a study led by Rahul De, Hewlett-Packard Chair Professor at the Indian Institute of Management Bangalore.

  • No driver, no problem: NJ's self-driving car developers

    While DriveAI’s work is coming on a much smaller scale than the tech giants of the world, its members take pride in one key aspect: The entire project is open-source.

    The team regularly posts updates on its progress and snags. Anyone can view the DriveAI source code and provide input or suggest changes.

    While other self-driving car divisions and companies are protecting their work behind lock and key, DriveAI’s project will be free for anyone to apply and use for their own work.

    “Google’s going to write a bunch of proprietary code. All these car manufacturers are going to write their own proprietary code,” team member Parth Mehrotra said. “It’s a lot of wasted effort if everybody does the same thing again and again.

    “If ours isn’t up to par or where the industry wants the technology to be, they can contribute the manpower to it,” he said.

    An open-source project allows researchers across the globe to weigh in and suggest changes to the software. The company has already addressed issues raised by someone with a master’s degree in computer science who simply read over the source code.

    “What good is all of this technology if people can’t access it or have control over it?” Shoyoye said. “What good is collecting data if you can’t analyze it? People around the world can analyze this in real time and understand how autonomous vehicles are working in real time. That can only propel it forward.”

  • The only way to ensure the VW scandal never happens again

    Most people realize that computers aren't going to go away any time soon. That doesn't mean that people have to put up with these deceptions and intrusions on our lives.

    For years, many leading experts in the software engineering world have been promoting the benefits and principles of free software.

    What we mean by free is that users, regulators and other independent experts should have the freedom to see and modify the source code in the equipment that we depend on as part of modern life. In fact, experts generally agree that there is no means other than software freedom to counter the might of corporations like Volkswagen and their potential to misuse that power, as demonstrated in the emissions testing scandal.

    If Governments and regulators want to be taken seriously and protect society, isn't it time that they insisted that the car industry replaces all hidden code with free and open source software?

Ubuntu Leftovers

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

GNOME 3.18 in Fedora 23, Gallery, and Plans for GNOME 3.20

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  • Test drive GNOME 3.18 in Fedora 23 Beta

    Earlier today, the GNOME project announced the release of GNOME 3.18, the next version of the default desktop environment available in Fedora Workstation. The best and easiest way to try out GNOME 3.18 for yourself is to use the freshly released Beta version of Fedora 23 Workstation. GNOME 3.18 has over 25,000 changes, updates and new features contributed by over 770 contributors:

  • GNOME 3.18 "Gothenburg" Is Out and Full of Goodies - Gallery

    After GNOME developers teased the features of the GNOME 3.18 "Gothenburg" desktop environment a full day before release, the new version has been finally made available in its stable form.

  • What the future holds (or plans for GNOME 3.20)

    We did it. Yes, we finally made it. We’re having the 3.18 release, and is the best release ever – just like every GNOME release. We saw many cool features landing, a number of awsome project which the GNOME interns (hey, I was one of them too!) worked on this summer and lots of exciting news going around.

VIA’s first ARM COM runs Linux on a 1GHz dual-core i.MX6

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VIA revealed its first ARM based computer-on-module: the “QSM-8Q60,” which is also its first COM of any kind to adopt the 70 x 70mm Qseven 2.0 form-factor.

VIA Technologies has a long history as developer of CPUs and chipset silicon, as the creator of several popular single-board computer standards including Mini-ITX, Pico-ITX, and Nano-ITX, and as a manufacturer of SBCs conforming to those formats. Despite its limited success in competing with Intel and AMD in the x86 processor market, VIA continues to fabricate and embed its own, somewhat obscure processors such as the 64-bit x86 architecture-based Isaiah II, and ARM Cortex A9-based processors including the Elite E1000 and WonderMedia WM8950.

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Mozilla Firefox Release, Now in GNU/Linux Repos

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OSS Leftovers

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  • Sorry Microsoft, sometimes open source is just better (and free)

    There can be several reasons to resort to open source software solutions. Sometimes, it's simply the only suitable offering out there. Others, it's the best of its breed. And when expense is an issue, you can't beat a zero dollar price tag. In any case, open source is an option you can't ignore.

    As regular readers know, we've lived in a post-MS Office world for a while now. Free office suite LibreOffice does all we want and its Writer module works better than Word. Version 5, released last month, introduces a better organised command centre, Windows 10 compatibility, a style preview panel, short codes that enable quick insertion of emojis and other symbols and the ability to crop images inside the word processor.

    Whether all these new features matter to every user is not the point. The point is that LibreOffice develops under democratic principles, where users can vote on the features they want most. And since the development team has no commercial reason to hold back new features to maximise the profitability of older versions, enhancements flow through shortly after they're ready.

  • How Open Source and Crowdfunding Are Creating a New Business Niche
  • Google's new squeeze: Brotli compression open-sourced
  • How Open Source Is Changing Enterprises

    There was once a time when IT vendors shunned the idea of open source. Why wouldn’t they? The idea of sharing their very own programming innovations with others was viewed as detrimental to any competitive business. But nearly 20 years on, open source is now in vogue and has been embraced by some of the biggest IT vendors and their clients. So what changed? We find out.

  • Three students jump into open source with OpenMRS and Sahana Eden

    We are three students in the Bachelor of Computer Science second degree program at the University of British Columbia (UBC). As we each have cooperative education experience, our technical ability and contributions have increasingly become a point of focus as we approach graduation. Our past couple of years at UBC have allowed us to produce some great technical content, but we all found ourselves with one component noticeably absent from our resumes: an open source contribution. While the reasons for this are varied, they all stem from the fact that making a contribution involves a set of skills that goes far beyond anything taught in the classroom or even learned during an internship. It requires a person to be outgoing with complete strangers, to be proactive in seeking out problems to solve, and to have effective written communication.

  • 3 Open Source Desktop Publishing Tools for Small Businesses

    Small businesses and start-ups are always on the lookout for ways to save money on new and expensive services. Many budget-minded small businesses are returning to the days of hands-on and in-house to keep costs down, and the many open source tools available today can help do just that.

  • 14 tips for teaching open source development

    Academia is an excellent platform for training and preparing the open source developers of tomorrow. In research, we occasionally open source software we write. We do this for two reasons. One, to promote the use of the tools we produce. And two, to learn more about the impact and issues other people face when using them. With this background of writing research software, I was tasked with redesigning the undergraduate software engineering course for second-year students at the University of Bradford.

  • Cloudera's open source codeathon project with Bay Area Discovery Museum

Leftovers: Software

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Evolution of Apache Hadoop

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The year 2016 will see Americans lining up to elect their new president. While passion and sentiments will dictate the outcome of the elections on the surface, deep down, modern technology will be at play, helping determine who will be the next president. These elections will harness the power of Big Data on a scale never done before. We have already seen the role that Big Data played in 2012 elections, and it’s only going to get bigger. This Big Data revolution is led by, as expected, open source and Apache Hadoop, in particular.

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On OpenStack: Coders to learn how to deploy humanitarian-focused apps on OpenStack

Open Source Storage Joins OpenStack® Foundation, Appoints Patrick Willis as Board Member

Programming News

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