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Friday, 19 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Mir, Vulkan, Mesa Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 4:46pm
Story Best Linux desktop of 2018 Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 4:15pm
Story How To Boot Into Linux Command Line Mohd Sohail 15/01/2018 - 4:11pm
Story Barcelona and GNU/Linux (Now in Corporate Media) Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 4:04pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 10:21am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 9:52am
Story Dr. Lovesource: Or how I learned to stop worrying and love the open Rianne Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 9:44am
Story 2 scientific calculators for the Linux desktop Rianne Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 9:39am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:54am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:51am

IPFire Open Source Firewall Linux Distro Gets Huge Number of Security Fixes

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Security

IPFire 2.19 Core Update 117 is now available to download and comes with the latest OpenSSL 1.0.2n TLS/SSL and crypto library, as well as an updated OpenVPN implementation that makes it easier to route OpenVPN Roadwarrior Clients to IPsec VPN networks by allowing users to choose routes in each client’s configuration.

The update also improves the IPsec implementation by allowing users to define the inactivity timeout time of an idle IPsec VPN tunnel that's being closed and updating the strongSwan IPsec-based VPN solution to version 5.6.1. It also disabled the compression by default and removed support for MODP groups with subgroups.

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System76 Continues to Improve HiDPI Support for Their Ubuntu-Based OS in 2018

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Work on the second release of Pop!_OS Linux will continue this year with a rebase on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, due for release on April 26, 2018. The distro will also be released this spring, after Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and will feature out-of-the-box support for HiDPI displays.

System76 says that it received great feedback from the community in regards to the HiDPI improvements they are adding into Pop!_OS Linux lately, and, besides the fixing many of the reporting issues, they are also working on better integration of the HiDPI daemon into the desktop, including support for tweaking its behavior.

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The 5 best Linux distros for the enterprise: Red Hat, Ubuntu, Linux Mint and more

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Three of the five Linux distributions discussed offer reliable and professional-grade support, all have frequent updates to ensure that security exploits are addressed in a timely manner, and all have at least some level of corporate connectivity baked in. In addition, all of them can run Windows programs through virtual machines or subsystems such as Wine. That ability might appeal to executives, but it raises the question of whether it’s really necessary or even a good idea.

There’s also a big cost difference between deploying Linux and Windows: Linux itself is free, so it’s the distributor’s support that you’ll pay for. And, yes, you will want to do that. The price for proper enterprise-ready support still makes Linux desktop a much less expensive option.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Future Tumbleweed Snapshot to Bring YaST Changes

Filed under
SUSE

Changes to YaST are coming and people using openSUSE Tumbleweed will be the first to experience these planned changes in a snapshot that is expected to be released soon.

Those following the YaST Team blog may have been read about the implementation changes expected for libstorage-ng, which have been discussed for nearly two years. Libstorage is the component used by YaST; specially used in the installer, the partitioner and AutoYaST to access disks, partitions, LVM volumes and more.

This relatively low-level component has been a constant source of headaches for YaST developers for years, but all that effort is about to bear fruit. The original design has fundamental flaws that limited YaST in many ways and the YaST Team have been working to write a replacement for it: the libstorage-ng era has begun.

This document offers an incomplete but very illustrative view of the new things that libstorage-ng will allow in the future and the libstorage limitations it will allow to leave behind. For example, it already makes possible to install a fully encrypted system with no LVM using the automatic proposal and to handle much better filesystems placed directly on a disk without any partitioning. In the short future, it will allow to fully manage Btrfs multi-device filesystems, bcache and many other technologies that were impossible to accommodate into the old system.

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Games: GOG, The Station, EVERSPACE, Turnover

Filed under
Gaming

Security: Microsoft, Twitter, Korea and DHS

Filed under
Security

How to set up a Raspberry Pi for retro gaming

Filed under
Gaming
HowTos

I grew up with console gaming and over the years I have had a number of systems, including Atari, SNES, Sega Genesis, and my all-time-favorite—the Commodore Amiga. I recently found a backup of old games I have been carrying around with me for years and got nostalgic for the glory days of retro gaming. I grabbed some old hardware and started tinkering with it so I could relive my childhood. I was surprised how well these games run on my Raspberry Pi and it's become something of a new hobby.

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Who Was To Blame For The Ubuntu BIOS Bug?

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

So who is to blame for the corruption of the BIOS?

Ultimately I would put the majority of the blame at the door of the manufacturers and the BIOS developers. You simply should not be able to corrupt the BIOS and there should be a reset option which returns it to factory settings if all else fails. The Ubuntu developers were the unlucky people to instantiate the bug by including a defective driver within the Kernel.

Some of the blame has to go to the users as well. Maybe we need to be a bit smarter when installing operating systems and not necessarily jump at the latest thing.

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Asus Tinker Board S adds 16GB eMMC and more

Filed under
Android
Linux

Asus announced a “Tinker Board S” SBC that has the same Rockchip RK3288 as the original, but adds 16GB eMMC, HDMI-CEC support, a smart audio jack, and improved power management features.

Asus unveiled a minor upgrade to its open-spec Tinker Board SBC, which was originally unveiled a year ago. Like the original, the Tinker Board S combines a quad-core, Cortex-A53 Rockchip RK3288 SoC with a 40-pin Raspberry Pi-style expansion connector. The upgrade is primarily notable for the addition of 16GB of eMMC storage. No pricing was indicated.

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Security: MalwareTech, Linux vs Meltdown and Spectre, Linus Torvalds Rage, Microsoft Bricks Machines

Filed under
Security
  • MalwareTech Prosecution Appears To Be Falling Apart As Gov't Plays Keep Away With Documents Requested By Defense

    Marcus Hutchins, a.k.a. MalwareTech, went from internet hero (following his inadvertent shutdown of the WannaCry ransomware) to federal government detainee in a surprisingly short amount of time. Three months after saving the world from rampaging malware built on NSA exploits, Hutchins was arrested at the Las Vegas airport as he waited for his flight home to the UK.

    When the indictment was published, many people noted the charges didn't seem to be backed by much evidence. The government accused Hutchins of creating and selling the Kronos malware, but the offered very little to support this claim. While it's true much of the evidence against Hutchins will be produced in court, the indictment appeared to be stretching legal definitions of certain computer crimes to their limits.

    The government's case appears to be weak and reliant on dubious legal theories. It's not even 100% clear that creating and selling malware is an illegal act in and of itself. The charges the government brought rely heavily on proving Hutchins constructed malware with the intent to cause damage to computers. This isn't so easily proven, especially when the government itself is buying malware to deploy for its own purposes and has yet to bring charges against any of the vendors it buys from. Anyone selling exploits to governments could be said to be creating malware with intent to cause harm. That it's a government, rather than an individual, causing the harm shouldn't make any difference -- at least not if the government wants to claim selling of malware alone is a federal offense.

  • ​The Linux vs Meltdown and Spectre battle continues

    Meltdown is a CPU vulnerability. It works by using modern processors' out-of-order execution to read arbitrary kernel-memory location. This can include personal data and passwords. This functionality has been an important performance feature. It's present in many modern processors, most noticeably in 2010 and later Intel processors. By breaking down the wall between user applications and operating system's memory allocations, it can potentially be used to spy on the memory of other programs and the operating systems.

  • ‘It Can’t Be True.’ Inside the Semiconductor Industry’s Meltdown

    It was late November and former Intel Corp. engineer Thomas Prescher was enjoying beers and burgers with friends in Dresden, Germany, when the conversation turned, ominously, to semiconductors.

    Months earlier, cybersecurity researcher Anders Fogh had posted a blog suggesting a possible way to hack into chips powering most of the world’s computers, and the friends spent part of the evening trying to make sense of it. The idea nagged at Prescher, so when he got home he fired up his desktop computer and set about putting the theory into practice. At 2 a.m., a breakthrough: he’d strung together code that reinforced Fogh’s idea and suggested there was something seriously wrong.

  • Linus Torvalds Is Not Happy About Intel's Meltdown And Spectre Mess

    Meltdown and Spectre exploit an architectural flaw with the way processors handle speculative execution, a technique that most modern CPUs use to increase speed. Both classes of vulnerability could expose protected kernel memory, potentially allowing hackers to gain access to the inner workings of any unpatched system or penetrate security measures.

    The flaw can't be fixed with a microcode update, meaning that developers for major OSes and platforms have had to devise workarounds that could seriously hurt performance.

    In an email to a Linux list this week, Torvalds questioned the competence of Intel engineers and suggested that they were knowingly selling flawed products to the public. He also seemed particularly irritated that users could expect a five to 30 per cent projected performance hit from the fixes.

  • It gets worse: Microsoft’s Spectre-fixer wrecks some AMD PCs

    Microsoft’s fix for the Meltdown and Spectre bugs may be crocking AMD-powered PCs.

    A lengthy thread on answers.microsoft.com records numerous instances in which Security Update for Windows KB4056892, Redmond’s Meltdown/Spectre patch, leaves some AMD-powered PCs with the Windows 7 or 10 startup logo and not much more.

Tiny industrial temperature module runs Linux on a Zynq-7000

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G28M” is a SODIMM-style module that runs Linux on a Zynq-7000 FPGA SoC, and offers -40 to 85°C support, up to 1GB DDR3, 512MB flash, a GbE controller, and optional WiFi/BT.

iWave has produced several Altera FPGA based computer-on-modules including the Cyclone V based IW-RainboW-G17D, but the 67.6 x 37mm, SODIMM form-factor iW-RainboW-G28M appears to be its first Xilinx Zynq based module. Other SODIMM-style Zynq COMs include PLDA’s SoMZ-7045.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What I See for LJ 2.0: in a Word, Community

    It has been too long, but I was at least one of the founders of the Seattle UNIX User's Group. I remember the first meeting well. It took place at Seattle University, and our guest speaker was Bill Joy. He impressed me in that he had a huge pile of overhead transparencies (remember, this was in the 1980s), asked a few questions of the group, selected some of them and started talking. He was right on target.

    My point is that I became a UNIX geek in about 1980, and although UNIX was hot stuff at Bell Labs, it wasn't exactly a household word. The users group was our tool to build the community.

    In the 1980s, I was running a small company that published UNIX reference cards and did UNIX training and consulting. I chose UNIX because I saw a need for decent documentation and training. We were filling that void.

  • Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D Lands OpenGL Bindless Texture Support

    Longtime Nouveau Gallium3D contributor Ilia Mirkin has landed OpenGL bindless texture (ARB_bindless_texture) support within Mesa 17.4-dev Git.

    ARB_bindless_texture is an important OpenGL extension for reducing the API and OpenGL driver overhead of resource bindings and allows accessing texture objects without first needing to bind/re-bind them. RadeonSI has already supported this extension as it's needed for Feral's port of Dawn of War III for Linux. This extension isn't currently mandated through OpenGL 4.6 but is important for "AZDO" purposes.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.8 Milestone 1 Released
  • Salsa webhooks and integrated services

    Since many years now, Debian is facing an issue with one of its most important services: alioth.debian.org (Debian's forge). It is used by most the teams and hosts thousands of repositories (of all sorts) and mailing-lists. The service was stable (and still is), but not maintained. So it became increasingly important to find its replacement.

    Recently, a team for volunteers organized a sprint to work on the replacement of Alioth. I was very skeptical about the status of this new project until... tada! An announcement was sent out about the beta release of this new service: salsa.debian.org (a GitLab CE instance). Of course, Salsa hosts only Git repositories and doesn't deal with other {D,}VCSes used on Alioth (like Darcs, Svn, CVS, Bazaar and Mercurial) but it is a huge step forward!

Software: BadISO, MusE 3.0.0, Krita, GNOME and More

Filed under
Software
  • Announcing BadISO

    For a few years now I have been working on-and-off on a personal project to import data from a large collection of home-made CD-Rs and DVD-Rs. I've started writing up my notes, experiences and advice for performing a project like this; but they aren't yet in a particularly legible state.

    As part of this work I wrote some software called "BadISO" which takes a possibly-corrupted or incomplete optical disc image (specifically ISO9660) and combined with a GNU ddrescue map (or log) file, tells you which files within the image are intact, and which are not. The idea is you have tried to import a disc using ddrescue and some areas of the disc have not read successfully. The ddrescue map file tells you which areas in byte terms, but not what files that corresponds to. BadISO plugs that gap.

  • MusE 3.0.0 released

    Three years after the last stable release, version 3.0 of the MusE MIDI/Audio sequencer is now available. As you might expect there many changes since the last release including a switch to Qt5, a new Plugin Path editor in Global Settings, a mixer makeover with lots of fixes, a system-wide move to double precision of all audio paths, and much more.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Wine, Soundnode, Etcher + More

    Welcome to our first Linux Release Roundup of 2018 — and as you might expect from the first week of a new year, there’s not an awful lot to round up!

    I like to assume that app developers spent their holidays enjoying themselves rather than beavering away on apps for our collective benefit.

    Even so, here are a couple of recent updates – but warning: this post contains Electron.

  • Interview with Emily K. Mell

    That it’s free! I think it’s remarkable that the open-source community could create something of this quality without a money spigot. Given Adobe’s outrageous pricing scheme for Photoshop, you’d think that software like this couldn’t exist anywhere else. Krita is a much better option.

  • Loving Gitlab.gnome.org, and getting notifications

    I'm loving gitlab.gnome.org. It has been only a couple of weeks since librsvg moved to gitlab, and I've already received and merged two merge requests. (Isn't it a bit weird that Github uses "pull request" and Everyone(tm) knows the PR acronym, but Gitlab uses "merge request"?)

  • 7 Best Alternatives To Microsoft Office Suite — 2018 Edition

    Some people need specific features or compatibility with other contacts, and that’s understandable; it’s expected to come at a price. But what about those who don’t need much out of an office software? The average person, even if technically inclined, doesn’t need much out of a word processor (I mean, it’s not like it’s a text editor or anything). So, should you pay for something that you don’t need? Probably none of my business, so I’ll just give you the facts to make an informed decision and select the best Microsoft Office alternative...

Tizen: Refrigerators and Phones

Filed under
Linux
  • Samsung to unveil new model of Family Hub Refrigerator at CES 2018

    Samsung Electronics has today announced the 2018 version of its award-winning Family Hub smart refrigerator. A winner of the 2018 Consumers Electronics Show (CES) 2018, the refrigerator will be on display at the CES 2018, to be held in Las Vegas from 9-12 January, 2018.

  • Samsung’s Tizen based Z2 gets a Software update – OBQU

    The Tizen based Samsung Z2 got a little software/firmware update last week. When I say little, I think I’m not exaggerating, as it only measures 7.9MB, but I think it’s important to cover all Tizen smartphone software news until there is no Tizen smartphone software news.

Fedora and Red Hat: New ISO, AArch64, ARM, OpenShift, Kubernetes

Filed under
Red Hat
  • F27-20180105 updated isos released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.11-300 kernel.

  • Fedora 28 Looking To Promote Its AArch64 Server Support

    The latest in the long list of planned features/changes for Fedora 28 come down to an AArch64 promotion.

    Fedora developers are looking to promote their AArch64 / ARM64 / ARMv8 server offerings to being a "primary architecture" for this next Fedora release. The Fedora AArch64 server installer, Cloud images, and Docker base images would be the same status then as the other primary server architectures like x86_64.

  • Video: Red Hat Showcases ARM Support for HPC at SC17

    In this video from SC17, Jon Masters from Red Hat describes the company’s Multi-Architecture HPC capabilities, including the new ARM-powered Apollo 70 server from HPE.

  • PodCTL #20 – Gathering Kubernetes Communities

    Before Kubernetes became popular, we had a suspicion that these trends would happen and we started the OpenShift Commons community. Whereas the Kubernetes community is focused on the technology, the OpenShift Commons community strives to bring together both technologists and practitioners to share knowledge and work to solve common challenges.

  • 5 reasons Kubernetes is the real deal

    I've been to a lot of tech conferences in my life, but there was something different about the December 2017 KubeCon/Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Summit in Austin. Sure, there's a ton of hype around Kubernetes, but it's something more. Not only did attendance go up by a staggering amount vs. 2016 (there were more than 4,000 people in Austin) but it was about who was and wasn't there. The content was solid, the Linux Foundation did its usual fabulous job running the event, but the real highlight for me was about the who.

    [...]

    Many open source projects come from one developer's crazy/beautiful idea, but leave lots and lots to be done before the use cases are built out and proven. In this case, similar to MapReduce/Hadoop, the primary use case and even most key foundational technical elements have been proved out, in production at Google for years.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Rethinking your open source use policy

    I spoke with someone the other day that was fired from his job as a technical product manager after more than 20 years of experience. He is now job-searching but is finding it difficult. There is a new bar set for speed of technology development that capitalizes on agile software development practices and leveraging open source technologies—two things that were not taken seriously just ten years ago. According to 69 percent of senior executives, this digital transformation is forcing us now to rethink our cybersecurity strategies.

    To accommodate these time constraints from management, developers have turned more and more to open source code as a great asset to build products and features, as opposed to writing code from scratch.  Open source technologies are available openly on the internet through sites like GitHub and SourceForge. Open source code now makes up 90 percent of the code composition of our modern applications.

  • New-Age Networking Predictions for the New Year: Open Source

    As software-defined networking (SDN), network functions virtualization (NFV) and other new-age networking initiatives mature, we'll be taking a look at what's in store for some of the most promising projects in the new year, now examining the open source movement.

    Modern networking techniques such as SDN and NFV are closely tied to the open source phenomenon. As they've originated, evolved and matured, such approaches naturally have gravitated to open source, which itself is in the midst of a rising popularity trend.

  • What is Lisa OS, the legendary operating system by Apple to be released for free

    The Computer History Museum in California has decided to go ahead and release the Apple’s legendary Lisa operating system for free. The OS will now be available as open source for everyone. However, even back in 1983, Apple had a reputation being forward with its product. The tech giant announced Lisa desktop computer on January 19, 1983. Officially, “Lisa” stood for “Local Integrated Software Architecture”, however, there are multiple reports that state that the name of the OS was also the name of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs’ daughter.

  • Lisa OS: Steve Jobs' rare failed project to be released for free as open source
  • FOSDEM 2018 talk: Perl in the Physics Lab

    FOSDEM 2018, the "Free and Open Source Developers' European Meeting", takes place 3-4 February at Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Solbosch, Brussels - and our measurement control software Lab::Measurement will be presented there in the Perl devrooom! As all of FOSDEM, the talk will also be streamed live and archived; more details on this follow later.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

Games: DRAG, Geneshift, Balloonatics and More

Tumbleweed Update

  • Tumbleweed Rolls Forward with New versions of Mesa, Squid, Xen
    This week provided a pretty healthy amount of package updates for openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed. There were three snapshots released since the last blog and some of the top packages highlighted this week are from Mesa, Squid, Xen and OpenSSH. The Mesa update from version 17.2.6 to 17.3.2 in snapshot 20180116 provided multiple fixes in the RADV Vulkan driver and improvements of the GLSL shader cache. The Linux Kernel provides some fixes for the security vulnerabilities of Meltdown in version 4.14.13 and added a prevent buffer overrun on memory hotplug during migration for KVM with s390. The snapshot had many more package updates like openssh 7.6p1, which tightened configuration access rights. A critical fix when updating Flatpak packages live was made with the gnome-software version 3.26.4 update. File systems package btrfsprogs 4.14.1 provided cleanups and some refactoring while wireshark 2.4.4 made some fixes for dissector crashes. Xen 4.10.0_10 added a few patches. Rounding out the snapshot, ModemManager 1.6.12 fixed connection state machine when built against libqmi and blacklisted a few devices to include some Pycom devices.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Rolls To Mesa 17.3, Linux 4.14.13
    OpenSUSE has continued rolling in the new year with several key package updates in January. Exciting us a lot is that openSUSE Tumbleweed has migrated from Mesa 17.2 to now Mesa 17.3. Mesa 17.3.2 is the version currently in openSUSE's rolling-release.

India Digital Open Summit 2018