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Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics in Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:51pm
Story Kernel Space/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:49pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:49pm
Story KDE Plans Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:47pm
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:45pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:42pm
Story Linux and FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:41pm
Story Mozilla News Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:41pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2017 - 11:40pm

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

antiX A Fast And Lightweight Linux Distribution

Filed under
Reviews

antiX is a fast and lightweight Linux distribution. It is based on Debian stable. antiX is a very different distro, it isn’t like Debian or Ubuntu. It doesn’t use systemd. Actually, most Linux distros are using systemd to manage the system processes, but antiX doesn’t like systemd.
I don’t have any problem with systemd, but time after analyze systemd, I realized that it is not the best way to replace SysVinit, because it doesn’t follow the UNIX philosophy. I think that systemd is very complex, maybe this is the reason for why antiX doesn’t use it.

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Also: Chakra 2017.03 Goedel is released

Games for GNU/Linux: Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, Serious Sam Fusion 2017

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Graphics and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Pipeline Statistics Queries Wired Up For Intel ANV Vulkan Driver

    Pipeline statistics queries is the latest Vulkan capability being added to the Intel "ANV" Mesa Vulkan driver.

    Pipeline statistics queries allow applications to query a set of Vulkan pipeline counters. Developers interested in learning more about the feature can see the Vulkan documentation.

  • SUSE Developers Publish Radeon GCN Backend Code For GCC Compiler

    While the AMDGPU "GCN" compiler support in LLVM is quite mature now, the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) hasn't yet received a full-fledged GCN compiler back-end for AMD GPUs. SUSE developers have been working on that for AMD and today they have published their code branch. This GCN back-end for GCC is primarily focused on compute capabilities rather than compiling graphics shaders.

  • xf86-video-ati 7.9 / xf86-video-amdgpu 1.3 DDX Driver Updates
  • Trying Out The New OpenGL Threaded Dispatch In Mesa 17.1

    At the beginning of today, OpenGL threaded dispatch landed in Mesa as work that's existed in patch form for years but was recently revived for Mesa Git due to the potential for significant performance gains in select scenarios.

  • Open Source Radeon & AMDGPU Linux Drivers Updated for AMD GPUs with Improvements

    Michel Dänzer announced today the general availability of new maintenance updates for the open source AMDGPU (xf86-video-amdgpu) and Radeon (xf86-video-ati) graphics drivers.

    xf86-video-ati 7.9.0 and xf86-video-amdgpu 1.3.0 are now available for download and they are coming soon to a GNU/Linux distro near you to improve your gaming experience if you're using an AMD Radeon graphics card.

    Both releases come with the ability to use DRM render nodes for DRI3 clients if they are available, and allow the TearFree option to be toggled at runtime by using a RandR output property called "TearFree."

  • NVIDIA might have more open drivers in future on Linux

    Here’s an interesting one, a developer from NVIDIA noted on the Linux Kernel Mailing List that NVIDIA has been designing some new open source drivers. So I did some digging and got an interesting response.

  • Hammering The AMD Ryzen 7 1800X With An Intense, Threaded Workload

    Today I got around to running a very heavy/demanding, very real-world workload on the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X that I've been meaning to test with this Zen CPU.

    The workload I've been running on the Ryzen 7 1800X the past few hours is that of Open Porous Media, the open-source OPM project is a growing initiative around research and simulators for modeling and simulation of porous media processes, including a reservoir simulator and permeability upscaling. This sort of workload has relevance in areas like oil and natural gas industries.

The End of the Line for EPEL-5

Filed under
Red Hat

For the last 10 years, the Fedora Project has been building packages for the same release of another operating system. However on March 31st, 2017, that will come to an end when Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) version 5 moves out of production.

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BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD On NVMe SSDs: Samsung Good, Intel 600p Not

    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has been testing out various NVMe M.2 SSDs under his BSD operating system to see how these latest-generation storage devices perform.

  • LLD Linker Declared Ready For Production On x86_64 ELF Platforms

    LLVM developer Rui Ueyama is encouraging the "dogfeeding" of their linker, LLD, that should now be ready for production use on some platforms/architectures with this week's LLVM 4.0 release.

    Rui Ueyama believes that the LLD linker is ready for production with ELF platforms -- namely as Linux and BSDs -- on at least x86_64 but the AArch64 and MIPS architecture support should be in good shape too.

  • vBSDcon 2017 CFP Open

    Verisign is hosting its 3rd vBSDcon, scheduled for September 8 - 9, 2017, in Reston, VA. A Call For Presentations is currently open and submissions are being accepted at vBSDcon.com. CFP administration is being conducted through EasyChair, which require accounts to upload submissions for consideration. Our call is open through April 30, 2017. So get your submissions in soon!

Google Introduces Guetzli

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Announcing Guetzli: A New Open Source JPEG Encoder

    At Google, we care about giving users the best possible online experience, both through our own services and products and by contributing new tools and industry standards for use by the online community. That’s why we’re excited to announce Guetzli, a new open source algorithm that creates high quality JPEG images with file sizes 35% smaller than currently available methods, enabling webmasters to create webpages that can load faster and use even less data.

  • Guetzli: Google Rolls Out A New JPEG Encoder

    Google has announced Guetzli, not a German cookie, but rather a new open-source algorithm for creating high-quality JPEGs that are 35% smaller than currently available methods.

  • Google releases open source 'Guetzli' JPEG encoder

    Google is one of the biggest champions of open source. Not only does the search giant use open source software in its products, but it contributes to the community too. There are many projects made open source by the company, which helps the greater good.

    Today, Google releases yet another open source project. Called "Guetzli," it is a JPEG encoder that aims to produce even smaller image file sizes. In fact, the search giant claims a whopping 35 percent improvement over existing JPEG compression. If you are wondering why smaller file sizes are important, it is quite simple -- the web. If websites can embed smaller images, users can experience faster load times while using less data.

How Canonical makes money from Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are three active LTS releases of Ubuntu: 12.04, 14.04 and 16.04. The support for 12.04 is ending this year on April 28, 2017. While Canonical is encouraging users to upgrade to 14.04 or 16.04 LTS, there are still a lot of companies using 12.04.

Customers running critical services on their servers and cloud really don’t like frequent upgrades. They tweak, tune and customize different components of their infrastructure and when you bring in too many changes at the same time with a major release upgrade, something is going to break.

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Why do you use Linux and open source software?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As I mentioned when The Queue launched, although typically I will answer questions from readers, sometimes I'll switch that around and ask readers a question. I haven't done so since that initial column, so it's overdue. I recently asked two related questions at LinuxQuestions.org and the response was overwhelming. Let's see how the Opensource.com community answers both questions, and how those responses compare and contrast to those on LQ.

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Slackel Openbox Plays Hard to Get

Filed under
Reviews

Slackel's Openbox edition is a lightweight operating system that offers reliable performance once you get the box open. It is not an ideal OS for every user, though.

Slackel 6.0.8 Openbox, the latest version of the Greece-based project's lightweight distribution, was released by developer Dimitris Tzemos last fall.

Slackel is a Linux distro that offers several benefits for users who step away from the typical mainstream Debian-based Linux distros. Based on both Slackware and Salix, it offers a few advantages not usually found with the Slackware Linux lineup.

For example, Slackel is fully compatible with both Slackware and Salix software packages. The main difference is it includes the current version of Slackware and the latest version of KDE in the repository.

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Fedora 26 Alpha Delays

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 26 Alpha Has Been Delayed

    Fedora 26 Alpha isn't going to make it out on time and has been delayed, pushing back the final F26 already by a second time.

  • Fedora 26 Alpha Delayed by a Week Due to Late Blockers, Could Launch on March 28

    Red Hat's Jan Kurik has announced today, March 16, 2017, that the upcoming Alpha release of the Fedora 26 Linux operating system has been delayed by one week due to late blockers.

    This is the second delay the Fedora 26 Alpha release received. It was initially scheduled for launch on March 14, and then delayed until March 21, but it seems that the realese on that date won't happen either because during today's Go/No-Go meeting, the Fedora Linux developers have decided that some critical bugs need to be resolved before it hits the streets.

Turtl A Privacy Focused Evernote Note Taking Alternative

Filed under
Linux

Turtl is primarily a note-taking app like Evernote and Google Keep with a high focus on privacy and security. According to their site, “It's a private place to keep your notes, research, passwords, bookmarks, dream logs, photos, documents and anything else you want to keep safe”.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Orange Pi PCs get Ubuntu App Store thanks to Canonical

Filed under
Ubuntu

There’s no shortage of small, low-power PC-on-a-module devices designed to piggyback on the success of the Raspberry Pi. But one problem with some of these cheap single board computers is that they don’t have the same kind of user and developer community as the Raspberry Pi, which can make it harder to get official support.

So it’s interesting to see that the makers of the Orange Pi line of products have partnered with Ubuntu Linux maker Canonical to offer an official app store for Orange Pi products running Ubuntu software.

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How an open source Gitter could challenge Slack

Filed under
OSS

It sure sounds like a match made in dev heaven.

Yesterday, GitLab -- maker of an open source competitor to GitHub -- announced it had acquired Gitter, a Slack-like chat service aimed mainly at software developers.

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Do GitHub's updated terms of service conflict with copyleft?

Filed under
GNU
Legal

GitHub's updated terms caused a great deal of concern, but while they are confusing, they do not appear to be incompatible with copyleft. The Free Software Foundation (FSF), though, still recommends using other code hosting sites.

GitHub recently updated their terms of service (ToS). Users of the site are raising many concerns over the new terms, fearing that the ToS could be incompatible with the copyleft licenses on works uploaded to GitHub. In particular, section D of the new terms, which handles rights granted to GitHub and GitHub users, makes many hackers very uncomfortable.

Section D.4 states, "You grant us and our legal successors the right to store and display your Content and make incidental copies as necessary to render the Website and provide the Service. " At first glance that might appear to grant permissions on your work without the concomitant protective guarantees found in copyleft licenses like the GNU General Public License (GPL). Users who care about ensuring that their software never becomes proprietary would not want to give such unconditional permission. And those uploading works that incorporate third-party copylefted code may not even be able to grant such permissions.

But licenses like the GNU GPL already give the necessary permissions to make, use, and modify local copies of a work. Are the new GitHub ToS asking for more than that? It's not fully clear. While the grant language could fit within the scope of the GPL, other words used in the section like "share" or "distribute" could be understood to mean something that wouldn't line up with the GPL's terms.

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[How To] Install Latest NVIDIA Drivers In Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Do you have a Nvidia graphics card on your desktop? That's great until you are in need of the latest drivers especially when you are a gamer. Unlike Windows, Nvidia drivers for Linux desktops are quite hard to come by, and installing the latest drivers on your Linux desktop can be quite an arduous process. Fortunately for Linux users, there are the third party graphics drivers PPA which keeps an updated Nvidia driver for installation. The PPA is currently in testing but you can nonetheless get working Nvidia drivers from here.

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more

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Leftovers: OSS

  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?
    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance. In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."
  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide
    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.
  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities
    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Software and today's howtos

Security and Bugs

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Devops embraces security measures to build safer software
    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.
  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors
    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw. Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors. And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.