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Wednesday, 19 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Graphics: AMD and Libinput 1.12

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD Patches in Support for FreeSync to Linux

    AMD developer Nicholas Kazlauskas has uploaded a series of patches, that when eventually added to the Linux kernel, will enable 'FreeSync' within Linux. Adaptive sync is the Displayport spec and variable refresh rate is the same but pertains to the HDMI spec that allows for graphics adapters to drive displays with varying frame timings. Michael Larabel from Phoronix is optimistic that they will become available with the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel.

  • AMD Finally Rolls Out New Linux Patches For Adaptive-Sync / VRR (FreeSync)

    While the open-source AMD Radeon Linux graphics stack has gotten into particularly good shape the past two years or so, one of the areas that has left the red Linux gamers unsatisfied is the lack of FreeSync support (or DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync / HDMI Variable Refresh Rate) when using the fully open-source stack. It looks like that could be changing soon with the new set of patches under review.

  • Libinput 1.12 Released With New Quirks System, Touchpad Improvements

    Peter Hutterer announced the release today of libinput v1.12 as the widely used Linux input handling library on Wayland/Mir/X.Org desktops.

    Libinput 1.12 is a big release that has been in development the past few months and features its own quirks system to replace their use of the hwdb hardware database, new documentation, better support for FreeBSD, new trackpoints code, improved touchpad behavior, better palm detection, new pointer jump detection code, and a variety of other fixes and improvements for this generic input handling library.

Linux Foundation and Linux Events

Filed under
Linux
  • Looking forward to the Kernel Summit at LPC 2018

    The LPC 2018 program committee would like to reiterate that the Kernel Summit is going ahead as planned as a track within the Linux Plumbers Conference in Vancouver, BC, November 13th through 15th. However, the Maintainers Summit half day, which is by invitation only, has been rescheduled to be colocated with OSS Europe in Edinburgh, Scotland on October 22nd. Attendees of the Maintainers Summit, once known, will still receive free passes to LPC and thus will probably be present in Vancouver as well.

  • Tech Topics for Kernel Summit

    If you missed the refereed-track deadline and you have a kernel-related topic (or, for that matter, if you just now thought of a kernel-related topic), please consider submitting it for the Kernel Summit.

  • The Linux Foundation launches new Hyperledger training courses and certification

    The Linux Foundation is offering an educational opportunity for students to enrol for its latest LFD271 – Hyperledger Fabric Fundamentals training course, which introduces the fundamental concepts of blockchain and distributed ledger technologies.

    Students who sign up will also learn about the core architecture and components that make up typical decentralised Hyperledger Fabric applications. Enrolled students will also get to work with Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Fabric Certificate Authority and the Hyperledger Fabric SDK.

Python joins movement to dump 'offensive' master, slave terms

Filed under
Development

Python creator Guido van Rossum retired as "benevolent dictator for life" in July, but like Michael Corleone in The Godfather III, he's been pulled back in to resolve a debate about politically incorrect language.

Like other open source communities, Python's minders have been asked whether they really want to continue using the terms "master" and "slave" to describe technical operations and relationships, given that the words remind some people of America's peculiar institution, a historical legacy that fires political passions to this day.

Last week Victor Stinner, a Python developer who works for Red Hat, published four pull requests seeking to change "master" and "slave" in Python documentation and code to terms like "parent," "worker," or something similarly anodyne.

Read more

September 2018 Drivers: The Current Linux Performance & Perf-Per-Watt From NVIDIA Kepler To Pascal vs. AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

There is one week to go until NVIDIA begins shipping the GeForce RTX 2080 "Turing" series but while waiting for that hardware, here is a look back at how various graphics cards are performing for Linux games from the GTX 1000 Pascal series back through the GTX 600 Kepler series. On the AMD side in this comparison is also going from Vega back to the GCN 1.0 Southern Islands. The Vulkan/OpenGL Linux gaming performance is being looked at as well as the overall system power consumption and performance-per-Watt.

Read more

Also: Phoronix Test Suite 8.2 Released With Official Docker Benchmarking Image, New Testing Improvements

OpenSSL 1.1.1 Is Released

Filed under
OSS
Security

After two years of work we are excited to be releasing our latest version today - OpenSSL 1.1.1. This is also our new Long Term Support (LTS) version and so we are committing to support it for at least five years.

OpenSSL 1.1.1 has been a huge team effort with nearly 5000 commits having been made from over 200 individual contributors since the release of OpenSSL 1.1.0. These statistics just illustrate the amazing vitality and diversity of the OpenSSL community. The contributions didn’t just come in the form of commits though. There has been a great deal of interest in this new version so thanks needs to be extended to the large number of users who have downloaded the beta releases to test them out and report bugs.

Read more

Also: OpenSSL 1.1.1 Released With TLS 1.3 Support, Better Fends Off Side-Channel Attacks

Alpine Linux 3.8.1 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.8.1 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

This is a bugfix release of the v3.8 stable branch, based on linux-4.14.69 kernels and it contains bugfixes. It contains an important security update for apk-tools which fixes a potential remote execution. A CVE is pending.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Can Open Source Improve Japan’s New Blockchain-based Voting System?

    Besides Switzerland and the USA, Japan is now the most recent implementer of Blockchain in its voting system. Let’s take a look at the news in brief and also the current challenges in the model. Can Open Source help in tackling them?

    [...]

    Complete details of the initiative (translated) are available on the Tsukuba city page.

    Though integrating Blockchain with the “My Number” system makes the voting process easier, there really are some notable setbacks, one of which is described in the video that needs to be dealt with in order to improve this voting system.

  • IRC's 30th Birthday; Mozilla Working on New JavaScript APIs for VR; Arch Linux Answering Questions on Reddit; Microsoft Splits Its Visual Studio Team Services; and Hortonworks, IBM and Red Hat Announce the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative

    Mozilla yesterday announced it is beginning a new phase of work on JavaScript APIs "that will help everyone create and share virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) projects on the open web". Mozilla's new WebXR Device API has two goals: 1) "To support a wider variety of user inputs, such as voice and gestures, giving users options for navigating and interacting in virtual spaces"; and 2) "To establish a technical foundation for development of AR experiences, letting creators integrate real-world media with contextual overlays that elevate the experience." For more information, see the Immersive Web Community Group.

  • Converting a WebGL application to WebVR

    A couple months ago I ported the Pathfinder demo app to WebVR. It was an interesting experience, and I feel like I learned a bunch of things about porting WebGL applications to WebVR that would be generally useful to folks, especially folks coming to WebVR from non-web programming backgrounds.

    Pathfinder is a GPU-based font rasterizer in Rust, and it comes with a demo app that runs the Rust code on the server side but does all the GPU work in WebGL in a TypeScript website.

    We had a 3D demo showing a representation of the Mozilla Monument as a way to demo text rasterization in 3D. What I was hoping to do was to convert this to a WebVR application that would let you view the monument by moving your head instead of using arrow keys.

  • Combining the Benefits of Commercial & Open Analytics [Ed: "Commercial & Open" is misleading because Free/Open Source software is used a lot commercially. Some just attempt to spread the line/lie that only proprietary is suitable commercially.]
  • More Details On The AMD GCN Back-End For GCC That's Expected To Merge For GCC 9

    -
    Last week I reported on Code Sourcery / Mentor Graphics posting their new AMD GCN port to the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC). This GPU back-end for the widely-used GCC compiler is hoped for merging ahead of the GCC 9 stable release expected in early 2019. At this past weekend's GNU Tools Cauldron 2018 conference was a briefing by Mentor Graphics on undertaking funded by AMD.

  • Book review: The Economics of Open Access – on the Future of Academic Publishing

    Two decades ago, the world of academic publishing was taken by a storm called ‘open access’. The movement of ‘open access’ advocates for making published content available to the public for free. No fees and no (or little) right-based restrictions to limit access (apparently, the wisdom that authors need financial incentives to create does not apply to scholars who write for pleasure or reputation alone). The aim of open access is [was] to democratize access to knowledge. In ‘The Economics Open Access’, Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen investigate whether ‘open access’ strategies have delivered on their promises.

    Combined with the rise of the Internet and digital technologies, open access strategies should have made the dissemination of knowledge (via academic publications) cheaper than ever. Instead, we find libraries facing higher subscription fees which forces them to cut back on their catalogue listing and monograph in-take…so what went wrong?

    The book offers an economic empirical analysis the impact of ‘open access’ has had on the academic publishing market world-wide. The analysis is based on two different sets of data: an ‘objective’ data set capturing the state of the academic publishing markets (i.e. growth in publication numbers, publishers, levels of open-access practices etc.), and a ‘subjective’ data set which documents scholars’ views on open access policies and how they engage with them in practice. This second set of data, based on over 10,000 responses from 25 different countries, is undoubtedly the most novel and original contribution of the book to the debate.

  • Europe's New 'Plan S' For Open Access: Daft Name, Great News

    Keeping copyright in the hands of authors is crucial: too often, academics have been cajoled or bullied into handing over copyright for their articles to publishers, thus losing the ability to determine who can read them, and under what conditions. Similarly, the CC-BY license would allow commercial use by anyone -- many publishers try to release so-called open access articles under restrictive licenses like CC-BY-NC, which stop other publishers from distributing them.

    Embargo periods are routinely used by publishers to delay the appearance of open access versions of articles; under Plan S, that would no longer be allowed. Finally, the new initiative discourages the use of "hybrid" journals that have often enabled publishers to "double dip". That is, they charge researchers who want to release their work as open access, but also require libraries to take out full-price subscriptions for journals that include these freely-available articles.

    Suber has a number of (relatively minor) criticisms of Plan S, which are well-worth reading. All-in-all, though, this is a major breakthrough for open access in Europe, and thus the world. Once "admirably strong" open access mandates like Plan S have been established in one region, others tend to follow in due course. Let's just hope they choose better names.

  • Open Jam, the open source game jam, returns for 2018

    Team Scripta is back with the second annual Open Jam, a game jam that promotes open source games and game creation tools.

  • AsioHeaders 1.12.1-1

    A first update to the AsioHeaders package arrived on CRAN today. Asio provides a cross-platform C++ library for network and low-level I/O programming. It is also included in Boost – but requires linking when used as part of Boost. This standalone version of Asio is a header-only C++ library which can be used without linking (just like our BH package with parts of Boost).

Hortonworks, IBM, Red Hat Team Up on Open Hybrid Architecture

Filed under
Red Hat

Systemd, Red Hat's Marketing as Podcast, Microsoft EEE, Upcoming Financial Results and More

Filed under
Red Hat

Software: TLPUI, Filelight, WPS Office

Filed under
Software
  • TLPUI Is A Graphical User Interface For TLP Power Management Tool (Ubuntu Installation Instructions)

    TLP is an advanced power management tool for optimizing battery life on laptops running Linux. Its default configuration is usually enough to see an improvement in battery life, however, TLP offers a wide range of configuration options which can be changed by editing its configuration file.

  • Filelight – Visualize Disk Usage On Your Linux System

    Finding disk space usage is no big deal in Unix-like operating systems. We have a built-in command named du that can be used to calculate and summarize the disk space usage in minutes. And, we have some third-party tools like Ncdu and Agedu which can also be used to track down the disk usage. As you already know, these are all command line utilities and you will see the disk usage results in plain-text format. However, some of you’d like to view the results in visual or kind of image format. No worries! I know one such GUI tool to find out the disk usage details. Say hello to “Filelight”, a graphical utility to visualize disk usage on your Linux system and displays the disk usage results in a colored radial layout. Filelight is one of the oldest project and it has been around for a long time. It is completely free to use and open source.

  • WPS Office Update Now Available to Download for Ubuntu

    An updated version of WPS Office for Linux is available to download for Ubuntu and other Linux distributions.

    The popular China-based office suite (formerly known as Kingsoft Office) is not open source but it is free to download and to use.

    A handful of features (including cloud backup) are only available to users with a premium or professional subscription/serial key, while other features (like a PDF reader) are exclusive to the iOS and Android apps.

GNOME: Nautilus Terminal 3, GNOME.Asia Summit 2018 and Gtranslator Resurrection

Filed under
GNOME
  • Get A Terminal Embedded In Nautilus File Manager With Nautilus Terminal 3

    Nautilus Terminal 3 embeds a terminal into Nautilus (Files, the default Gnome browser), similar to KDE's Dolphin file manager. The terminal automatically changes directories based on the user's navigation in the file browser.

    This Nautilus extension is a re-implementation of the old Nautilus Terminal that was initially only available for Nautilus 2.x, and later 3.0 and 3.2, which should work with recent Nautilus versions.

  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2018

    Last year I’d been COSCUP 2017 at first time, it gave a great impression of COSCUP. It’s open, freedom and very energetic. It’s very nice this year GNOME.Asia Summit joint with COSCUP and openSUSE.Asia.

    [...]

    And at night we had a GNOME.Asia BoF to review the Good vs. Bad, we collected a lot of ideas to make the GNOME.Asia better in future.

    In the second day, I made a topic about “flatpak vs. snap”, introduced some concepts and basic usages. And I also listened Max’s “Community experience”, Kukuh’s “GNOME Recipes”, Shobha’s “Humanitarian FOSS projects” and Wen’s “GNOME.Asia experience”.

  • Gtranslator Resurrection

    The last week I received a telegram message about Gtranslator, that was unmaintained for a long time. GNOME translators uses different tools to translate .po files, Gtranslator is a tool for translator that is integrated with the GNOME desktop, but with the time, Gtranslator is getting old and there are several known bugs that never get fixed.

    So I decided to go ahead and become the maintainer of Gtranslator with the main idea of update the interface and fix mayor bugs.

Games: Open Match, Galaxy Champions TV, Need to Know, Solace Crafting, INSOMNIA: The Ark, Victory At Sea

Filed under
Gaming

Server: Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, DevOps, Running Apache Cassandra on Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
  • Difference between Docker swarm and Kubernetes

    When you are on learning curve of application containerization, there will be a stage when you come across orchestration tools for containers. If you have started your learning with Docker then Docker swarm is the first cluster management tool you must have learnt and then Kubernetes. So its time to compare docker swarm and Kubernetes. In this article, we will quickly see what is docker, what is kubernetes and then comparison between the two.

  • Stop Killing Your Cattle: Server Infrastructure Advice

    If you've spent enough time at DevOps conferences, you've heard the phrase "pets versus cattle" used to describe server infrastructure. The idea behind this concept is that traditional infrastructure was built by hand without much automation, and therefore, servers were treated more like special pets—you would do anything you could to keep your pet alive, and you knew it by name because you hand-crafted its configuration. As a result, it would take a lot of effort to create a duplicate server if it ever went down. By contrast, modern DevOps concepts encourage creating "cattle", which means that instead of unique, hand-crafted servers, you use automation tools to build your servers so that no individual server is special—they are all just farm animals—and therefore, if a particular server dies, it's no problem, because you can respawn an exact copy with your automation tools in no time.

    If you want your infrastructure and your team to scale, there's a lot of wisdom in treating servers more like cattle than pets. Unfortunately, there's also a downside to this approach. Some administrators, particularly those that are more junior-level, have extended the concept of disposable servers to the point that it has affected their troubleshooting process. Since servers are disposable, and sysadmins can spawn a replacement so easily, at the first hint of trouble with a particular server or service, these administrators destroy and replace it in hopes that the replacement won't show the problem. Essentially, this is the "reboot the Windows machine" approach IT teams used in the 1990s (and Linux admins sneered at) only applied to the cloud.

  • Running Apache Cassandra on Kubernetes

    The Cassandra controller can, of course, perform operations within the Cassandra cluster. For example, want to scale down your Cassandra cluster? Instead of manipulating the StatefulSet to handle this task, the controller will see the CRD change. The node count will change to a lower number (say from six to five). The controller will get that state change, and it will first run a decommission operation on the Cassandra node that will be removed. This ensures that the Cassandra node stops gracefully and redistributes and rebalances the data it holds across the remaining nodes. Once the Cassandra controller sees this has happened successfully, it will modify that StatefulSet definition to allow Kubernetes to decommission that pod. Thus, the Cassandra controller brings needed intelligence to the Kubernetes environment to run Cassandra properly and ensure smoother operations.

    As we continue this project and iterate on the Cassandra operator, our goal is to add new components that will continue to expand the tool's features and value. A good example is Cassandra SideCar (shown in the diagram above), which can take responsibility for tasks like backups and repairs. Current and future features of the project can be viewed on GitHub. Our goal for the Cassandra operator is to give devs a powerful, open source option for running Cassandra on Kubernetes with a simplicity and grace that has not yet been all that easy to achieve.

KDE A Look at Okular and at KMail

Filed under
KDE
  • Okular – A Universal Cross-Platform Document Viewer

    If there is one thing the open source community is not short of it is document viewers. We have published articles on a couple of them in the past not excluding Buka, Bookworm, and Easy Ebook Viewer.

    Today, we introduce to you another document viewer you can use to read ePub ebooks and PDFs and it goes by the name of Okular, is an open source and cross-platform KDE-developed document viewer and it ships together with the KDE application release.

    This means that if you run KDE then you probably have Okular installed on your system. The document viewer has support for a variety of document formats including PDF, ePub, XPS, DjVu, CHM, and Postscript, among others.

    With PDF documents, users can add comments, highlight sections, and add several shapes without affecting the original file. Okular also features an inbuilt reading service (Jovie), along with the ability to extract text from eBooks into separate text files.

  • Unified Mailboxes in KMail

    Today KMail has gained a new cool feature that has been repeatedly requested in the User survey last year as well as on forums and social networks: Unified mailboxes.

    Unified mailboxes offer not only a unified inbox – a single “Inbox” folder showing emails from inboxes of all your accounts, it also provides unified sent and drafts folders by default. But we did not stop there: you can create completely custom unified mailboxes consisting of any folders you choose. You can even customize the default ones (for example exclude an Inbox from a particular account).

Browsh and Firefox on Old PCs (Better on GNU/Linux)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Moz/FF
Web
  • Browsh – A Modern Text Based Browser Which Supports Graphics And Video

    We had wrote many articles about text based browser in the past such as Links, Links2, ELinks, Lynx, w3m and Netrik.

    Why we need a text-based browser in Linux? As you already know most of the Linux servers are running without GUI. It helps Linux administrator to browse the website from CLI.

    As i know, all these text-based browsers renders only web pages and supports color but browsh is advanced, well-established, feature-rich modern text based browser which supports graphics and video.

  • Firefox Just Dropped Windows XP and Vista Support, and Soon Steam Will Too

    Version 52 of Firefox’s Extended Support Edition (ESR) was the last version of Firefox compatible with Windows XP and Vista machines, but it is no longer getting security updates as of last week. This means any security flaws will never be patched, potentially putting users in danger of breaches.

What the gamer means to open source coder culture

Filed under
OSS

The first episode of Season 2 of the Command Line Heroes podcast drops today. (New episodes will be available every other week, and there's also bonus material you can get via the newsletter.) The new season focuses on seven big influencers that have shaped IT infrastructure and modern development over the last 40 years.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Decawave and Runtime accelerate development of indoor location services through open source

    Decawave and Runtime today announced support for the open source Apache Mynewt Operating System (OS) on Decawave’s DW1000 Ultra-Wideband (UWB) transceiver. The combination of these technologies provides developers of real-time location (RTLS) applications with an open and reusable development environment and a framework for device-to-cloud lifecycle management and messaging.

    Decawave, the global leader in UWB-based silicon for RTLS and proximity applications, and Runtime, a leading IoT platform-as-a-service and open source solution provider, worked collaboratively on the implementation of Apache Mynewt support for the DW1000. The addition of the Apache Mynewt OS enables support for multiple hardware platforms and a wide range of network protocols, allowing Decawave to offer a unified code base across its development kits and hardware platforms. This lowers barriers to adoption of UWB technology and reduces time-to-market for developers.

  • Open source: The next 20 years

    In the future, I expect open source software to maintain, if not broaden, its central role in the broad software ecosystem. Open source will continue to invade domains dominated by proprietary software, with more and more large companies, like Microsoft, investing heavily in open source and releasing both existing and new software under open source licenses. I specifically think, as more software gets consumed as a service rather than as source, it’ll be interesting to see how open source principles keep pace.

    Beyond the software ecosystem, open source principles are permeating into other fields: open source hardware is growing rapidly and allowing for an entire ecosystem of hardware development never seen before. Open collaboration in academia is on the rise, enabling researchers in all sorts of fields, not just computer science, to share information in ways that is speeding up discoveries by leaps and bounds.

  • Open Mainframe Project Announces Open Source Framework for Modernization

    The Open Mainframe Project has announced Zowe, an open source software framework that bridges the divide between modern applications and the mainframe, intended to provide easier interoperability and scalability among products and solutions from multiple vendors. Zowe is the first open source project based on z/OS.

    Zowe's mission is to enable delivery of a more integrated environment for z/OS systems through an extensible open source framework and the creation of an ecosystem of independent software vendors, system integrators, clients and end users. This new framework will help engender a simpler, more intuitive environment for a variety of IT professionals performing administrative, development, test and operation tasks on z/OS, and help onboard the next generation of mainframe users.

  • Shelter is an open source sandboxing app to isolate apps from your data

    Big data is a big business right now and this can come in the form of just about any type of information that someone can get their hands on. Whether it’s a business tracking your location for monetization or a malicious application abusing various permissions to gain access to as much of your data as possible. For those who are very cautious about their personal data, you should know there is a new open source application called Shelter that lets you sandbox applications to isolate them from your data.

  • Why novelty open source licenses hurt businesses more than they help [Ed: Mac Asay continues to push anti-FOSS/copyleft agenda while those paying his salary are proprietary software companies]
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What’s New in Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Ubuntu budgie. As part of Ubuntu 18.04 flavor this release ships with latest Budgie desktop 10.4 as default desktop environment. Powered by Linux 4.15 kernel and shipping with the same internals as Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), the Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS official flavor will be supported for 3 years, until April 2021. Prominent new features include support for adding OpenVNC connections through the NetworkManager applet, better font handling for Chinese and Korean languages, improved keyboard shortcuts, color emoji support for GNOME Characters and other GNOME apps, as well as window-shuffler capability. Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS also ships with a new exciting GTK+ theme by default called Pocillo, support for dynamic workspaces, as well as a “minimal installation” option in the graphical installer that lets users install Ubuntu Budgie with only the Chromium web browser and a handful of basic system utilities. Read more

Red Hat: Boston, US Government, OpenShift Route, VirtualBox and More

  • BU Spark! teams up with Red Hat, hosts software design workshop
    Students traveled across Boston to its Fort Point neighborhood to attend a BU Spark! workshop about interaction design Friday. There they delved into interaction design and explored how to develop user-friendly software. BU Spark! and Red Hat Inc. hosted the Interaction Design Bootcamp jointly at Red Hat’s Boston office. BU students and Spark! Interaction design fellows attended. Red Hat is a software company that specializes in information technology and has a research relationship with Boston University that includes educational elements. The programs taught by Red Hat focus on user experience design, one of Red Hat’s specializations, according to their website.
  • Open source can spark innovative business transformation in government, Red Hat leaders say
    The federal government, largely hamstrung by legacy systems, is in need of a major digital transformation. Open source technology can be the spark that sets off that revolution, leaders from open-source software company Red Hat said Tuesday. “The types of technologies that you choose matter,” said Mike Walker, global director of Open Innovation Labs at Red Hat. “It will influence the way your business operates and open new doors to new business process, and ultimately allow you to become a software company that can achieve some of those innovations and reductions in cost and time.”
  • Kubernetes Ingress vs OpenShift Route
    Although pods and services have their own IP addresses on Kubernetes, these IP addresses are only reachable within the Kubernetes cluster and not accessible to the outside clients. The Ingress object in Kubernetes, although still in beta, is designed to signal the Kubernetes platform that a certain service needs to be accessible to the outside world and it contains the configuration needed such as an externally-reachable URL, SSL, and more. Creating an ingress object should not have any effects on its own and requires an ingress controller on the Kubernetes platform in order to fulfill the configurations defined by the ingress object. Here at Red Hat, we saw the need for enabling external access to services before the introduction of ingress objects in Kubernetes, and created a concept called Route for the same purpose (with additional capabilities such as splitting traffic between multiple backends, sticky sessions, etc). Red Hat is one of the top contributors to the Kubernetes community and contributed the design principles behind Routes to the community which heavily influenced the Ingress design.
  • VirtualBox DRM/KMS Driver Proceeding With Atomic Mode-Setting Support
    The "vboxvideo" DRM/KMS driver for use by VirtualBox guest virtual machines that has been part of the mainline Linux kernel the past several cycles will soon see atomic mode-setting support. Hans de Goede of Red Hat, who has been stewarding this driver into the Linux kernel after Oracle has failed to do so, is tackling the atomic mode-setting as his latest advancement to this driver important for a VirtualBox desktop VM experience. Published today were initial patches preparing the move to atomic mode-setting but not yet the full migration to this modern display API that offers numerous benefits.
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  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Moves Lower on Volume Spike for September 18

IBM Looking to Distract From Recent Reports That it Helped Police Racially Profile the Public (by Openwashing)

Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics

  • Linux Patches Surface For Supporting The Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5
    Last year Creative Labs introduced the Sound BlasterX AE-5 PCI Express gaming sound card while finally there are some patches pending for supporting this high-end sound card in Linux. Connor McAdams who most recently got the Creative Recon3D support into good shape on Linux has now been working on getting the Sound BlasterX AE-5 working well on Linux.
  • Blockchain Training Takes Off
    Meanwhile, job postings related to blockchain and Hyperledger are taking off, and knowledge in these areas is translating into opportunity. Careers website Glassdoor lists thousands of job posts related to blockchain.
  • AMD Picasso Support Comes To The RadeonSI OpenGL Driver
    Last week AMD sent out initial support for yet-to-be-released "Picasso" APUs with the Linux AMDGPU kernel graphics driver. Today on the user-space side the support was merged for the OpenGL RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. Picasso details are still fairly light but they are expected to be similar to Raven Ridge and for the AM4 processor socket as well as an edition for notebooks. On the same day as publishing the Picasso AMDGPU kernel patches, AMD also went ahead and published the Linux patches for the "Raven 2" APUs too.
  • The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Arrives For Linux Benchmarking
    It looks like NVIDIA has their launch-day Linux support in order for the GeForce RTX 2080 "Turing" graphics cards slated to ship later this week as arriving today at Phoronix was the RTX 2080 Ti. The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is NVIDIA's new flagship desktop GPU with the Turing GPU architecture, 4352 CUDA cores, a 1635MHz boost clock speed rating for this Founder's Edition model, 11GB of GDDR6 video memory yielding a 616 GB/s memory bandwidth rating, and designed to suit real-time ray-tracing workloads with their RTX technology. Pricing on the RTX 2080 Ti Founder's Edition is $1,199 USD. Last week NVIDIA published more details on the Turing architecture for those interested as well as on the new mesh shader capability.