Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 15 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Dell welcomes back Muslim workers srlinuxx 1 22/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Blog entry Re-install Texstar 2 22/03/2005 - 2:41am
CA survey srlinuxx 21/03/2005 - 4:13am
Page Thank You For Completing Our Survey srlinuxx 21/03/2005 - 4:07am
Blog entry A Peak at MDK 10.2-b2 AMD64 srlinuxx 2 20/03/2005 - 6:21pm
Story Computer Addiction or Healthy Enthusiam? srlinuxx 2 20/03/2005 - 6:02pm
Story unix motorcycle srlinuxx 1 19/03/2005 - 6:30pm
Page Applications list srlinuxx 19/03/2005 - 6:01pm
Blog entry slashdot effect srlinuxx 1 19/03/2005 - 6:00am
Blog entry Problems Problems Problems Texstar 1 18/03/2005 - 3:21am

Hackers homing in on Cellular Phones

Filed under
Sci/Tech

This story kinda hits home for me as I now work on a computer all day for cingular wireless (formerly AT&T in our branch). I guess this is why call volume has been increasing steadily lately. Here's the full story on Reuter's slow ass site.

Linux Kernel Security is Lacking?

Filed under
Linux

Seems Jason Miller is finding fault in the Linux kernel security bug fix procedure. He goes on and on about security and how security vulnerabilities are handled. Although he mentioned that Gentoo had an accessible security contact, that really didn't apply to things like the underlying kernel. You can read the rest of his article including his thoughts on how to improve the situation here on securityfocus.

ATI has released 64-Bit drivers

Filed under
Software

According to AMDZone and ATI's own site, ATI has released 64-bit drivers for XFree86 and Xorg. Here's a link the download page.

No Case - No Problem

Filed under
Hardware
Humor
-s

Just mount every thing on the wall! LOL Here's the discussion thread with pictures. Too funny.

2004 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

Browser of the Year - Firefox (77.12%)

Distribution of the Year - Slackware (19.36%)

LiveCD Distribution of the Year - Knoppix (57.69%)

Database of the Year - MySQL (53.51%)

Desktop Environment of the Year - KDE (58.25%)

I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works?

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

A little birdie told me that an update to the acclaimed PCLinuxOS Preview 8 is in the works and possibly due out next week. Details are a bit sketchy at this time, but it seems Tom has been hard at work updating the hardware detection and mklivecd scripts. Now don't get your hopes up, but I hear it might sport a newer 2.6.10 kernel, including patches to fix a little kvm switch problem. Of course it will include all kinds of application updates and other goodies. More on this as it develops.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

Filed under
MDV

Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

50 gmail invites?

Filed under
Google
Software

Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

Moooore Spam!

Filed under
Security

Spam has new way to evade security

E-mails via service providers clogging system

Yep, just what we need, more spam. Apparently they aren't as concerned with hiding from their isps as getting the mail out as they are now just sending it through their isps servers. Read the gory details here.

Linux leaders at open-source summit

Filed under
OSS

Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

Filed under
Movies
-s

Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

Filed under
Gaming
-s

Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to Install IonCube Loader on Ubuntu - Cloudbooklet

    How to Install IonCube Loader on Ubuntu. IonCube Loader is a PHP extension used when you are using a PHP script that is encrypted using ionCube. IonCube needs to be installed in your webserver and made accessible to your PHP to use it. In this guide you are going to learn how to install ionCube loader on Ubuntu or Debian and configure your PHP or PHP-FPM and PHP-CLI to use it.

  • How to Setup CentOS Stream from AWS Marketplace

    In the current trend of IT Infrastructure, Cloud Computing occupies a tremendous role. Most of the top companies are looking for Cloud Providers to have their Infrastructure. As per our requirement, we can provision our servers at any time. According to the server configuration, we will be charged per usage. Amazon Marketplace is the place where you can find software from qualified third-party vendors. It is like an online software store where you can buy software and use it as per your need. In this article, we will see the detailed steps to launch CentOS-Stream from AWS Marketplace.

  • Create a MAN page for your own program or script with Pandoc - PragmaticLinux

    A MAN page is documentation for a software program or script, created in the groff typesetting system. Ever tried writing a MAN page? I bet you thought to yourself: “Yeez, there’s got to be an easier way to do this”. Luckily, there is. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to write a MAN page comfortably in Markdown. Then we’ll use Pandoc to create the actual MAN page for your program or script, properly formatted in the groff typesetting system.

  • Looking into Linux user logins with lslogins

    One convenient way to list details about user logins on a Linux system is to use the lslogins command. You'll get a very useful and nicely formatted display that includes quite a few important details. On my system and likely most others, user accounts will start with UID 1000. To list just these accounts rather than include all of the service accounts like daemon, mail and syslog, add the -u option as shown in the example below.

Programming Leftovers

  • Coming in glibc 2.33: Reloadable nsswitch.conf

    In my previous article about nsswitch.conf I talked about how simple, perhaps too simple, this config file is to use. What I didn’t cover then was how simplistic its internal implementation is. Specifically, an application only loads this file once—the first time it’s needed. So, what do you do when nsswitch.conf needs to change? How do you update all of the running applications? You don’t! The only way to force a reload is to stop the application and restart it. That is not always an option, especially for critical applications that might take a long time to restart. Recent work behind the scenes in the GNU C library will change all of this. As of glibc version 2.33, this config file now reloads and reparses each time it changes, and only the configuration is reloaded. If the configuration calls for an external shared library to be loaded, that object is only ever loaded once. It may be called in a different sequence, or not called at all, but it is never unloaded. This behavior avoids a whole class of problems related to unloading shared objects that might still be in use.

  • SEGGER's Complete J-Link Software Now Available for Linux on ARM

    SEGGER’s entire portfolio of J-Link software is now available for Linux on ARM, for both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms. This includes both the command-line programs and GUI tools such as J-Flash, J-Flash SPI, J-Scope, the J-Link Configurator, and the GUI version of the GDB Server. “J-Link can now be used on Raspberry Pi and other ARM-based machines, without any limitations,” says Alex Grüner, CTO at SEGGER. “Small single-board ARM computers now offer the same functionality as x86 powered machines. The inexpensive Raspberry Pi and similar boards are now viable options, especially in test farms and production environments.”

  • Bootstrappable builds

    The idea of Reproducible Builds—being able to recreate bit-for-bit identical binaries using the same source code—has gained momentum over the last few years. Reproducible builds provide some safeguards against bad actors in the software supply chain. But building software depends on the tools used to construct the binary, including compilers and build-automation tools, many of which depend on pre-existing binaries. Minimizing the reliance on opaque binaries for building our software ecosystem is the goal of the Bootstrappable Builds project. For example, GCC is written in C and C++, which means that it requires compilers for those two languages in order to be built from source. In practice, that generally means a distribution would use its existing binary executables of those tools to build a new GCC version, which would then be released to users. One of the concerns with that approach is described in Unix inventor Ken Thompson's Turing Award lecture "Reflections on Trusting Trust" [PDF]. In a nutshell, Thompson said that trusting the output of a binary compiler is an act of faith that someone has not tampered with the creation of that binary—even if the source code is available. The Bootstrappable Builds project was started as an offshoot of the Reproducible Builds project during the latter's 2016 summit in Berlin. A bootstrappable build takes the idea of reproducibility one step further, in some sense. The build of a target binary can be reproduced alongside the build of the tools required to do so. It is, conceptually, almost like building a house from a large collection of atoms of different elements.

  • Parasoft Accelerates CI/CD Pipeline Through Partnership With IAR Systems

    IAR Build Tools for Linux uses the leading build tools from IAR Embedded Workbench and empowers software developers who build safety-critical applications to work directly on the Linux host environment, eliminating toolchain version management.

  • Josef Strzibny: Working with decimals in Elixir

    Integers are not enough, and floats are flawed? Decimals to the rescue! A short guide of what’s important when working with decimals in Elixir. This post is about the Decimal 2.0 module from decimal Hex package. As with every module in Elixir, running h Module and Module.module_info in IEx is a good place to start.

  • Swift Deploys: Dealing with Anti-Patterns and Unresolved Issues

    In a long end-of-the-year blog post, Charity Majors, co-founder and CTO of honeycomb.io, discussed lead time to deploy, or “the interval encompassing the time from when the code gets written and when it’s been deployed to production.”

  • Perl weekly challenge 95

    You are given a number $N. Write a script to figure out if the given number is Palindrome. Print 1 if true otherwise 0.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 95: Palindrome Numbers and Demo Stack
  • Learn awk by coding a "guess the number" game | Opensource.com

    Once you understand these concepts, you can start figuring the rest out. For example, most languages have a "way of doing things" supported by their design, and those ways can be quite different from one program to another. These ways include modularity (grouping related functionality together), declarative vs. imperative, object-orientation, low- vs. high-level syntactic features, and so on. An example familiar to many programmers is "ceremony," that is, the amount of work required to set the scene before tackling the problem. The Java programming language is said to have a significant ceremony requirement, stemming from its design, which requires all code to be defined within a class.

  • The terminal, the console and the shell - what are they?

    The other day, as I was going through some of my old notes, I stumbled upon something I had written about the console, the terminal and the shell on Unix-like operating systems. I have decided to rewrite these notes in order to share them here on my website. So without further ado we will now stroll down memory lane and take a quick look at the origins of the Unix terminal and shell. And I will also give my advice to new users on Linux or BSD regarding the choice of terminal emulator and shell.

Raspberry Pi: EasyOS, YARH.IO, Proprietary Blobs and Inkplate

     
  • Current status of EasyOS on the Pi4

    The videos seem to play OK though. Regarding the hanging, SM seems to be waiting on a response from youtube.com, so I don't know if that is a problem with youtube.com or the network interface. Regarding point-3, sometimes just replugging the USB-stick is sufficient to get it recognized. But sometimes replugging multiple times still does not work.

  •   
  • Stripped-down Raspberry Pi 3B+ SBC powers YARH.IO Micro 2 DIY handheld PC

    We’ve already seen a few DIY Raspberry Pi-based handheld computers in the past with the likes of Zero Terminal V3 or hgTerm powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero and a stripped-down Raspberry Pi 3 board respectively. So why not another? YARH.IO Micro 2 DIY handheld PC is based on a Raspberry Pi 3B+ SBC stripped from its Ethernet port, whose double stack USB connectors have been replaced with single stack USB connectors. The DIY computer also adds off-the-shelf parts with a 4″ touch screen display and a Bluetooth keyboard without touchpad, and gets its power from a 3,500 mAh battery.

  • Get VMware on Raspberry Pi
             
  • 2.5-inch "Industrial Pi" Pico-ITX SBC offers PoE , mini DP++ port

    Inkplate 10 also supports Peripheral Mode which allows you to control the display from another board such as Raspberry Pi or Arduino via commands sent over a UART or USB connection.

Xfce 4.16 Desktop Lands in openSUSE Tumbleweed, Download Now

If you’ve been waiting for Xfce 4.16 to land in openSUSE Tumbleweed, I have some good news today as the wait is over and you can install the desktop environment right now from distribution’s software repositories and upgrade from Xfce 4.14. Xfce 4.16 brings many goodies for fans of the lightweight desktop environment, including fractional scaling, dark mode for the Panel, CSD (Client-side decorations) support for all the Settings dialogs, a revamped About Xfce dialog with info about CPU, GPU and RAM, as well as a refreshed look with new icons and color palette. Read more