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Wednesday, 04 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Chromium OS for Raspberry Pi 3 Officially Released, PINE64 Port Coming Soon

Filed under
OS
Linux

Chromium OS for SBC project, through Dylan Callahan, informs Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of the Chromium OS for Raspberry Pi 3 single-board computers.

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Roundup of community backed x86 hacker SBCs

Filed under
Android
Linux

The first community supported x86 hacker SBCs not backed by Intel or AMD are pricier than most ARM SBCs, but offer faster CPUs and competitive power drain.

The first x86-based community supported hacker SBCs not backed by Intel or AMD have reached market, offering higher prices than most ARM SBCs, but featuring faster processors and competitive power consumption. The Kickstarter-backed newcomers, all of which run Linux or Android, include the now-shipping JaguarBoard, the soon to ship UP board, and the Udoo X86, due in November.

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Tiny ARM9 COM and SBC support dual Ethernet and CAN

Filed under
Android
Linux

Boardcon’s 40 x 40mm “MINI287” COM runs Linux on an NXP i.MX287 SoC, offers dual Ethernet and CAN ports, and is also available as a sandwich-style SBC.

Thanks to the cost and power consumption sensitivities of the IoT market, old-time ARM9 system-on-chips continue to arrive in new embedded boards. Boardcon’s tiny (40 x 40mm) MINI287 computer-on-module taps the NXP/Freescale i.MX287, the highest-end member of the power-sipping i.MX28x SoC family, differentiated by its dual CAN interfaces, dual Ethernet ports, and L2 switch support. Boardcon recently released an Android-ready MINI3288 COM based on a Rockchip RK3288 SoC.

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GNU releases ethical evaluations of code-hosting services

Filed under
Development
GNU

Today the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the GNU Project announced evaluations of several major repository-hosting services according to the standards of the GNU Ethical Criteria for Code Repositories. Released in 2015, these criteria grade code-hosting services for their commitment to user privacy and freedom. At the time of publication, Savannah and GitLab have met or surpassed the baseline standards of the criteria.

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Open Source and Android: A History of Google's Linux-Based Mobile OS

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OSS

How open is Android, Google's Linux-based mobile operating system? That's a question European regulators are now asking as they level antitrust charges against Alphabet, Google's parent company. To gain some perspective on the issue, a brief history of Android and its role in the open source ecosystem is in order.

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Epiphany Browser Does Its First Development Release Towards GNOME 3.22

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GNOME

GNOME's Epiphany web-browser has done its first development release in the GNOME 3.21 series, which is culminating with the GNOME 3.22 release this September.

Some of the changes to find with Epiphany 3.21.1 include "paste and go" support for the address bar, allow opening WebP files with the open dialog, redesigned error pages, a Duplicate Tab menu item for tabs, various fixes, updated translations, and more.

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Cinnamon 3.0 released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

On behalf of the team and all the developers who contributed to this build, I am proud to announce the release of Cinnamon 3.0!

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Also: Cinnamon 3.0 Officially Announced

Raspberry Pi cameras jump to 8MP, keep $25 price

Filed under
Linux

The v2 Raspberry Pi Camera and low-light PiNoIR Camera advance from 5- to 8-megapixels via a Sony IMX219PQ sensor with improved image quality.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has replaced its official 5-megapixel Raspberry Pi Camera and night-vision Raspberry Pi NoIR Camera with improved 8-megapixel models. Like the older cameras, which are almost out of stock, the new cameras are priced at $25. As before, the Raspberry Pi PiNoIR camera is almost identical to the visible light camera except that it removes the infrared (IR) filter for improved imaging in the dark.

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LibreOffice and Open365

Filed under
LibO
OSS
  • Open365 Is An Open Source Alternative to Microsoft Office 365

    One of Microsoft’s Office 365 program chief advantages over open source alternatives is the ability to sync documents via the cloud so you can edit them everywhere. Open365 has stepped up to finally match this feature set.

    Open365 works a lot like Office 365 does. The suite builds on LibreOffice Online to let you open your documents in the browser, or use any of the client apps for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android to open them. Open365 also gives you 20GB of cloud-based storage to store your files on that will be synced across your devices.

  • Open365: open source Office 365 alternative

    Open365 is an open source Office 365 alternative that allows you to edit or create documents online, and to sync files with the cloud.

    The service is in beta currently but you can sign up for it already on the official website. You may use it using a web browser, download clients for Windows, Mac or Linux desktop machines, or for Android. An iOS client is in the making currently and will be made available as well soon.

    Open 365 offers two main features that you can make use of. First, it enables you to synchronize files between devices you use and the cloud.

  • The importance of the Document Liberation Project

    Today I would like to focus on a quite interesting project, even though it is rarely spoken of: The Document Liberation Project. The Document Liberation Project is LibreOffice’s sister project and is hosted inside the Document Foundation; it keeps its own distinct goals and ecosystem however. We often think of it as being overly technical to explain, as the project does not provide binaries everyone may download and install on a computer. Let’s describe in a few words what it does.

  • Tested the Libre Office software.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora BTRFS+Snapper – The Fedora 24 Edition

    In the past I have configured my personal computers to be able to snapshot and rollback the entire system. To do this I am leveraging the BTRFS filesystem, a tool called snapper, and a patched version of Fedora's grub2 package. The patches needed from grub2 come from the SUSE guys and are documented well in this git repo.

  • Fedora @ GNOME.Asia
  • Linux Fest North West Day 0

    We had about 250 at Fedora Game Night, gave away shirts to table winners and ran out of early sign-in badges.

  • Linux Fest North West Day -1

    If you live in the Northwest come an join all the Linux enthusiast this weekend at LinuxFest NorthWest. Seminars and Exhibits are at Bellingham Technical Collage Saturday and Sunday, and the Fedora sponsored Game Night is Friday from 6-10 at Fox Hall at the Hampton Inn. If you join us at Game Night you can get your pass early, play some board games and try out the SuperTuxKart races. At the exhibit on Saturday and Sunday you can participate in the SuperTuxKart Tournament at the Fedora booth. We could also use some help staffing the booth, contact me if you can help.

  • Going to Bitcamp 2016

    The Fedora Project attended as an event sponsor this year. At the event, we held a table in the hacker arena. The Ambassadors offered mentorship and help to Bitcamp 2016 programmers, gave away some free Fedora swag, and offered an introduction to Linux, open source, and our community. This report recollects some highlights from the event.

  • GSoC-2016
  • Data science and Fedora

    I’ve decided to use Fedora as my default GNU/Linux operating system to develop and test data science stuffs. Fedora is pretty nice because it has regular releases and includes most updated mainstream packages.

  • Crouton Fedora new version available!

    I’ve managed to clean the scripts even further, and now it is using Docker images from Koji to set itself up instead of downloading RPM’s. You save a lot of data and a lot of time. It now can install a base Fedora system in less than a minute.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

A perfect marriage: YOU and Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
GNU
Ubuntu
Legal

Canonical claims it has taken legal advice and that it is allowed to ship OpenZFS with its Linux.

What ever the legal rights and wrongs, Ubuntu's support is clearly aimed primarily at the server use case. ZFS is not an option within the installer. In fact you'll need to install the userland parts of ZFS yourself before you can format disks and get everything working. Still, if you're interested in trying Ubuntu atop ZFS, Canonical has a guide to using ZFS.

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Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Adedayo Samuel

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

From my experience interviewing for jobs and to advance my career, it has been a personal desire of mine to understand the inner workings of a computer, and Linux provided a platform for doing that by having a design philosophy that doesn’t shy away from the command line so that caused me to dive right in!

I like open source because of the free software movement (we can always do with more free software), and more importantly because such a movement is capable of inspiring an operating system like Linux which powers servers of Fortune 500 companies and services we depend on like Banks, Facebook, Twitter, etc., and my favorite mobile OS – Android.

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Here Come the x86 Hacker Boards

Filed under
Android
Linux

The first x86-based community-backed hacker SBCs not backed by Intel or AMD have reached market, offering higher prices than most ARM SBCs, but with faster processors and competitive power consumption. The Kickstarter-backed newcomers, all of which run Linux or Android, include the now-shipping JaguarBoard, the soon to ship UP board, and the Udoo X86, due in November.

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Oettinger: ‘Open source licences should be the norm’

Filed under
OSS

Industry-friendly open source licences should become the norm for building data platforms, for the web, and for digital consumer services, says Günther Oettinger. The European Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society urges cooperation between standardisation organisations and open source communities on cloud computing services.

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Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS Officially Released for Raspberry Pi 3 and Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu MATE team has been proud to announce today, April 25, 2016, the general availability of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system for Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 single-board computers.

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Introducing the extra wallpapers for Fedora 24

Filed under
Red Hat

In the Fedora 24 alpha release, you could preview an early version of the default wallpaper for Fedora 24. Each release, the Fedora Design team collaborates with the Fedora community to release a set of 16 additional backgrounds to install and use on Fedora. The Fedora Design team takes submissions from the wider community, then votes on the top 16 to include in the next release.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Tweak Is Now Officially Dead and Buried
    The creator and maintainer of the once popular Ubuntu Tweak utility, Tualatrix Chou, announced a few minutes ago that its project is no longer under maintenance starting May 2, 2016. Ubuntu Tweak was one of the most downloaded applications that could have allowed Ubuntu users to tweak every single component of their GNU/Linux operating systems, making their lives much easier while using Ubuntu.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Won’t Use Unity 8 By Default
    Unity 8 will not ship as the default desktop in Ubuntu 16.10, the Ubuntu desktop team has said. Yakkety Yak will ship the tried and trusty — or tired and dusty, depending on your point of view — Unity 7 desktop as the default desktop environment.
  • A step-by-step guide to installing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) on your PC
    Ubuntu 16.04 is a long-term supported (LTS) version of the popular GNU/Linux operating system from Canonical, which was officially launched on April 21, 2016. Dubbed as Xenial Xerus, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the 24th release of Ubuntu, which will be supported with critical security patches and software updates for the next five years, that is until 2021.

Linux or Bust, No Mir/Unity 8 this Fall

More news out of the Ubuntu developers summit headlines today's Linux news. OMG!Ubuntu! reported today that "Yakkety Yak will ship the tired and dusty Unity 7 desktop." In other news Michael Larabel posted today of the developers' discussion surrounding FESCo's decision not to rebuild the full codebase for Fedora 25 and The Var Guy listed five reasons Linux is on the rise. Read more

Linux or Bust: Why Businesses Can’t Ignore This Growing Trend

It used to be a clear sign of geekiness. People who were into Linux would rave about its benefits and flexibility…as long as you knew how to install your own OS, dig around for the hardware drivers you needed, and be a master of command-line instructions. For a world building technical literacy through more user-friendly front-end systems, Linux was a niche reserved for technology enthusiasts. Read more

Scopes and Swipes, or How I Learned to Love Ubuntu's Unity

I am still not about to run Unity as the main desktop environment on my workstation, not when KDE is available. However, seeing Unity run in the environment it was designed for does eliminate my distaste for it. Thanks to Unity, the Aquaris M10 offers an experience that my Samsung Galaxy Tab2 cannot possibly compete with. I have already done productive work on it, and plan on taking it with me the next time I travel. Far from being just a piece of hardware to review, it has become my tablet of choice. Read more