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Friday, 20 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Games: Privacy Settings in Steam and GNU/Linux in Humble Strategy Bundle

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve Offers Up New Privacy Settings For Steam Gamers

    In wake of recent privacy scandals in the tech world, Valve is now offering new privacy settings for Steam users.

    The expanded Profile Privacy Settings Page offers greater control of what Steam account information is shared publicly, including what can be accessed by Steam friends or publicly to others on Steam. There are now controls over who can view your game details, the ability to keep total game playtime privacy, and more.

  • New Profile Privacy Settings
  • Steam revamps profile privacy settings, Steam Spy no longer able to operate

    While I was asleep Valve announced some new profile privacy settings which are good for users, but it seems Steam Spy is likely going to shut down as a result.

  • The Humble Strategy Bundle has a few interesting Linux games

    Love your strategy games? You can pick up a few that support Linux in the latest Humble Strategy Bundle (affiliate link). I will only note the games that support Linux, as there's a bunch that don't.

    For $1 you will get Planetary Annihilation: TITANS and some Company of Heroes 2 DLC designed for the WDC charity.

A Look at Solus 3 Budgie, GNU/Linux Distribution

Filed under
Reviews

The last time I tried Solus, it was still in its infancy stages, and it wasn’t to my tastes really. I had been thinking of which Linux distro to take a look at next, and I wanted to pick something that wasn’t based off Debian / Ubuntu / Arch / Gentoo / OpenSUSE or any of the majors, so I decided to give Solus 3 a try, being a completely independent distro – And it wasn’t bad.

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Ubuntu 18.04 Makes it Easier to Install Kernel Updates without Rebooting

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Canonical is making it super easy to take advantage of Linux kernel live patching.

Live patching lets you install and apply critical Linux kernel security updates without rebooting your system.

This means you can keep your computer safe at kernel level without any impact on your uptime or productivity.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Server development summary – 10 April 2018

Mozilla: Accessibility, Rust, Internet Health Report

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Introducing the Accessibility Inspector in the Firefox Developer Tools

    The built-in Firefox Developer Tools just received a new family member. The Accessibility Inspector allows you to inspect your website’s exposure to assistive technologies.

  • This Week in Rust 229

    Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

  • Rust all-hands (dev-tools stuff)

    Last week (sigh, the week before last now) we held an 'all-hands' event in Berlin. It was a great event - fantastic to meet so many Rust people in real life and really energising to see how much is being planned and implemented. There is a blog post describing the whole event on the Rust blog.

    In this post I want to summarise some of the important dev-tools stuff that happened. Our planning and notes from some meetings is in the dev-tools team repo.

  • Notes v4 with multi-note support

    Multi-note support is now available in the new Test Pilot Notes v4 update. This was the most requested feature after going through all of the user research and feedback. You may also notice more UX changes to make Notes feel more like the rest of Firefox by following the Photon design system guidelines.

  • Mark Surman: A scandal, a napkinand the health of the internet

    Today marks the launch of Mozilla’s first full edition of the Internet Health Report, an open source effort to explore the state of human life on the internet.

    As we put our final touches on the report, the United States scrambled to prepare for testimony by Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, following revelations about user data obtained by Cambridge Analytica. The conversation: what should the Senate and Congress ask him?

    The list of questions is long.What do we do about the data of up to 87 million people floating around, unrecoverable? Can artificial intelligence help address suspicious behaviour around elections? What are Facebook’s responsibilities to users and the public? Unsurprisingly, it was also quite scattered. We do not yet have a collective mental map of how issues like these connect.

  • The Internet has serious health problems, Mozilla Foundation report finds

    Of particular concern were three issues:

    • Consolidation of power over the Internet, particularly by Facebook, Google, Tencent, and Amazon.
    • The spread of "fake news," which the report attributes in part to the "broken online advertising economy" that provides financial incentive for fraud, misinformation, and abuse.
    • The threat to privacy posed by the poor security of the Internet of Things.

How Netflix Deploys Open Source AI to Reveal Your Favorites

Filed under
Sci/Tech

In this AI based Science article, we explore How Netflix adopted an Open Source Model to improve their Entertainment Recommender Systems.
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Make your first contribution to an open source project

Filed under
OSS

It's a common misconception that contributing to open source is difficult. You might think, "Sometimes I can't even understand my own code; how am I supposed to understand someone else's?"

Relax. Until last year, I thought the same thing. Reading and understanding someone else's code and writing your own on top of that can be a daunting task, but with the right resources, it isn't as hard as you might think.

Read more

Linux 4.17 Additions and Donald Becker's New Career Move

Filed under
Linux
  • Laptop Support Improvements Head Into Linux 4.17

    Andy Shevchenko has submitted the platform-drivers-x86 updates for the Linux 4.17 kernel merge window that largely benefit modern x86 laptops running Linux.

  • Linux 4.17 To Support Microsemi Ocelot MIPS SoCs

    There are old CPU architectures being dropped from the Linux 4.17 kernel while also some new CPU support added. The latest work added with the busy Linux 4.17 development cycle is support for the MIPS-based Microsemi Ocelot SoCs.

    The Ocelot SoCs are manufactured by Microsemi and used to power a range of Ethernet switches and other devices from security cameras to industrial controls. Ocelot has been around since 2016. The onboard MIPS processor appears to run around 500MHz.

  • ZEDEDA Hires Open-Source Pioneer Donald Becker

    Prior to joining ZEDEDA, Becker was an early primary contributor to the Linux kernel, focusing on high-performance networking and distributed computing. He founded and led the Beowulf Project at NASA, which directly led to Linux becoming the OS of choice for high performance distributed computing. Along with researchers at other centers, he received the Gordon Bell Prize in 1997 for his work using Beowulf clustering software on PCs to solve math problems previously run on purpose-built supercomputers.

Games: Steam Machines and Feral GameMode

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve should stick to Linux for Steam Machines: here’s why

    Steam Machines have failed, at least commercially. There’s hardly any argument there. Even Valve itself admits as much. Valve, however, would not concede defeat and promises to remain committed to pushing Linux gaming forward. Some might see it as simple lip service to calm SteamOS fans. Others might see it as a pointless endeavor and business suicide. And yet, if Valve’s dreams are to become reality, it really doesn’t have much choice to stick to its Linux guns for the long term and these are the reasons why.

  • Feral has created a new frame-rate boosting mode for Linux games

    Feral Interactive, the outfit responsible for bringing titles such as Hitman to Linux, has released a new open source tool which is designed to ensure that Linux users get the best performance from its games.

  • A Quick Look At Feral GameMode / P-State Powersave vs. Performance

    With today's release of the Feral GameMode library/daemon of course I am running some benchmarks... Here is some initial numbers while this has spurred some fresh benchmarks looking at the P-State vs. CPUFreq performance and their respective frequency scaling governor options.

    I will be doing some fresh Linux gaming benchmarks using P-State/CPUFreq and their governor options while testing with both Radeon and GeForce graphics cards. First up is the Intel Core i7 8700K tests to be followed by similar AMD Ryzen tests with CPUFreq.

Graphics: DRM and NVIDIA 396.18 (Blob) Beta

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Finally A Discussion Is Back Concerning FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync / VRR DRM Support

    While AMD has plumbed in FreeSync variable-rate refresh support with their AMDGPU DC display code stack, it's not yet all happy on the open-source mainline kernel as the missing piece has been over having a unified API for the Direct Rendering Manager drivers that can be used for supporting Free-Sync or the VESA-approved AdaptiveSync or HDMI VRR (Variable Refresh Rate). The discussion over having this common API for DRM drivers is back to being discussed.

  • NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Driver Reaches Beta With New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler

    NVIDIA has rolled out an exciting beta Linux driver today, the first in their upcoming 396 driver series.

    The NVIDIA 396.18 Linux beta driver is now available and it's quite exciting. Exciting me the most with the NVIDIA 396 driver series is the introduction of a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. The goal of this new compiler is to reduce shader compilation time and shader system memory consumption. This new SPIR-V compiler is enabled by default but for now the old compiler is still around and can be toggled with the __GL_NextGenCompiler= environment variable.

  • NVIDIA 396.18 beta driver is out with a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler to reduce shader compilation time

    The new NVIDIA 396.18 beta is officially out and it's one of the more interesting driver releases from NVIDIA.

    The biggest thing included in the driver, is the brand new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. NVIDIA say this will help to reduce shader compilation time and shader system memory consumption. Their older compiler will be removed in a future driver version, but if you have issues with the new one which is on by default, you can use the "__GL_NextGenCompiler=" (0 or 1) environment variable to disable it.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Confirms RHEL 8 Will Drop Python 2

    While it could have been pretty much assumed up until now that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 would ship without Python 2 considering that next enterprise Linux OS release isn't even out yet, its long-term maintenance support, and Python 2 reaching EOL at the start of 2020, but now it's been made official.

    As part of today's Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 release, Red Hat issued their latest deprecation notices. Most notable this time around with RHEL 7.5 as a new deprecation notice is that of Python 2.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 Officially Released, Enhances Hybrid Cloud Security

    Red Hat announced today the general availability of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system with new features and security enhancements needed for hybrid cloud environments and the enterprise world.

    The fifth maintenance update of Red Hat's enterprise-ready Linux-based operating system, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 is here to add yet another layer of performance and security enhancements to existing installations, as well as a plethora of new features with new deployments, which would mostly benefit enterprise customers on the desktop, server, and cloud infrastructures.

  • RHEL 7.5, ​the latest version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, arrives

    Red Hat has come a long way in 25 years. Now, the Linux company is continuing to drive forward both in the Linux server business and in the cloud with its latest distribution release: Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.5.

    The Raleigh, N.C.-based Red Hat emphasized in this release not the newest RHEL's Linux improvements, but rather, how RHEL can be used "as a consistent foundation for hybrid cloud environments ... [and] further integration with Microsoft Windows infrastructure both on-premise and in Microsoft Azure."

  • Red Hat boss urges automation for disruption

    Automating “as much as possible” can help telecoms operators and other enterprises move at a pace akin to the world’s technology giants, according to Jim Whitehurst, president and CEO of open source solutions provider Red Hat (pictured).

    Whitehurst told Mobile World Live one of the biggest issues facing the telecoms industry and other enterprises was an inability to make their operations move faster, and implementing automation processes was essential to achieving business transformation.

    “It’s about creating a layered architecture, it’s thinking about business process systems and the culture around how to make sure people are doing things that people need to do and you can automate everything else around and make it as simple as possible,” he said.

  • The investing case for Red Hat, why TD is steering away from marijuana stocks, and trouble for the TSX
  • Red Hat Still Pointed Higher
  • Application Software Stocks' Research Reports Released on RealPage, Red Hat, RingCentral, and SAP
  • DevConf’18 and CommOps FAD

    DevConf.cz 2018 is the 10th annual, free, Red Hat sponsored community conference for developers, admins, DevOps engineers, testers, documentation writers and other contributors to open source technologies such as Linux, Middleware, Virtualization, Storage, Cloud and mobile where FLOSS communities sync, share, and hack on upstream projects together in the beautiful city of Brno, Czech Republic.

  • Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 0)

Linux Foundation: LFN, Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), Open Container Initiative (OCI)

Filed under
Linux
  • NETSCOUT Joins Linux Foundation Networking

    LFN was formed on January 1, 2018 as a new entity within The Linux Foundation that increases collaboration and operational excellence across its networking projects. LFN integrates the governance of participating projects to improve operational excellence and simplify member engagement.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Continues Growth with Five New Members

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, is announcing that five new members have joined the project including ARKAMYS, IVIS, Paragon Software, SiFive, and Trillium Software. The steady growth of AGL demonstrates continued momentum and community support for the project, which now has more than 120 members.

  • Open Container Initiative Announces Distribution Specification Project

    The Open Container Initiative (OCI), an open source community for creating open standards around containers, today announced the launch of the Distribution Specification project to standardize container image distribution based on the specification for the Docker Registry v2 protocol, which supports the pushing and pulling of container images.

  • ​Open Container Initiative nails down container image distribution standard

    The Open Container Initiative (OCI), the open-source community in charge of creating container standards, has announced the launch of the Distribution Specification project to standardize container image distribution. This new standard is based on the Docker Registry v2 protocol. It standardizes container image distribution, which supports the pushing and pulling of container images.

FUD Against FOSS From CA Technologies (Veracode and SourceClear)

Filed under
OSS
Security

Microsoft Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft

Google and Netflix Work on Kayenta

Filed under
OSS

ReactOS 0.4.8 Released With Fix For 17 Year Old Bug, Various Driver/Kernel Improvements

Filed under
OS

ReactOS 0.4.8 is now available as the project's first update of 2018 that continues working on becoming an "open-source Windows" with binary drop-in compatibility support.

First off, ReactOS 0.4.8 has fixed a seventeen year old bug pertaining to its Common Cache implementation. With this bug fix there should be less file corruption on different supported file-systems. There is also a bug fix pertaining to file writing too.

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Open source Linux automotive stack runs on Raspberry Pi and new Intel ARP

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Luxoft has released an open source version of its Linux- and GENIVI-based PELUX automotive development platform, which runs on an RPi 3 and Intel’s ARP platform, based on an Atom-driven Conga-SA5 COM and a Cyclone V SoC FPGA.

The automotive division of Luxoft Holding launched an open source version of its PELUX software suite for in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) and cluster control GUIs. The Yocto Project based PELUX 1.0 includes the Qt Automotive Suite and “leverages” GENIVI Alliance standards. It’s initially available for the Raspberry Pi 3 and Intel NUC/Minnowboard platforms.

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More in Tux Machines

Openwashing Apple and Microsoft Proprietary Frameworks/Services

Viperr Linux Keeps Crunchbang Alive with a Fedora Flair

Do you remember Crunchbang Linux? Crunchbang (often referred to as #!) was a fan-favorite, Debian-based distribution that focused on using a bare minimum of resources. This was accomplished by discarding the standard desktop environment and using a modified version of the Openbox Window Manager. For some, Crunchbang was a lightweight Linux dream come true. It was lightning fast, easy to use, and hearkened back to the Linux of old. Read more

Openwashing Cars

  • Open source: sharing patents to speed up innovation
    Adjusting to climate change will require a lot of good ideas. The need to develop more sustainable forms of industry in the decades ahead demands vision and ingenuity. Elon Musk, chief executive of Tesla and SpaceX, believes he has found a way for companies to share their breakthroughs and speed up innovation. Fond of a bold gesture, the carmaker and space privateer announced back in 2014 that Tesla would make its patents on electric vehicle technology freely available, dropping the threat of lawsuits over its intellectual property (IP). Mr Musk argued the removal of pesky legal barriers would help “accelerate the advent of sustainable transport”. The stunning move has already had an impact. Toyota has followed Tesla by sharing more than 5,600 patents related to hydrogen fuel cell cars, making them available royalty free. Ford has also decided to allow competitors to use its own electric vehicle-related patents, provided they are willing to pay for licences. Could Telsa’s audacious strategy signal a more open approach to patents among leading innovators? And if more major companies should decide to adopt a carefree attitude to IP, what are the risks involved?
  • Autonomous car platform Apollo doesn't want you to reinvent the wheel
    Open source technologies are solving many of our most pressing problems, in part because the open source model of cooperation, collaboration, and almost endless iteration creates an environment where problems are more readily solved. As the adage goes, "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow." However, self-driving vehicle technology is one rapidly growing area that hasn't been greatly influenced by open source. Most of today's autonomous vehicles, including those from Volkswagen, BMW, Volvo, Uber, and Google, ride on proprietary technology, as companies seek to be the first to deliver a successful solution. That changed recently with the launch of Baidu's Apollo.

today's leftovers

  • KDE Applications 18.04 Brings Dolphin Improvements, JuK Wayland Support
    The KDE community has announced the release today of KDE Applications 18.04 as the first major update to the open-source KDE application set for 2018.
  • Plasma Startup
    Startup is one of the rougher aspects of the Plasma experience and therefore something we’ve put some time into fixing [...] The most important part of any speed work is correctly analysing it. systemd-bootchart is nearly perfect for this job, but it’s filled with a lot of system noise.
  • Announcing Virtlyst – a web interface to manage virtual machines
    Virtlyst is a web tool that allows you to manage virtual machines. In essence it’s a clone of webvirtmgr, but using Cutelyst as the backend, the reasoning behind this was that my father in law needs a server for his ASP app on a Win2k server, the server has only 4 GiB of RAM and after a week running webvirtmgr it was eating 300 MiB close to 10% of all available RAM. To get a VNC or SPICE tunnel it spawns websockify which on each new instance around 20 MiB of RAM get’s used. I found this unacceptable, a tool that is only going to be used once in a while, like if the win2k freezes or goes BSOD, CPU usage while higher didn’t play a role on this.
  • OPNFV: driving the network towards open source "Tip to Top"
    Heather provides an update on the current status of OPNFV. How is its work continuing and how is it pursuing the overall mission? Heather says much of its work is really ‘devops’ and it's working on a continuous integration basis with the other open source bodies. That work continues as more bodies join forces with the Linux Foundation. Most recently OPNFV has signed a partnership agreement with the open compute project. Heather says the overall OPNFV objective is to work towards open source ‘Tip to top’ and all built by the community in ‘open source’. “When we started, OPNFV was very VM oriented (virtual machine), but now the open source movement is looking more to cloud native and containerisation as the way forward,” she says. The body has also launched a C-RAN project to ensure that NFV will be ready to underpin 5G networks as they emerge.
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E07 – Seven Years in Tibet - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Failure to automate: 3 ways it costs you
    When I ask IT leaders what they see as the biggest benefit to automation, “savings” is often the first word out of their mouths. They’re under pressure to make their departments run as efficiently as possible and see automation as a way to help them do so. Cost savings are certainly a benefit of automation, but I’d argue that IT leaders who pursue automation for cost-savings alone are missing the bigger picture of how it can help their businesses. The true value of automation doesn’t lie in bringing down expenses, but rather in enabling IT teams to scale their businesses.
  • Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 Launches With Secured Kubernetes
    After months of development effort, Kubernetes is now fully supported in the stable release of the Docker Enterprise Edition. Docker Inc. officially announced Docker EE 2.0 on April 17, adding features that have been in development in the Docker Community Edition (CE) as well as enhanced enterprise grade capabilities. Docker first announced its intention to support Kubernetes in October 2017. With Docker EE 2.0, Docker is providing a secured configuration of Kubernetes for container orchestration. "Docker EE 2.0 brings the promise of choice," Docker Chief Operating Officer Scott Johnston told eWEEK. "We have been investing heavily in security in the last few years, and you'll see that in our Kubernetes integration as well."