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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LinuxCon and Linux at 25 Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 10:09pm
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:33pm
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:32pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:24pm
Story EXT4, Btrfs, XFS & NILFS2 HDD File-System Tests On Linux 4.8 (and More Linux Kernel News) Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:21pm
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 9:03pm
Story FOSS content management systems (CMS) Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:53pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:47pm
Story Open Source History: Why Did Linux Succeed? Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:44pm
Story Red Hat goes to work on OpenStack network convergence Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2016 - 8:40pm

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • mutt 1.7.0 released
  • Vim 8 pre-announcement

    Work on Vim 8.0 is coming close to an end. I hope version 8.0 can be released in about two weeks.

    This is a last chance to modify new features in a way that is not backwards compatible. Once 8.0 is out we can’t make changes that would break plugins.

  • digiKam 5.x Photography Application Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    digiKam is digital photo management application for specially designed for KDE desktop environment. Digital photo management program designed to import, organize, enhance, search and export your digital images to and from your computer. It provides a simple interface which makes importing and organizing digital photographs a "snap". The photos are organized in albums which can be sorted chronologically, by folder layout or by custom collections. digiKam enables you to manage large numbers of digital photographs in albums and to organize these photographs for easy retrieval using tags (keywords), captions, collections, dates, geolocation and searches. It has many features for viewing, organizing, processing and sharing your images. Thus, digiKam is a formidable digital asset management (DAM) software including powerful image editing functions. An easy-to-use camera interface is provided, that will connect to your digital camera and download photographs directly into digiKam albums. More than 1000 digital cameras are supported by the gphoto2 library. Of course, any media or card reader supported by your operating system will interface with digiKam.

  • 5 Tools for Monitoring Disk Activity in Linux
  • What is BPF and why is it taking over Linux Performance Analysis?

    The newest tool for observing the Linux operating system is the “Berkeley Packet Filter” (BPF). BPF allows users to run a small piece of code quickly and safely inside the operating system. Originally used for packet filtering, it has since been enhanced from its eponymous use-case to support dynamic tracing of the Linux operating system. For example, it is possible to write a small BPF program that prints every time a particular file was accessed by a user.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Release management in Open Source projects

Filed under
Development
OSS

Open source software is widely used today. While there is not a single development method for open source, many successful open source projects are based on widely distributed development models with many independent contributors working together. Traditionally, distributed software development has often been seen as inefficient due to the high level of communication and coordination required during the software development process. Open source has clearly shown that successful software can be developed in a distributed manner.

The open source community has over time introduced many collaboration systems, such as version control systems and mailing lists, and processes that foster this collaborative development style and improve coordination. In addition to implementing efficient collaboration systems and processes, it has been argued that open source development works because it aims to reduce the level of coordination needed. This is because development is done in parallel streams by independent contributors who work on self-selected tasks. Contributors can work independently and coordination is only required to integrate their work with others.

Relatively little attention has been paid to release management in open source projects in the literature. Release management, which involves the planning and coordination of software releases and the overall management of releases throughout the life cycle, can be studied from many different aspects. I investigated release management as part of my PhD from the point of view of coordination theory. If open source works so well because of various mechanism to reduce the level of coordination required, what implications does this have on release management which is a time in the development process when everyone needs to come together to align their work?

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FarmBot, the open-source CNC farming robot

Filed under
OSS

The FarmBot structure fixes directly on top of any standard raised planter box. You can think of it like a 3D printer, but instead of extruding plastic, the tool head deposits seeds, delivers water and rids the box of weeds, all by moving across a gantry. Powered by a Raspberry Pi 3, an Arduino Mega and a motor control shield, the FarmBot brings agricultural automation within the reach of the committed hobbyist.

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Linux Mint 18 “Sarah” KDE – BETA Release

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Linux Mint 18 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

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The Philosophy of Open Source in Community and Enterprise Software

Filed under
OSS

Open source software is alive and well, backing most of the systems we take for granted every day. Communities like Github have paved the way for more open collaboration and increased contributions. More software today is branded with the marketing gimmick of being moved “into the cloud”, and into subscription models were people perpetually rent software rather than purchase it. Many of the websites we use are walled gardens of free services that are not open, and which make it intentionally difficult to move your data should you become unsatisfied with the service provider. Much of the opens source software being released today is backend technology or developer tools. We are still a far cry away from having the day to day software we use being truly free, not only in cost, but being able to modify it to our needs and run it anywhere we want.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Performance Benchmarks Against Other Linux/BSD Distributions

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 was released last week and since then many Phoronix readers have inquired about benchmarks of it since it's the first major GNU/Linux distribution using the LLVM Clang compiler by default over GCC.

Thus in continuing my recent BSD and Linux OS performance comparison, here are results of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 out-of-the-box compared to many other distributions using the same Xeon Skylake hardware platform.

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LinuxCon to Highlight How Linux Has Changed in Its 25 Years

Filed under
Linux

When Linus Torvalds first got started on Linux 25 years ago, it was all about the kernel. For Torvalds today, in conversation after conversation, he will almost always reiterate that the kernel is still his primary focus. The difference between Linux today and Linux 25 years ago is that Linux is about much more than just Torvalds, or even the Linux kernel. Linux today is about the wider world that Linux enables. It's a world where the collaborative development model that Linux pioneered has been extended into every realm of software development.

Ten years ago, when I first met Jim Zemlin, his message was about trying to prevent the fragmentation of Linux by having the Linux Standards Base. While fragmentation is still a concern, it's no longer at the top of the list for Linux. Today Linux and the wider ecosystem it helps enable is the basis of the modern world, from the internet of things to smart phones, servers and everything in between.

As Zemlin has said many times in his state of Linux address at LinuxCon events over the years, "Linux is awesome."

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Android makers try to make their phones eye-catching

Filed under
Android

It’s getting rarer for phone launches to generate excitement these days — especially in the Android world, where all models use the same underlying Google software. Every year, phones get routine refreshes such as faster processors, better cameras and longer battery life.

But Android phone makers haven’t given up trying to stand out. Samsung, for instance, hopes to encourage upgrades by giving its new Galaxy Note 7 phone an eye scanner for identification and related security features. Other manufacturers are looking beyond the phone entirely, pinning their hopes on innovative accessories. Motorola offers mix-and-match modules that let you upgrade your phone on the fly, while Alcatel is focused on adding virtual-reality features, including a headset.

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Emergency Mode Thoughts

    This week, I listened to the psaltery voice of Bryan Lunduke lovingly berating and belittling his guests on his podcast. Martin Wimpress, whose work with MATE made it the first project I ever donated to was among the guests. He was asked why he based his project on Debian/Ubuntu and to that Martin responded with polite comments about the robustness of the communities around those projects. He’s right and because of that community I didn’t tag him on Google Plus and wait for a reply. I got my answer much, much faster than that.

  • GUADEC 2016: BoFs

    The Birds of a feather sessions at GUADEC was a great opportunity to sit down and get work done. I participated in the engagement team’s BoF which involved lots of brainstorming for GNOME’s 20th birthday. Over the two days we delegated all the different tasks to do and planned what should be done up to and doing the event. Together with Sri I’ll be working on merchandise for the event which among other things could involve beer mugs.

  • My GUADEC experience

    It’s been three days since I got back home and I have to say that I already miss being there with all the GNOME community:).

    I actually didn’t know how this experience would be. I had never actually been to a GNOME meeting before and all my interaction with the community was purely online.

  • iPhone Sales Soften, Fall Over 7% in Q2
  • SoundHound - Music search galore?
  • ReactOS 0.4.2 Officially Released
  • New BlackArch Linux ISO Released with Over 1,500 Penetration Testing, Hacking Tools
  • Address Bar Spoofing Vulnerability Found in Several Browsers

    Chrome, Firefox and other web browsers are plagued by vulnerabilities that can be exploited to spoof their address bar. Some of the affected vendors are still working on addressing the issues.

    Pakistan-based researcher Rafay Baloch discovered that the address bar in Google Chrome, also known as the omnibox, can be tricked into flipping URLs.

    The problem, which affects Chrome for Android, is related to how Arabic and Hebrew text is written from right to left (RTL). If an attacker’s URL starts with an IP address and it contains an Arabic character, the URL’s host and path are reversed.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Decides To Drop PulseAudio

    DragonFlyBSD developers have decided to remove PulseAudio from their dports packaging system and patch their desktop software to not depend upon this open-source sound server.

    Running PulseAudio on DragonFlyBSD appears to cause problems for users, similar to PulseAudio in its early days on Linux, "the pulseaudio server didn't seem to work and even caused one CPU to spin at 100% usage. Moreover, it seems that firefox, even if built without pulseaudio, would detect if PA was installed and use it over ALSA resulting in no sound and a spinning CPU," according to John Marino who removed PA from DragonFlyBSD.

  • LLVM Clang 3.9 Still On Track For Release Next Week

    LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg tagged LLVM 3.9.0-rc2 on Thursday and it's still looking like LLVM/Clang 3.9 could ship on schedule next week.

    Hans noted in the RC2 announcement, "This is a release candidate in the very real sense that if nothing new comes up, this is be what the final release looks like. There are currently no open release blockers, and no patches in my merge-queue."

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • 3 Firefox Add-ons Every Ubuntu User Needs

    Firefox is the default browser in Ubuntu — but it doesn’t integrate with the Unity desktop as well as it could.

    That’s where the following Ubuntu Firefox add-ons come in. These little extras, trivial though they seem, help to bridge the (admittedly few) gaps and missing functionality between browser and OS.

  • Mozilla is changing its look—and asking the Internet for feedback

    Mozilla is trying a rebranding. Back in June, the browser developer announced that it would freshen up its logo and enlist the Internet's help in reaching a final decision. The company hired British design company Johnson Banks to come up with seven new "concepts" to illustrate the company's work, as shown in the gallery above.

    The logos rely on vibrant colors, and several of them recall '80s and '90s style. In pure, nearly-unintelligible marketing speak, Mozilla writes that each new design reflects a story about the company. "From paying homage to our paleotechnic origins to rendering us as part of an ever-expanding digital ecosystem, from highlighting our global community ethos to giving us a lift from the quotidian elevator open button, the concepts express ideas about Mozilla in clever and unexpected ways" Mozilla's Creative Director Tim Murray writes in a blog post.

    Mozilla is soliciting comment and criticism on the seven new designs for the next two weeks, but this is no Boaty McBoatface situation. Mozilla is clear that it's not crowdsourcing a design, asking anyone to work on spec, or holding a vote over which logo the Internet prefers. It's just asking for comments.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Krita 3.0.1 Alpha Builds

    Last week the merge window closed and Krita entered a four week stabilization phase. Several very interesting branches were merged, with features ranging from a new head-up-display for quickly changing brush settings, a wavelet filter, a threshold filter, to a an upgrade for all number entry boxes: those support maths now! Sadly, we haven’t managed to dot all the i’s on the video-export branch for saving animated gifs and videos, so that’s not in.

  • Queueing up for Plasma 5.8

    It’s been too long since I’ve posted on Planet… I missed you! But despite my slothish activity there are rituals to be followed, and so comes a wallpaper for Plasma 5.8;

    Probably the first thing I’ll mention is that the Plasma 5.8 wallpaper will be shipping with a 4K UHD version. The last wallpaper was meant to have a 4K version, but it simply didn’t happen. Seemingly everyone is beginning to enjoy screens with high pixel densities, so it’s about time we shipped wallpapers to match, and it’s a fun bullet-point for an LTS release.

  • Space Left at the (Non)Party Flat at Akademy/QtCon
  • Conferences I will attend in the next two months
  • Akademy is this year at QtCon along with FSF-E, Qt, VLC and others.

  • Akademy and QtCon -- and the future of QFuture
  • LabPlot is comfortable with FITS

    So we are here, GSoC 2016 is officially over, it's time for the final evaluations, so this will be a closing post for this GSoC. I've learned many things while I was working on my project and I'm really thankful to my mentors, Stefan and Alexander (not officially my mentor, but we talked many times and he helped me many times too). I'll be happy to help in integration of this project in the next release of LabPlot Smile

  • Peruse 1.1 "The Cuppa Release"

    Slightly later than the 21st of June this year, the inaugural release of the Peruse comic book reader was made, and received with while not wide spread excitement, then certainly with mostly positive comments (and some very good suggestions). If you are a software developer yourself, you will know exactly how much this means to me. If you are not: This is what sustains us, what encourages us to continue working on the things we do. Thank you all very much!

  • Riding the memory lane…
  • The Editor Improved!!
  • GSoC'16 Update! Offline Extension of WikiEditor for WikiToLearn!
  • Google Summer of Code'16 Summary
  • QtWebKit Technology Preview 3
  • New QtWebKit Preview Adds NPAPI & Qt Plugin Support

    While upstream Qt developers continue focused on supporting Qt WebEngine as their Chromium-based browser engine environment, others meanwhile have been working on reviving Qt WebKit.

    Some developers have been working to revive QtWebKit and began releasing technology previews of the revised module.

  • Modifier only shortcuts available in Plasma 5.8
  • GSoC 2016 – Final post: TuxPaint, a QML Canvas 2d creation
  • KStars on Windows – Beta version

    Here we are! Google Summer of Code is over and KStars on Windows project is done. It was truly an incredible summer and I am grateful for the opportunity I was given to work on such a great project and learn so much from my mentor, Jasem Mutlaq.

  • Gsoc 2016: Sum up

    Actually Gsoc didnt take me a lot of time but sometimes I still feel burnt out for some reasons. I read a blog post of another Kde – Gsoc student and she also mentioned about the stressful and depression. I think it is shadow part of the IT industry. And we student havent learnt how to deal with it (stress) yet when it comes to real (paid) projects.

  • Isn’t the end, it’s just the beginning – Google Summer of Code 2016

    Tomaz hassled me into submitting a project to Google Summer of Code, a project that until then I had never heard of in my life. KDE was chosen to be one of the communities to be able to host students and projects for KDE entire environment be improved.

More reading comprehension issues in Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Do you know the one difference between incompetent people who use Windows versus those who use Linux? The latter feel entitled and opinionated enough to twitter about their superiority complex. You just don't hear the average folks running Windows complain, because they have better things to do, like watch Youtube. Since you can't do that in Linux, because things break all the time, you masochistically waste your energy fixing your system so it can do what any decent Windows 98 box could 9,000 years ago, and then defend your choice with the classic zeal of a Stockholm Syndrome casualty.

This is an unfair comment toward all the Linux people who do care, do work hard, and do try to make better products, but I am not really sure what's the best way, if any, to convey my message to people with reading ability challenges. This is not a call to improve Linux and make it better and blah blah. I've expressed myself enough times on that. You know what the magic formula is and how to make Linux desktop succeed. It is to listen to me, because I'm always right. So the one piece still left is to sit down and read. There. And please, don't link this article in your blogs or whatever. The first response will be: clickbait. Or: he has disabled comments on his site. Don't. No need. Just read. Carefully. That's all.

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Debian GNU/Linux Birthday : A 23 Years of Journey and Still Counting…

Filed under
Debian

On 16th August 2016, the Debian project has celebrated its 23rd anniversary, making it one of the oldest popular distribution in open source world. Debian project was conceived and founded in the year 1993 by late Ian Murdock. By that time Slackware had already made a remarkable presence as one of the earliest Linux Distribution.

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Open365 – Clouding with style

Filed under
OSS

Office, suite, cloud. Sounds familiar. Google Docs. Yup. Microsoft Office 365. Yup. LibreOffice. No. Wait, what? Buzzwords around modern technology concepts are all too easy to ignore, but this one actually caught my attention beyond the almost-too-cliche dotIO domain, the blue design very reminiscent of Docker (hint), and optimistic text that promises wonders.

Anyhow, Open365 is an all-in-one productivity suite, based on KDE, Seafile, LibreOffice, Docker, and Jitsi. That’s enough buzz to keep you warm till 2020, but is it any good? Or rather, can it compete with the proven giants out there? I decided to explore and see what gives.

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Also:

The Linux File System Structure Explained

Filed under
Linux

Samsung’s Android Payday

Filed under
Android
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver