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Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kodi 17.1 “Krypton” is Released Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 10:43am
Story Two open source secure email services Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 9:58am
Story Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 Is the Last in the Series, Enhances Security Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 2:17am
Story Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Final Beta Lands Late Tomorrow, Freeze Now in Effect Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 2:11am
Story Ubuntu's Mir Finally Supports Drag & Drop Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 2:10am
Story KDE Plasma 5.9.4 Brings Improvements for Plasma Desktop, Workspace and Discover Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 2:04am
Story Zorin OS 12 Downloaded over Half a Million Times, 60% Are Windows and Mac Users Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2017 - 2:00am
Story Linux on Servers Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2017 - 7:42pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2017 - 7:41pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 21/03/2017 - 7:40pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Munich's desktop Linux was 'working fine' before politicians decreed return to Windows

    That is the claim of Karl-Heinz Schneider, the head of IT at the City of Munich's IT services provider [email protected], the company behind the City's desktop Linux implementation. In an interview, he claimed that there were no "compelling technical reasons" for the authority to order a migration back to Windows, suggesting that political interference was behind the move.

  • Joyent + Shippable Fireside Chat

    Shippable CEO, Avi Cavale and Joyent CTO, Bryan Cantrill join for a fireside chat to learn what both organizations are currently up to, and what contributions are ahead for the microservices ecosystem.

  • KDE neon With Testing Translations

    For the longest time, the plan was to equip KDE neon’s Developer Editions with translations. As the Developer Editions are built directly from our Git repositories and we do not maintain translations alongside the source code, there is a bit of a problem as the build somehow needs to bridge the gap between code and translations.

    It’s fortunate that I also happen to work on ReleaseMe, a KDE tarball release application, and rebuilt it from scratch years ago already, so it supports third party usage of some of its functionality.

  • GNOME 3.24 RC2 Released

    The final GNOME 3.23 development release is out ahead of next week's planned GNOME 3.24 debut.

  • PHP version 7.0.17 and 7.1.3
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, February 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • LXLE 16.04.2 GNU/Linux Distro to Bring All the Goodies from Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS

    The developer of the LXLE GNU/Linux distribution announced the immediate availability for download of the Beta build of his upcoming LXLE 16.04.2 release.

    LXLE 16.04.2 Beta is here to address various of the issues that have been discovered since the previous version of the distro, namely LXLE 16.04.1, but also to improve some of the functionalities and sync the software repositories with the upstream ones of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

Linux on Servers and Networks

Filed under
Server
  • Parity Check: Expectations Around Monitoring Have Changed

    Monitoring software company BigPanda recently published its second annual State of Monitoring report, which provides data and a few answers. It is based on responses from over 1,500 IT pros. When comparing the 2017 and 2016 reports we found that many things have not changed. The top IT concerns are about security and downtime. The top IT monitoring challenges are quick remediation of service disruptions, getting money to buy monitoring tools and reducing the number of unimportant alerts being generated. Interestingly, even the top performance key performance indicators (KPIs) are the same, with customer satisfaction cited by 73 percent, followed service level agreements (SLAs) compliance, incident volume and mean time to repair (MTTR).

  • IT Automation Best Practices for Network Engineers and Architects

    Software-defined networking (SDN) for L2 and L3 (layer two and three) networking and network function virtualization (NFV) for L4-L7 network services have remained elusive for many IT departments due to the lack of maturation of the technology or specialized skills needed to implement them. But, network automation doesn’t have to be an all or nothing proposition. Software-defined approaches for application and networking services combined with scripting and orchestration tools such as Ansible are enabling practical approaches to network automation that doesn’t require boiling the ocean. In this article, I’ll examine some best practices for network automation in L4-L7 services that can drive immediate improvements in your network.

  • Serverless: Redefining DevOps

    There is a dramatic shift underway in how many in house, and commercial, DevOps tools are being created and used

    The growth in interest in serverless computing continues at pace, and for many organisations serverless technologies such as AWS Lambda, Azure Functions or Google Cloud Functions are becoming an essential part of their development and operations toolkit.

  • IT Workers Say Their Companies Are Migrating to Virtual Infrastructures, Study Says

    An overwhelming 86 percent of respondents to a Chef survey of IT practitioners have completed or are in the progress of migrating from a physical infrastructure to a virtual one.

    Chef interviewed more than 1,500 global IT workers that use Chef servers and found that many emerging and legacy technologies are being rebuilt around the needs of developers. In addition, companies are piloting and adapting new technologies like cloud, containers, and microservices in search of speed.

  • ARM Antes Up For An HPC Software Stack

    The HPC community is trying to solve the critical compute challenges of next generation high performance computing and ARM considers itself well-positioned to act as a catalyst in this regard. Applications like machine learning and scientific computing are driving demands for orders of magnitude improvements in capacity, capability and efficiency to achieve exascale computing for next generation deployments.

    ARM has been taking a co-design approach with the ecosystem from silicon to system design to application development to provide innovative solutions that address this challenge. The recent Allinea acquisition is one example of ARM’s commitment to HPC, but ARM has worked with the HPC community to develop compilers, libraries, and other key tools that are now available for ARM HPC deployments in 2017.

  • Mesosphere Extends Data Services Reach

    In general, Hsu says, IT organizations are making it clear that they need platforms that go well beyond merely orchestrating containers and images. Applications running in production environments require access to a full range of services that IT operations teams need to be able to manage at scale, he says. Container orchestration engines such as Kubernetes may meet the requirements of an individual developer, but most IT operations teams are looking manage multiple applications accessing hundreds of services that all need to be centrally managed, says Hsu.

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • EXT4 Patch For Statx Support

    The statx system call was added to Linux 4.11 for providing enhanced file stats. While the statx() system call is in place for Linux 4.11, not all of the file-systems yet support it.

  • TEE Subsystem Proposed For Linux 4.12 Kernel

    Linaro developers are hoping to merge the generic TEE subsystem into the Linux 4.12 kernel this spring.

    TEE is short for the Trusted Execution Environment and is a trusted OS running in a secure environment, such as TrustZone on ARM CPUs or a separate secure co-processor. We've previously covered the work on TEE for Linux and obviously not everyone is happy about "trusted" computing efforts on Linux and implementations like TEE.

  • Bcachefs Brings New On-Disk Format With Encryption, Better Multi-Device Support
  • Bcachefs - encryption, fsck, and more

    It's been far too long since the last announcement - lots of stuff has been
    happening. The biggest milestone has been all the breaking on disk format
    changes finally landing, but there's been lots of other stuff going on, too.

    On the subject of the breaking on disk format changes - there's an excellent
    chance this'll be the last breaking change, so if you're thinking about trying
    out bcachefs this is an excellent time. Also, if you have a filesystem in the
    old format, code to read your filesystem is available in the bcachefs-v0 braches
    of both linux-bcache and bcache-tools.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Gnome Encfs Manager – An Ease way to Create a Encrypted Directory in Linux

    Gnome Encfs Manager (short name is GEncfsM) is a tool to manage EncFS filesystems in Linux whihc is best alternative for Cryptkeeper and has lots of unique features. It’s very useful when you use EncFS with cloud sync / storage services such as Dropbox, etc.,

    GEncfsM is an easy to use manager and mounter for encfs stashes featuring per-stash configuration, Gnome Keyring support (standard authentication mechanism). Tray menu is inspired by Cryptkeeper. You have a option to mount the directory automatically on login.

  • `PB For Desktop`: Cross-Platform Desktop App For Pushbullet (Supports Android Notification Mirroring On Linux Desktops)

    KDE Connect (with KDE Connect Indicator for Unity and other desktops that support AppIndicators) is great for integrating Android devices with your desktop. However, KDE Connect depends on quite a few KDE packages, which some users don't want to install on their GTK-based desktops.

    An alternative to KDE Connect is Pushbullet. While the free version has some limitations and it doesn't offer all the features available with KDE Connect, it does provide options to send files up to 25MB, send messages from your desktop (limited to 100/month in the free version, and a storage cap of 2GB) and most importantly, it can mirror your phone's notifications on the desktop.

  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.1.18 & 5.0.36 with Improvements for Shared Folders

    Oracle announced the availability of two new maintenance updates for the 5.1 and 5.0 stable branches of the open-source and cross-platform Virtualbox virtualization software for all supported platforms.

    VirtualBox 5.1.18 is now the newest and most advanced version of the 5.1 series, bringing improvements for Shared Folders by addressing two regressions discovered in the previous point release. Specifically, it fixes an issue with access to long paths and case-insensitive filename access, but only for Windows guests.

  • PC Building Simulator for Windows and Linux

    PC Building Simulator is a game for Windows and Linux devices in which you simulate the building of desktop computer systems.

  • PC Building Simulator pre-alpha game released (free)

    This week a new Sim game has been released in alpha testing stage and free to donwload for those interested in the topic. The PC Building Simulator v0.01 is available to download now for Windows and Linux users.

  • Chrome Could Start Using Native Notifications on Linux

    Google Chrome could soon use native notifications on Linux desktops. A bug report asking for the browser to use a Linux desktop environment’s notification system was filed late last year but recently become active again. Google Chrome (and Chromium) currently use the Chrome Notification API to show alerts from websites, extensions and Chrome Apps on Windows, macOS and Linux.

  • Firefox Goes PulseAudio Only, Leaves ALSA Users With No Sound

    If you’re a Linux user who upgraded to Firefox 52 only to find that the browser no longer plays sound, you’re not alone.

    Firefox 52 saw release last week and it makes PulseAudio a hard dependency — meaning ALSA only desktops are no longer supported.

    Ubuntu uses PulseAudio by default (as most modern Linux distributions do) so the switch won’t affect most — but some Linux users and distros do prefer, for various reasons, to use ALSA, which is part of the Linux kernel.

  • GNU Guile 2.2.0 released

    We are pleased to announce GNU Guile 2.2.0, the first of a new stable release series. More than 6 years in the making, Guile 2.2 includes a new optimizing compiler and high-performance register virtual machine. Compared to the old 2.0 series, real-world programs often show a speedup of 30% or more with Guile 2.2.

    Besides bringing the compiler and virtual machine, Guile 2.2 removes limitations on you and your programs by lowering memory usage, speeding up the "eval" interpreter, providing better support for multi-core programming, and last but not least, removing any fixed stack size limit. With Guile 2.2, you can recurse to your heart's content!

Linux and Android Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Ubuntu snaps expand to Orange Pi SBCs and a QorIQ SoC

    Shenzhen Xunlong is launching an Ubuntu snap app store for its Orange Pi SBCs. Canonical also ported its snap-based Ubuntu Core distro to NXP’s LS1043A SoC.

    Shenzhen Xunlong Software Co. Ltd has achieved considerable success with its Raspberry Pi compatible, open-spec Orange Pi SBCs. However, many buyers have avoided these amazingly low-cost boards due to spotty software support. Now, the company is partnering with Canonical to develop an Orange Pi App Store that packages Linux apps as Ubuntu “snaps,” the package technology used in Ubuntu Core. Canonical also announced that Ubuntu Core was now available on devices using NXP’s Cortex-A53 based QorIQ LS1043A SoC (see farther below).

  • NXP aims new MCUs and QorIQ SoCs at IoT

    NXP announced a Linux-ready, dual ARMv8 QorIQ LS1028A SoC with TSN Ethernet, and unveiled several new MCUs including a tiny, 4x4mm MC9S08SUx.

  • PiSound, The Audio Card For The Raspberry Pi

    Kids today are being loud with their ‘drum machines’ and ‘EDM’. Throw some Raspberry Pis at them, and there’s a need for a low-latency sound card with MIDI and all the other accouterments of the modern, Skrillex-haired rocker. That’s where PiSound comes in.

  • NetBSD adds RPi Zero support with 7.1 release

    Raspberry Pi Zero users have another operating system to choose from, with the release of NetBSD 7.1.

    The Pi Zero isn't the only development board added in the release: the ARM-based ODROID-C1 quad-core single board computer also gets its moment in the spotlight.

  • Open-source platform eases voice-controlled applications

    The Matrix Voice is a Raspberry Pi-based or stand-alone dev board that allows makers and advanced industrial hardware developers alike to create voice-control apps within minutes, at attractive unit economics.

  • Making an Amazon Echo Compatible Linux System - Michael E Anderson, The PTR Group, Inc.
  • Android, iOS rampant as Windows phone sinks: Kantar [iophk: "overplays Microsofy size and importance"]

    Kantar said in the top five European markets, Android enjoyed 74.3% of sales. iOS held 22.7%, with the iPhone 7 being the top-selling device in the UK, France and Germany.

  • Have We Seen a Concorde Moment in Cameraphone Design? Did we go through 'Peak Camera' already in our smartphone evolution?

    Meanwhile in the familiar tech space of smartphones we may have had our 'Concorde Moment'. And that would have been in the area of camera phones. Not that the overall performance of a smartphone had somehow peaked - they keep getting more powerful in most ways - but no, I mean in the specific area of camera performance. We have seen the megapixel race for fitting more pixels to a cameraphone sensor reach a monster level at 41 megapixels with the Nokia 808 Pureview in 2012. This level was maintained in the Nokia Lumia 1020 released in 2013. However, in the four years since, no later versions of Nokia/Lumia/Microsoft flagship class smartphones have matched that camera pixel count or even come close. And cameras in rival phones have not come anywhere near close, with the 24 megapixel class being about the highest count we've seen elsewhere (so far). At least early signs of HMD's ownership of the Nokia brand now does not suggest a return to this 'super' class of megapixel count in the image sensor race. It does kind of suggest we may have had a 'Concorde moment' on that side of the matter.

  • Video: How to scale the Android display
  • Advantech and partners form Embedded Linux & Android Alliance
  • Timesys Joins Embedded Linux and Android™ Alliance (ELAA) as a Founding Member to Drive New Mobile and IoT Solutions

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • Linux Plumbers Conference Call for Refereed Presentations

    We are pleased to announce the Call for Refereed Presentation
    Proposals for the 2017 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which
    will be held in Los Angeles, CA, USA on 13-15 September in conjunction
    with The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit.

    Refereed Presentations are 45 minutes in length and should focus on a
    specific aspect of the “plumbing” in the Linux system. Examples of
    Linux plumbing include core kernel subsystems, core libraries,
    windowing systems, management tools, device support, media
    creation/playback, and so on. The best presentations are not about
    finished work, but rather problems, proposals, or proof-of-concept
    solutions that require face-to-face discussions and debate.

  • Bosch Connected Experience: Eclipse Hono and MsgFlo

    Since this is a hackathon, there is a competition on projects make in this event. To make the Hono-to-MsgFlo connectivity, and Flowhub visual programming capabilities more demoable, I ended up hacking together a quick example project — a Bosch XDK controlled air theremin.

  • Codes of Conduct

    These days, most large FLOSS communities have a "Code of Conduct"; a document that outlines the acceptable (and possibly not acceptable) behaviour that contributors to the community should or should not exhibit. By writing such a document, a community can arm itself more strongly in the fight against trolls, harassment, and other forms of antisocial behaviour that is rampant on the anonymous medium that the Internet still is.

    Writing a good code of conduct is no easy matter, however. I should know -- I've been involved in such a process twice; once for Debian, and once for FOSDEM. While I was the primary author for the Debian code of conduct, the same is not true for the FOSDEM one; I was involved, and I did comment on a few early drafts, but the core of FOSDEM's current code was written by another author. I had wanted to write a draft myself, but then this one arrived and I didn't feel like I could improve it, so it remained.

  • Keynote: Building and Motivating Engineering Teams - Camille Fournier, Senior Thinker and Raconteur

    Maintaining respect is key to building a successful team, according to Camille Fournier, at the Open Source Leadership Summit in February.

  • Keynote: An Exploration of Citrix Delivery Networks by Danny Phillips
  • Growing Up Node by Trevor Livingston, HomeAway

    Trevor Livingston, principal architect at HomeAway, offers insight on how to introduce Node into companies at Node.js Interactive.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

antiX A Fast And Lightweight Linux Distribution

Filed under
Reviews

antiX is a fast and lightweight Linux distribution. It is based on Debian stable. antiX is a very different distro, it isn’t like Debian or Ubuntu. It doesn’t use systemd. Actually, most Linux distros are using systemd to manage the system processes, but antiX doesn’t like systemd.
I don’t have any problem with systemd, but time after analyze systemd, I realized that it is not the best way to replace SysVinit, because it doesn’t follow the UNIX philosophy. I think that systemd is very complex, maybe this is the reason for why antiX doesn’t use it.

Read more

Also: Chakra 2017.03 Goedel is released

Games for GNU/Linux: Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, Serious Sam Fusion 2017

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Graphics and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Pipeline Statistics Queries Wired Up For Intel ANV Vulkan Driver

    Pipeline statistics queries is the latest Vulkan capability being added to the Intel "ANV" Mesa Vulkan driver.

    Pipeline statistics queries allow applications to query a set of Vulkan pipeline counters. Developers interested in learning more about the feature can see the Vulkan documentation.

  • SUSE Developers Publish Radeon GCN Backend Code For GCC Compiler

    While the AMDGPU "GCN" compiler support in LLVM is quite mature now, the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) hasn't yet received a full-fledged GCN compiler back-end for AMD GPUs. SUSE developers have been working on that for AMD and today they have published their code branch. This GCN back-end for GCC is primarily focused on compute capabilities rather than compiling graphics shaders.

  • xf86-video-ati 7.9 / xf86-video-amdgpu 1.3 DDX Driver Updates
  • Trying Out The New OpenGL Threaded Dispatch In Mesa 17.1

    At the beginning of today, OpenGL threaded dispatch landed in Mesa as work that's existed in patch form for years but was recently revived for Mesa Git due to the potential for significant performance gains in select scenarios.

  • Open Source Radeon & AMDGPU Linux Drivers Updated for AMD GPUs with Improvements

    Michel Dänzer announced today the general availability of new maintenance updates for the open source AMDGPU (xf86-video-amdgpu) and Radeon (xf86-video-ati) graphics drivers.

    xf86-video-ati 7.9.0 and xf86-video-amdgpu 1.3.0 are now available for download and they are coming soon to a GNU/Linux distro near you to improve your gaming experience if you're using an AMD Radeon graphics card.

    Both releases come with the ability to use DRM render nodes for DRI3 clients if they are available, and allow the TearFree option to be toggled at runtime by using a RandR output property called "TearFree."

  • NVIDIA might have more open drivers in future on Linux

    Here’s an interesting one, a developer from NVIDIA noted on the Linux Kernel Mailing List that NVIDIA has been designing some new open source drivers. So I did some digging and got an interesting response.

  • Hammering The AMD Ryzen 7 1800X With An Intense, Threaded Workload

    Today I got around to running a very heavy/demanding, very real-world workload on the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X that I've been meaning to test with this Zen CPU.

    The workload I've been running on the Ryzen 7 1800X the past few hours is that of Open Porous Media, the open-source OPM project is a growing initiative around research and simulators for modeling and simulation of porous media processes, including a reservoir simulator and permeability upscaling. This sort of workload has relevance in areas like oil and natural gas industries.

The End of the Line for EPEL-5

Filed under
Red Hat

For the last 10 years, the Fedora Project has been building packages for the same release of another operating system. However on March 31st, 2017, that will come to an end when Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) version 5 moves out of production.

Read more

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD On NVMe SSDs: Samsung Good, Intel 600p Not

    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has been testing out various NVMe M.2 SSDs under his BSD operating system to see how these latest-generation storage devices perform.

  • LLD Linker Declared Ready For Production On x86_64 ELF Platforms

    LLVM developer Rui Ueyama is encouraging the "dogfeeding" of their linker, LLD, that should now be ready for production use on some platforms/architectures with this week's LLVM 4.0 release.

    Rui Ueyama believes that the LLD linker is ready for production with ELF platforms -- namely as Linux and BSDs -- on at least x86_64 but the AArch64 and MIPS architecture support should be in good shape too.

  • vBSDcon 2017 CFP Open

    Verisign is hosting its 3rd vBSDcon, scheduled for September 8 - 9, 2017, in Reston, VA. A Call For Presentations is currently open and submissions are being accepted at vBSDcon.com. CFP administration is being conducted through EasyChair, which require accounts to upload submissions for consideration. Our call is open through April 30, 2017. So get your submissions in soon!

Google Introduces Guetzli

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Announcing Guetzli: A New Open Source JPEG Encoder

    At Google, we care about giving users the best possible online experience, both through our own services and products and by contributing new tools and industry standards for use by the online community. That’s why we’re excited to announce Guetzli, a new open source algorithm that creates high quality JPEG images with file sizes 35% smaller than currently available methods, enabling webmasters to create webpages that can load faster and use even less data.

  • Guetzli: Google Rolls Out A New JPEG Encoder

    Google has announced Guetzli, not a German cookie, but rather a new open-source algorithm for creating high-quality JPEGs that are 35% smaller than currently available methods.

  • Google releases open source 'Guetzli' JPEG encoder

    Google is one of the biggest champions of open source. Not only does the search giant use open source software in its products, but it contributes to the community too. There are many projects made open source by the company, which helps the greater good.

    Today, Google releases yet another open source project. Called "Guetzli," it is a JPEG encoder that aims to produce even smaller image file sizes. In fact, the search giant claims a whopping 35 percent improvement over existing JPEG compression. If you are wondering why smaller file sizes are important, it is quite simple -- the web. If websites can embed smaller images, users can experience faster load times while using less data.

How Canonical makes money from Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are three active LTS releases of Ubuntu: 12.04, 14.04 and 16.04. The support for 12.04 is ending this year on April 28, 2017. While Canonical is encouraging users to upgrade to 14.04 or 16.04 LTS, there are still a lot of companies using 12.04.

Customers running critical services on their servers and cloud really don’t like frequent upgrades. They tweak, tune and customize different components of their infrastructure and when you bring in too many changes at the same time with a major release upgrade, something is going to break.

Read more

Why do you use Linux and open source software?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As I mentioned when The Queue launched, although typically I will answer questions from readers, sometimes I'll switch that around and ask readers a question. I haven't done so since that initial column, so it's overdue. I recently asked two related questions at LinuxQuestions.org and the response was overwhelming. Let's see how the Opensource.com community answers both questions, and how those responses compare and contrast to those on LQ.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Samsung Z4 gets WiFi Certified with Tizen 3.0 onboard, Launching soon

Today, the next Tizen smartphone, which should be the named the Samsung Z4, has received its WiFi certification (certification ID: WFA70348) – Model number SM-Z400F/DS with firmware Z400F.001 on the 2.4Ghz band. WiFi certification is usually one of the last steps before a mobile device gets released and means a launch is coming real soon as we have already seen the Z4 make its debut appearance at the FCC. For the previous model, the Samsung Z2, we saw it get WIFi certified on 7 July and then launched on 23 August, a mere 6 weeks. Read more

Linux 4.10.6

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.6 kernel. All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.9.18 Linux 4.4.57

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

  • Mux Controller Subsystem Proposed For Linux 4.12
    A new subsystem has been proposed for staging in the Linux 4.12 kernel. Peter Rosin has requested Greg KH pull in the mux controller subsystem for the Linux 4.12 kernel. He explained of this new subsystem, "This adds a new mux controller subsystem with an interface for accessing mux controllers, along with two drivers providing the interface (gpio and adg792) and two consumers (iio and i2c). This is done in such a way that several consumers can independently access the same mux controller if one controller controls several multiplexers, thus allowing sharing."
  • Marek Looking To Tackle Large RadeonSI Performance Bottleneck
    Prolific Mesa developer Marek Olšák is looking to tackle what he thinks is the "biggest performance bottleneck at the moment" for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver.
  • Shader Variants Support For Etnaviv Gallium3D