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Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story antiX 16.1 Linux OS Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie," without Systemd Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 2:45am
Story An Everyday Linux User Review Of Elementary OS Loki 0.4 Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 2:43am
Story Canonical Improves Classic Confinement and Aliases Support in Snapd 2.21 Daemon Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 2:37am
Story Dell Announces New Ubuntu-Powered Dell Precision Mobile Workstation Line-Up Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 2:35am
Story Distributions and Kernels Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:50am
Story Software and today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:48am
Story More Games Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:47am
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:46am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:45am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 12:44am

Review: PocketCHIP—Super cheap Linux terminal that fits in your pocket

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Portable, pocket-sized computer. Runs Linux. Has a good battery life. Bonus points for a physical keyboard, and full-size USB port. Double bonus points for being cheap.

That’s sort of my ideal “carry with me” device. If I can have a Linux device, with a proper shell that I can work entirely from, I’m a happy camper. Over the past few years I’ve been able to hobble together a few devices to accomplish this Utopian goal—more or less.

Read more

Hardware With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Papa's Got a Brand New NAS

    At the beginning of my search, I started down a more traditional route with a cheap 1U server and a modern motherboard, but I quickly started narrowing down the motherboards to small, lower-power solutions given this machine was going to run all day. As I started considering some of the micro ATX solutions out there, it got me thinking: could I use a Raspberry Pi? After all, the latest iteration of the Raspberry Pi has a reasonably fast processor, a decent amount of RAM, and it's cheap, so even if one by itself wasn't enough to manage all my services, two or three might do the trick and not only be cheaper than a standard motherboard but lower power as well.

  • Traditional PCs Continue To Decline

    I’m joining the 21st century by switching to GNU/Linux on ARM instead of what the remains of the Wintel monopoly ships. 2017 should be the last year an x86-based PC runs in my home, except for a print-server. I don’t have an ARMed driver for the damned printer, but that printer is getting old. Maybe it will die…

  • Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

    You can now program the Open-V on the web, and see the results in real time. The code is compiled in the web IDE and then flashed to a microcontroller which is connected to a live YouTube live stream. It’s pretty neat to flash firmware on a microcontroller thousands of miles away and see the development board blink in response.

  • Linux ready COM taps FPGA/ARM Arria 10 SoC

    Enclustra’s “Mercury+ AA1” COM runs Linux on an Altera Arria 10 FPGA/ARM hybrid with up to 8GB DDR4, up to 8GB eMMC, PCIe Gen 3, and -40 to 85°C support.

    Swiss FPGA specialists Enclustra announced a Mercury+ AA1 computer-on-module built around Intel/Altera’s dual-core, Cortex-A9 Arria 10 FPGA/ARM hybrid SoC. The 74 × 54mm module is open for pre-orders, and is said to be “already in use,” suggesting it has entered the sampling stage.

Software: New Linux WiFi Daemon, New GStreamer, GRASS GIS and syslog-ng

  • New Linux WiFi Daemon Streamlines Networking Stack

    If you’ve ever used an embedded Linux development device with wireless networking, you’ve likely benefited from the work of Marcel Holtmann, the maintainer of the BlueZ Bluetooth daemon since 2004, who spoke at an Embedded Linux Conference Europe panel in October.

  • New Wireless Daemon for Linux

    This presentation from Marcel Holtmann is about a new 802.11 wireless daemon for Linux. It is a lightweight daemon handling all aspects around WiFi support for Linux. It is designed with a tiny footprint for IoT use cases in mind.

  • GStreamer 1.11.1 Released

    GStreamer 1.11.1 is now available as the first unstable release of this multimedia framework for their 1.11 development series, which will culminate with GStreamer 1.12.

  • GRASS GIS 7.2.0 released

    After almost two years of development the new stable major release GRASS GIS 7.2.0 is available. It provides more than 1950 stability fixes and manual improvements compared to the former stable release version 7.0.5. The new version includes a series of new modules to analyse raster and vector data along with new temporal algebra functionality.More than 50 new addons are also available. A summary of the new features is available at New Features in GRASS GIS 7.2.

  • syslog-ng 3.9.1 released

    We released syslog-ng version 3.9.1 just before Christmas , four months after the 3.8.1 release. It contains tons of bugfixes and many small incremental changes compared to the previous version. Performance has improved in multiple places, Big Data drivers were updated, and secure logging to Elasticsearch is now possible using SearchGuard.

Tizen News

Filed under
Linux
  • Samsung publishes Gear S3 compatibility list for Android and iOS
  • Smartphone Game: Solve Math new game released to Tizen Store

    Are you a math lover? Well then, on the Tizen store app developer Amjad Chaudhry has released another game called Solve Math. In this math game, you have a calculation with a bit missing, a number or an operation sign. The questions start off quite easy and become gradually harder as you progress through the various levels. You have four alternative answers and eight seconds to answer the questions. If you choose the wrong answer, your time will lessen by two seconds. Your goal is to get as far as you can.

  • You can win $10,000 for your Tizen mobile app under Samsung’s new program

    Samsung have announced a new Tizen Mobile App Incentive Program for 2017 to boost Tizen app development. The program will run between February 1st to October 31st while the participation registration has already started. Samsung are giving away a mammoth $10,000 cash incentive for the top 100 apps every month through this program which should definitely bring in talented developers onto the Tizen platform in the coming days.

  • Smartphone App: UC News App now added to the Tizen Store

    Last year UC Browser, UC Mini Browser, Xender & ShareIt most popular apps were added to Tizen Store by Openmobile World Wide Inc. Those apps are running on Tizen smartphones by their popular app ACL for Tizen.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

KDE Plasma 5.9 Beta Kicks off 2017 in Style

Filed under
KDE

Today KDE releases the beta of this year’s first Plasma feature update, Plasma 5.9. While this release brings many exciting new features to your desktop, we'll continue to provide bugfixes to Plasma 5.8 LTS.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.9 Beta Released, Adds Global Menus & Better Wayland Support

KDE Kicks Off 2017 in Style with KDE Plasma 5.9 Beta, Brings Back Global Menus

The Linux Foundation Welcomes JanusGraph

Filed under
Linux

We’re pleased to kick off 2017 by announcing that JanusGraph, a scalable graph database project, is joining The Linux Foundation. The project is starting with an initial codebase based on the Titan graph database project. Today we see strong interest in the project among developers who are looking to bring the graph database together, as well as support from organizations such as Expero, Google, GRAKN.AI, Hortonworks, IBM and others. We look forward to working with them to help create a path forward for this exciting project.

Several members of the JanusGraph community, including developers from Expero, GRAKN.AI and IBM, will be at Graph Day Texas this weekend and invite discussion about the project.

Read more

Antergos vs. Fedora vs. Ubuntu vs. openSUSE vs. Debian 9 vs. Clear Linux For Early 2017

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

At the end of December I posted a number of Linux workstation/server distribution benchmarks while this article has the results from the more desktop-focused (non-graphics) Linux distribution benchmarks. Up for benchmarking off a Skylake NUC in this article was Antergos, Fedora 25, Ubuntu 16.10, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Debian 9 Testing, and Intel's Clear Linux.

Read more

Phoronix Test Suite 7.0-Ringsaker Milestone 1 Released

Fedora, Manjaro, and Ubuntu MATE on the Raspberry Pi 2 & 3

Filed under
Linux

I'm a bit surprised, disappointed and encouraged all at the same time. Surprised and disappointed by the number of problems that I had with Fedora 25, and the magnitude of some of those problems, particularly on the Pi 2 and with the Fedora spins. I was really hoping that I would be able to install Fedora and just use it reasonably happily, and it did not turn out that way. I will cling to the positive side, though, that this is now an official Fedora distribution, they are continuing to work and improve it, and that means it is very likely going to get steadily better. Perhaps by the time Fedora 26 comes along it will be a lot more like what I was hoping for right now.

But I am encouraged by both Manjaro ARM and Ubuntu MATE. Both of these installed easily and worked really well. Both recognized the Pi 3 built-in WiFi and Bluetooth adapters, and both performed reasonably well.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD Has Been Working On An Open-Source GPU Debug Tool, To Be Released Soon

    Yesterday we noted the new open-source AMD GPU debugging tool being developed by a Valve engineer as part of their work on the open-source RADV/RadeonSI/AMDGPU code. It turns out AMD has officially been working on a GPU debugging tool too.

    As noted in that article yesterday it was sad that AMD hadn't to date worked on a full-featured debug tool, especially considering how good Intel's intel-gpu-tools is for debugging and testing, and how many years already AMD has been working on their open-source driver stack without having some official and public open GPU debug tool. Fortunately, it turns out that AMD has been working on such a utility.

  • OpenGL 4.3 Lands For Maxwell With Nouveau Gallium3D, Plus 1.5~3.5x Performance Boost

    It should be a busy end of week for Mesa with the Mesa 17.0 feature freeze being this weekend. In addition to Haswell hitting OpenGL 4.2, Nouveau's NVC0 Gallium3D driver has enabled OpenGL 4.3 support for newer Maxwell and Pascal hardware.

  • OpenGL 4.3 now available in Mesa for nouveau (NVIDIA) for Maxwell and above

    Samuel Pitoiset (Valve developer) just put some fresh work into Mesa-git that enables OpenGL 4.3 with nouveau (NVIDIA) for Maxwell and above.

  • Haswell should now see OpenGL 4.2 thanks to recent work in Mesa

    Mesa is continuing to progress rapidly, as of today Haswell should now support OpenGL 4.2 ready for the next release of Mesa. Only a few days ago Haswell gained OpenGL4, so this progress is amazing.

    Mesa 17 should arrive soon, which means this will be in the next stable release. Mesa switched their versioning, so Mesa 13.1 is now Mesa 17 as they are using a year-based version model.

  • OpenGL 4.2 Now Exposed For Intel Haswell On Mesa 17.0

    Days ago we mentioned the patches were lining up to get Intel's Haswell to OpenGL 4.2 and this morning those patches have landed in Mesa Git ahead of the branching for the Mesa 17.0 release.

  • Updated AMD DC/DAL Patches For Polaris 12, 5K VSR

    Harry Wentland of AMD on Wednesday posted updated DC (DAL) display patches for the AMDGPU code-base.

    This is just the latest of long-running work on getting the DC display stack into shape for hopefully merging into the mainline Linux kernel later this year.

The 6 unwritten rules of open source development

Filed under
Development
OSS

The sports world is rife with unwritten rules. These are the behaviors and rituals that are observed but rarely documented in an official capacity. For example, in baseball, unwritten rules range from not stealing bases when well ahead to never giving up an intentional walk when there’s a runner on first. To outsiders, these are esoteric, perhaps even nonsensical guidelines, but they are followed by every player who wants to be a valued teammate and respected opponent.

Software development, particularly open source software development, also has an invisible rulebook. As in other team sports, these rules can have a significant impact on how an open source community treats a developer, especially newcomers.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

5 ways to be successful with open source software

Filed under
OSS

The skills gap in big data will remain relatively constant in the next year, but this shouldn’t deter people from adopting Hadoop and other open-source technologies. As most of us know, when new technologies are created and vie for users, they are known by few.

Only once a particular type of software is a mature standard part of the canon do we begin to have a substantial number of folks skilled in its use — but even then the skills gap can persist. It will disappear only when we stop seeing big improvements to the stack, which I doubt we want. In short, the skills gap is one of the primary factors gating the rate of platform change, but it’s also a sign innovation is at hand.

Read more

Also: Proof that openness scales

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Announcing Remacs: Porting Emacs to Rust

    I am delighted to announce Remacs, a project to port Emacs to Rust!

    Emacs, at its heart, is a lisp interpreter written in C. In Remacs, we’re replacing this C code with Rust, and all the elisp you know and love will just work.

    If you’ve ever fancied contributing to core Emacs, this is a great opportunity to learn the internals. There’s tons of low hanging fruit, we have a list of good first bugs and even a walkthrough of writing your first elisp function using Rust.

  • Remacs: Re-Implementing Emacs In Rust

    For those looking at other new uses for the Rust programming language, there is now a Rust implementation of the popular Emacs editor.

  • It’s Time to Ditch Skype and TeamSpeak, Discord Launches Its App for Linux Users

    In a very brief announcement posted on Twitter earlier today, January 11, 2016, Discord, the company behind the popular, free, and secure all-in-one voice and text chat for gamers announced the first stable release of their app for Linux platforms.

    Linux was the missing piece for them to achieve full status and offer their services across all major platforms, both on desktop and mobile. Discord is currently available for Android, iOS, Mac, and Windows, but you can also use it directly from the Web, using a compatible web browser.

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • 2017 January Elections: Interviews

    The 2017 January cycle of Elections is in full swing. Voting officially began on Tuesday, January 10th, and ends Monday, January 16th at 11:59 UTC. Voting takes place on the Voting application website. As part of the Elections coverage on the Community Blog, most of the candidates running for seats published their interviews and established their platforms here. Are you getting ready to vote and looking for this information? You can find the full list of candidates and links to their interviews below.

  • Free your Desktop (or the tools I use)

    Quite some time ago I wrote a Free Your Android post, as an overview of the software I use on my mobile phone. I decided to write this similar post as an overview of the software I regularly use on my laptop. This can also be considered as a "Free Your Desktop" post, although the biggest step here would be to change the operation system if you are not already using a Linux distribution.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Third Party Patch Roundup – December 2016
  • The MongoDB hack and the importance of secure defaults

    If you have a MongoDB installation, now would be the time to verify that it is secure. Since just before Christmas, over 28,000 public MongoDB installs have been hacked. The attackers are holding the hacked data ransom, demanding companies pay using Bitcoins to get their data back. From the looks of it, at least 20 companies have given in and paid the ransom so far. This post explains the hack, how to protect yourself, and what we can learn from it.

  • Implantable Cardiac Devices Could Be Vulnerable to Hackers, FDA Warns

    Low-level hackers can play with your heart. Literally. Pacemakers, defibrillators and other devices manufactured by St. Jude Medical, a medical device company based in Minnesota, could have put patients’ lives at risk, the US Food & Drug Administration warned on Monday, the same day a new software patch was released to address these vulnerabilities.

    There are several confirmed vulnerabilities that could have granted hackers remote access a person’s implanted cardiac device. Then, they could change the heart rate, administer shocks, or quickly deplete the battery. There hadn’t been any report of patient harm related to these vulnerabilities as of Monday, the FDA said.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.10-rc5

Things seem to be calming down a bit, and everything looks nominal. There's only been about 250 changes (not counting merges) in the last week, and the diffstat touches less than 300 files (with drivers and architecture updates being the bulk, but there's tooling, networking and filesystems in there too). Read more Also: Linus Torvalds Announces Fifth Linux 4.10 Kernel RC, Everything Looks Nominal Linux 4.10-rc5 Released, Now Codenamed "Anniversary Edition"

Fedora 26 Linux to Enable TRIM for Better Performance of Encrypted SSD Disks

According to the Fedora 26 release schedule, the upcoming operating system is approaching an important milestone, namely the proposal submission deadline for system-wide changes, which is currently set for January 31. Read more Also: Fedora 26 Planning To Enable TRIM/Discard On Encrypted Disks

New CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Linux Kernel Security Updates Pushed Into Beta

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is informing users of the CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 enterprise-ready operating systems to upgrade their kernel packages immediately if they are using the Beta channel. Read more

KDE Neon Installer

  • KDE Neon Has Stylish New Install Wizard
    KDE Neon has adopted distro-agnostic Linux installer ‘Calamares’ its unstable developer edition. Calamares replaces the Canonical-developed Ubiquity installer as the default graphical installer used when installing the Ubuntu-based OS on a new machine. The stylish install wizard is already in use on a number of other KDE-based Linux distributions, including Chakra Linux and Netrunner.
  • KDE neon Inaugurated with Calamares Installer
    You voted for change and today we’re bringing change. Today we give back the installer to the people. Today Calamares 3 was released. It’s been a long standing wish of KDE neon to switch to the Calamares installer. Calamares is a distro independent installer used by various projects such as Netrunner and Tanglu. It’s written in Qt and KDE Frameworks and has modules in C++ or Python.