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Tuesday, 09 Feb 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Devs Might Skip the OTA-9.5 Hotfix in Favour of a Massive OTA-10 Update Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2016 - 12:25am
Story Samsung begins updating Z1 Smartphone in India to Tizen 2.4 – version Z130HDDU0CPB1 Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:36pm
Story Example Uses Of The Linux grep Command Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:28pm
Story Red Hat encourages open source adoption at Asia Pacific Forum in Philippines Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:24pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:24pm
Story Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:23pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:22pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:20pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:19pm
Story GNOME and KDE Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:18pm

Mozilla News (Dr. Karim Lakhani, Caribou Digital)

Filed under
Moz/FF

Linux Kernel in Ubuntu LTS, 3.14.60 LTS Released

Filed under
Linux
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Now Officially Powered by Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

    It's finally here! We know that we've told you so many times about the fact that the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system will get the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel someday, but that day is today, February 1, 2016.

    Just a few minutes ago, Canonical pushed the final Linux kernel 4.4 LTS packages into the stable repositories of the upcoming distribution for early adopters like us to upgrade and replace the old Linux 4.3 kernel from the Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) released.

  • Linux Kernel 3.14.60 LTS Released with PowerPC and AArch64 Improvements

    After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.4.1 LTS and Linux kernel 3.10.96 LTS, kernel maintainer and developer Greg Kroah-Hartman published details about the availability of the sixtieth maintenance build of the Linux 3.14 LTS kernel series.

    Changing 65 files, with 375 insertions and 154 deletions, Linux kernel 3.14.60 LTS is here to add various improvements to the PowerPC (PPC), AArch64 (ARM64), x86, OpenRISC, and MN10300 hardware architectures, as well as to update several drivers, especially for things like PA-RISC, USB, Xen, ISDN, HID, connector, and networking (PPP, bonding, and Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)).

Celebrating 15 Years of SELinux

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

On Dec. 22, 2000, the NSA released their code to the wider open source world in the form of SELinux, and in doing so forever changed the security landscape of not just Linux, but the technology world at large. A combination of policies and security frameworks, SELinux is one of the most widely-used Linux security modules. Without these innovations, Common Criteria, a crucial government security certification, would likely not exist for Linux.

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SMARC COM runs Linux or Android on quad core AM437x

Filed under
Android
Linux

Embedian’s “SMARC-T4378” module runs Linux or Android on TI’s Cortex-A9 AM437x SoC, and features up to 1GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, dual GbE, and an optional carrier.

The SMARC-T4378 appears to be the first SMARC form-factor computer-on-module to be based on the Texas Instruments Sitara AM4378 system-on-chip. The 82 x 50mm Embedian COM joins AM437x-based modules in various other sizes from CompuLab, Variscite, and MYIR that were introduced over the past year, and follows Embedian’s SMARC-compatible SMARC-T335X, which runs on the Cortex-A8 based Sitara AM3354. The Cortex-A9-based AM4378 is clocked to 1GHz instead of the AM3354’s 600MHz.

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6 Benefits of Using Open Source Software in Government (Industry Perspective)

Filed under
OSS

Open source software thrives in government and is in some ways a technical expression of democracy: engineers building common ground and forging a more open and free future for all.

But it’s also often misunderstood in parts of the public sector, seen as a time-consuming and unsupported solution. So if you’re on the fence about open source, keep reading to learn about benefits, evaluation methods, support tools and a few packages to consider right away.

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GPIO Zero and Raspberry Pi programming starter projects

Filed under
Linux

One of the most exciting starter activities to do with a Raspberry Pi is something you can't do on your regular PC or laptop—make something happen in the real world, such as flash an LED or control a motor. If you've done anything like this before, you probably did it with Python using the RPi.GPIO library, which has been used in countless projects. There's now an even simpler way to interact with physical components: a new friendly Python API called GPIO Zero.

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Mozilla Pushes Firefox 45 Into Beta, Promises GTK3 Integration for Linux, Again

Filed under
Moz/FF

Now that we're all enjoying the new features of the Firefox 44.0 web browser on our personal computer, the time has come for Mozilla developers to concentrate their efforts on the next major release.

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Could Linux Mint Replace Ubuntu?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

One of the neatest features about using Linux for everyday computing are the endless choices that are available.

For years, Ubuntu was considered the "top distro" for most people. Recently however, I've seen indications that this is no longer the case. Arch Linux is gaining new users faster than ever. And for those who want a more "predefined experience," Linux Mint is catering to an ever-growing audience as well. Mint's not really my distro of choice. However, pretending that it's not a real contender when compared to other distros is nonsense. Linux Mint has become a big time player.

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Tizen v Android Wear: Which smartwatch OS is right for you?

Filed under
Android
Linux

It's fair to say no-one has answered the smartwatch question yet. But in Google's Android Wear and Samsung's Tizen OS, we have two very different attempts.

We pit the two operating systems against each other, looking at hardware, compatibility, interface, health and fitness tracking and apps to help you decide which platform to plump for.

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Linux 4.5 RC2 and AMDGPU

Filed under
Linux
  • Here Is A Linux 4.5-rc2 Kernel To Play With The New AMDGPU Functionality

    With a report that Linux 4.5-rc2 manages to improve the AMD R9 Fury (Fiji) performance, I spun up a Linux 4.5-rc2 kernel this morning for easing those wanting to test the AMDGPU driver atop Ubuntu.

    While the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA ships with the AMDGPU DRM driver enabled, it doesn't yet enable the new PowerPlay Kconfig option for getting faster performance on hardware like Fiji, Tonga, etc. Their kernel also doesn't ship with the experimental CIK GPU support enabled. Thus I spun a 4.5-rc2 kernel this morning that enables these extra AMDGPU tunables.

  • AMDGPU Driver Said To Be Much Faster With Linux 4.5-rc2 Kernel

    With Linux 4.5-rc2 that was released last night, the new AMDGPU DRM driver is supposedly much faster compared to last week's 4.5-rc1 kernel.

    A Phoronix reader commented, "I read through the changelog and saw that there were several amdgpu patches. I just built this RC, rebooted, and ran some 3d benchmarks an the result is: a) double or quadruple the framerates that I got with RC1, and Cool no more overheating. I have the same model R9 Fury that Michael excluded from the last round of benchmarks due to performance/stability problems."

  • Kernel prepatch 4.5-rc2

Leftovers: OSS (Lexumo, Red Pitaya, IBM Mainframes, John Sullivan's Talk)

Filed under
OSS
  • Draper Spinout Lexumo Looks to Secure IoT With $4.9M From Boston VCs

    On the Internet of Things side, you can name a security startup for almost every letter of the alphabet: Attify, Bastille, CyberCanary, and so on. But most of these companies have very different approaches as compared with Lexumo. (As for Lexumo’s name: Gaynor says it is loosely connected to the Latin roots for “code” and “fix.” Fair enough.)

  • Measure magnetic field with open source teslameter

    A Slovenia-based start-up called Red Pitaya has created a programmable test and measurement instrument which runs open source software and it has posted its first test applications on the internet.

    The board can be configured as an oscilloscope, an arbitrary waveform generator or spectrum analyser by downloading software applications from the company’s online marketplace.

    One design project describes an open source app which can be used to identify unwanted electromagnetic emissions by performing magnetic field measurements.

  • IBM Aims to Expand Open Source Community Surrounding Mainframes [Ed: openwashing campaign to make its proprietary overpriced mainframes seem more ethical]

    In addition to updating the systems that make up the IBM LinuxONE portfolio, IBM has announced that it is optimizing both its StrongLoop framework for creating application programming interfaces and the Cloudant NoSQL database that it provides as a managed service to run on IBM Linux. They also announced that they are collaborating with SUSE to leverage OpenStack to manage instances of the Linux on a mainframe and that the Go programming language developed by Google is now available on IBM Linux mainframes.

  • Overthrowing the Tyranny of Software by John Sullivan

    As part of my master class on Free and Open Source (FOSS) Software at University Paris Diderot, I invite guest lecturers to present to my students the point of views of various actors of the FOSS ecosystem --- companies, non-profits, activists, lawyers, etc.s

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Kali Linux Literature

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
  • Migrating from Kali Linux 2 to Kali Linux 2016.1

    The first edition of Kali Linux Rolling, Kali 2016.1, was released more than a week ago. It marks the end of Kali Linux 2 and the beginning of a new release regime.

    It’s still based on Debian Testing, so existing users don’t have to do anything special but run a few commands to upgrade from Kali Linux 2 to Kali Linux 2016.1. Aside from installation images for the GNOME 3 desktop, there are also installation images for the Light edition, which uses the Xfce desktop environment. And there are also ARM installation images.

  • Kali Linux Cookbook eBook - $24 value, now free!

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • digiKam 5.0 Image Editor Receives New, Sleek Color Lookup Adjustment Tool

    By the looks of it, this year, KDE users will have a bunch of awesome and powerful tools, all of them ported to the next-generation Qt 5 UI toolkit, and this is also the case of the famous digiKam image editor.

  • podlators 4.06

    More build system changes, this time to (hopefully) finish merging with core so that we don't have to maintain separate build systems and machinery between core and this package. This time, there aren't even any real test suite changes. I was thinking about continuing converting the test suite to the new snippet-based format, but ran out of steam today.

  • Best Cross-Platform Note-taking Apps to Enhance Productivity

    When it comes to taking notes on the go, there are many solutions you can try out. You can carry a small notepad, you could take notes in a simple text file, or you could try out any app from the thousands of choices the Android Play Store offers. While there seems to be no dearth of good choices in this department, apps that are truly cross-platform are hard to find. That's why, in today's article, we'll help you find apps that you can use to take notes and refer to them from everywhere.

  • Jono Bacon Thinks About A Hybrid Desktop With GNOME Shell Atop Mac OS X

    Jono Bacon, the former Ubuntu Community Manager who is currently employed by GitHub, has proposed a hypothetical new open-source project that effectively comes down to bringing the Linux user-space -- complete with the GNOME Shell -- over to Mac OS X.

    Jono explained his new idea in a blog post, "You want the very best computing experience, so you first go out and buy a Mac. They have arguably the nicest overall hardware combo (looks, usability, battery etc) out there. You then download a distribution from the Internet. This is shipped as a .dmg and you install it. It then proceeds to install a bunch of software on your computer. This includes things such as: GNOME Shell, All the GNOME 3 apps, Various command line tools commonly used on Linux, An ability to install Linux packages (e.g. Debian packages, RPMs, snaps) natively." Basically, GNU/OSX.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

UEFI Bricks

Filed under
Linux

Lexumo Lands $4.89 Million Seed Round To Help Ensure Open Source Code Security

Filed under
OSS
Security

What has Lexumo created to warrant that kind of financial attention? It indexed all of the open source code in the world and created a cloud security service aimed at helping companies using open source code inside embedded systems or enterprise software. These groups can submit their code to the Lexumo service and it checks for any known security vulnerabilities. What’s more, it will then continuously monitor the code for updates and inform developers when one is available.

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Ubuntu Phone's Unity 8 Convergence Progress Captured in a Single Photo

Filed under
Ubuntu

We all know by now that there's a lot of Ubuntu Phone convergence work in progress happening as we speak, and with each new OTA update, Canonical's mobile devices are turning into full-fledged and usable desktops.

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Best Android smartphones: February 2016 edition

Filed under
Android

Whatever you requirements or budget, there's an Android handset on this list for you. Due to popular demand, I've added a couple of budget smartphones that retail for around $200 too, including one that offers a high level of water resistance.

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