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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 14 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firm beats Intel to 10Gbit CMOS photonics chip srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:11am
Story Stolen laptop exposes data of 100,000 srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:11am
Story Game Rush hosts Doom 3 midnight sale srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:11am
Story First Details on Next-Gen UT srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:09am
Story Safety Cheat Sheet srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:09am
Story Nvidia working on 90 series of drivers srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:08am
Story Opteron Memory Timings Tested srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:08am
Story Cingular, AT&T Wireless ring up most complaints srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:06am
Story 'Matrix Online' a new virtual reality srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:05am
Story Carmack going mobile with Doom RPG srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 2:05am

More Summit Notes

Filed under
OSS

Information Week has another story covering last weeks Open Source Summit with quotes from Linus and others on the future plans for the kernel, the patent issues, and standards. A nice read.

Night that the Lights went Out in TN

Filed under
Sci/Tech
-s

We had about an hours down time this morning due to a fight between a 97 Ford Explorer and one of our old power poles. The pole lost. Well, actually you should have seen the other guy too - what a mess. There were splinters and glass everywhere. But our greedy electric company was their usual prompt self and got us back online in record time with little loss of revenue. I apologize for any inconvenience this must have caused. Big Grin Thanks.

Did SCO end up helping Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Here's a real nice article by Stuart Cohen on Businessweek Online exclaiming that SCO's legal maneuvers only made Linux stronger. It states SCO's litigation seemed to bring developers and the community together fighting for the cause. He says "we can thank SCO for helping to move Linux even faster from the fringe of the computer network to the heart of the data center."

Hackers homing in on Cellular Phones

Filed under
Sci/Tech

This story kinda hits home for me as I now work on a computer all day for cingular wireless (formerly AT&T in our branch). I guess this is why call volume has been increasing steadily lately. Here's the full story on Reuter's slow ass site.

Linux Kernel Security is Lacking?

Filed under
Linux

Seems Jason Miller is finding fault in the Linux kernel security bug fix procedure. He goes on and on about security and how security vulnerabilities are handled. Although he mentioned that Gentoo had an accessible security contact, that really didn't apply to things like the underlying kernel. You can read the rest of his article including his thoughts on how to improve the situation here on securityfocus.

ATI has released 64-Bit drivers

Filed under
Software

According to AMDZone and ATI's own site, ATI has released 64-bit drivers for XFree86 and Xorg. Here's a link the download page.

No Case - No Problem

Filed under
Hardware
Humor
-s

Just mount every thing on the wall! LOL Here's the discussion thread with pictures. Too funny.

2004 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

Browser of the Year - Firefox (77.12%)

Distribution of the Year - Slackware (19.36%)

LiveCD Distribution of the Year - Knoppix (57.69%)

Database of the Year - MySQL (53.51%)

Desktop Environment of the Year - KDE (58.25%)

I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works?

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

A little birdie told me that an update to the acclaimed PCLinuxOS Preview 8 is in the works and possibly due out next week. Details are a bit sketchy at this time, but it seems Tom has been hard at work updating the hardware detection and mklivecd scripts. Now don't get your hopes up, but I hear it might sport a newer 2.6.10 kernel, including patches to fix a little kvm switch problem. Of course it will include all kinds of application updates and other goodies. More on this as it develops.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

Filed under
MDV

Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

50 gmail invites?

Filed under
Google
Software

Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

Moooore Spam!

Filed under
Security

Spam has new way to evade security

E-mails via service providers clogging system

Yep, just what we need, more spam. Apparently they aren't as concerned with hiding from their isps as getting the mail out as they are now just sending it through their isps servers. Read the gory details here.

Linux leaders at open-source summit

Filed under
OSS

Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

Filed under
Movies
-s

Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

Filed under
Gaming
-s

Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Canonical Enhances the Reliability of Its Kubernetes for IoT, Multi-Cloud & Edge

MicroK8s is an upstream Kubernetes deployment certified by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and developed entirely by Canonical to run offline on your workstation or edge device for all your development, prototyping, and testing needs. MicroK8s is delivered as a snap, which makes it possible to run all Kubernetes services natively and comes bundled with all the libraries and binaries required. The latest MicroK8s 1.16 release adds high-availability clustering by integrating enterprise SQL database through Canonical's in-house built Dqlite distributed SQL engine to enable rapid deployment of highly standardized small K8s clusters. Dqlite is designed to reduce memory footprint of the cluster in MicroK8s by embedding the database inside Kubernetes itself. Read more

Zombieload V2 TAA Performance Impact Benchmarks On Cascade Lake

While this week we have posted a number of benchmarks on the JCC Erratum and its CPU microcode workaround that introduces new possible performance hits, also being announced this week as part of Intel's security disclosures was "Zombieload Variant Two" as the TSX Async Abort vulnerability that received same-day Linux kernel mitigations. I've been benchmarking the TAA mitigations to the Linux kernel since the moment they hit the public Git tree and here are those initial benchmark results on an Intel Cascade Lake server. Read more

today's leftovers

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    Android, developed on Linux, is the biggest mobile operating system by far, used by 85 percent of users. Given its credentials as an extremely popular open-source and free operating system, Linux could provide the most powerful opportunity to build a bridge between blockchain and the real world. Although it’s not widely used as a desktop operating system, Linux has been released for more hardware platforms than any OS in history. The chances are you’re already using it in some format, as Linux is embedded into hardware such as TVs, game consoles, routers, smartwatches, and more.

  • How to Download and Install KaOS linux on VirtualBox
  • MX Linux 19: The Best XFCE Distro?

    MX Linux is taking the industry by storm, is MX Linux 19 worth all the hype? In this video, I'll show off this new version of the mega-popular Linux distribution and you'll see it in action, installed on real hardware. Is MX Linux 19 the best XFCE distro available today?

  • Insider 2019-11: logging to Elasticsearch; PE 6 to 7 upgrade; Elastic 7; in-list(); off-line deb; Splunk conf;

    This is the 76th issue of syslog-ng Insider, a monthly newsletter that brings you syslog-ng-related news.

  • WordPress introduces a new way for bloggers to get paid

    WordPress, one of the internet’s leading purveyors of blog infrastructure and hosting, has taken a step toward making blogging more sustainable by allowing sites to easily accept recurring payments. Think: subscriptions. The tool will be available to anyone with a paid WordPress site and to sites that use the company’s Jetpack toolkit.

  • Digging for license information with FOSSology

    For a number of years FOSSology was distributed and maintained by HP, until it became an LF project in 2015. It is easier for companies to collaborate on software in a project at an organization like the LF, he said, it makes for a safer harbor for competitors to work together—in Germany, at least. He works for Siemens AG, which is a rather large Germany company. Breaking up archive files into their constituent files—some of which may need to be unpacked themselves—then scanning the individual source and other files for their licenses is the basic task of FOSSology. It has a powerful license scanner, he said. Its web-based interface can then give an overview of the contents—which licenses apply to various parts of the tree, for example—and allow users to drill down into the file hierarchy to the individual files to see their copyrights and license-relevant text. When looking at the file, FOSSology highlights that license-relevant text and shows a comparison with the reference text of the license it has determined for the file. Determining the license that applies to a file is challenging, however. Files have a wide variety of license-relevant text in them, some of which is ambiguous. It depends on the kind of source code you are working with, but the scanner is unable to decide on a license for up to 30% of files it sees, so it is up to a human reviewer to tag the right license. It is then important to also track what reviewers decide on files in the FOSSology database. The Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) format is used to describe various things in a package, including licensing information. FOSSology can both import and export SPDX information, which allows exchanging information between two FOSSology users to share analysis work. FOSSology is one of a few tools that can consume SPDX information; it can be used to review what another party has concluded about the licensing of a code base. In addition, when a package gets updated, the previous analysis can be used as a starting point; the new dependencies and other changes can be incorporated into that rather than starting from scratch. [...] Huber handed the microphone back to Jaeger to wrap up the presentation. He said that FOSSology participated in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for 2019; the project had three GSoC participants working on various projects. FOSSology has been working on integrating with three different open-source projects as well. Software Heritage is a repository of published software, while ClearlyDefined is a repository of metadata about published software. In both cases, FOSSology has plans to interact with them via their REST APIs. The third project is not as well known, he said. Atarashi takes a new approach in scanning for licenses. Instead of using regular expressions and rules, it uses text statistics and information-retrieval techniques. Another initiative that the project has undertaken is FOSSology Slides, which is a site for gathering slides that can be used to talk and teach about FOSSology. They are all licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 (as are the slides [PDF] from the OSS EU talk). They can be used as is, or adapted for other uses; he encouraged anyone to contribute their FOSSology slides as well. One nice outcome of that is that some Japanese FOSSology users translated slides from FOSSology Slides to that language and contributed them back, Jaeger said. Other translations would be welcome for those who want to contribute to the project but are not software developers. A FOSSology user in the audience pointed out that the tool is only able to analyze the code it is given, so package dependencies have to be figured out separately. Jaeger agreed, noting that FOSSology is focused on understanding the licenses in the code it is given; there are other tools that can help figure out what the dependencies are and there are no plans to add that to FOSSology. He suggested the OSS Review Toolkit (ORT) as one possibility.