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Thursday, 18 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debugging and Compiling Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:26pm
Story Security: Meltdown and Spectre, GPG and SSH, Mageia Updates Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 5:16pm
Story Games: CRYENGINE, Epic Car Factory, Godot, Depth of Extinction, Yuzu, GPD Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 4:48pm
Story Graphics: Mir, Vulkan, Mesa Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 4:46pm
Story Best Linux desktop of 2018 Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 4:15pm
Story How To Boot Into Linux Command Line Mohd Sohail 15/01/2018 - 4:11pm
Story Barcelona and GNU/Linux (Now in Corporate Media) Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 4:04pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 10:21am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 9:52am
Story Dr. Lovesource: Or how I learned to stop worrying and love the open Rianne Schestowitz 15/01/2018 - 9:44am

Hands-on: Raspberry Pi Zero 3-Port USB Hub with Ethernet

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi Zero has been a wonder since it was first introduced. So much power (and so much fun!) in such a small package. Ah, but there was the problem, too -- such a small package, that it didn't have room for very many connectors, and the ones that it had were smaller than the standard-sized connectors on the full-sized Pi models.

The biggest of these problems was with USB connections. The Pi Zero has only one USB port (yeah, I know it looks like there are two, but the other one is the power connection and you can't hijack it), and it is not even a standard Type-A port, it is a microUSB (also known as OTG or 'on the go'). That means that Pi Zero owners who needed to connect USB devices and dongles (who doesn't?) had to buy some kind of micro-to-TypeA adapter cable.

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Rugged mobile gateway runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

Artila’s “Matrix-713” mobile IoT gateway runs Linux on a Cortex-A5 ATSAMA5D35, and provides Fast and Gigabit Ethernet, 2x CAN, 2x mini-PCIe, GPS, and an IMU, and supports -20 to 80°C temperatures.

Artila’s Mobile IoT Gateway Matrix-713 follows a similarly headless Matrix-710 embedded computer announced last May, which also runs Linux 4.9 on a 536MHz, Cortex-A5 Atmel ATSAMA5D35 SoC, and shares many of the same features. It’s not a replacement, however, but rather a more advanced, mobile-friendly alternative. (Separately, Artila announced a new Aport-213 (PDF) serial-to-WiFi gateway.)

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Vipul Siddharth: How Do You Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Vipul Siddharth is an intern at Red Hat. He is pursuing a bachelors degree in computer applications from Christ University in Bengaluru, India. Vipul started using Linux in 2015 His first distribution was Fedora and despite trying Arch, Elementary and others Fedora remains his primary operating system.

Siddarth’s current daily routine starts with working out, the college and finally the office. He is currently working on Fedora Cloud. “Now I am working on building a testing framework for fedora cloud.” Along with this, he regularly contributes to Fedora Quality Assurance. Vipul also organizes FOSS and Fedora events. “I have organized Fedora activity days and fedora-release parties for Fedora 25 and 26.”

Siddharth’s childhood hero was Goku from Dragon Ball Z. “I wanted to eat, laugh and protect the world like him. I kinda still do.” Vipul’s favorite movies are 12 Angry Men and The Godfather (I, II and III)

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Release | Endless OS Version 3.3.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Fixes to the dual-boot OS selection menu. An error message introduced in Endless OS 3.3.7 is fixed, and hibernated Windows systems are detected in more cases.

Drag and drop for apps. We’ve added drag and drop functionality to the applications displayed in your desktop folders. You can now reorder apps, and add and remove apps from folders more easily.

Dual-boot installation from DVDs. The Endless Installer for Windows now works correctly when run from a DVD.

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Top 5 Open Source Firewalls for Business

Filed under
OSS

Whether it be for home or for your workplace, chances are you've encountered an open source firewall. And if you haven't, you really should check out what these open source firewalls have to offer. In this article, I'll share the open source firewalls I've admired, used in the past and heard good things about. Keep in mind that the needs of your workplace may vary, so be sure to review the features of each firewall solution carefully.

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8 unusual FOSS tools for agile teams

Filed under
GNU

You might be familiar with the expression: So many tools, so little time. In order to try to save you some time, I've outlined some of my favorite tools that help agile teams work better. If you are an agilist, chances are you're aware of similar tools, but I'm specifically narrowing down the list to tools that appeal to open source enthusiasts.

Caution! These tools are a little different than what you may be expecting. There are no project management apps—there is a great article on that already—so there are no checklists, no integrations with GitHub, just simple ways to organize your thoughts and promote team communication.

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Security: Meltdown and Spectre Patches

Filed under
Security
  • Linux Mint project advises on Meltdown and Spectre

    The Linux Mint project has released a guide to address the Meltdown and Spectre bugs offering instructions for users on how they should mitigate the holes in their systems. It explains how to tighten up your web browsers and driver software, as well as providing a status update on when we can expect a patch to the kernel.

    The main browser that’s bundled with the operating system is Firefox. The advice is to ensure you update to Firefox 57.0.4, which was released several days ago. As for Chrome and Opera, you should go into the respective flags pages and enable strict site isolation, also called site per process. Google plans to fix the bug next month when it releases the next major edition of Google Chrome. An Opera update will follow.

  • Canonical Releases Ubuntu Kernel and Nvidia Updates to Fix Meltdown and Spectre

    As promised, Canonical released a few moments ago the new kernel and Nvidia updates to address the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerability on all supported Ubuntu Linux releases.

    The company said last week in a public announcement that it will patch all supported Ubuntu releases against Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities, and the first set of patches are now available in the stable software repositories of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) to address some of these issues.

  • Linux Mint security notice on Meltdown and Spectre

    A security notice was posted on the official Linux Mint blog on January 9, 2017. It informs users of the Linux distribution about the recently discovered security issues in modern processors called Meltdown and Spectre, and how these affect Linux Mint.

    The notice contains instructions to protect Linux Mint systems from potential attacks that target the vulnerabilities. It covers web browsers, Nvidia drivers, and the Linux kernel.

  • Tails 3.4 Anonymous Live System Released with Meltdown and Spectre Patches

    The Tails development team announced today the release and general availability of the Tails 3.4 amnesic incognito live system, also known as the anonymous live system.

    Tails is a Debian-based live Linux system designed with a single purpose in mind, to hide all your online activity from the prying eyes of the government. For that, it relies on the latest Tor and Tor Browser technologies by allowing users to connect to the Tor anonymous network.

  • Tails 3.4 privacy-focused Linux distro now available with Meltdown and Spectre fixes

    With everything going on in the world these days, it can feel like you are naked when using your computer. If you previously felt safe and secure, these last several years have probably eroded all of your confidence. Between Edward Snowden's revelations and the many vulnerabilities constantly hitting the news, it is tempting to just live in the woods without electricity.

    Before you sell your house, buy a tent, and become a nomad, you should consider a Linux distribution the helps you fight back against evil governments, nefarious hackers, and other bad people. Called "Tails," this Linux-based operating system is designed to be run from a live environment, such as on a DVD or flash drive, so you can hide your tracks and enjoy your God-given right to privacy. Today, version 3.4 becomes available and if you are already a Tails user, you should upgrade immediately. Why? Because it includes kernel 4.14.12 which offers fixes for Meltdown and Spectre (partially).

  • Greg Kroah-Hartman on Meltdown and Spectre Bugs: Go Update Your Linux Kernel

    Renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman has published an in-depth article on the status of the Meltdown and Spectre patches in the Linux kernel.

    As you already know, two severe hardware bugs were unearthed last week as the worst chip flaws in the history of computing. Dubbed Meltdown and Spectre, these security vulnerabilities affect us all, and put billions of devices at risk of attacks by allowing attackers to steal your sensitive data that's stored in kernel memory via locally installed apps or on the Web through malicious scripts.

Android Things and Google Assistant appear in new smart speakers, smart displays, and modules

Filed under
Android
Google

Google announced third-party products that run Android Things, Google Assistant, and Cast, including smart speakers from LG and iHome. There are also embedded modules from Qualcomm, MediaTek, and Rockchip that will drive speakers and smart displays from JBL, Lenovo, Sony, and others.

Google has avoided the CES show in recent years, but has shown up big in 2018 to counter-attack Amazon’s voice assistant juggernaut Alexa with news about its rival, second place Google Assistant agent. We’ll focus here on new products that combine the Assistant voice agent with Google’s lightweight Android Things distribution. These include the LG ThinQ WK7 and iHome iGV1 smart speakers, and three new computer-on-modules: the Qualcomm SD212 Home Hub Platform, MediaTek MT8516, and Rockchip RK3229 SoM. The modules will drive speaker and smart displays from JBL, Lenovo, LG, and Sony, as well as smart speaker reference designs from three ODMs: Tymphany, Goertek, and Tonly.

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Ubuntu Releases Security Patch For Meltdown

Filed under
Linux

In another article, I have covered what is Meltdown and Spectre and told you how critical it is for us Linux users. The Linux had been fixed immediately after the two flaws were discovered. But the Ubuntu maintained kernel was not updated against Meltdown and Spectre.

Read<br />
more

The Combined Impact Of Retpoline + KPTI On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Over the past week I have posted many KPTI and Retpoline benchmarks for showing the performance impact of these patches to combat the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities. But with my testing so far I haven't done any showing the combined impact of KPTI+Retpoline on Ubuntu versus a completely unpatched system. Here are some of those results.

Similar to the Benchmarking Clear Linux With KPTI + Retpoline Support, these tests are similar but with a few different systems and looking at the performance when testing from Ubuntu 17.10. The comparison on each system was to a stock Linux 4.14.0 kernel compared to the Linux 4.14 kernel with the upstream KPTI patches paired with the Retpline v5 patches that have yet to be merged for mitigating Spectre.

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With Linux, You Don't Get One Kernel of Truth... You Get Many

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As much as I love to poke at the inner workings of my computer, I'll admit that until recently, I didn't give much thought to which version of the Linux kernel my desktop system was running.

For most desktop users, this isn't all that odd. Compatibility of kernel modules is often critical for servers and production systems, but day-to-day desktop usage doesn't change much from update to update.

Two things motivated me to scrutinize the kernel version more closely: considerations for specific hardware; and a very scary bug recently identified in the Ubuntu distribution's latest release.

Having picked up a lot of useful tips in exploring different kernel versions, I decided to share what I've learned so far.

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Sayonara: A Beautiful Lightweight Music Player Has Its First Stable Release

Filed under
News

If you are looking for a lightweight music player with clean, intuitive user interface and all the standard features, give Sayonara a try. It's first stable version is just out.
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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Libstorage-NG Landing Soon In openSUSE Tumbleweed For Improving The Installer

    Users of the openSUSE rolling-release Linux distribution will soon find an improved installer thanks to Libstorage-NG landing soon and improvements to YaST.

    Libstorage is a low-level storage library used by SUSE's YaST for dealing with disk / partition / LVM management and other storage device interaction. For over the past two years, libstorage-ng has been in development as the next-generation implementation.

  • Debbugs Versioning: Merging

    One of the key features of Debbugs, the bug tracking system Debian uses, is its ability to figure out which bugs apply to which versions of a package by tracking package uploads. This system generally works well, but when a package maintainer's workflow doesn't match the assumptions of Debbugs, unexpected things can happen.

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 09 Jan 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • LXD Weekly Status #29

    And we’re back from the holidays!
    This “weekly” summary is covering everything that happened the past 3 weeks.

    The big highlight was the release of LXD 2.21 on the 19th of December.

    During the holidays, we merged quite a number of bugfixes and smaller features in LXC and LXD with the bigger feature development only resuming now.

    The end of year was also the deadline for our users to migrate off of the LXD PPAs.
    Those have now been fully deleted and users looking for newer builds of LXD should use the official basckport packages or the LXD snap.

Servers: Private Servers, Kubernetes Highlights

Filed under
Server
  • Explore private cloud platform options: Paid and open source

    An open source private cloud platform, Apache CloudStack offers a comprehensive management system that features usage metering and image deployment. It supports hypervisors including VMware ESXi, Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix XenServer and KVM.

    CloudStack also handles features like tiered storage, Active Directory integration and some software-defined networking. As with other open source platforms, it takes a knowledgeable IT staff to install and support CloudStack.

  • 7 systems engineering and operations trends to watch in 2018

    Kubernetes domination

    Kubernetes came into its own in 2017 and its popularity will only grow in 2018. Edward Muller, engineering manager at Salesforce, predicts that building tools on top of Kubernetes is going to be more prevalent next year. “Previously, most tooling targeted one or more cloud infrastructure APIs,” says Muller. “Recent announcements of Kubernetes as a Service (KaaS?) from major cloud providers is likely to only hasten the shift.”

  • 2018: The Year of Kubernetes and Interoperability

    On its own, Kubernetes is a great story. What makes it even better is the soaring interoperability movement it’s fueling. An essential part of enabling interoperable cloud-native apps on Kubernetes is the Open Service Broker API. OSBAPI enables portability of cloud services across offerings and vendors. A collaborative project across multiple organizations, including Fujitsu, Google, IBM, Pivotal, Red Hat and SAP, it enables developers, ISVs, and SaaS vendors to deliver services to applications running within cloud-native platforms. In 2017, we saw adoption of the API by Microsoft and Google. Late in the year, Amazon and Pivotal partnered to enable expose Amazon’s services via the broker as well. Red Hat uses it to support the OpenShift marketplace.

Linux, the Linux Foundation, and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux 4.17 To Likely Include Intel DRM Driver's HDCP Support

    Back in November a Google developer proposed HDCP content protection support for the Intel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) Linux driver that is based upon their code from Chrome OS / Chromium OS. It looks like that High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection support in the i915 DRM driver will come for Linux 4.17.

    It's too late to happen for Linux 4.16 considering it would be too tardy for it to be comfortably added to DRM-Next. Google developer Sean Paul who has been spearheading this HDMI/DisplayPort HDCP support for the open-source Intel DRM driver believes the code is now ready for merging.

  • Linux Foundation LFCS and LFCE: Miltos Tsatsakis

    The Linux Foundation offers many resources for developers, users, and administrators of Linux systems. One of the most important offerings is its Linux Certification Program, which is designed to give you a way to differentiate yourself in a job market that's hungry for your skills.

    How well does the certification prepare you for the real world? To illustrate that, we will be highlighting some of those who have recently passed the certification examinations. These testimonials should help you decide if either the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator or the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer certification is right for you.

  • Mesa 17.3.2 Release Notes / January 8, 2018

    Mesa 17.3.2 is a bug fix release which fixes bugs found since the 17.3.1 release.

    Mesa 17.3.2 implements the OpenGL 4.5 API, but the version reported by glGetString(GL_VERSION) or glGetIntegerv(GL_MAJOR_VERSION) / glGetIntegerv(GL_MINOR_VERSION) depends on the particular driver being used. Some drivers don't support all the features required in OpenGL 4.5. OpenGL 4.5 is only available if requested at context creation because compatibility contexts are not supported.

  • Mesa 17.3.2 Released With The Latest Stable Fixes

    While Mesa 18.0 will premiere later this quarter as the first feature update of 2018, Mesa 17.3.2 is now available as the second bug-fix release for last quarter's Mesa 17.3 series.

  • NVIDIA Rolls Out New Vulkan Beta Driver With Conservative Rasterization Support

    NVIDIA is sticking to their pledge of being quick with delivering support for new revisions of Vulkan support in their Windows and Linux drivers.

    Vulkan 1.0.67 was released on Friday and while it's mostly a mundane maintenance update, it does include one new extension: VK_EXT_conservative_rasterization. This extension adds a conservative rasterization mode to Vulkan and is similar to the GL_NV_conservative_raster OpenGL extension (more details on conservative rasterization here).

  • VC5 Gallium3D Driver Is Onto Pushing More Triangles In Simulator

    The VC5 open-source Gallium3D driver designed to support the next generation of Broadcom VideoCore graphics hardware is onto rendering more triangles, at least with the hardware simulator.

Software and Games: TEA Ebook, Akiee, KDE Discover Software Center and More

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • TEA Ebook – A Modern Ebook App for Stylish Readers

    We have reviewed a good number of ebook apps in the past, most of which have been in development for a long time. Today, we bring you a relatively new app to the application market and it goes by the name of TEA Ebook.

    TEA Ebook is a free and cross-platform EPUB and PDF reader with which you can browse and read through your entire digital library wherever you are, and without an internet connection.

  • Akiee – A Markdown-Based Task Manager for Developers

    Akiee is a cross-platform, AGILE-inspired task manager that helps you to concentrate on your most important tasks by making use of ranks instead of priorities.

    It features a simple UI with three main tabs, Todo, Doing, and Done. A "+" button for adding new tasks, an “Editor” button for editing tasks directly, and an “All” button to list all your tasks.

  •  

  • Discover, the KDE Software Center App, is Improving Nicely

    Many KDE fans –maybe even you– consider the app to be too limited, preferring instead to use an alternative tool like Synaptic or the Muon Software Center to handle package management.

    So popular is Muon that Kubuntu 17.10 even re-added it to its install image!

    But Discover shouldn’t be forgotten about.

    It’s important that Plasma desktop has a vibrant, easy to use, “one-stop-shop” for users to discover, install, update and remove software on their desktops.

  •  

  • Polishing Discover Software Center

    KDE Discover Software Center is a key element of our Usability and Productivity initiative because it encompasses the basic experience of discovering, installing, and removing software. Most regular people don’t want to use the command line to do this, and for them, we have Discover.

  • Breaking apart massive bosses in the Breakout-like 'Puppet Kings', some thoughts

    I have fond memories of Breakout as a child, my son even has a rather low quality version on his 'kids camera' and Puppet Kings [Steam] is an interesting take on it.

  • Need to relax? Guppy is a simple game about trying to survive as a fish

    Since releases are always light at the start of a year, I've been able to look over some more titles sent to our Steam Curator. Guppy [Steam, Official Site] is one such game, that sees you become a fish.

Mozilla leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Marketing Engineering & Ops Blog: Kuma Report, December 2017

    We have a lot of things we have to do in Q1 2018, such as the CDN and Django 1.11 update. We postponed a detailed plan for 2018, and instead will spend some of Q1 discussing goals and priorities. During our discussions in December, a few themes came up.

    For the MDN Web Docs product, the 2018 theme is Reach. We want to reach more web developers with MDN Web Docs data, and earn a key place in developers’ workflows. Sometimes this means making developer.mozilla.org the best place to find the information, and sometimes it means delivering the data where the developer works. We’re using interviews and surveys to learn more and design the best experience for web developers.

    For the technology side, the 2018 theme is Simplicity. There are many seldom-used Kuma features that require a history lesson to explain. These make it more complicated to maintain and improve the web site. We’d like to retire some of these features, simplify others, and make it easier to work on the code and data. We have ideas around zone redirects, asset pipelines, and translations, and we hope to implement these in 2018.

    One thing that has gotten more complex in 2017 is code contribution. We’re implementing new features like browser-compat-data and interactive-examples as their own projects. Kuma is usually not the best place to contribute, and it can be challenging to discover where to contribute. We’re thinking through ways to improve this in 2018, and to steer contributor’s effort and enthusiasm where it will have the biggest impact.

  • Retained Display Lists

    As part of the lead up to Firefox Quantum, we added new telemetry to Firefox to help us measure painting performance, and to let us make more informed decisions as to where to direct our efforts. One of these measurements defined a minimum threshold for a ‘slow’ paint (16ms), and recorded percentages of time spent in various paint stages when it occurred. We expected display list building to be significant, but were still surprised with the results: On average, display list building was consuming more than 40% of the total paint time, for work that was largely identical to the previous frame. We’d long been planning on an overhaul of how we built and managed display lists, but with this new data we decided that it needed to be a top priority for our Painting team.

  • Multilingual Gecko in 2017

    In January 2017, we set the course to get a new localization framework named Fluent into Firefox.

    Below is a story of the work performed on the Firefox engine – Gecko – over the last year to make Fluent in Firefox possible. This has been a collaborative effort involving a lot of people from different teams. It’s impossible to document all the work, so keep in mind that the following is just the story of the Gecko refactor, while many other critical pieces were being tackled outside of that range.

    Also, the nature of the project does make the following blog post long, text heavy and light on pictures. I apologize for that and hope that the value of the content will offset this inconvenience and make it worth reading.

Security leftovers

Filed under
Security

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
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CentOS Linux 7 and 6 Users Receive New Microcode Updates for Intel and AMD CPUs

CentOS Linux is an open-source, free, enterprise-class, and community-supported operating system based on and compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux. As such, it regularly receives new important security updates as soon as they are released upstream by Red Hat. About two weeks ago, CentOS Linux 7 and 6 users received kernel and microcode updates that mitigated the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities unearthed earlier this month. However, after some thorough testing, Red Hat discovered that these updated microcode firmware developed by Intel and AMD caused hardware issues. Read more

Google moves to Debian for in-house Linux desktop

Google has officially confirmed the company is shifting its in-house Linux desktop from the Ubuntu-based Goobuntu to a new Linux distro, the DebianTesting-based gLinux. Margarita Manterola, a Google Engineer, quietly announced Google would move from Ubuntu to Debian-testing for its desktop Linux at DebConf17 in a lightning talk. Manterola explained that Google was moving to gLinux, a rolling release based on Debian Testing. Read more

Android Support Removed from Intel Graphics Driver Debugging Tool for Linux

For those unfamiliar with intel-gpu-tools, it's a collection of tools for GNU/Linux distribution that allows the debugging the official Intel graphics driver for Intel GPUs. Tools include a GPU hang dumping program, performance microbenchmarks for regression testing the DRM, as well as a performance monitor. The latest release, intel-gpu-tools 1.21, adds quite a bunch of changes, including automatic loading of DRM modules when opening a DRM device, much-improved GPU quiescing code to more thoroughly flush pending work and old data, as well as production support for the Meson build system while automake is still kept around. Read more

Educational-Oriented Escuelas Linux 5.6 Distro Released with LibreOffice 6.0

Based on the latest release of the Ubuntu-based and Enlightenment-focused Bodhi Linux operating system, Escuelas Linux 5.6 is powered by the Linux 4.14.13 kernel, which includes patches against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities, and comes with a bunch of up-to-date educational apps. These include the OnlyOffice 4.8.6 office suite (only for the 64-bit edition), Vivaldi 1.13, Chromium 63, Google Chrome 63, and Mozilla Firefox 57 "Quantum" web browsers, Geogebra 5.0.414 geometry, algebra, statistics, and calculus app, latest Adobe Flash Player 28 plugin, and the upcoming LibreOffice 6.0 open-source office suite. Read more