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Monday, 08 Feb 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LuninuX OS 15.10 Launches as the Walking Walrus, Based on Ubuntu 15.10 Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:11am
Story SlackEX Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.1 and KDE 4.14.3, Based on Slackware 14.2 Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:09am
Story IceCat 38.6.0 release Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 10:05am
Story iPhone vs Android: Almost Half Of iPhone Users Think Android Phones Are More Advanced Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 9:59am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:20am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:19am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:18am
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:16am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:15am
Story More on Unicef's FOSS Plans Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2016 - 1:15am

Arch Linux 2016.02.01 Is Available to Download, Still Powered by Linux Kernel 4.3

Filed under
Linux

It's the first day of February, so guess what? A new ISO image for the powerful and highly customizable Arch Linux operating system is now available for download via the official channels.

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Now Officially Powered by Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's finally here! We know that we've told you so many times about the fact that the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system will get the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel someday, but that day is today, February 1, 2016.

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Leftovers: Gaming (Tropico 5, Master of Orion, Superhot)

Filed under
Gaming

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • R9 Fury Performance Gains With Linux 4.5-rc2? I'm Not So Lucky

    When reading this morning of "double or quadruple the framerates that I got with RC1" for an R9 Fury owned by a Phoronix reader, I immediately set out to run some R9 Fury benchmarks on Linux 4.5-rc2 compared to my 4.5-rc1 results last week and compared to Catalyst. I also did the same for an R9 285 Tonga on AMDGPU as well for reference purposes.

  • AMDGPU ACP Support Called For Merging Still Into Linux 4.5

    While the Linux 4.5 kernel's merge window ended more than one week ago, it looks like the AMDGPU driver may get a late feature arrival: ACP support.

    ACP is the Audo Co-Processor support found in new AMD APUs/SoCs. AMD developers had been working on the support for several months while the audio and power management related ACP code landed during the Linux 4.5 merge window. With that code now mainlined, AMD's Alex Deucher is looking to land the ACP driver support into the AMDGPU DRM driver.

  • The Intel Mesa Driver Has Gotten Faster Since Switching To NIR

    Eduardo Lima of Igalia spoke this weekend at FOSDEM about the work done over the past year on switching the Mesa Intel i965 back-end to using the NIR intermediate representation.

    The presentation by this developer covered GLSL IR vs. NIR, the Intel shader pipeline, what NIR is all about, and more. NIR is the new Mesa intermediate representation that was initially designed by a high school student. Besides Intel's interest in NIR, Freedreno and VC4 Gallium3D drivers have also been actively interested in this IR.

Leftovers: OSS (UNICEF, Google, and 'Cloud')

Filed under
OSS

UNICEF

  • UNICEF Innovation Fund to invest in open source technology start-ups

    To qualify for funding, projects must be open source and have a working prototype. They can involve developing a new technology, or expanding or improving an already existing one.

  • UNICEF launches Innovation Fund for open-source investment

    The United Nations has announced that it will provide some 60 start-ups with more than $9 million in funding to develop open-source technologies to improve the lives of children in developing countries.

  • UNICEF Aims to Drive Open Source Innovation that Helps Children

    The One Laptop per Child project -- which aims to empower children worldwide through technology -- didn't end up being fully open source. But starting this week, UNICEF hopes to leverage open source code for the benefit of children once again by funding select open source projects.

    On Monday, UNICEF announced that it would award funding from the UNICEF Innovation Fund to support software projects that are creating or improving technologies designed to help children (or any "youth under 25"). To qualify, the projects must be open source.

  • UN invests $9m in 'open source' tech to save children's lives

    The United Nations will fund 60 startups to create open source technologies to improve the lives of children in developing countries.

    Unicef, the children's charity run by the UN, will channel more than $9 million into startups baed on venture capital style investing. But it isn't concerned if the companies fail.

Google

  • Google spotlights Go language with new open source load balancer

    Most of Google's open source releases have centered on infrastructure-building projects, like Kubernetes, that stem from the company's work with its public cloud infrastructure. But Google's latest open source project -- a load-balancing technology called Seesaw -- instead comes from work done for the company's corporate, in-house infrastructure.

'Cloud'

  • ownCloud Hits New Milestones: How You Can Get Going With It

    The ever popular ownCloud open source file-sharing and storage platform for building private clouds has reached some remarkable new milestones. You can move beyond what services such as Dropbox and Box offer by leveraging ownCloud, and you don't have to have your files sitting on servers that you don't choose, governed by people you don't know.

    Now, ownCloud Inc. has announced that is has achieved 100% year-over-year growth in 2015 with its open source platform, and is on track to double that growth again in 2016. "For 2016, ownCloud is already on track to double bookings to more than $16 million," the company reports. "Today, it has more than 300 customers across 47 countries, with downloads of the community and enterprise edition in 193 countries supporting more than 8 million users." Here are more details, and info on how you can leverage ownCloud.

  • Free Hadoop and Spark Training Offerings Arrive

    These training programs promise to make a difference. According to Nick Heudecker and Lisa Kart, research directors, Gartner Inc., “As more organizations invest in big data, the shortage of available skills and capabilities will become more acute. Instead of facing a difficult recruiting market, organizations should focus on adapting available skills and engaging with established service providers to fill the skills gap.”

BSD Impact: LLVM, Haiku OS

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM Continues To Dominate Across Many Operating Systems, Software Projects

    LLVM gets GPU exposure via NVIDIA's CUDA, Mesa LLVMpipe, LunarGLASS, the AMDGPU open-source driver stack, SPIR / SPIR-V, and a majority of the OpenCL implementations in the world. Web projects around LLVM include Google's Portable Native Client (PNaCl), WebKit FTL JIT, EmScripten, and WebAssembly, among others.

  • Haiku OS Powered By BSD? It's A Possibility

    François Revol presented at FOSDEM this weekend about the prospects of Haiku OS ever becoming a BSD distribution. Haiku OS, the well known BeOS re-implementation, does currently rely upon some BSD components but more integration is possible.

    Haiku OS is the project that continues to be developed for more than the past decade as a open-source operating system compatible with BeOS.

Linux and FOSS Events (LCA 2016, OpenStack Summit Austin)

  • Spring 2016 ‘Big Tent’ Linux and FOSS Conferences

    Today linux.conf.au 2016 gets cranked up for a five day run in the land down under for a big tent show where registration is sold out. This comes on the heels of another big show which folded its tent last night, FOSDEM 2016, the two day event that ran this weekend in Brussels. Both of these came after the most hyped SCALE ever — and evidently rightfully so. The first-of-the-year Linux and FOSS lovefest vacated the Pasadena Convention center a little over a week ago, not to return until March 2-5, 2017, a very late date for that event.

  • OpenStack Summit Austin: CFS period extended

    Just a small update on the Call for Speakers for the OpenStack Austin summit.

Mozilla News (Dr. Karim Lakhani, Caribou Digital)

Filed under
Moz/FF

Linux Kernel in Ubuntu LTS, 3.14.60 LTS Released

Filed under
Linux
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Now Officially Powered by Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

    It's finally here! We know that we've told you so many times about the fact that the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system will get the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel someday, but that day is today, February 1, 2016.

    Just a few minutes ago, Canonical pushed the final Linux kernel 4.4 LTS packages into the stable repositories of the upcoming distribution for early adopters like us to upgrade and replace the old Linux 4.3 kernel from the Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) released.

  • Linux Kernel 3.14.60 LTS Released with PowerPC and AArch64 Improvements

    After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.4.1 LTS and Linux kernel 3.10.96 LTS, kernel maintainer and developer Greg Kroah-Hartman published details about the availability of the sixtieth maintenance build of the Linux 3.14 LTS kernel series.

    Changing 65 files, with 375 insertions and 154 deletions, Linux kernel 3.14.60 LTS is here to add various improvements to the PowerPC (PPC), AArch64 (ARM64), x86, OpenRISC, and MN10300 hardware architectures, as well as to update several drivers, especially for things like PA-RISC, USB, Xen, ISDN, HID, connector, and networking (PPP, bonding, and Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)).

Celebrating 15 Years of SELinux

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

On Dec. 22, 2000, the NSA released their code to the wider open source world in the form of SELinux, and in doing so forever changed the security landscape of not just Linux, but the technology world at large. A combination of policies and security frameworks, SELinux is one of the most widely-used Linux security modules. Without these innovations, Common Criteria, a crucial government security certification, would likely not exist for Linux.

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SMARC COM runs Linux or Android on quad core AM437x

Filed under
Android
Linux

Embedian’s “SMARC-T4378” module runs Linux or Android on TI’s Cortex-A9 AM437x SoC, and features up to 1GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, dual GbE, and an optional carrier.

The SMARC-T4378 appears to be the first SMARC form-factor computer-on-module to be based on the Texas Instruments Sitara AM4378 system-on-chip. The 82 x 50mm Embedian COM joins AM437x-based modules in various other sizes from CompuLab, Variscite, and MYIR that were introduced over the past year, and follows Embedian’s SMARC-compatible SMARC-T335X, which runs on the Cortex-A8 based Sitara AM3354. The Cortex-A9-based AM4378 is clocked to 1GHz instead of the AM3354’s 600MHz.

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6 Benefits of Using Open Source Software in Government (Industry Perspective)

Filed under
OSS

Open source software thrives in government and is in some ways a technical expression of democracy: engineers building common ground and forging a more open and free future for all.

But it’s also often misunderstood in parts of the public sector, seen as a time-consuming and unsupported solution. So if you’re on the fence about open source, keep reading to learn about benefits, evaluation methods, support tools and a few packages to consider right away.

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GPIO Zero and Raspberry Pi programming starter projects

Filed under
Linux

One of the most exciting starter activities to do with a Raspberry Pi is something you can't do on your regular PC or laptop—make something happen in the real world, such as flash an LED or control a motor. If you've done anything like this before, you probably did it with Python using the RPi.GPIO library, which has been used in countless projects. There's now an even simpler way to interact with physical components: a new friendly Python API called GPIO Zero.

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Mozilla Pushes Firefox 45 Into Beta, Promises GTK3 Integration for Linux, Again

Filed under
Moz/FF

Now that we're all enjoying the new features of the Firefox 44.0 web browser on our personal computer, the time has come for Mozilla developers to concentrate their efforts on the next major release.

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Could Linux Mint Replace Ubuntu?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

One of the neatest features about using Linux for everyday computing are the endless choices that are available.

For years, Ubuntu was considered the "top distro" for most people. Recently however, I've seen indications that this is no longer the case. Arch Linux is gaining new users faster than ever. And for those who want a more "predefined experience," Linux Mint is catering to an ever-growing audience as well. Mint's not really my distro of choice. However, pretending that it's not a real contender when compared to other distros is nonsense. Linux Mint has become a big time player.

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Tizen v Android Wear: Which smartwatch OS is right for you?

Filed under
Android
Linux

It's fair to say no-one has answered the smartwatch question yet. But in Google's Android Wear and Samsung's Tizen OS, we have two very different attempts.

We pit the two operating systems against each other, looking at hardware, compatibility, interface, health and fitness tracking and apps to help you decide which platform to plump for.

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Linux 4.5 RC2 and AMDGPU

Filed under
Linux
  • Here Is A Linux 4.5-rc2 Kernel To Play With The New AMDGPU Functionality

    With a report that Linux 4.5-rc2 manages to improve the AMD R9 Fury (Fiji) performance, I spun up a Linux 4.5-rc2 kernel this morning for easing those wanting to test the AMDGPU driver atop Ubuntu.

    While the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA ships with the AMDGPU DRM driver enabled, it doesn't yet enable the new PowerPlay Kconfig option for getting faster performance on hardware like Fiji, Tonga, etc. Their kernel also doesn't ship with the experimental CIK GPU support enabled. Thus I spun a 4.5-rc2 kernel this morning that enables these extra AMDGPU tunables.

  • AMDGPU Driver Said To Be Much Faster With Linux 4.5-rc2 Kernel

    With Linux 4.5-rc2 that was released last night, the new AMDGPU DRM driver is supposedly much faster compared to last week's 4.5-rc1 kernel.

    A Phoronix reader commented, "I read through the changelog and saw that there were several amdgpu patches. I just built this RC, rebooted, and ran some 3d benchmarks an the result is: a) double or quadruple the framerates that I got with RC1, and Cool no more overheating. I have the same model R9 Fury that Michael excluded from the last round of benchmarks due to performance/stability problems."

  • Kernel prepatch 4.5-rc2

Leftovers: OSS (Lexumo, Red Pitaya, IBM Mainframes, John Sullivan's Talk)

Filed under
OSS
  • Draper Spinout Lexumo Looks to Secure IoT With $4.9M From Boston VCs

    On the Internet of Things side, you can name a security startup for almost every letter of the alphabet: Attify, Bastille, CyberCanary, and so on. But most of these companies have very different approaches as compared with Lexumo. (As for Lexumo’s name: Gaynor says it is loosely connected to the Latin roots for “code” and “fix.” Fair enough.)

  • Measure magnetic field with open source teslameter

    A Slovenia-based start-up called Red Pitaya has created a programmable test and measurement instrument which runs open source software and it has posted its first test applications on the internet.

    The board can be configured as an oscilloscope, an arbitrary waveform generator or spectrum analyser by downloading software applications from the company’s online marketplace.

    One design project describes an open source app which can be used to identify unwanted electromagnetic emissions by performing magnetic field measurements.

  • IBM Aims to Expand Open Source Community Surrounding Mainframes [Ed: openwashing campaign to make its proprietary overpriced mainframes seem more ethical]

    In addition to updating the systems that make up the IBM LinuxONE portfolio, IBM has announced that it is optimizing both its StrongLoop framework for creating application programming interfaces and the Cloudant NoSQL database that it provides as a managed service to run on IBM Linux. They also announced that they are collaborating with SUSE to leverage OpenStack to manage instances of the Linux on a mainframe and that the Go programming language developed by Google is now available on IBM Linux mainframes.

  • Overthrowing the Tyranny of Software by John Sullivan

    As part of my master class on Free and Open Source (FOSS) Software at University Paris Diderot, I invite guest lecturers to present to my students the point of views of various actors of the FOSS ecosystem --- companies, non-profits, activists, lawyers, etc.s

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
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