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Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Servers/Networks Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:12am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:10am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:07am
Story Linux and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:06am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:03am
Story Wickr Liberated Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 9:48am
Story Why enterprises should embrace open source Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 9:37am
Story Open Source First: A manifesto for private companies Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 9:18am
Story Transit Routing in GNOME Maps Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 9:01am
Story Ubuntu/Vista 10 Miniature Devices Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 8:43am

Server/Workstation Tests: Antergos vs. Clear Linux vs. Fedora vs. Scientific Linux vs. Ubuntu vs. openSUSE

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

So for your viewing pleasure this Friday are some fresh results from these different distributions. Unfortunately, while there is much interest these days in Solus by Linux enthusiasts, its installer had issues with the system being used. Additionally, Debian Stretch was running into a kernel bug on this system so the testing couldn't happen there either.

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Fedora 25 Graphics and Fedora 27 Release Schedule

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 25: Wayland vs Xorg

    Almost as good as Alien vs Predator only much better. Anyhow, as you probably know, I have recently tested Fedora 25. It was an okay experience. Overall, the distro behaved reasonably well. Not the fastest, but stable enough, usable enough, with some neat improvements here and there. Most importantly, apart from some performance and responsiveness loss, Wayland did not cause my system to melt. But that's just a beginning.

    Wayland is in its infancy as a consumer technology, or at least that thing that people take for granted when they do desktop stuff. Therefore, I must continue testing. Never surrender. In the past few weeks of actively using Fedora 25, I did come across a few other issues and problems, some less worrying, some quite disturbing, some odd, some meaningless. Let us elaborate.

  • Fedora 27 Scheduled To Be Released On Halloween

    While Fedora 26 isn't even being released until June, today the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) has approved the initial release schedule for Fedora 27.

    The approved schedule has the F27 branching from Rawhide on 25 July, a possible alpha release on 22 August, the beta release on 26 September, the final freeze on 17 October, and to do the official Fedora 27 release on 31 October. The approved Fedora 27 schedule can be found via this FESCo ticket.

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel 4.9.9 Released with Many Updated Drivers, x86 and PowerPC Fixes

    Only five days after releasing Linux kernel 4.9.8, developer Greg Kroah-Hartman today announced the general availability of the ninth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.9 kernel series.

    With 74 files changed (506 insertions and 321 deletions), Linux kernel 4.9.9 is now considered the most advanced and secure stable kernel version there is for a Linux-based operating system. According to the appended shortlog, the biggest part of the patch are updated drivers, this time for things like BCMA, DMA, GPU (AMDGPU, Intel i915, Nouveau), iiO, HID, InfiniBand, PCI, PINCTRL, USB, Vhost, and Virtio.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.48 LTS Has Minor NFS, x86 and PowerPC Changes, Updated Drivers

    After informing the Linux community today about the availability of Linux kernel 4.9.9, renowned Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the long-term supported Linux 4.4.48 kernel.

  • libinput knows about internal and external touchpads

    libinput has a couple of features that 'automagically' work on touchpads such as disable-while-typing and the lid switch triggered disabling of touchpads and disabling the touchpad when an external mouse is plugged in [1]. But not all of these features make sense on all touchpads. For example, an Apple Magic Trackpad doesn't need disable-while-typing because unless you have a creative arrangement of input devices [2], the touchpad won't be where your palm is likely to hit it. Likewise, a Logitech T650 connected over a unifying receiver shouldn't get disabled when the laptop lid closes.

Phoronix on Graphics: Mesa and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa:

  • Mesa 17.0 Benchmarks With Intel: Noticeably Better Vulkan Performance

    With Mesa 17.0 due to be released any day now, here are fresh benchmarks of Mesa 17.0's Git code as of Friday compared to Mesa 12.0.6, Mesa 13.0.4, and the current Mesa 17.1-devel Git master code. Not only is the i965 OpenGL driver performance being examined but also the ANV Vulkan driver present since Mesa 12.

  • Mesa RFC Changes To Help Worms WMD, Tropico 5 & Crookz

    In continuation of this morning's article about Valve Planning To Carry Mesa GL Thread Feature On SteamOS, Per-Game Features, it looks like the developers working for Valve on the open-source Linux graphics driver stack are looking to do more in the per-game profile space.

  • Valve Planning To Carry Mesa GL Thread Feature On SteamOS, Per-Game Features

    It's looking like Valve will begin carrying some out-of-tree patches for their Mesa packages they use on SteamOS.

    The discussion around OpenGL threaded dispatch for Mesa hasn't ended. There is opposition to landing this code in mainline Mesa if there are Piglit regressions, the potential for game/application crashes, and other issues, even if the feature were to be enabled by default.

AMD:

  • AMDGPU Gets More Power-Related Fixes In Linux 4.11

    It feels like the work on power management / clock-gating / PowerPlay is a never-ending mission within the AMDGPU DRM driver -- more work has been queued up for the next kernel cycle.

    Last week was the main AMDGPU features for Linux 4.11 being submitted to DRM-Next. In that article you can find out about the various new features that will premiere in the DRM driver with Linux 4.11. There was power management work as part of that earlier pull while coming today were some fixes of material to land for Linux 4.11.

  • AMDGPU DC/DAL Code Receives Atomic Improvements

    AMDGPU's DC display code (better known as DAL) received some fresh patches on the public mailing list this week to improve its atomic mode-setting implementation.

    One of the latest projects by AMD developers working on their open-source Linux DRM kernel driver has been for "addressing some of the problems in DC's atomic implementation."

  • Radeon GPU Analyzer Open-Sourced: Analyze OpenGL / Vulkan / OpenCL

    In addition to AMD having open-sourced their UMR debugger a few days back, over in their "GPU Open" team they open-sourced the Radeon GPU Analyzer.

GNU/Linux Release of Civilization VI and Performance Tests (Benchmarks)

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gaming
  • Linux Release Of Civilization VI Comes With A Few Caveats

    Linux gamers got some great news this morning when Civilization VI finally debuted on the Penguin-loving platform. But, as the day progresses, those same gamers are finding out more and more that has made some regret their purchase.

  • Trying Intel Kabylake Graphics With Civilization VI On Ubuntu Linux

    I was very surprised to find out that I was able to get Intel HD Graphics working with Aspyr Media's latest Linux game port, Civilization VI. Here are some benchmark results.

    Aspyr Media only lists NVIDIA graphics as officially supported, but I couldn't resist trying out the latest-generation Intel Kabylake graphics for this game. Yesterday I posted 14-way NVIDIA benchmarks of Civilization 6 on Linux while my RadeonSI results are coming up shortly...

  • RadeonSI Performance For Civilization VI On Linux With Mesa 17.1 + 4.10 Kernel

    Since yesterday's release of Civilization VI for Linux, ported by Aspyr Media, we have published a 14-way NVIDIA GPU comparison with this newest high-profile Linux game release. This morning I also shared some Intel Kabylake game figures for Civilization 6 while now the focus is on RadeonSI.

  • Trying Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D With Civilization 6 On Mesa 17.1

    With Intel Kabylake graphics on Mesa working (albeit very slowly) for Aspyr Media's latest Linux game port, Civilization VI, and RadeonSI Gallium3D running too albeit at a less than desirable speed, I decided to try running the open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) driver with this latest AAA Linux game release.

    I tried Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D from Mesa 17.1-devel Git this morning. I was running the Linux 4.10 kernel and had enabled NvBoost=2 mode and re-clocked the graphics card to its 0f performance state. The NVIDIA graphics card for this open-source driver testing was the GeForce GTX 780 Ti Kepler.

Why I’m going back to Linux after five years of using macOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

I’ve been a supporter of the Electronic Frontier Foundation since 2004. Their work on privacy, free expression and technology are all things I am passionate about. For the last year or so, I have become more concerned with privacy issues in technology. The rise in big data and how everything is tracking everything we do has given me significant concerns. I’ve been giving a lot of thought to which ecosystems I want to stay in. I’m not going to say I trust any of these technology companies, but I can control (or minimize) my footprint with some of these companies.

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Munich's U-turn, Fedora 27 on Halloween, Back to Linux

Filed under
-s

In the story that wouldn't die, Munich's Linux reversal in in the news again as the city's administrative committee recommended moving to a uniform Windows-based deployment throughout city government by 2020. Elsewhere, Fedora 27 is scheduled for release on October 31, 2017 and kde.org got a new look. Former Linux user Paul Cutler has returned to the fold and Blogger Dedoimedo compared Fedora's Xorg to Wayland.

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Zorin OS 12 Review | LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week

Filed under
Linux

Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based Linux distro that seeks to stand out amongst the many Linux distros around. It is touted as “a replacement for Windows and MacOS, designed to make your computer faster, more powerful and secure”. So what’s the deal with Zorin? Is it worth your attention in the sea of distros? Let us take a look at what makes this distro stand apart.

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more

Chromebooks are Spreading Out in the Educational Market

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

In recent months, several prominent analysts have taken aim at media reports that have allegedly miscast how well Chromebooks--portable computers based on Google's Chrome OS platform--are doing in sales terms. "There has been a ton of misreporting as many lazy reporters and bloggers have characterized this as all sales, which it wasn't, or even consumer sales, which it most assuredly was not," Stephen Baker of the NPD Group, has told Computerworld, for example.

Chromebooks are actually a fast growing part of the portable computer market, though, and Chrome OS has become an entrenched operating system. Particularly in schools, these systems are making a difference, and now Asus and Acer are out with new models focused on the educational market.

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Linux Kernel 3.10.105 LTS Is Out with Almost 300 Improvements, Security Fixes

Filed under
Linux
Security

Linux kernel maintainer Willy Tarreau was proud to announce today the availability of a new maintenance update for the long-term supported Linux 3.10 kernel series, version 3.10.105.

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antiX 17 Linux Operating System Gets New Alpha Build, Now Uses Kernel 4.9.6

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Debian-based antiX 17 Linux has recently entered development, and it today received a new Alpha build, the second in the upcoming series based on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

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Sailfish OS 2.1.0 now available to early access for Jolla devices

Filed under
OS

This is our biggest release in a while after Aurajoki. It marks thousands of bug fixes with fundamental improvements to the operating system and is now available for early access across Jolla devices.

2.1.0 is named after Finland’s Iijoki, located in Northern Ostrobothnia, which flows 370 kilometers into the gulf of Bothnia.

Iijoki brings major architectural changes to Sailfish OS by introducing Qt 5.6 UI framework, BlueZ 5 Bluetooth stack and basic implementations of 64-bit architecture. It also brings improvements to the camera software with faster shutter speeds, initial support for Virtual Private Networks (VPN), option to enlarge UI fonts to different levels and last but not least, a large number of bug and error fixes mostly reported by our community.

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Also: 2.1.0/Iijoki

Judge Nixes PS3 Linux Class Action Settlement As Class's Lawyers Victimize The Class A Second Time

Filed under
Linux
Legal

We've made the point for several years now that the way class action lawsuits are handled in America is flawed in fundemental ways. What was supposed to be a method for enabling large groups of the aggrieved to pool resources against much larger and better-funded entities has instead devolved into a procedure that appears almost perfectly designed to enrich unscrupulous lawyers while the class itself gets a laughable percentage any monetary damages.

We get to see these flaws in practice yet again, this time in an update for the story that simply will not die: the legal action over Sony removing the PS3's ability to run Linux, which it advertised when the console launched. The class action suit had reached a proposed settlement, only to have the presiding judge nix it, essentially over concerns that the class was being victimized all over again, this time by its own lawyers.

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Debian-Based Elive 2.8.0 Beta Distro Is Out with Performance Improvements, More

Filed under
Debian

Four months have passed since the release of Elive 2.7.8 Beta, and the developers of the Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution have announced today the availability of a new Beta version.

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Five New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities Patched in Ubuntu 16.10 for Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical announced a few hours ago the availability of a new security update for the Raspberry Pi 2 kernel packages of the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system, which patches a total of five newly discovered vulnerabilities.

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Beautiful New Design on kde.org

Filed under
KDE

While in KDE we pride ourselves on making beautiful software our website has lagged behind modern requirements and trends. Visual Design Group member Ken Vermette has quietly worked away with key stakeholders to create a design and update the content. The new site uses correct HTML5 and is responsive to working on mobiles and tablets. It includes an introduction to our products, community and how you can get involved.

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Real-time Linux explained, and contrasted with Xenomai and RTAI

Filed under
Linux

At ELC Europe, Real-time Linux developer Jan Altenberg described the progress of RTL, compared it to Xenomai and RTAI, and unveiled new benchmarks.

Real-time Linux (RTL), a form of mainline Linux enabled with PREEMPT_RT, has come a long way in the past decade. Some 80 percent of the deterministic PREEMPT_RT patch is now available in the mainline kernel itself. Yet, backers of the strongest alternative to the single-kernel RTL on Linux — the dual-kernel Xenomai — continue to claim a vast superiority in reduced latency. In an Embedded Linux Conference Europe presentation in October, Jan Altenberg rebutted these claims while offering an overview of the real-time topic.

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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

openHAB and Canonical

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Free open smart home platform eases IoT setups

    Canonical, openHAB Foundation and Azul Systems joined forces to launch snap packaging openHAB 2.0, a free open smart home platform that acts as a control hub for home IoT setups. openHAB is easy to install, highly customisable and comes with great performance across a wide range of hardware from PCs to Raspberry Pis.

  • Free and open code for smart home platform, as a Ubuntu snap

    Canonical, openHAB Foundation and Azul Systems have launched the snap packaging of openHAB 2.0, a completely free open smart home platform that acts as a control hub for home IoT setups, that can be an alternative to Apple Homekit and Samsung SmartThings.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source docks with mainstream vendors

Open source and mainstream are joining forces this week as the Docker software containerisation platform comes under the spotlight at technology-focused network and information sessions in Cape Town and Johannesburg. "The diversity of our partners at the event − Docker, Microsoft Azure, Atlassian, SUSE and HPE – is a clear indication of the excitement around the Docker platform," says Muggie van Staden, MD of Obsidian Systems. Read more

What’s the best Linux firewall distro of 2017?

You don’t have to manage a large corporate network to use a dedicated firewall. While your Linux distro will have an impressive firewall – and an equally impressive arsenal of tools to manage it – the advantages don’t extend to the other devices on your network. A typical network has more devices connected to the internet than the total number of computers and laptops in your SOHO. With the onslaught of IoT, it won’t be long before your router doles out IP addresses to your washing machine and microwave as well. The one thing you wouldn’t want in this Jetsonian future is having to rely on your router’s limited firewall capabilities to shield your house – and everyone in it – from the malicious bits and bytes floating about on the internet. A dedicated firewall stands between the internet and internal network, sanitising the traffic flowing into the latter. Setting one up is an involved process both in terms of assembling the hardware and configuring the software. However, there are quite a few distros that help you set up a dedicated firewall with ease, and we’re going to look at the ones that have the best protective open source software and roll them into a convenient and easy to use package. Read more

Zorin OS 12 Business Edition Launches with macOS, Unity, and GNOME 2 Layouts

Three months after launching the biggest release ever of the Ubuntu-based operating system, the Zorin OS team is today announcing the availability of Zorin OS 12 Business Edition. Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel, Zorin OS 12 Business Edition ships with the innovative Zorin Desktop 2.0 desktop environment that offers multiple layouts for all tastes. These means that you can make your Zorin OS 12 desktop look like macOS, GNOME 2, or Unity with a click. Read more

GNOME and Other Software

  • Nautilus 3.24 – The changes
    Since Nautilus was created, if a user wanted to open a folder where the user didn’t have permissions, for example a system folder where only root has access, it was required to start Nautilus with sudo. However running UI apps under root is strongly discouraged, and to be honest, quite inconvenient. Running any UI app with sudo is actually not even supported in Wayland by design due to the security issues that that conveys.
  • GNOME hackaton in Brno
    Last week, we had a presentation on Google Summer of Code and Outreachy at Brno University of Technology. Around 80 students attended which was a pretty good success considering it was not part of any course. It was a surprise for the uni people as well because the room they booked was only for 60 ppl.
  • Peek Gif Recorder Gets Updated, Now Available from a PPA
    Peek, the nifty animated gif screen capture app for Linux desktops, has been updated. Peek 0.9 reduces the size of temporary files, adds a resolution downsampling option (to help the app use fewer resources when rendering your gif), and introduces fallback support for avconf should ffmpeg be unavailable.
  • Cerebro is an Open Source OS X Spotlight Equivalent for Linux
    Billed as an ‘open-source productivity booster with a brain’, Cerebro is an Electron app able to run across multiple platforms. It’s an extendable, open-source alternative to Spotlight and Alfred on macOS, and Synapse, Kupfer, Ulauncher, GNOME Do, and others on Linux.
  • JBoss Fuse 6.3 integration services for Red Hat OpenShift released
    Red Hat announced the latest update to the Red Hat JBoss Fuse-based integration service on Red Hat OpenShift. With the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud-based SaaS systems, and new data streams, organizations can face increasing pressure to more quickly deliver innovative new services. Traditional centralized, monolithic ESB-style integration approaches are often ill-suited to support the business in responding to this pressure.
  • Fedora 25: The perf linux tool.
  • Meet the chap open-sourcing US govt code – Paul, an ex-Microsoft anti-piracy engineer [Ed: Used to work for Microsoft and now spreads the GPL ("cancer" according to Microsoft) in the US government]
    The manager of the project, Berg said, really wanted to release MOOSE as open source, but didn't know how to do so. As a result it took 18 months to traverse government bureaucracy and to obtain the necessary permissions. It's now available under the GPL 2.1 license.