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Monday, 27 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux and FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 9:00pm
Story Mutter Receives Wayland Improvements, Memory Leak Plugged from GNOME Shell Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 8:57pm
Story PulseAudio 9.0 is out Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 8:53pm
Story Linux AIO Brings All the Debian Live 7.11.0 Editions Into a Single ISO Image Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 8:47pm
Story Mozilla rebrand Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 8:39pm
Story PS3 Settlement Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 8:07pm
Story OPNFV Summit and News Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 7:57pm
Story Raspberry Pi controls Linux devices without the hassle Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 7:14pm
Story Developer: TIzen SCM Tool Released – 16.02 Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 7:10pm
Story Samsung Powers their SMART Signage Portfolio with Tizen Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 7:08pm

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • ibus-chewing-1.5.1 Released
  • A few words about the future of the Limba project

    Both Alex and I have been experimenting with 3rd-party app distribution for quite some time, with me working on Listaller and him working on Glick and Glick2. All these projects never went anywhere. Around the time when I started Limba, fixing design mistakes done with Listaller, Alex started a new attempt at software distribution, this time with sandboxing added to the mix and a new OSTree-based design of the software-distribution mechanism. It wasn’t at all clear that XdgApp, later to be renamed to Flatpak, would get huge backing by GNOME and later Red Hat, becoming a very promising candidate for a truly cross-distro software distribution system.

  • Git 2.9 improves submodules, diff readability

    The open source Git distributed version control system, the cornerstone of the GitHub code-sharing site, has been upgraded with faster submodules and improvements for diffs and testing.

    Version 2.9, released this week, expands options for submodules, which enable users to keep another Git repository in a subdirectory of a repository. The submodule improvements focus on speed and flexibility.

  • Git 2.9 Released

    A new version of Git was released this week, bringing a number of improvements that will be a welcome sight to software developers. Alongside the normal bug fixes and general maintenance work, some interesting new experimental features have been added.

  • Calibre 2.59 Has Better EPUB 3 Support, Amazon Metadata Download Improvements

    Today, June 17, 2016, Calibre developer Kovid Goyal has proudly announced the release and general availability of the Calibre 2.59 update of the open-source and cross-platform ebook library management software.

    Calibre 2.59 arrives after only one week after the debut of Calibre 2.58, the previous point release that added compatibility with the latest Qt 5.x technologies (Qt 5.5 or later) on the Ubuntu Linux operating systems. And it looks like it introduces several improvements to the Amazon Metadata Download functionality.

  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.3 Is Now Available

    The Wine team released today third stable release of their software. Version 1.8.3 has 54 bugfixes.

    This stable release contains bugfixes, translations updates and updated GPU description table(NVIDIA cards were added), new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

  • Wine 1.8.3 Released With More Bug Fixes

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta
  • KDE Plasma 5.7 to Ship with Huge Wayland Improvements, New System Tray

    Today, June 17, 2016, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing that the Beta of the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment is now available for public beta testing.

    Initially planned for June 16, KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta is here, and we can finally see what the KDE developers have prepared for fans of the modern, Qt5-based desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems. And just by taking a quick look at the release notes, we can notice that a lot of goodies are coming.

  • KDE e.V. joins advisory board of The Document Foundation

    The Document Foundation announces that KDE e.V. is joining the organization’s Advisory Board, and at the same time The Document Foundation joins KDE’s group of advising community partners as an affiliate.

  • GNOME & KDE Join The Document Foundation Advisory Board

    The GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. have joined the Advisory Board of The Document Foundation.

    The GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. have joined TDF's Advisory Board while in exchange The Document Foundation now has a seat on the boards of both GNOME and KDE. The press message The Document Foundation sent out this morning explained, "The objective is to strengthen relationships between the largest not for profit organizations focused on open source software, to foster the growth of the entire ecosystem."

  • The Qt Company Releases Qt 5.7
  • Qt 5.7 GUI Toolkit Released with Raspberry Pi 3 Support, Qt Creator 4.0

    Today, June 16, 2016, the Qt Company was proud to announce the final release and general availability of the long-anticipated Qt 5.7 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit for all supported platforms.

    As many of you expected, Qt 5.7 is a major release that brings exciting new features and technologies for any and all Qt application developers out there, no matter if they're using a GNU/Linux distribution or the latest Windows 10 and macOS operating systems.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Versus Closed: Addressing The IoT Standards Problem
  • Here's how developers should choose open source components wisely [Ed: WhiteSource self promotion]

    An open source component can be inappropriate for a developer in many ways. Starting from the risks the component is exposed to, to its license policy, developers have to keep a lot of things in mind while selecting the right piece for their tech puzzle. In an exclusive conversation with TechGig.com, Rami Sass, CEO and Co-Founder of WhiteSource, shared tips for selecting right open source components with developers. Read on.

  • Open-Source Test Automation Tools and You

    There's a shift to open-source mobile test automation tools happening today among developers and QA. And it's not just happening in mobile testing. Many mature technology sectors are adopting lightweight, vendor-transparent tools to fulfill the need for speed and integration.

    As with many free and open-source software markets however, a plethora of tools complicates the selection process. How do you know what to spend time learning, integrating and deploying in your own environment?

  • Lack of open source support continues to pose IT challenge

    Open source software and hardware continue to infiltrate the data center, but the lack of professional support remains a top business and IT concern.

  • Will Open Big Data Platforms Lead to an Open Enterprise?

    Big Data implementations are invariably built around Hadoop, Apache Spark and other open source solutions. And since these constructs must integrate into the broader enterprise data ecosystem at some point, is it possible that open source will come to rule the data center as a matter of course?

  • Ramping Up Your Open Cloud Deployment and Applications
  • New hospital in Houston selects open source EHR vendor

    Sacred Oak Medical Center in Houston, opening in August, will use the OpenVista electronic health record system of Medsphere Systems. The inpatient behavioral health facility will open with 20 beds and plans to expand over time to 80 beds.

  • GSA CTO headlines WT open source breakfast

    The use of open source software is pretty much a forgone conclusion in the federal market but we are just now starting to scratch the surface of its power to disrupt the market.

  • 3D printed human hands, open source course materials, and more news
  • Open Source Agriculture

    An open source tool, the Food Computer, is being developed at MIT that can be used to create, save, and share climates for growing crops, maximized for nutrition, yield and taste, regardless of location or season.

  • Free culture in an expensive world
  • College courses without textbooks? These schools are giving it a shot.

    A community college reform group has selected a handful of schools in Virginia and Maryland to develop degree programs using open-source materials in place of textbooks, an initiative that could save students as much as $1,300 a year.

  • New open source 'GreenWeb' to mobile battery while browsing internet

    A new, open source computer programming framework that could make the web significantly more energy efficient, allowing people to save more battery power while browsing on mobile devices, has been developed by researchers including one of Indian-origin.

    Scientists developed what they are calling "GreenWeb," a set of web programming language extensions that enable web developers to have more flexibility and control than ever before over the energy consumption of a website.

    "Because user awareness is constantly increasing, web developers today must be conscious of energy efficiency," said Vijay Janapa Reddi from University of Texas in the US.

  • Rumors of COBOL's demise have been greatly exaggerated: Meet GnuCOBOL

    A recent article on Slashdot points out with some chagrin that the Department of Homeland Security and Department of Veterans Affairs in the United States still use COBOL, originally invented in 1959, based on work by the late Rear Admiral Grace Hopper. The implication is—and has been for some years in the IT community—that COBOL is a completely dead language. Not so! In 1997, the Gartner Group reported that 80% of the world's business ran on COBOL, and surveys in 2006 and 2012 by Computerworld found that more than 60% of large financial organizations use COBOL (more, in fact, than use C++, a much newer language), and that for half of those, COBOL was used for the majority of their internal code. The COBOL standard has continued to be updated, with the most recent change being in 2014.

  • Open standard for UK emergency services

    The United Kingdom is introducing an open standard for IT systems used by emergency services, the country’s Digital Service announced on 23 May. The ‘Multi-Agency Incident Transfer’ (MAIT) standard is to harmonise the exchange of information within the emergency responder community to streamline the flow incident information between agencies.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • ART single thread performances

    ART has been the default routing table backend in OpenBSD for some months now. That means that OpenBSD 6.0 will no longer consult the 4.3 BSD reduced radix tree to perform route lookups.

    The principal motivation for adopting a new tree implementation can be explained in three letters: SMP.

    I'll describe in a different context why and how ART is a good fit in our revamp of OpenBSD network stack. For the moment, let's have a look at the single-thread performances of this algorithm in OpenBSD -current.

  • parallel-lib: New LLVM Suproject
  • LLVM Has New "parallel-lib" Sub-Project

    This new parallelism library is described as "[hosting] the development of libraries which are aimed at enabling parallelism in code and which are also closely tied to compiler technology. Examples of libraries suitable for hosting within the parallel-libs subproject are runtime libraries and parallel math libraries. The initial candidates for inclusion in this subproject are StreamExecutor and libomptarget which would live in the streamexecutor and libomptarget subdirectories of parallel-libs, respectively."

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Mozilla Funds Open Source Code Audits

    As part of the Mozilla Open Source Support program (MOSS), the Mozilla Foundation has set up a fund dedicated to helping open source software projects eradicate code vulnerabilities.

  • Intel Hidden Management Engine – x86 Security Risk?

    So it seems the latest generation of Intel x86 CPUs have implemented a Intel hidden management engine that cannot be audited or examined. We can also assume at some point it will be compromised and security researchers are labelling this as a Ring -3 level vulnerability.

  • Smart detection for passive sniffing in the Tor-network

    If you haven't yet read about my previous research regarding finding bad exit nodes in the Tor network you can read it here. But the tl;dr is that I sent unique passwords through every exit node in the Tor network over HTTP. This meant that is was possible for the exit node to sniff the credentials and use them to login on my fake website which I had control over.

  • Lone hacker, not Russian spies, responsible for Democratic Party breach

    RED-FACED SECURITY OUTFIT CrowdStrike has admitted that the Russian government wasn't responsible for a hack on the Democratic Party after lone hacker Guccifer 2 claimed that he was responsible for the breach.

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • The Document Foundation and GNOME Foundation to tighten their relationship, by exchanging seats in their Advisory Boards

    The Document Foundation and GNOME Foundation have decided to tighten their relationship, in a move intended to create stronger ties between the two communities, and to foster the integration between LibreOffice and one of the most popular desktop environments for Linux.

    The GNOME Foundation is a non-profit organization that furthers the goals of the GNOME Project, which is composed of both volunteers and paid contributors, helping it to create a free software computing platform for the general public that is designed to be elegant, efficient, and easy to use.

  • Stepping towards Proxies.

    I’m doing a GSoC project this summer which in a single line is to “handle proxies in our system”. Some of us may not have encountered this headache ever . The problem starts arising from the time we start thinking of multiple connections with proxies enabled . Firefox or any browser can’t be helpful in this case ( it doesn’t know which proxy to choose for an inserted URL). Env vars like http_proxy, https_proxy ? No!. We can’t use a LAN thing with a VPN, so there’s no scope for a generic proxy ( Proxies are meant to be separate for each connection like all other network resources ) . So what we needed ?

  • Examining transit tracks on the map

    Oh, and as a little word of warning, in case someone is planning on trying this out at home, there is currently a bug in the latest git master of OpenTripPlanner that makes useage without OSM data loaded in the server (as is what I have intended for GNOME usage, since we already have GraphHopper, and as OTP would probably not scale well loading many large regions worth of raw OSM data) querying for routes using pure coordinates doesn't work in that case, so I'm on a couple of weeks old commit right now.
    I might wait until this is resolve. Or I might actually look into trying to query for transit stops near the start and finish point and use that when performing the actual query, which might actually yield better result when selecting a subset of allowed transit modes.

    It is also probably time to start trying to find funding for a machine hosting an OTP instance for GNOME Smile

Fedora 24 Final a GO, Snaps Not So Much

Filed under
-s

Jan Kurik tonight announced that Fedora 24 is GO for release. Despite a couple of Windows 10 boot bugs the Fedora 24 RC 1.2 (20160614.0) compose is considered GOLD. In other news, Fedora developers aren't exactly overjoyed at the prospect of Snap packages for Fedora and they sure didn't cooperate with Canonical as implied. Besides the security risks, Fedora is backing xdg-app successor Flatpack. Elsewhere, KDE, GNOME, and The Document Foundation just got a lot chummier and Darknet.org joined in with the FSF to advise against the Intel Management Engine.

Read more

Linux on Servers

Filed under
Server

KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta Release

Filed under
KDE

This release brings an all-new login screen design completing the Breeze startup experience we trialed in Plasma 5.6. The layout has been tidied up and is more suitable for workstations that are part of a domain or company network. The Air and Oxygen Plasma themes which we still fully support for users that prefer a more three-dimensional design have also been improved.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta Released

Samsung’s Next Smartwatch Gear S3 to be Codenamed Solis, Runs Tizen

Filed under
Linux

The Gear S2 has served as a fantastic Tizen flagship smartwatch, but now its time for the next iteration in its evolution, and according to a recent report it’s codenamed Solis. We expect this next device to run Tizen, hence the reason we are reporting it, and it will also support a circular display.

Read more

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Graphics Performance With NVIDIA's GTX 1070 & GTX 1080

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

For your viewing pleasure this Friday is our largest Windows vs. Linux graphics/gaming performance comparison ever conducted at Phoronix in the past 12 years! With the brand new NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 graphics cards, their performance was compared under Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.04 x86_64 when using the very latest NVIDIA Corp drivers for each OS. A range of Steam gaming benchmarks and more were done, including some cross-platform Vulkan graphics benchmarks. Continue on for this interesting comparison.

Read more

Fedora Anaconda and Mint Install - Hands-on with two more Linux installers

Filed under
Red Hat

Last week I made a side-by-side comparison of Calamares and Ubiquity, the former a non-denominational Linux installer and the latter the Ubuntu installer.

This week, since it was just announced that Fedora 24 will be released next Tuesday, I would like to make a similar walk-through of the Fedora installer (anaconda) and the Linux Mint Debian Edition installer.

Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu: Quick install guide

    Honestly, modern Linux is easier, faster and less hassle to install than any recent release of Windows. That's the truth. No messing with keys, no worrying about activation and no digging out that lost install disc or USB drive.

    The beauty of Linux is that because it's free software anyone can download (or pop in a disc) and start using it. You don't even have to install anything! Linux technology and its free and easy licence means that it can be run straight off a CD or DVD.

  • Canonical Goes Snap Happy, Nextcloud 9 Released & More…

    When karma comes to visit, the one thing to remember is that in some way — which might even seem totally unrelated — you have some responsibility for that karmic bite. The best thing to do is to accept it with grace and to move on. I tell you this because that should give you a pretty fair assessment of what my life has been like since the last Week in Review.

    But it hasn’t all been bad karma. There’s been good news on the FOSS front as well…

  • Oh SNAP, and there’s the Devil

    I don’t know how else to put it. I’m sorry. It’s bad. It’s bad in my opinion, not fact. My opinion, is my expectation, will only turn fact by the time it is too late to do anything about it.

    It’s like, “why back-up anything?” — well, you’ll know when you’ve lost everything. In other words, when it is just slightly beyond way too fucking late.

  • Snappy Moves to New Platforms

    Canonical's Snappy package manager is taking its first steps outside the Ubuntu world. As of now, you can install it on Arch, Debian, Fedora and several other popular distros. And with developers like Mozilla getting behind it, it could soon become a new "universal standard".

  • Ubuntu’s SNAPS now available to other Linux Distros
  • Canonical and Chef Add DevOps Options with Habitat and Snap Packages

    DockerCon hasn't even started yet, but the channel has already seen two major open source DevOps announcements. Here's an overview of the latest news from Canonical about snap packages and Chef about its new app automation platform, Habitat.

  • App distribution for Linux just got way better

    Ubuntu's "snap" package format now works on a bunch of other popular Linux distros, including Arch, Debian, Fedora, and most of the Ubuntu flavors. It's also coming to CentOS, Mint, OpenSUSE, and even OpenWrt, among others.

  • Goodbye rpm and deb. Hello Snaps!
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