Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 19 Dec 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story MacBook to Chromebook: No regrets Roy Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 11:30pm
Story Efl and Elementary 1.12.2 releases Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 11:07pm
Story Red Hat launches RHEL 7.1 Beta with IBM Power8 support Roy Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 11:04pm
Story Android 5.0 Lollipop: Update Dates for Nexus, Samsung, HTC as well as Sony Devices Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 11:04pm
Story Tanglu 2 Offers Classic GNOME and KDE Desktop with the Help of Debian – Gallery Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 10:59pm
Story Turn Your Old Computer into a Gaming Console with LinuxConsole 2.3 OS Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 10:51pm
Story Pearl Linux MATE Wants to Offer the Ultimate Mac OS X Clone, Fails Miserably Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 10:47pm
Story Ten Linux Desktops Showing How Windows and Mac OS X Designs Are Trapped in the Past Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 10:27pm
Story OSI 2014 Annual Report Roy Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 10:16pm
Story KDE AT ITS VERY BEST! Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2014 - 10:13pm

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Fedora 21

Filed under
Red Hat

Review: 6 business-class Chromebooks test their mettle

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

I've spent the last three weeks taking six business-oriented Chromebooks through their paces. I started out as a skeptical Windows-rules-them-all kind of guy: I've been using Windows since the early days, and I've rarely strayed from the ghosts of my Windows masters. By the end of my Chromebook experiment, however, my old biases were shaken.

Read more

OpenBSD Laptop

Filed under
BSD

I have been meaning to give OpenBSD a try for a while now. What has been attracting me to this operating system was: the big emphasis on security while still being functional, the urge to try another unix-like operating system that is not Linux, and of course Puffy. Here I will be going through the steps I took towards learning about OpenBSD and getting it running on my laptop. I hope that you can take bits and pieces out of this post to help you with your learning experience when you decide it is your time to venture off into the BSD world.

Read more

Alpine 3.1.0 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are pleased to announce Alpine Linux 3.1.0, the first release in v3.1 stable series.

This release is built with musl libc and is not compatible with v2.x and earlier, so special care needs to be taken when upgrading.

Read more

AMDKFD -- AMD HSA On Linux -- Will Not Support 32-Bit Linux

Filed under
Linux

This really shouldn't come as a huge surprise, but AMD won't support HSA on 32-bit Linux.

Given that all of AMD's processors of the last several years have supported x86_64, software in general is beginning to focus on 64-bit only, and that within their binary drivers for matters like OpenCL 2.0 is 64-bit Linux only, the open-source HSA stack is being limited to 64-bit Linux.

Read more

OpenELEC 5.0 RC2 Is Out, It's an Awesome OS for Embedded Devices Already

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The embedded operating system built specifically to run the famous KODI (XBMC) media player solution, OpenELEC, has been upgraded to version 5.0 RC2 and a new image is now ready for testing and download.

Read more

Lamborghini Tauri 88: The $6,000 Android phone

Filed under
Android

Times are tough for a lot of us but apparently not for everybody according to Android Authority. They reported today on a new Android phone called the Lamborghini Tauri 88 that will be made by…you guessed it…the same folks that make Lamborghini cars. And it will sell for a measly $6000!

Read more

F2FS On Linux 3.19 To Support Faster Boot Times

Filed under
Linux

The Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) will see another round of improvements with the now in-development Linux 3.19 kernel.

The F2FS file-system this time around features several bug-fixes and other changes. The noteworthy work for this kernel cycle is less than previous cycles but includes better memory and I/O control when under memory pressure, support for the dirsync mount option, and a fastboot mount option to yield reduced boot times.

The complete list of changes for the F2FS flash file-system in the Linux 3.19 kernel can be found via this pull request by Jaegeuk Kim.

Read more

Firefox 35 Beta Arrives with Conference Call Features for Hello

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla has just released the Beta branch of the upcoming Firefox 35.x and it looks that they don't plan anything out of the ordinary for it, although there are some improvements and various other changes ready.

Read more

Ubuntu 15.04 Gets Linux Kernel 3.18

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 15.04 (Vidid Vervet) is now under development and this is a time when new features and components are added to the distribution. The same is true for the Linux kernel, which has been updated to version 3.18.

Read more

Mozilla Developer Experimenting With Firefox UI In HTML

Filed under
Moz/FF

Paul Rouget of Mozilla has gone public with his experimental, proof-of-concept work to rebuild the Firefox user-interface within HTML.

Rouget is hoping to one day replace the Firefox UI currently written in XUL with an HTML implementation. However, first the HTML needs to be made faster and enriched for constructing the entire Firefox UI. This would also allow for the Firefox UI to be eventually rendered by their next-generation Servo Engine rather than Gecko.

Read more

Open source for sensitive email

Filed under
OSS

We often discuss the many benefits of open source software. The single most important factor, the one that all benefits emerge from, is open. This is actually at the heart of what the software is, a community-driven software package with full transparency into the code base. Governments care about open source because it provides three powerful benefits: monetary savings, improved quality, and better security and privacy. This last benefit is often less-than-obvious, but equally important.

Read more

Linux Distros: What’s in a Name?

Filed under
Linux

Yesterday, the Fedora Project released Fedora 21, and with it the tech media got on its proverbial horse and started reports and reviews of the latest release. While it’s a good release and we won’t be reviewing it here — I already gave it a shakedown during the alpha and found it to be fantastic and completely worth the wait — there’s one thing that’s missing from Fedora 21 that I find rather disheartening.

Read more

6-Way Winter 2014 Linux Distribution Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With this week's launch of Fedora 21, here's a performance comparison of the new Fedora Linux release compared to the Arch-based Antergos rolling-release distribution, Debian GNU/Linux Jessie, openSUSE Tumbleweed, CentOS Linux 7, and Ubuntu 14.10.

These six Linux distributions were all tested with the same hardware that came down to an MSI X99S SLI PLUS motherboard with Intel Xeon E5-2687W v3 ten-core processor plus Hyper Threading. The system also had 16GB of quad-channel DDR4 memory, 80GB Intel SSD, and Radeon HD 7850 graphics.

All six Linux distributions were tested with their default installation settings and packages.

Read more

Mozilla and Telenor Announce WebRTC Competency Center to Advance WebRTC and Help Standardization

Filed under
Moz/FF

Web Real-Time Communications (WebRTC) is changing the way people communicate over the Web by enabling developers to more easily integrate real-time communications on websites, mobile Web apps or video conferencing systems. WebRTC makes complex real-time communications technology available to everyone, driving a wave of new communications services that significantly improves user choice.

Read more

Qt 5.4 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

I am happy to announce that Qt 5.4 has been released today and is available for download from qt.io. Together with Qt 5.4, we have also released Qt Creator 3.3 and an update to Qt for device creation on embedded Linux and embedded Android.

But let’s start with Qt 5.4. One of the main focus areas of this Qt release has been around Web technologies and we have a lot of cool new things to offer there.

Read more

Intel extends its Internet-of-Things ecosystem

Filed under
Linux

Intel introduced a new IoT “end-to-end reference model” that includes a Linux-ready edge management platform, security, services, and ecosystem partners.

The new reference platform, called the “Intel IoT Platform,” helps fill in the gaps in Intel’s growing ecosystem of Internet of Things gateways, cloud-based services, and endpoint devices like the Linux-based Intel Galileo SBC and Intel Edison module.

Read more

[Video] Tizen OS For Smart Life, Carsten Heitzler, Samsung #Slush2014

Filed under
Linux

Carsten Heitzler, who is the Principal Engineer at Samsung was onstage at Slush 2014 presenting Tizen OS for Smart Life. Slush is one of the biggest startup events of the year with over 13,000 attendees. Carsten discusses what is an Operating System and how Tizen is similar to other Linux distributions that are typically designed for server or the desktop environment, but in the case of Tizen it is much much more, with having the flexibility of being able to be used in things like Smart watches, Smart Cameras, TVs, Mobile Phones, Cars, IoT and anything that you can or want to fit an Operating System into, we have Tizen.

Read more

Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" Mate Review: Simply awesome performance!

Filed under
Reviews

I guess I discussed sometime back in my blog that Linux Mint won't pursue Ubuntu's schedule of releasing a new distro every 6 months and instead focus on Ubuntu's LTS releases. True to their promise, they have released an update to the Linux Mint 17 LTS, nicknamed "Rebecca". The release notes states of the following incremental improvements: "The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 17.1 'Rebecca' MATE. Linux Mint 17.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2019. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use. Linux Mint 17.1 MATE edition comes with two window managers installed and configured by default: Marco (MATE's very own window manager, simple, fast and very stable); Compiz (an advanced compositing window manager which can do wonders if your hardware supports it). Among the various window managers available for Linux, Compiz is certainly the most impressive when it comes to desktop effects."

Read more

Syndicate content