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Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu MATE, Not Just a Whim Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 6:34pm
Story EU-Fossa project submits results of code audits Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 6:27pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:44pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:39pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:38pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:34pm
Story And More Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 3:32pm
Story Blockchain and FOSS Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 2:07pm
Story Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 11:31am
Story More Security News (and FUD) Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 11:28am

Linux and Linux Foundation: JS Foundation, Modern Take on Tux

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Leftovers: Software

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  • Find Files Faster with FSearch, an ‘Everything Search Engine’ for Linux

    FSearch is a promising new file search utility for the Linux desktop, inspired by the Everything Search Engine tool for Windows.

  • Released OpenStack Newton, Moving OpenStack packages to upstream Gerrit CI/CD

    OpenStack Newton was released on the Thursday 6th of October. I was able to upload nearly all of it before the week-end, though there was a bit of hick-ups still, as I forgot to upload python-fixtures 3.0.0 to unstable, and only realized it thanks to some bug reports. As this is a build time dependency, it didn’t disrupt Sid users too much, but 38 packages wouldn’t build without it. Thanks to Santiago Vila for pointing at the issue here.

    As of writing, a lot of the Newton packages didn’t migrate to Testing yet. It’s been migrating in a very messy way. I’d love to improve this process, but I’m not sure how, if not filling RC bugs against 250 packages (which would be painful to do), so they would migrate at once.

  • Rcpp now used by 800 CRAN packages

    A moment ago, Rcpp hit another milestone: 800 packages on CRAN now depend on it (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo declarations). The graph is on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage over time.

    The easiest way to compute this is to use the reverse_dependencies_with_maintainers() function from a helper scripts file on CRAN. This still gets one or false positives of packages declaring a dependency but not actually containing C++ code and the like. There is also a helper function revdep() in the devtools package but it includes Suggests: which does not firmly imply usage, and hence inflates the count. I have always opted for a tighter count with corrections.

  • opensourced

    All the authors agreed to a GPLv2+ licensing, so now it's time for to meet the world. It does about the simplest thing you can imagine: ssh to the server and use GNU tar to tar down every filesystem that has the “dump” bit set in fstab. Every 30 days, it does a full backup; otherwise, it does an incremental backup using GNU tar's incremental mode (which makes sure you will also get information about file deletes). It doesn't do inter-file diffs (so if you have huge files that change only a little bit every day, you'll get blowup), and you can't do single-file restores without basically scanning through all the files; tar isn't random-access. So it doesn't do much fancy, but it works, and it sends you a nice little email every day so you can know your backup went well. (There's also a less frequently used mode where the backed-up server encrypts the backup using GnuPG, so you don't even need to trust the backup server.) It really takes fifteen minutes to set up, so now there's no excuse. Smile

  • Skype’s WebRTC Linux app remains in alpha, but it now has video calling [Ed: Video calling worked fine in Skype for GNU/Linux before Microsoft bought and then RUINED it. Stop revisionism.]

Wayland Live CD

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  • Wayland Live CD release

    I have pushed out new ISO files for the Wayland Live CD project, named after my favorite celebrity (Rebecca Black).

  • Debian Testing Wayland Live CD Updated With Latest Support

    The Live CD Linux distribution focused on showcasing the potential of Wayland across different desktops, toolkits, and applications is out with a new ISO release.

    Developer and Phoronix reader "Nerdopolis" has announced the latest version of his RebeccaBlackOS that packages up the latest Wayland/Weston code and other software supporting Wayland. He announced, "I have pushed out new ISO files for the Wayland Live CD project, named after my favorite celebrity (Rebecca Black). I wanted to time the release to celebrate the release of her new song The Great Divide, but I had some issues I previously had to resolve This might be the last set of ISOs I announce here. I will post newer ISOs/commits, but probably won't announce to the Wayland mailing list."

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat to flaunt open source technologies

    “Making true digital transformation is difficult unless organisations in the Middle East embrace central themes such as software-defined everything, hyperscale, containers and hybrid cloud,” said Lee Miles, General Manager Middle East and Africa, Red Hat. “Proprietary technology will no longer exist as a viable innovation model. Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, will participate in GITEX Technology Week where its focus will be on demonstrating how the company’s open source technologies are helping accelerate business transformation by enabling all these trends.”

  • Analysts Advise About Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Latam conference at Puno in Peru

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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  • Meet Hubot: The DevOps chat bot
  • Google Delivers its own Open Source Report Card

    In recent months, Google has open sourced a slew of useful tools, many of them tested and hardened in-house. They include machine learning applications, 3D visualization tools and more. Now, in a move that should be followed by other companies, Google has announced the 'Open Source Report Card.'

    "Today we're sharing our first Open Source Report Card, highlighting our most popular projects, sharing a few statistics and detailing some of the projects we've released in 2016. We've open sourced over 20 million lines of code to date and you can find a listing of some of our best known project releases on our website," said Josh Simmons, from Google's Open Source Programs Office.

  • IBM i Open Source Roadmap Finds Perl

    Support for open source development on IBM i has been a big deal for the Technology Refresh program. Just last week, with the latest TR announcement, support for Perl was added along with support for the current version of Node.js, which is v6. In previous TRs, we have seen support for programming languages like Ruby and Python, plus tools such as the GNU Compiler Collection and Git. The PHP language, the Eclipse integrated development environment, and the Apache web server are pre-TR open source advancements.

    Compared to Node.js, Python, Ruby, and PHP, there's not much happening in terms of new application development in Perl. It was once one of the big three--Perl, Python, and PHP--recalled consultant Alan Seiden, after I emailed him to discuss open source support on i. Seiden, a PHP subject matter expert, was quick to note PHP originally was a macro language over Perl scripts in the days before PHP was rewritten in C. Perl scripts are under the covers for a ton of open source software.

  • How a healthy developer conference budget can provide a big ROI for organizations

    At OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Emily Hugenbruch, John Arwe, and Ji Chen will give a talk called How to lose clients and alienate coworkers: Lessons learned on an OpenStack enterprise journey. In a recent email interview, Emily, an Advisory Software Engineer and z/VM OpenStack Community Liaison at IBM, discusses the transition developers from proprietary backgrounds must make when they move onto open source projects, and she explains the big ROI on sending developers to conferences.

  • Event report: PyCon India 2016

    This time instead of per day report, I will try to write about things happened during PyCon India. This time we had the conference at JNU, in Delhi. It was nice to be back at JNU after such a long time. The other plus point was about the chance to meet ilug-delhi again.

  • Chrome Remote Desktop 53 adds remote sound support [APK Download]

    Chrome Remote Desktop is a rather obscure Google product, but that doesn't mean it's not useful. Once the desktop application is installed, you can control it from any Android device, iOS device, or computer (with Chrome). In my testing, it actually works extremely well, often with a lower latency than popular remote access applications like TeamViewer.

  • Easier installations, telecom success, and more OpenStack news
  • Instagram open sources iOS UI crash fix
  • OpenBGPD Large Communities

    Back in the early days of The Internet, when routers rode dinosaurs to work and nerds weren't cool, we wanted to signal to our network neighbours certain information about routes. To be fair, we still do. But, back then everyone had 16 bit ASNs, so there was a simple concept called 'communities'. This was a 32bit opaque value, that was traditionally split into two 16bit values. Conveniently, we were able to encode an "us" and a "them", and perform actions based on what our neighbours told us.


    OpenBGPD in OpenBSD -current has support for Large Communities, and this will be available in the 6.1 release and later.

  • Dutch govt ordered to use open standards for comms from 2017

    Government bodies in the Netherlands will have to use open technology standards for communications after next year, following a vote by the nation's parliament.

    The requirement for open document standards has already been adopted by the Netherlands Senate, but a motion by Member of Parliament Astrid Oosenbrug has now unified the policy. She said the lower house would be the first government body to standardize around the use of Open Document Format (ODF).

    "We should set the right example," she said. "Ironically, lower house published the adopted law on its website by providing a download link to a document in a proprietary format."

    As part of the new legislation, the government will also promote the use of open source code across government and the private sector. Michiel Leenaars, head of the Dutch Internet Society, welcomed the move.

  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Ubuntu 16.10, FreeBSD 11, Android 7.1, And More
  • Open data as a game

    Around the world something interesting is happening: Governments, and even a few private companies, are opening up huge stores of data they've been collecting over decades.

  • Tech giants collaborate on open source specs for faster servers
  • Big Tech Companies Announce OpenCAPI Consortium To Develop Open Hardware For Servers
  • OpenCAPI Looks to Redefine Server Architecture Beyond PCIe
  • Razor Releases 2nd Gen Open Source VR Development Kit

    Razer is part of the Open-Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) ecosystem, a new standard in VR gaming to push the VR gaming experience forward and supporting the venture with the OSVR Hacker Dev Kit, a virtual reality device and open-source software that enables programming for any variety of VR technology.

  • VK9: Still Pursuing Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan

    VK9 is the project formerly known as SchaeferGL as an open-source project implementing Direct3D 9 over Vulkan.

    It's been a few months since originally writing about this open-source project and fortunately pleased this week to see its development continuing, albeit now under the name VK9. The developer, Christopher Schaefer, recently passed his "third milestone" with getting to the point where the geometry is correctly being passed to the render pipeline, texture loading is beginning to work, etc.

Ubuntu Leftovers (New Name, ARM, and More)

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Games for GNU/Linux

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  • Inklings, a lemmings-style puzzle game is now out on Linux

    Inklings [Steam, Official Site] is an indie lemmings-style puzzle game with simple visuals, guide your Inklings to safety! This game comes from a family team of developers.

    The developer told me that himself and his brother developed it, while their mother had a hand at the level paintings.

    I've tested it out for a bit, as the developer sent in a key and I haven't come across any problems. It's quite a nice game, but it is rather simplistic visually.

  • Hyper Ultra Astronautics, a fast-paced competitive local multiplayer space arena
  • Stellar Overload, the block-based adventure FPS is now on Steam

    If you remember, I recently wrote about Stellar Overload [Steam, Official Site] and did a small preview. The good news is that the game is now available on Steam with Linux support.

    While there are a lot of these block games now, Stellar Overload at least offers up some unique features. The major one being cube shaped planets to explore. I've found it to be way more interesting than other blocky games.

Development News

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  • PHP 8.0 Likely To Have A New JIT Engine

    Zend has begun developing a new JIT (Just-In-Time) Engine for PHP and is expecting it will likely be ready for PHP 8.0.

    PHP 8.0 is still out in the distance with PHP 7.1 being what's under development now for release in the weeks ahead while PHP8 is much further down the road. However, Zend has already begun work on a new JIT for PHP that they hope will be able to "deliver some useful results" for the next major PHP version.

  • Top software and the programming language in which they are written

    BackRub (Google’s first incarnation) was written in Java and Python. Now, Google’s front end is written in C and C++ and its famous crawlers (Spyders) were written in Python. However, the crawler kept crashing, and indexes got stale with old information, therefore Google developed a new crawler (capable of incremental index updates) written in C++.

  • ALLVM: Forthcoming Project to Ship All Software As LLVM IR

    Interest is growing around shipping software as LLVM IR and will be discussed at this year's LLVM Developers' Meeting.

    Various parties have been investigating using LLVM IR as the medium for shipping software while doing the final conversion on the host for execution. The aim would be to provide greater performance, security, and other benefits by the distributed software being LLVM IR.

The Exciting Features Of The Linux 4.9 Kernel

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This weekend was the release of Linux 4.9-rc1 to mark the end of the 4.9 kernel merge window. As such, here's our usual feature overview recapping all of the changes to Linux 4.9 that have us excited about the next version of this open-source kernel.

Some of the highlights include AMDGPU GCN 1.0 experimental support, memory protection keys support, mainline support for the LG Nexus 5 and Raspberry Pi Zero (along with a lot of other ARM hardware), the Greybus subsystem was added, support for vmapped stacks, and many other additions.

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Also: Linux Kernel 4.4.25 LTS Is a Small Update with PowerPC, ARM, and x86 Changes

Red Hat finds virtualization vital for enterprise despite container competition

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Red Hat

Containers are hot, but virtualization adoption remains on the rise within the enterprise, according to recent Red Hat research.

The survey of more than 900 enterprise IT pros found businesses are using virtualization to drive server consolidation, decrease provisioning time, and provide infrastructure for developers to build and deploy applications.

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Also: Why Red Hat's OpenShift, not OpenStack, is making waves with developers

Android Leftovers

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  • gnome extensions

    In general when using Gnome I try and avoid extensions. Most of the ‘default’ setup is fine or I was able to get used to it and it works well enough. There are a few extensions I do use however for various reasons. All of these work with Wayland.

  • GNOME 3.22/KDE Plasma 5.8 release party in Brno

    Last Thursday, we organized a regular Linux Desktop Meetup in Brno and because two major desktop environments had had their releases recently we also added a release party to celebrate them.

    The meetup itself took place in the Red Hat Lab at FIT BUT (venue of GUADEC 2013) and it consisted of 4 talks. I spoke on new things in GNOME 3.22, our KDE developer Jan Grulich spoke on new things in Plasma 5.8, then Oliver Gutierrez spoke on Fleet Commander and the last talk was given by Lucie Karmova who is using Fedora as a desktop in a public organization and shared her experiences with the Linux desktop.

  • GNOME outreach flyer for local groups and events

    One of my very early contributions to GNOME was a flyer. FOSDEM 2014 was one of the first conferences I attended and with me I had brought printouts of this flyer which we handed out to people from the GNOME stand.

Security News

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  • Security advisories for Monday
  • NyaDrop exploiting Internet of Things insecurity to infect Linux devices with malware

    A Linux threat known as NyaDrop is exploiting a lack of security in Internet of Things (IoT) devices to infect them with malware.

    A NyaDrop attack begins with the threat attempting to brute force the default login credentials of internet-exposed IoT device running Linux. It does so by running through its list of stored usernames and passwords, a collection which is no doubt similar to that of the Mirai botnet.

  • Smart cities: 5 security areas CIO should watch

    New worms designed to attach to IoT devices will emerge − and they could wreck more havoc given the extended reach of the new converged networks.

    Conficker is an example of a worm that spread on PC’s in 2008 and is still persistent and prevalent in 2016.

    Likewise, worms and viruses that can propagate from device to device can be expected to emerge – particularly with mobile and the Android operating system.

    Embedded worms will spread by leveraging and exploiting vulnerabilities in the growing IoT and mobile attack surface. The largest botnet FortiGuard labs has witnessed is in the range of 15 million PCs.

Red Hat Names University of Dammam as the first Red Hat Academy in Saudi Arabia

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Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that the University of Dammam has been signed as the first Red Hat Academy in Saudi Arabia. Starting today, the university will offer Red Hat courses and exams to up to 200 students per year, who will receive hands-on instruction, curriculum and labs, performance-based testing, and educator support.

University of Dammam has chosen Red Hat to support its IT infrastructure and encourages students to learn in new and exciting ways. As a pre-eminent research-based institution, the University of Dammam has grown and developed through continually assessing and aiming to improve its curriculum and expand its academic capabilities across disciplines.

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Also: Dammam university named first Red Hat Academy in Saudi

Ubuntu 17.04 to Be Dubbed "Zesty Zapus," Will Launch on April 2017

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Just a few minutes ago, Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth had the great pleasure of announcing the codename of the next major release of the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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Also: Ubuntu 17.04 ZZ Codename Announced

Chromebooks: The smart person's guide

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Chromebooks are any laptop that, under license from Google, runs the Linux kernel-based Chrome OS. Chrome OS is incredibly lightweight, drawing almost all of its interface from the Chrome browser. It also supports Chrome apps, and as of late 2016 will be the only platform to get new Chrome apps.

Chromebooks are manufactured by a variety of vendors, such as Google, HP, Acer, Samsung, Dell, and others. They range in price from the mid $100 range to over $1,200 for the Google Pixel. Educational pricing is available as well.

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How Building Strong Open Source Teams Is Like Raising Chickens

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Dr. Margaret Heffernan, in her LinuxCon North America keynote, tells an open source story that isn't about software. It's a story about chickens.

If your organization is struggling to build teams that work well together, and it feels more like The Hunger Games than a smoothly functioning team, let the tale of the two chicken flocks show you the open source way. Dr. Heffernan tells how a reseacher used two flocks of laying hens to study how to breed more productive egg-layers. One was an average, nothing special flock, just ordinary hens. The other flock was composed of super-chickens, hens who were highly productive egg layers. The researcher bred only the most productive of the super-chickens, and did no selective breeding in the first flock.

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Also: Keynote: Beyond Measure: The True Power and Skill of Collaboration by Dr. Margaret Heffernan

Linux Foundation whacks open JavaScript projects umbrella

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A project fostering JavaScript’s panoply of projects has been established by the Linux Foundation.

The JS Foundation will cultivate JavaScript application and server-side projects. The thinking is to create a centre that drives broad adoption and development of JavaScript technologies and that fosters collaboration. It should help devs and tools builders make sense of the rapid pace of change.

The focus on standardization and mentoring, JS Foundation executive director Kris Borchers told the Open Source Business Conference in London on Monday. The Linux Foundation and Node.JS will, in particular, work to advance the JavaScript language through bodies such as ECMA TC39 and the W3C.

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Open source ResinOS adds Docker to ARM/Linux boards

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OSS has spun off the Yocto-based OS behind its IoT framework as a ResinOS 2.0 distro for running Docker containers on Linux IoT devices., the company behind the Linux/Javascript-based IoT framework for deploying applications as Docker containers, began spinning off the Linux OS behind the framework as an open source project over a year ago. The open source ResinOS is now publicly available on its own in a stable 2.0.0-beta.1 version, letting other developers create their own Docker-based IoT networks. ResinOS can run on 20 different mostly ARM-based embedded Linux platforms including the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, and Odroid-C1, enabling secure rollouts of updated applications over a heterogeneous network.

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More in Tux Machines

Qt Creator 4.2 Beta released

Qt SCXML is a new module in Qt that allows you to create state machines from State Chart XML and embed them into Qt C++ and Qt Quick applications (Overview). It was released as Technical Preview in Qt 5.7 and will be released fully supported with Qt 5.8. Qt Creator 4.2 now supplements the module by offering a graphical editor for SCXML (experimental). It features editing states and sub-states, transitions, events, and all kinds of properties. The editor is experimental and the plugin is not loaded by default. Turn it on in Help > About Plugins (Qt Creator > About Plugins on macOS) to try it. Read more Also: Qt Creator 4.2 Beta Released

6 Best Linux Desktop Environments [Part - 2]

Linux has been developing at a good pace through this last years and with development comes better support for different hardware regarding support for proprietary drivers for video cards, better file systems, more choices in what operating system to use and one of the things that has it importance is distros graphical environment. Read

OpenStack in the Headlines

  • OpenStack Adoption and Revenues on the Rise
    One thing you can count on at the semiannual OpenStack Summits are new studies and reports about OpenStack. And that's the case at the OpenStack Summit going on in Barcelona, Spain, now through Oct. 28. A number of studies are being discussed at the event, including the October 2016 OpenStack User Survey and new analysis on the state of OpenStack from analyst firm 451 Group. According to the 451 Group, the OpenStack software market will generate $1.8 billion in revenue in 2016 and grow to $5.7 billion by 2020. The firm is forecasting that the five-year compound annual growth rate for OpenStack from 2015 through 2020 will be 35 percent. The semiannual OpenStack User Survey is also a topic of discussion at the OpenStack Summit, providing insight into the state of OpenStack deployment. Among the high-level findings is that 71 percent of OpenStack clouds are now in production and fully operational, up from 59 percent in 2015. Also of note is how well-regarded the Kubernetes orchestration system has become, outpacing CloudFoundry in terms of user interest. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the latest OpenStack research studies.
  • ​HPE backs off from OpenStack development
    HPE still supports OpenStack in its Helion cloud program, but it's cutting way back on how much it's spending on helping create OpenStack.
  • Is OpenStack Cloud Interoperability a Myth?
    Boris Renski, co-founder of Mirantis, argues that interoperability doesn't start at the infrastructure layer. It starts with applications, he said. BARCELONA—A keynote highlight on Oct. 26 at the OpenStack Summit here was a live, onstage demonstration with 16 OpenStack vendors, all showing a degree of interoperability. The demonstration was part of an interoperability challenge, though, according to Boris Renski, co-founder of Mirantis and member of the OpenStack board of directors, the infrastructure layer is not necessarily the right place to emphasize interoperability.
  • Communications Leaders Choose Red Hat OpenStack Platform for Powering Cloud Deployments to Deliver New Services