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Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debian Project mourns the loss of Kristoffer H. Rose Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 8:59am
Story Linux Users v Windows Users, Debian Mourns Another Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 8:56am
Story Open source tools can help small businesses cut costs and save time Rianne Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 8:52am
Story Solus Gets MATE 1.16 Desktop Environment and Linux Kernel 4.7.5, Up-to-Date Apps Rianne Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 8:46am
Story 7 Ways Linux Users Differ from Windows Users Rianne Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 8:45am
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 8:04am
Story Servers/Networks Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 8:03am
Story Kubernetes News Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 8:02am
Story Ubuntu 16.10 Final Beta Officially Released with Linux Kernel 4.8, Download Now Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 7:54am
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5 "Atticus" to Reach End of Life on September 30, 2016 Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2016 - 7:47am

GNU/Linux and Hardware

Linux on Servers

Filed under
Server
  • ONOS Hummingbird Release Advances Open-Source SDN
  • SDN Platforms Boron, Hummingbird Released

    Seen by some as competing for supremacy in the software-defined networking (SDN) controller space, the ONOS Project and the OpenDaylight Project just released respective platforms within one day of another.

    Today, the ONOS Project announced its eighth quarterly platform release, called Hummingbird, described as "the only SDN control plane that can support both disruptive and incremental SDN for service providers and enterprises seeking to virtualize and optimize to keep agile pace with the explosion of mobile devices, video and Big Data applications."

  • Containerized Production Environments: Networking, Security, and Storage

    So you have an application that is composed around containers. You have lightweight base images, a centralized container registry, and integration with the deployment and continuous integration (CI) pipeline — everything needed to get containers working at full scale on your hardware. For running a multitier application, you spent time on using a service discovery mechanism for your application containers. You have a logging mechanism that pulls out the information from each container and ships them to a server to be indexed. Using a monitoring tool that is well suited for this era when machines are disposable, you see an aggregate of your monitoring data, giving you a view of the data grouped around container roles. Everything falls nicely into place.

  • What is DevOps? Bridget Kromhout Explains
  • Best Practices for Implementing Open Source in Your DevOps Toolchain
  • DevOps for Pointy-Haired Bosses by Victoria Blessing, Texas A&M University
  • 3 strikes against the public cloud

    AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, and other IaaS offerings all set their pricing in relation to running stuff as internal infrastructure. Take Elastic MapReduce or AWS's managed Hadoop compute cluster. Does anyone actually use it and think, “yeah, that’s worth the money”? Would they think that even if the goofy bugs and idiosyncrasies were fixed? Remember, this is another service on top of AWS, so EC2 is a sort of base price.

    For small to midsized departments, it's cheaper to run stuff on Amazon than at home because you need fewer people to manage it. That said, a tangled web of instances in the public cloud quickly becomes unwieldy, and eventually, someone has to manage it. Usually the issue is forced by the finance department. For larger, internet-scale services, you start to find Amazon’s pricing doesn’t scale so well.

  • Windows Server 2016: Leg up or lock in?

    The growth of Linux is clearly something that Microsoft is aware of...

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • What’s new in 389 Directory Server 1.3.5

    As a member of the 389 Directory Server (389DS) core team, I am always excited about our new releases. We have some really great features in 1.3.5. However, our changelogs are always large so I want to just touch on a few of my favourites.

    389 Directory Server is an LDAPv3 compliant server, used around the world for Identity Management, Authentication, Authorisation and much more. It is the foundation of the FreeIPA project’s server. As a result, it’s not something we often think about or even get excited for: but every day many of us rely on 389DS to be correct, secure and fast behind the scenes.

  • Adobe Returns to Linux with the New NPAPI Flash Player After 4 Years
  • Codeweavers CrossOver 15.3.0 for Linux and Mac OSX has been released

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 15.3.0 for both Mac OSX and Linux. CrossOver 15.3.0 has important bug fixes for both Mac and Linux users.

  • Enlightenment EFL Adds Atomic Modesetting, Nuclear Page-Flipping

    The Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) now has support for atomic mode-setting and nuclear page-flipping!

    This atomic mode-setting and nuclear page-flipping support is designed for the Linux 4.8 kernel and newer and so far has just been tested with the Intel DRM driver.

    Samsung developer Chris Michael commented with the nearly thousand lines of new code that on working systems it provides "buttery smoothness."

  • Kubuntu beta; please test!

    When you run into bugs, try to report them via "apport", which means using ubuntu-bug packagename in the commandline. Once apport has logged into launchpad and downloaded the relevant error messages, you can give some details like a short description of the bug, and can get the number. Please report the bug numbers on the qa site in your test report.

SUSE and GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
GNOME
SUSE
  • GNOME 3.22 Now Available On OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
  • GNOME 3.22 Streamlines Into Tumbleweed

    Less than 48 hours from when GNOME’s release team unveiled version 3.22 (Karlsruhe), openSUSE Tumbleweed users are getting the full upstream experience of the latest GNOME.

    Snapshot 20160921 made 3.22 available to user, but there were plenty of other snapshots during the week that brought new packages to Tumbleweed users.

    Dominique Leuenberger, a member of the openSUSE release team, wrote that there were five snapshots this week in an email to developers on the openSUSE Factory Mailing List.

    The Linux Kernel updated to 4.7.4 and VirtualBox updated a version in the 20160920 snapshot. Snapshot 20160914 updated KDE Frameworks to 5.26.0 and KDE Applications 16.08.1.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/38

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Ubuntu

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Should I Use an Open Source Ecommerce Cart?

    One of the biggest decisions small business owners make when launching an ecommerce site is deciding on which shopping cart to offer. Long gone are the days when a PayPal button on your website was sufficient. If you plan to run a modern online storefront that’s appealing to customers, a shopping cart is a must.

  • New Hardware Solutions Target Internet of Things

    New hardware strategies are taking shape in the Internet of Things space. In one of the more interesting new moves, SolidRun, a maker of System on Module (SoM) solutions, Single Board Computers (SBC) and Industrial PCs, today announced new products designed to reduce the required footprint, simplify the development process, and shorten the time to market for Intel Braswell-based IoT products. SolidRun claims that it now offers the world's smallest scalable SoM solution for Intel's 14nm Braswell family of quad-core processors.

    Meanwhile, Nextcloud, a new company forked from the ownCloud cloud platform is focusing on IoT as well. The company, Canonical and Western Digital have launched an Ubuntu Core Linux-based cloud storage and Internet of Things device called Nextcloud Box. It bundles the open source Nextcloud service and can be driven by a Raspberry Pi and Raspberry Pi 3 devices. This is essentially a turnkey and easy way to roll your own private cloud and manage it, but its base with Ubuntu Core enables the device to act as an extensible IoT gateway at home, controlling other devices and connecting them with their owners.

    SolidRun's new 14nm Intel Braswell chip based MicroSoM is designed to make harnessing Braswell chips for IoT applications simple.

  • Riot: Encrypted Open Source Messenger for Teams

    Smartphone users who communicate and often do teamwork like to have three different things. For starters, they like to easily communicate with their friends, family or work partners. Secondly, they want to use as fewer tools as possible, so it is ideal to have all their stuff in the same place. Last but not least, they want all this with the certainty of being secured and have their privacy assured.

    For anyone feeling this is their description, know that there is an app comprising all that: Riot, a secure messaging environment that brings online collaboration into one workspace. It is launching publicly this week, after a successful beta phase under the codename Vector. Riot is built on Matrix, an open standard for decentralized persistent communication.

  • Indoor navigation tool for blind individuals now available as open-source app

    Navatar, an indoor navigation system for students who are blind, launched this month as a free, open-source project that is available for Android phones.

    Navatar was developed by a research team led by Eelke Folmer, an associate professor of computer science and engineering, and developed with funding from Reader's Digest Partner's for Sight Foundation and Google Research.

    "Navigating campus environments can be quite a challenge for blind students and having to rely on a sighted guide is a significant loss of independence," Folmer said. "With Navatar we aim to remove this barrier and help more blind students pursue a college degree."

    Navatar overcomes a number of the obstacles traditionally associated with indoor navigation systems for blind users. Unlike existing systems, Navatar doesn't require any instrumentation and only relies on low-cost sensors available in smartphones and a digital map of the environment.

  • OpenSolaris-Derived Illumos Switching Away From GRUB 0.97 To A New Bootloader

    The OpenSolaris-derived Illumos project is rolling out its new bootloader project to use on new systems in place of its old GRUB (v0.97) legacy bootloader.

    This new bootloader for Illumos is derived from the FreeBSD boot loader. Illumos developers are switching away from GRUB-Legacy to this new loader in order to support functionality like UEFI booting, RAID-Z, and other modern features. The FreeBSD loader won the decision for the Illumos job rather than GRUB2.

  • GISWATER, Free and Open Source technology for the integral water cycle management

    When you need to design water supply or urban drainage master plans and you don't dispose of the adecuated tools, you pass a hard time. Me and my partner Josep Lluís we knew it by experience. We had many trouble to develop hydraulic projects without using a software affordable from an economic point of view, user-friendly and integrable with GIS technologies.

  • The must-have features for Perl 6

    Perl 6 came out in general release around Christmas 2015, and since then I've heard a lot of questions about it, both from people in and out of the Perl community. Jeff Goff is a longtime member of the Perl community and a good friend who's been heavily involved in Perl 6 development, so I asked him a few of the questions from what I've been hearing others ponder.

    Jeff has been speaking on the topic at conferences this year, including the upcoming OSCON London event. Get the inside scoop from my interview with him.

GNU News

Filed under
GNU

GNU/Linux Game Sales

Filed under
Gaming
  • 'SOMA' from Frictional Games sales figures released, Linux accounted for around 1.1% of sales

    Frictional Games, the developers of 'SOMA' [Official Site] have released their sales figures. The game sold about 450,000 copies of which 5,000 was from Linux gamers. So that's around 1.1%.

  • Survival Horror Game Sees Linux Sales Around 1%

    It's been one year since Frictional Games launched SOMA as their latest science fiction survival horror game. The game is supported on Windows, OS X, Linux, and PlayStation 4. This game saw close to half a million sales, but just over 1% of them were from Linux gamers.

    Frictional Games shared via a tweet that of the 450,000+ SOMA sales, Linux accounted for only around 5,000 sales, or about 1%. SOMA is powered by Frictional Games' in-house HPL Engine 3.

DIGMA presents the world’s first Tablet running Tizen 3.0 OS

Filed under
Linux

During the Forum “Internet of Things” (IoT), that was held on September 22, 2016 in Media Center MIA “Russia today” (Moscow), DIGMA presented the world’s first Tizen-based tablet running version 3.0 of the Operating System (OS) with a new “architecture designed for the Internet of Things”. This tablet is aimed squarely at businesses and government enterprise organizations that require data security and device stability from their OS and required apps.

Read more

7 things you need to know for WordPress development

Filed under
OSS

WordPress never fails to surprise the web development community. Over time, it has evolved into one of the best Content Management Systems (CMS) out there. And currently, it powers more than 25% of the web. Besides its popularity, WordPress is also known for usability and an easy-to-develop environment.

Read more

Revive Your Old PC With Lightweight Linux LXLE

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

LXLE is a super-lightweight, Lubuntu-based Linux distribution that should breath life in to most old machines. However, the big difference that LXLE offers over many other lightweight operating systems is that it has a focus on eye candy.

Just because you’re running a lightweight operating system, it doesn’t need to look like something from The Matrix!

I decided to install LXLE on an old Compaq Netbook that I had lying around the house. It’s fairly low-powered, having a first generation 1.6 GHz single core Intel Atom CPU, 2 GB of RAM, and a 160 GB 5400 RPM hard disk drive. This should be the perfect little machine to test LXLE on.

Read more

2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Yasin Sekabira: Open Source Entrepreneur

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Reviews

Being a LiFT Scholarship 2016 recipient on paper is like a dream come true. It’s an opportunity to work even harder, train harder, and stay competitive in what you really do best,

Today open source and Linux are absolutely up there in the top, it’s an opportunity to sharpen my open source skills from newbie to Ninja Pro. With The Linux Foundation and Linus Torvalds, you just feel like you’re learning and mastering Kung fu from Bruce-Lee.

The LiFT Scholarship will help me to prepare for my LFCE (Linux Foundation Certified Engineer), and hopefully pass it and add it to my belt. The LFCE badge really shows the world that you can play like Messi or Score like T.Henry of Arsenal.

Read more

A Not For The Everyday Linux User Review Of Porteus 3.1

Filed under
Reviews

Ok, so this is the way I see it. Porteus is fine as a USB based distribution if you just want to use a web browser and maybe type a document.

For everything else it is just too difficult and for no real reward. For instance I could create a Xubuntu or Lubuntu persistent USB drive and all the hardware stuff would work out of the box and I would have access to the full software repositories.

With Porteus it feels like you are fighting it and if something is difficult to master then it needs to provide some reward for the effort such as having something so cool that you go wow.

Yes it is small at around the 300 megabytes mark and it boots quickly. The download screen is a good idea and whilst the idea of save files isn't new (Puppy does it, as do persistent *buntu distributions) the concept is a decent one.

The fact that you have to mess around with configuration files to get it to work and the fact that there is a concept of cheat codes and the fact that finding and installing software is so convoluted just makes it too much effort.

Read more

4 command-line graphics tools for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Images and the command line. They seem an unlikely pair, don't they? There are people who'll tell you that the only way you can manipulate and view graphics is with GUI applications like GIMP.

For the most part, they're wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job.

Let's take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.

Read more

GNOME Release Party Manchester

Filed under
Just talk

GNOME Release Party Manchester

Summary: Today's party celebrating the release of GNOME 3.22

RIANNE AND I both attended today's GNOME release party in Manchester. It was a good opportunity to meet some geeky people, including a few from Codethink, which organised this event.

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