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Saturday, 22 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open-source software may aid brain imaging to find disease treatments

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OSS

Researchers say the open-source software, called PySight, acts as a photon counting add-on for laser scanning microscopes. Because it can image deep into tissue, a laser-based technique known as multiphoton microscopy is often used to study the rapid activity of neurons, blood vessels and other cells at high resolution over time. The method uses laser pulses that excite fluorescent probes, eliciting the emission of photons, some of which are detected and used to form 2D and 3D images.

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Red Hat News: IBM, Ansible Tower, Federal Source Code Policy and More

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Red Hat
  • Hortonworks, IBM & Red Hat Partner on Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative

    Hortonworks (Nasdaq: HDP), IBM (NYSE: IBM) and Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) have entered into a partnership in an effort to help customers utilize hybrid cloud environments to field and run big data workloads, ExecutiveBiz reported Tuesday.

    Red Hat said Monday the collaborative Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative aims to develop a common enterprise deployment model for big data workloads and utilize the Red Hat OpenShift enterprise container and Kubernetes platform to support Hortonworks Data Platform, Hortonworks DataFlow, Hortonworks DataPlane and IBM Cloud Private for Data.

  • Red Hat Announces Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.3

    Red Hat, Inc. recently introduced Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.3 - the newest iteration of its enterprise framework for automating and orchestrating IT operations. Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.3 gets improved scaling and the ability to run Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, enterprise-grade Kubernetes container application platform, and an updated user interface.

  • IBM Relies on Kubernetes to Advance Analytics Strategy

    IBM this week extended the reach of the IBM Cloud Private (ICP) for Data platform to include the Red Hat OpenShift platform based on Kubernetes. ICP also aligns with Red Hat and Hortonworks on the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative for building hybrid big data applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform.

    In addition, IBM today announced it has extended ICP for Data to enable analytics queries to access data anywhere, by leveraging container-based technologies.

  • Innovation, we deliver! The Red Hat Mobile Portfolio Center is on the move

    Pay attention when you’re driving - you might just see Red Hat’s Shadowman in the next lane. You see, innovation is on the move at Red Hat! Or as Program Manager, Chris Hawver would say – the Mobile Portfolio Center (MPC) – is bringing Red Hat’s innovative solutions to the customer at venues near their offices.

    The annual Red Hat Summit, or the Red Hat Executive Briefing Centers around the globe, are great ways to catch up with the latest from Red Hat. But, due to travel and scheduling constraints, many of our customers miss those opportunities. So we’re expanding our reach with the MPC. We have many more stops planned as part of this initiative, there is a good chance the MPC is coming to a venue near you.

  • Red Hat’s OPEN FIRST road tour rolls on -- and into D.C.

    Two years ago, the U.S. government took an important step towards its technological future. The issuance of the Federal Source Code Policy in 2016 called for “efficiency, transparency, and innovation through reusable and open source software.” Since then, a number of important programs and initiatives have been created, including Code.gov, code.mil and others.

    Yet we believe there is still a significant amount of untapped potential for open source in government. That’s why we have created the Red Hat OPEN FIRST Road Tour, a nationwide seminar series aimed at bringing the open source discussion to government leaders across the U.S.

  • Futures Directions for Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Flagship Harbor Advisors LLC Grows Holdings in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Financial Review: Red Hat (RHT) vs. Weibo (WB)
  • Fedora: LibreOffice remote connection.

How to save 11 million Euros by switching to open-source software

Filed under
OSS

In 2003, Microsoft stopped supporting the Windows NT4 desktop operating system. As a result, Munich's city government had to migrate over 15,000 personal computers (PCs) to a new operating system. This made the disadvantages of dependence on big proprietary software providers obvious to local policy makers.

In 2004, the City Council decided to migrate its PCs to Linux, a free and open-source operating system, to achieve more independence and stimulate the local economy by using local developers for the migration. The choice for Linux was made despite the fact that Microsoft's CEO personally offered Munich a 90 percent discount on new software. The project, called LiMux, took seven years to complete and saved Munich over 11 million euros ($12.3 million). Other advantages include more flexibility in software management, better security, and a lower number of support calls.

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Linux Foundation: Hyperledger School and OpenDaylight Advances Open Source Software Defined Networking in Fluorine Release

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Linux
  • Going to Hyperledger school

    Hyperledger (or the Hyperledger project) is an umbrella project of open source blockchains and related tools.

    The project was founded by the Linux Foundation at the end of 2015 with the intention of encouraging the collaborative development of blockchain-based distributed ledgers.

  • Linux Foundation's OpenDaylight Fluorine Release Brings Streamlined Support for Cloud, Edge and WAN Solutions

    The OpenDaylight Project, the leading open source platform for programmable, software-defined networks, today announced its ninth release, OpenDaylight Fluorine. The latest version brings major advancements for solution providers through key enhancements to the platform, including simplified packaging to speed solution development and enhanced capabilities for key use cases.

  • OpenDaylight Advances Open Source Software Defined Networking in Fluorine Release

    OpenDaylight is made up of a collection of different networking capabilities that can be combined into an architecture to enable a complete SDN platform. Among the new features in OpenDaylight Fluorine, the Service Function Chaining (SFC) project supports Network Service Headers (NSH) for accelerated service delivery. The BGP and Path Computation Element Protocol (BGPCEP) for IP Transport has been improved to enable better SD-WAN use cases for inter-data center connectivity.

    Optical transport also gets a boost in the OpenDaylight Fluorine release, with the debut of the TransportPCE project, which is a reference implementation of Open ROADM (Reconfigurable Optical Add-Drop Multiplexer). The TransportPCE project enables network operators to configure their WDM (Wavelength-Division Multiplexing) equipment such that it can handle requests coming from an SDN controller.

Openwashing: Altair, Microsoft and SmartBear

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OSS

Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds, Network Manager VPNC, and Apache Struts

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Security

Why Python is so popular with developers: 3 reasons the language has exploded

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Development

Python is the fastest-growing programming language in the world, as it increasingly becomes used in a wide range of developer job roles and data science positions across industries. But how did it become the go-to coding language for so many tasks?

"Python is very popular because of its set of robust libraries that make it such a dynamic and a fast programming language," said Kristen Sosulski, clinical associate professor of information, operations, and management sciences in the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University, and author of Data Visualization Made Simple. "It's object-oriented, and it really allows for everything from creating a website, to app development, to creating different types of data models."

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Programming: Codetribute, Rust, HHVM ending support for PHP

  • Bugs Ahoy: The Next Generation

    Bugs Ahoy’s time is over, and I would like to introduce the new Codetribute site. This is the result of Fienny Angelina’s hard work, with Dustin Mitchell, Hassan Ali, and Eli Perelman contributing as well. It is the spiritual successor to Bugs Ahoy, built to address limitations of the previous system by people who know what they’re doing. I was thrilled by the discussions I had with the team while Codetribute was being built, and I’m excited to watch as the project evolves to address future needs.

  • Announcing Rust 1.29

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.29.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • HHVM ending support for PHP

    The HHVM project has announced that the Hack language and PHP will truly be going separate ways. The HHVM v3.30 release, due by the end of the year, will be the last to support code written in PHP.

Valve Increases Wine Usage, Blizzard Bans Wine Users

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve have now pushed out all the recent beta changes in Steam Play's Proton to everyone

    For those of you sticking with the stable channel of Steam Play's Proton system, Valve have today rolled out all the recent beta changes for everyone.

    Previously, you had access to Proton 3.7-3 which was what everyone used by default and you could also use the "Compatibility tool" dropdown in the Steam Play options section to switch to a beta to have the latest updates. Valve must now consider all the changes stable enough, as Proton 3.7-6 is now the default. There's another beta channel now, which is still currently at 3.7-6 but it should remain where the latest changes go.

    There's quite a lot of improvements included since the initial release, like: automatic mouse capturing in fullscreen windows by default, performance improvements, certain game compatibility improvements, an updated build of DXVK, more display resolution support and so on. You can see the full changelog here.

  • Some Linux Gamers Using Wine/DXVK To Play Blizzard's Overwatch Reportedly Banned

    Multiple individuals are reporting that they have been just recently banned by Blizzard for playing their games -- seemingly Overwatch is the main title -- when using Wine with the DXVK D3D11-over-Vulkan translation layer.

    Blizzard support has said they are not banning Linux gamers for using these "emulation" techniques but not officially supported.

    However, per this Reddit thread with one of the users writing into Phoronix, there have been recent bans to Linux gamers and the only expressed common denominator seems to be the use of Wine and DXVK.

Canonical and Ubuntu: Fresh Snaps, Design; Lubuntu Switching To VLC, KDE 5 LibreOffice Frontend

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Fresh Snaps from August 2018

    Another month passes and we’ve got a collection of applications which crossed our “desk” (Twitter feed) during August 2018. We have a mix of social tools, music creation and curation software, password storage systems, developer tools and some fun too. Take a look down the list, and discover something new today.

  • Financial services: escaping the burning platform

    The financial services industry is standing on a burning platform, it’s time to jump to safety or suffer the consequences.

    The platform in this picture is the legacy infrastructure that dominates their IT organisations. From ageing servers and a dwindling workforce that’s even capable of running these monoliths, the pressure to change, for many, would have already forced a leap to safety.

    Unfortunately for banks, that’s not the only pressure they are under. Challengers have emerged where there were none before and changes in regulation are forcing a dramatic rethink of how infrastructure can be approached and what technologies are available for them to use. Compounded by a growing demand from customers for services that are modern, always-on, safe, and simple to use, and you’ve got a perfect storm that FS is having to navigate.

  • Leading the Vanilla design system

    We currently have 47 websites from marketing to cloud applications under our suite of products here at Canonical, the Vanilla squad are working through migrating these sites to our latest release.

    We’ve completed 60% of the migration and are making good headway. Once complete, our codebase will be unified across our sites making it easier for our front-end developers to jump between projects. And from a design perspective we will have a consistent look and feel.

  • Lubuntu Switching To VLC, KDE 5 LibreOffice Frontend

    Lots of changes are happening in the Lubuntu camp.

    It's been busy in the Lubuntu space recently, the Ubuntu derivative that's historically shipped with the LXDE desktop environment. Most notably, Lubuntu 18.10 switching to LXQt by default over LXDE, while the LXQt spin has been experimental up to this point.

    Lubuntu is also planning to switch to Wayland and as part of that to port Openbox to run on the Mir-Wayland code. But this work isn't happening overnight but rather is a goal to have done by Lubuntu 20.10 in 2020.

Robots that run Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

The home for innovators, Ubuntu is a place where developers can create what previously lived solely in the realms of fiction. The internet of things, the cloud, and robots are world changing technologies and they’re all running Ubuntu.

With an estimated worldwide spending figure of $103bn by 2020, according to IDC, the field of robotics is one of those transformative industries that is really gaining traction, and it’s not just the manufacturing industry that’s using them, robots are everywhere.

From collecting tennis balls, to social robots, agriculture and retail. Robots are making our lives easier and it turns out that a large amount of them are an Ubuntu robot.

Don’t just take my word for it though, below is a list of of just some of the cool and brilliant ways Ubuntu is being used in the field of robotics.

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Also: Key considerations when choosing a robot’s operating system

Plasma 5.14 Beta Updates Discover, KWin and Adds New Widgets

Filed under
KDE

Thursday, 13 September 2018. Today KDE launches the beta release of Plasma 5.14.

Plasma is KDE's lightweight and full featured Linux desktop. For the last three months we have been adding features and fixing bugs and now invite you to test the beta pre-release of Plasma 5.14.

A lot of work has gone into improving Discover, Plasma's software manager, and, among other things, we have added a Firmware Update feature and many subtle user interface improvements to give it a smoother feel. We have also rewritten many effects in our window manager KWin and improved it for slicker animations in your work day. Other improvements we have made include a new Display Configuration widget which is useful when giving presentations.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Enters Beta with New Features, Improvements

Graphics: Vulkan, NVIDIA, RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Former Compiz Developer Creating New Window Animation Library

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME

Sam Spilsbury who was the former Compiz lead developer at Canonical and involved in the Unity desktop shell development is creating a new library spun out of Compiz.

Since leaving Canonical six years, he's spent a good portion of that time since working for Endless Computer on their GNOME Shell driven Linux desktop environment. Initially he wrote a "libwobbly" library at Endless for implementing support for "wobbly windows" and other animation logic spun out of the former Compiz code.

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Original: libanimation for everyone

GNU/Linux Version of Life is Strange: Before the Storm

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm is now officially available on Linux

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm, the three-part prequel to the original Life is Strange ported to Linux by Feral Interactive is now available. After very much enjoying the first game, I can't wait to dive into this!

    While the original was made by DONTNOD Entertainment, this time around it was developed by Deck Nine and published by Square Enix.

  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm Is Out Now for Linux and macOS

    UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive announced today the availability of the Life is Strange: Before the Storm adventure video game for the Linux and macOS platforms.

    Developed by Deck Nine and published by Square Enix, Life is Strange: Before the Storm was launched on August 31, 2017, as the second installment in the BAFTA award-winning franchise. The all-new three-part standalone story features new and beautiful artwork set three years before the events of the first Life is Strange game.

  • Life Is Strange: Before The Storm Is Now Out For Linux

    Feral Interactive released today Life is Strange: Before the Storm for Linux and macOS.

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm is the latest in this episodic game series from Deck Nine and ported to macOS and Linux by Feral Interactive. Before the Storm was released for Windows in late 2017.

Mozilla: Firefox Focus with GeckoView, WebRender, DNS over HTTPS (DoH)

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox Focus with GeckoView

    Firefox Focus is private browsing as an app: It automatically blocks ads and trackers, so you can surf the web in peace. When you’re done, a single tap completely erases your history, cookies, and other local data.

  • WebRender newsletter #22

    The closer we get to shipping WebRender, the harder it is for me to take the time to go through commit logs and write the newsletter. But this time is special.

    Yesterday we enabled WebRender by default on Firefox Nightly for a subset of the users: Desktop Nvidia GPUs on Windows 10. This represents 17% of the nightly population. We chose to first target this very specific configuration in order to avoid getting flooded with driver bugs, and we’ll gradually add more as things stabilize.

  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: DNS over HTTPS (DoH) – Testing on Beta

    DNS is a critical part of the Internet, but unfortunately has bad security and privacy properties, as described in this excellent explainer by Lin Clark. In June, Mozilla started experimenting with DNS over HTTPS, a new protocol which uses encryption to protect DNS requests and responses. As we reported at the end of August, our experiments in the Nightly channel look very good: the slowest users show a huge improvement, anywhere up to hundreds of milliseconds, and most users see only a small performance slowdown of around 6 milliseconds, which is acceptable given the improved security.

GNOME: Google Code-in and Canta Theme

Filed under
GNOME
  • Google Code-in 2018 and Wikimedia: Mentors and smaller tasks wanted!

    Google Code-in will take place again soon (from October 23 to December 13). GCI is an annual contest for 13-17 year old students to start contributing to free and open projects. It is not only about coding: We also need tasks about design, documentation, outreach/research, and quality assurance. And you can mentor them!

  • Give Your Ubuntu a Fresh Look Using Canta Theme and Icons

    We have seen some cool themes earlier, like Paper, Arc themes which comes with Dark and light version. However none of them having the Green as base color.

    Canta theme is a Green color based GTK theme which is available for GTK 2 and GTK 3 based desktop environments. You can install in in latest Ubuntu GNOME Shell along with all distributions which supports GTK 2 and 3.

    This theme comes with 11 variants classifying in base, light, dark, round, square and compact version for each.

Microsoft is Playing Dirty Again

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Windows 10 Tries to Push Firefox and Chrome Over the Edge

    Windows 10 now “warns” you not to install Chrome or Firefox when you download them. It’s just one of the many annoying ways Microsoft pushes Edge, which only has 4% market share despite Microsoft’s increasing desperation.

    Microsoft will probably start using this “app recommendations” feature to push other apps in the future, too. Imagine Windows warning you not to install LibreOffice because you could pay for Office 365 instead.

  • Microsoft: You don't want to use Edge? Are you sure? Really sure?

    Microsoft really wants you to use Edge in the latest Windows Insider builds, and the software giant is not afraid to let you know it.

    Windows Insider Sean Hoffman took to Twitter last night to express his displeasure at a pop-up shown by Windows 10 when he attempted to install an alternative browser. When he ran the Firefox installer, a pop-up showed up suggesting perhaps he'd like to stick with Edge. It is safer and faster, after all (according to Microsoft).

    Hoffman, running build 17744.1004, the current slow ring version of the next release of Windows 10, pulled no punches in his reaction.

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Graphics: AMDGPU, SVGA and Sway/Wayland

  • In-Progress AMDGPU Updates For Linux 4.20~5.0 Have DC Update, New Polaris ID
    - Last week AMD sent in their big feature pull request of AMDGPU driver changes to DRM-Next for the Linux 4.20 (or what will likely be Linux 5.0) and since then more changes have been queuing in their work-in-progress branch. That last pull request was a big one with AMD Raven2 support, AMD Picasso APU enablement, more Vega 20 upbringing work including initial xGMI support, AMDKFD merging into AMDGPU, VCN JPEG engine support, GPUVM virtual memory improvements, and various other changes as outlined in the aforelinked article.
  • VMware's SVGA Gallium3D Driver Enables OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support
    In preparation for the upcoming VMware Fusion 11 and VMware Workstation 15 releases, their Mesa/Gallium3D-based driver stack for Linux guest GPU acceleration has been seeing a variety of updates. Earlier this month was a big code push including many new features to its "SVGA" Gallium3D driver like MSAA, a various assortment of new OpenGL extensions, and other changes in step with their latest "VMWGFX" Linux kernel DRM drivers.
  • Sway 1.0 Alpha 6 Released, Now Supports Moving/Resizing Tiled Windows With The Mouse
    Released on Friday was the sixth alpha release of the upcoming Sway 1.0 Wayland compositor release that still strives for compatibility with the i3 window manager workflow. Sway 1.0 has already added a ton of new functionality like using the new wlroots Wayland library, output rotation, fractional scaling, daisy-changed DisplayPort monitors, better HiDPI support, DMA-BUF additions for screenshot capture and real-time video capturing, atomic additions, floating window improvements, better multi-GPU support, virtual keyboard protocol support, and a heck of a lot more.