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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Kernel Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 6:04pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 6:03pm
Story Andromium’s $99 Superbook turns your Android phone into a laptop (crowdfunding) Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 5:40pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 5:24pm
Story SUSE LLC's SUSE Manager Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:48pm
Story Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu Edition Review - The King of All Ubuntu Phones Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:45pm
Story Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS released Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:44pm
Story Why and How to Use Ring Instead of Skype on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:42pm
Story The Ubuntu-powered BQ Aquaris M10 tablet: Almost amazing Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:38pm
Story In Search of a Linux iTunes Replacement Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:34pm

Intel's SGX tiptoes towards Linux

Filed under
Linux

Intel has fulfilled a promise made in April to open-source a Linux driver for its SGX technology.

SGX – Software Guard Extensions – first landed in 2013, and gives programmers lock up code and data inside containers enforced by the CPU. The idea is to create an environment to assure people clouding their enterprise systems that not even admins in the data centre can spy on what's going on.

Back in April, Chipzilla promised an SGX SDK for Linux, and a few weeks ago – with so little fuss we overlooked it – it made good over at GitHub.

The current implementation is very Alpha-looking, with just one distribution anointed to run SGX – Ubuntu 14.04-LTS 64bits. The hardware requirement is a Skylake system configured with SGX enabled.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Wayland's Weston Now Working On Libweston-Desktop

    Wayland developers continue working on Libweston, which is aiming to make more of the Weston reference compositor reusable by other Wayland compositors. This library offers much of the boilerplate code around the Wayland protocols to allow more sharing by compositors and making it more straight-forward to get things up and running. The latest component is Libweston-desktop.

  • 6 Excellent Open Source Google Drive Clients

    Google Drive, formerly Google Docs, is a file storage and synchronization service created by Google. They are a multinational technology company specializing in Internet-related services and products that include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software.

    Google Drive allows users to store files in the cloud, share files, and edit documents, spreadsheets, and presentations with collaborators. Google Drive includes Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides, an office suite that permits collaborative editing of documents, spreadsheets, presentations, drawings, forms, and more. Google Drive lets you open and edit files from any device. Users get 15GB of free storage. This includes Google Drive, Google Photos, and Gmail. More storage can be purchased. Drive uses Google’s highly-secure, custom-built data centers.

  • FreeType 2.7 Bringing DirectWrite/ClearType-Like Rendering -- Much Better Looking Fonts On Linux

    FreeType 2.7.0 will be shipping with the v40 TrueType instructions interpreter enabled by default. This interpreter is going to "finally brings DirectWrite/ClearType-like rendering to the screen, or 'subpixel hinting' as some FreeType code calls it."

  • Solus 1.2.1 Releases Tomorrow

    We’re really excited to be releasing our last “traditional” release, Solus 1.2.1, tomorrow. We opted to delay by a day just to ensure we don’t push ourselves too hard after the recent Hackfest, as well as being able to take the time to do additional QA.

  • GIMP and LibreOffice on Ubuntu Phone

    GIMP and LibreOffice on Ubuntu Phone - meizu MX4 ubuntu edition

  • Facebook Announces Open-Source Swift SDK Beta for iOS [Ed: Proprietary software company helps another proprietary software company with openwashing]

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Microsoft’s Windows RT security patch also stops you from loading Linux

    It was big news when Microsoft announced it was working on a version of Windows that would run on tablets with ARM-based processors… but by the time Windows RT actually launched it was a lot less exciting. Devices like the Microsoft Surface and Surface 2 couldn’t run desktop Windows apps and weren’t significantly cheaper than Intel Atom-powered tablets running the full version of Windows, and they didn’t even get better battery life.

  • The sad state of Linux download security

    Installation images for many of the most popular Linux distributions are difficult or impossible to obtain securely via download.

  • Why we use the Linux kernel's TCP stack

    Let's start with a broader question - what is the point of running an operating system at all? If you planned on running a single application, having to use a kernel consisting of multiple million lines of code may sound like a burden.

    But in fact most of us decide to run some kind of OS and we do that for two reasons. Firstly, the OS layer adds hardware independence and easy to use APIs. With these we can focus on writing the code for any machine - not only the specialized hardware we have at the moment. Secondly, the OS adds a time sharing layer. This allows us to run more than one application at a time. Whether it's a second HTTP server or just a bash session, this ability to share resources between multiple processes is critical. All of the resources exposed by the kernel can be shared between multiple processes!

    [...]

    Having said that, at CloudFlare we do use kernel bypass. We are in the second group - we care about performance. More specifically we suffer from IRQ storms. The Linux networking stack has a limit on how many packets per second it can handle. When the limit is reached all CPUs become busy just receiving packets. In that case either the packets are dropped or the applications are starved of CPU. While we don't have to deal with IRQ storms during our normal operation, this does happen when we are the target of an L3 (layer 3 OSI) DDoS attack. This is a type of attack where the target is flooded with arbitrary packets not belonging to valid connections - typically spoofed packets.

Debian News

Filed under
Debian

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Nautilus Development

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • GSoC 2016: The adventure begins

    Hello! I am Razvan, a technology & open-source enthusiast and I am working on what is probably the most interesting project for me so far, Nautilus. So far, this has been the highlight of my experience – lots of interesting things learned while coding and a great interaction with the community. This is mainly thanks to Carlos, captain of Nautilus, who always finds the time to help me and other contributors whenever we get stuck. On top of this, the funny chats with him and people from the GNOME community make contributing so much more enjoyable! Up until now I’ve been titled King of the Trash™, I’ve learned about some file system magic from Christian Hergert, and I’ve also been threatened by a katana-wielding GNOME samurai. Awesome, right?

  • Extraction support in Nautilus

    As a result, the output will always have the name of the source archive, making it easy to find after an extraction. Also, the maximum number of conflicts an extraction can have is just one, the output itself. Hurray, no more need to go through a thousand dialogs!

  • Improved File Extraction Coming To GNOME's Nautilus

    As part of Google Summer of Code, improved extraction support for compressed files is being worked on for the Nautilus file manager.

KDE Notes and Blurbs

Filed under
KDE

CentOS 7 - Daily papercut fixes

Filed under
Red Hat

That's all for today. A bunch of small, innocent and possibly personal fixes that you might not like and appreciate, but they should come useful if you decide to embark on a serious day-to-day mission of using and taming CentOS. And not because it's bad and needs extra effort compared to the Ubuntus and Mints and Fedoras of this world. Because it stays put once tweaked, in a loving, predictable fashion. Something that compels me to keep on trying despite an occasional hiccup here and there. What's the word I'm looking for? Right. No regressions! That's that one! Fix once and forget about it - not dread what will happen in six months. Jolly good. These fine little tips and tricks just make the whole thing even more pleasurable.

I will expand this list as I continue exploring the CentOS 7 desktops more and more. We also have the Xfce adventure ahead of us. Truth to be told, I have never been so excited about CentOS before. Something had always been amiss. When I had modern hardware, CentOS 6 was approaching its zenith. Then CentOS 7 came about, but my laptops became outdated, and the newest box refused to boot this distro. Until now.

With the right combo of modern - on both the hardware and software side, I can finally give CentOS its full attention. And this means more games, more tweaking, and far more detail than almost any other distro attempt. It has taken the bulk of my Linux time, and I am really enjoying the experience. So you should expect more articles, more guides. One day, we might actually nail the perfect distro formula for all eternity. Stay sweet.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Undertale now available for SteamOS & Linux and it's on sale

    Thanks to the masses of people for letting me know. Undertale, the 2D RPG where you don't have to destroy anyone is now available for SteamOS and Linux.

  • Lovecraftian Horror Game "Conarium" Confirmed For Linux

    Zoetrope Interactive, makers of the well received Lovecraftian horror game "Darkness Within" (not available for Linux), have recently announced their next game "Conarium" and responded today on Twitter that, apart from a Mac OS version, this upcoming game will indeed also come to Linux!

  • Timbertales, a cross platform turn based strategy on Steam Greenlight and Kickstarter
  • The curious tale of vanishing Linux & SteamOS ports, a status on a few of them

    The one that is really getting on my nerves personally at the moment is Carmageddon: Reincarnation. It released into Early Access on March 27th 2014, over two years later the developer is still claiming we will one day get some sort of announcement. Their level of commitment to Linux has been a bit shocking.

    My next annoyance is of course The Witcher 3. It was announced by a big homepage image on Steam and then included in the big SteamOS sale. Over two years since the initial image on Steam and they still aren't confirming anything. My emails go completely unanswered too. We have a forum post that has been going for a while talking about it, where some people do seem to get replies. I fully believe they at one point intended to, and they changed their minds on it. Considering the developers never publicly confirmed it, I'm leaning more towards Valve acting without gaining absolute certainty on the port as they wanted another big name for SteamOS.

OpenMediaVault 3.0 Beta Updated

Filed under
Debian

OpenMediaVault 3.0.26 is now available for testing as the latest beta release of OMV 3.0.

For those out of the loop, OpenMediaVault is a NAS (Network Attached Storage) solution built atop Debian. Five years past the initial release of the software and succeeding FreeNAS, OpenMediaVault 3.0 has been in development for some time and is built off Debian GNU/Linux 8.

Read more

Nokia P1 Android smartphone: All That’s Known About the Nokia’s Secret Upcoming Phone

Filed under
Android

The yesteryears smartphone king, Nokia was in News recently for its upcoming Android smartphone, Nokia P1. We all know Nokia for its tough and rugged mobiles like 3310 and Express Music and judging by the interest shown in Nokia P1, people are awaiting the Finnish smartphone maker’s Android foray eagerly.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Now Microsoft Won’t Let You Install And Boot Linux On Locked-down Windows Computers

    Microsoft has released a security update that has patched a backdoor in Windows RT operating system.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #3

    Solus has always held the philosophy of a “stable core, updated apps”. To achieve the level of stability we desire, we have been utilizing the LTS branch of the Linux kernel, prioritizing stability in our graphics stack, and sticking to a specific GNOME release series for each major release of Solus. To be more precise, Solus 1.0 shipped with GNOME 3.18.x and the plan of using GNOME 3.22.x in Solus 2.0.

  • Work after DebConf

    First week after DebCamp and DebConf! Both were incredible — the debian project and it’s contributors never fail to impress and delight me. None the less it felt great to have a few quiet, peaceful days of uninterrupted programming.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • The Open Source License API

    Around a year ago, I started hacking together a machine readable version of the OSI approved licenses list, and casually picking parts up until it was ready to launch. A few weeks ago, we officially announced the osi license api, which is now live at api.opensource.org.

  • The DIY diabetes kit that's keeping us alive

    They are using Nightscout, an open source platform developed and run by a global community of type 1 diabetics.

    Open source means it is freely available for anyone to use and modify - in this case at their own risk.

    It's a combination of a commercial product called a Continuing Glucose Monitor (CGM), which provides constant updates, a DIY transmitter and the freely available Nightscout programming code which enables the CGM data to be shared with a cloud data storage area - where it can then be distributed to other devices.

    So both father and son now receive constant updates on their phones (and George's smartwatch) and are able to assess George's needs minute by minute.

    It has given George the gift of freedom - he can now join his friends on sleepovers and enjoy his favourite sports.

    Mr Samuelson acknowledges that it is not without risk.

    "I am using open source software to do calibrations. Open source software is giving me final numbers and it is not an approved algorithm - it's not going to be exactly the same as the proprietary algorithms," he says.

  • Preserving the global software heritage

    The Software Heritage initiative is an ambitious new effort to amass an organized, searchable index of all of the software source code available in the world (ultimately, including code released under free-software licenses as well as code that was not). Software Heritage was launched on June 30 with a team of just four employees but with the support of several corporate sponsors. So far, the Software Heritage software archive has imported 2.7 billion files from GitHub, the Debian package archive, and the GNU FTP archives, but that is only the beginning.

    In addition to the information on the Software Heritage site, Nicolas Dandrimont gave a presentation about the project on July 4 at DebConf; video [WebM] is available. In the talk, Dandrimont noted that software is not merely pervasive in the modern world, but it has cultural value as well: it captures human knowledge. Consequently, it is as important to catalog and preserve as are books and other media—arguably more so, because electronic files and repositories are prone to corruption and sudden disappearance.

  • FOSSA - Now we need feedback by the real experts

    The goal of the "Free and Open Source Security Audit" (FOSSA) pilot project is to increase security of Free Software used by the European institutions. The FSFE has been following the project since the early beginning in 2014. I am concerned that if the project stays on its current course the European Institutions will spent a large part of the 1 Million Euro budget without positive impact on the security of Free Software; and the result will be a set of consultancy reports nobody will ever read. But if we work together and communicate our concerns to the responsible people in the Parliament and the Commission, there might still be a valuable outcome.

  • Facebook Open Source Report Card: 54 Projects in Six Months [Ed: a proprietary mass surveillance, censorship and propaganda giant]

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Wait… usenet is still… alive?!?!

    So, in conclusion, Fortran is a pretty cool language. The syntax is a little different that a curly-brace guy like me is used to, but once you figure it out, it’s pretty easy to use and has a very nice feature set. Again, if you’d like to look at a functional complete example, check out my source repository on GitHub.

    I’m going to do a third post in this series where I actually build a modern web application using Fortran for the middle tier (I’m thinking I need a cool name like LAMP or BCHS so maybe FARM – Fortran, Apache, REST and mySQL?) but that’s for another day. Hope you enjoyed reading this as much as I enjoyed learning it.

  • Coding A Text Editor In Less Than 1000 Lines Of C Programming Language

    A coder has created a text editor in C programming language in less than 1000 lines. He has shared the code on GitHub and allowed the interested programmers to take a look at it and learn.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Smaller & Faster than Raspberry Pi Zero: Meet NanoPi NEO ARM Linux Development Board

    Raspberry Pi Zero has two noticeable attributes compared to other Raspberry Pi boards: it’s smaller and it’s cheaper. FriendlyARM has now designed another model for their NanoPi family, that about 12% smaller, although not quite as thin at all due to its Ethernet jack and USB connector, and much faster than Raspberry Pi Zero, with NanoPi NEO board powered by Allwinner H3 quad core processor.

  • Notes from the fourth RISC-V workshop

    Many of the lowRISC team (Robert Mullins, Wei Song, and Alex Bradbury) have been in Boston this week for the fourth RISC-V workshop. By any measure, this has been a massive success with over 250 attendees representing 63 companies and 42 Universities. Wei presented our most recent work on integrating trace debug, which you’ll soon be able to read much more about here (it’s worth signing up to our announcement list if you want to be informed of each of our releases).

  • Arduino-powered Lock Automatically Locks The Door When You Open Incognito Mode

    Mike, the CEO of the Useless Duck Company, has created an Arduino-powered door lock which locks the door automatically when you open an incognito window in your web browser. In a YouTube video, Mike shows how this awesome tech works.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
GNU
Software
  • GNU ease.js 0.2.8 released

    This is a minor release introducing transparent Error subtyping.

    This release succeeds v0.2.7, which was released 26 October, 2015. There are no backwards-incompatible changes; support continues for ECMAScript 3+.

  • A leadership change for nano

    The nano text editor has a long history as a part of the GNU project, but its lead developer recently decided to sever that relationship and continue the project under its own auspices. As often happens in such cases, the change raised concerns from many in the free-software community, and prompted questions about maintainership and membership in large projects.

  • Imgur-Screenshot Is a Nifty Screengrab and Upload Tool for Linux

    I recently began looking for a way to quickify (totally legit word) the process of uploading large screenshots to Imgur when I happened across an awesome little tool.

    It’s called Imgur-Screenshot and, like the name should already tell you, it’s a screenshot tool that uploads your snaps to the (popular, rad) Imgur image hosting service.

  • Firefox will get overhaul in bid to get you interested again

    The next update to Firefox, however, represents the first step in Mozilla's long-term plan to get you using its web browser once again. It hopes to rekindle the interest and influence it claimed a decade ago by revamping its core, which could make complex websites like Facebook snappier but make it more difficult for attackers to launch attacks over the web.

  • Mozilla Servo arrives in nightly demo form

    The Firefox codebase dates back to 2002, when the browser was unbundled from the Mozilla Application Suite—although much of its architecture predates even that split. Major changes have been rare over the years, but recently several long-running Mozilla efforts have started to see the light of day. The most recent of these is the Servo web-rendering engine, for which the first standalone test builds were released on June 30. Although the Servo builds are not full-blown browsers, they enable users to download and test the engine on live web sites for the first time. Servo is designed with speed and concurrency in mind, and if all goes according to plan, the code may work its way into Firefox in due course.

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More in Tux Machines

Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.7.2, Qt 5.7 and KDE Applications 16.04.3

Chakra GNU/Linux developer Neofytos Kolokotronis today, July 25, 2016, announced the release of the latest KDE and Qt technologies, along with new software versions in the main repositories of the Linux kernel-based operating system. Read more

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Server Administration

  • SysAdmins With Open Source Skills Are In Demand
    System administrators play a crucial role in businesses today. They are the individuals responsible for the configuration, support and maintenance of company computer systems and servers. For this reason, they are a popular hiring request, with defense and media companies alike looking for these professionals on Dice. Yet, despite the ongoing demand, finding and recruiting system administrators may be more of a challenge. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) found that the quarterly unemployment rate for system administrators was 0.6%, well below the national quarterly average (4.9%) and the quarterly average for all tech professionals (2.1%). Employers thus need to focus more of their recruitment strategies on poaching this talent from competitors.
  • One Phrase Sysadmins Hate to Hear (And How to Avoid It)
    A few years later, sysarmy, the local IT community, was born as the "Support for those who give support." And in that spirit, for this 8th AdminFest edition, we want to do exactly that: support those who help others in our Q&A platform, sysarmy.com/help. Each 500 points a participant earns, he/she gets a free drink in return!
  • DevOps'n the Operating System
    John Willis takes a brief look at the history of how Devops principles and operating systems have converged. He spends most of the time forward looking at what and how unikernels will converge with Devops tools, processes and culture. He ends with a demo of how containers, unikernels and Devops ideas can work together in the future.
  • 5 reasons system administrators should use revision control
    Whether you're still using Subversion (SVN), or have moved to a distributed system like Git, revision control has found its place in modern operations infrastructures. If you listen to talks at conferences and see what new companies are doing, it can be easy to assume that everyone is now using revision control, and using it effectively. Unfortunately that's not the case. I routinely interact with organizations who either don't track changes in their infrastructure at all, or are not doing so in an effective manner. If you're looking for a way to convince your boss to spend the time to set it up, or are simply looking for some tips to improve how use it, the following are five tips for using revision control in operations.

Kernel Space/Linux