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Wednesday, 29 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 6:46am
Story SUSE Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 6:33am
Story The Relative Windows vs. Linux Performance For NVIDIA, Intel & AMD Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 6:31am
Story NVIDIA Linux Performance-Per-Dollar: What The RX 480 Will Have To Compete Against Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 6:23am
Story RaspAnd Project Brings Android 6.0 Marshmallow to Raspberry Pi 3, Now with GAAPS Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 6:15am
Story BSD Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 6:13am
Story Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" to Ship with GCC 6 by Default, Binutils 2.27 Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 6:07am
Story Canonical Demonstrates How Easy It Is to Create a Vendor-Independent Snap Store Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 6:02am
Story Fedora: Latest News Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 5:53am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2016 - 5:51am

PulseAudio 9.0 is out

Filed under
Software
  • PulseAudio 9.0 is out
  • PulseAudio 9.0 Sound System Released, Supports Sample Rates Up to 384 kHz

    Just a few minute ago, June 22, 2016, Arun Raghavan proudly announced the debut of the PulseAudio 9.0 sound server for GNU/Linux operating systems, a major release that introduces several improvements and new features.

    Prominent features of PulseAudio 9.0 include support for sample rates up to 384 kHz, the implementation of a memfd-backed shared memory transport, significant improvements to the automatic routing functionality, as well as the adoption of the C11 C standard instead of C99.

    Furthermore, it looks like PulseAudio 9.0 comes with LFE (Low-frequency Effects) remixing disabled by default, which was enabled as part of the PulseAudio 7.0 release, the module-role-ducking and module-role-cork modules received various enhancements, and webrtc-audio-processing 0.2 or later is now required.

  • PulseAudio 9.0 Released With Many Audio Improvements

    Version 9.0 of the once-controversial PulseAudio sound server is now available for your open-source audio needs.

    First off, PulseAudio 9.0 brings the memfd transport support for Linux systems. This lets PulseAudio use Memfd on newer Linxu kernel versions rather than POSIX SHM shared memory.

Linux AIO Brings All the Debian Live 7.11.0 Editions Into a Single ISO Image

Filed under
Debian

Today, June 22, 2016, Softpedia has been informed by the Linux AIO developers about the immediate availability for download of the Linux AIO Debian Live 7.11.0 ISO images.

Linux AIO is a non-profit project whose main goal is to create Live, bootable ISO images that contain all the essential Live editions of various popular GNU/Linux distributions. For example, you'll find Live ISOs with all the official Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Fedora, Zorin OS, or PCLinuxOS Live flavors.

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Mozilla rebrand

Filed under
Moz/FF

PS3 Settlement

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Legal

Raspberry Pi controls Linux devices without the hassle

Filed under
Linux

A developer in Latvia has come up with a clever but simple control interface for your Linux devices which can be embedded Raspberry Pi designs.

Dubbed pyLCI, the software framework runs on the Raspberry Pi as long as it is connected to a suitable display and will control and configure a Linux system in headless mode.

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Developer: TIzen SCM Tool Released – 16.02

Filed under
Linux

Hey Tizen Devs, as you know you can use the Tizen SDK to develop your Tizen apps. Now, the Tizen tools team are happy to announce the release of the latest Tizen SCM Tools. You can find the major changes and known issues below:

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Samsung Powers their SMART Signage Portfolio with Tizen

Filed under
Linux

Samsung Electronics showcased their digital signage and visual display solutions portfolio at the InfoComm 2016 trade show, which was held last month at the Las Vegas Convention Center. InfoComm is the largest annual global conference for the professional AV industry and is expected to welcome more than 40,000 attendees from nearly 110 countries.

A unique feature of these signages is that they are powered by the Tizen Operating System (OS). By utilising the OS the signs are able to be used for advertising, content delivery, and information display management in corporate, hospitality, public, retail and at-home environments.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Google Hacker Donates His $15,000 Bug Bounty Cash Award To Charity

    Google’s leading security engineer Tavis Ormandy recently won a bug bounty challenge run by security solutions firm Bromium and decided to donate the money to charity. Following his gesture, Bromium matched Ormandy’s donation and donated $15,000 to Amnesty International organization.

  • Mozilla Awards $385,000 to Open Source Projects as part of MOSS “Mission Partners” Program

    For many years people with visual impairments and the legally blind have paid a steep price to access the Web on Windows-based computers. The market-leading software for screen readers costs well over $1,000. The high price is a considerable obstacle to keeping the Web open and accessible to all. The NVDA Project has developed an open source screen reader that is free to download and to use, and which works well with Firefox. NVDA aligns with one of the Mozilla Manifesto’s principles: “The Internet is a global public resource that must remain open and accessible.”

  • TOR Project And Security Experts Making A “Hardened” Version Of TOR To Defeat FBI

    The TOR Project is working closely with security researchers to implement a new technique to secure the TOR Browser against the FBI’s de-anonymization exploits. Called “Selfrando”, this technique will fight the FBI’s “Code Reuse” exploits and create a “hardened” version of TOR.

Review of Fedora 24

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

We run out of time to have a play around and do any kind of serious testing of the Boxes application. But we have been reading about it and understand it is a virtual machine package, designed to run sandboxed virtual machines. Yes, similar to Oracle VM VirtualBox. We intend to look more into the Boxes feature a little later down the track. So we will bring you more information on it soon.

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3 Indian women among finalists of Red Hat’s 2016 open source awards

Filed under
OSS

Three Indian women made it to the list of finalists after taking part in the 2016 ‘Women in Open Source' competition, organised by Red hat.

The finalists in the academic category include three women from India who are full-time students pursuing computer science and engineering degrees.

Now in its second year, the ‘Women in Open Source Award’ was created to honor women who make important contributions to open source projects and communities, or make innovative use of open source methodologies.

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Point Linux 3.2 MATE & Xfce Editions Land Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The development team behind the Point Linux project, a desktop-oriented GNU/Linux operating system based on the Debian's Stable branch, has announced the general availability of Point Linux 3.2.

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Linux distributions: Recommendations for a novice

Filed under
Linux

So, there you have it. Please keep in mind that these recommendations are based only on my own experience, on the specific Samsung N150 Plus target system, and on the variety of Linux distributions I currently have installed on my own N150 Plus. I did not consider a few others which I currently use on other systems (Sparky, Korora, KaOS and a few others), and I did not consider anything that I do not personally install and use.

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Why I must use Free Software - and why I tell others to do so

Filed under
OSS

My work colleagues know me well as a Free/Libre software zealot, constantly pointing out to them how people should behave, how FLOSS software trumps commercial software and how this is the only way forward. This for the last 20 odd years. It's a strain to argue this repeatedly: at various times, I have been asked to set out more clearly why I use FLOSS, what the advantages are, why and how to contribute to FLOSS software.

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GTK+ GUI Toolkit Updated for GNOME 3.21.3 with More Wayland Improvements

Filed under
GNOME

Now that the GNOME 3.21.3 desktop environment is out the door for public testers and early adopters who can't wait for the GNOME 3.22 release this fall, it's time for us to take a look at other upcoming GNOME and GTK+ technologies.

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Building a business on a solid open source model

Filed under
OSS

Since we announced Nextcloud, an ownCloud fork, many people have asked me how we plan to build a sustainable, healthy open source business. My short answer is that it requires a strong focus on maintaining a careful balance between the needs of all stakeholders: users, contributors, employees, customers, and—of course—investors. Building a solid open source business requires that management has confidence in the abilities of your company, stakeholders must be on board with the business model, and everyone must understand that balance is important for the ecosystem. Like a rising tide lifts all boats, a strong ecosystem benefits all stakeholders.

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GNOME 3.21.3 released

Filed under
GNOME

Hello all,

GNOME 3.21.3, the third snapshot of the GNOME 3.21 cycle, is now
available. You want it!

To compile GNOME 3.21.3, you can use the jhbuild [1] modulesets [2]
(which use the exact tarball versions from the official release).

[1] https://developer.gnome.org/jhbuild/
[2] https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.21.3/

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Also: GNOME 3.21.3 Offers an Early Taste of What's Coming to the GNOME 3.22 Desktop

GNOME 3.22 to Offer Usability Improvements to IMAP and SMTP Providers, More

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha 2 Released with a Full GNOME 3.20 Update, Mesa 11.2

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE Project's Ludwig Nussel was happy to announce the release of the second Alpha milestone towards the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system, just in time for the openSUSE Conference.

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Black Lab Software Announces the Cloudbox Pro and the Cloudbook Pro

Filed under
Linux

Today, June 22, 2016, Black Lab Software's CEO Robert J. Dohnert has informed Softpedia about the general availability of new hardware powered by the netOS Enterprise Linux operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

GeckoLinux 421 Plasma and SUSE Hack Week

  • GeckoLinux 421 Plasma review - It ain't no dragon
    I heard a lot of good praise about this little distro. My inbox is flooded with requests to take it for a spin, so I decided, hey, so many people are asking. Let us. The thing is, openSUSE derivatives are far and few in between, but the potential and the appeal are definitely there. Something like CentOS on steroids, the way Stella did once, the same noble way Fuduntu tried to emancipate Fedora. Take a somewhat somber distro and pimpify it into submission. GeckoLinux is based on openSUSE Leap, and I chose the Plasma Static edition. There's also a Rolling version, based on Tumbleweed, but that one never worked for me. The test box for this review is Lenovo G50. But wait! Dedoimedo, did you not recently write in your second rejection report that GeckoLinux had failed to boot? Indeed I did. But the combo of yet another firmware update on the laptop and a fresh new download fixed it, allowing for a DVD boot. Somewhat like the painful but successful Fedora exercise back in the day. Tough start, but let's see what gives.
  • La Mapería
    It is Hack Week at SUSE, and I am working on La Mapería (the map store), a little program to generate beautiful printed maps from OpenStreetMap data.
  • HackWeek XIV @SUSE: Tuesday

From Vista 10 to Linux Mint

  • Microsoft Scared into Changes, 5 Reasons to Ditch
    Following a small claims court judgment against them, Microsoft announced they would be making declining their Windows 10 upgrade easier. Why not just switch to Linux as Daniel Robinson highlighted five reasons you should. My Linux Rig spoke to Christine Hall of FOSS Force about her "Linux rig" today and Bryan Lunduke had some thoughts on Canonical's collaboration myth. Dedoimedo reviewed GeckoLinux 421 and Gary Newell tested Peppermint 7 on his new Lenovo Ideapad.
  • After Multi-Month Tone Deaf Shitshow, Microsoft Finally Lets Users Control Obnoxious Windows 10 Upgrade
    Microsoft's decision to offer Windows 10 as a free upgrade to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 made sense on its surface. It was a nice freebie for users happy to upgrade, and an effective way to herd customers on older Windows iterations onto the latest platform to help consolidate support expense. But Microsoft's upgrade in practice has seen no shortage of criticism from users annoyed by a total lack of control over the update, and Microsoft's violent tone deafness in response to the complaints. For example a Reddit post from an anti-poaching organization made the rounds earlier this year after the 17 GB automatic Windows 10 update resulted in huge per megabyte charges from their satellite broadband ISP. Microsoft's response to these complaints? Ignore them. As complaints grew, Microsoft finally provided a way to fully disable the forced upgrade, but made sure it involved forcing users to modify the registry, something Microsoft knew full well less technical users wouldn't be comfortable attempting to hurdle. [...] Things have been escalating ever since, often to comedic effect. But this week things changed somewhat with the news that Microsoft has struck a $10,000 settlement with a California woman who sued the company after an ill-timed Windows 10 upgrade brought her office computers to a crawl. The woman took Microsoft to court after support failed to help resolve the issue, a spokesman saying Microsoft halted its appeal of the ruling "to avoid the expense of further litigation."
  • Microsoft pays $10,000 to unwilling Windows 10 updater
  • The Linux Setup - Christine Hall, FOSS Force
    On my main desktop, I use Linux Mint 17.1, Rebecca. My main laptop, a 64-bit machine, is running Mint 17.2 Rafaela. The laptop got updated from Rebecca so I could write a review, but the desktop never got upgraded because it’s a 32-bit machine and would require another download, which I haven’t had the time to do. I have another laptop running Bodhi, which might be my favorite distro, but I can be more productive with Mint.
  • Linux Mint 18 Finally Arrives — Download Cinnamon and MATE Edition ISO Files Here
    The wait for the summer’s hottest Linux distro is over and you can finally download the release version of Linux Mint 18 “Sarah”. Often called the best Linux distribution for desktop PCs, Mint 18 comes loaded with new features and Linux 4.4 LTS Kernel.

AMD and Linux

  • The Updated AMD Polaris Firmware Blobs Needed For RX 480 Support Land
    One day ahead of the Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" launch, the necessary firmware updates for the production graphics card support have landed in linux-firmware.git.
  • AMD RX 480 released, AMD will possibly open up Radeon Software
    The next generation of AMD GPU's have launched, and it begins with the AMD RX 480. Benchmarks are now out there along with plenty of info. I don't have the card myself as I have no contacts at AMD, but luckily Phoronix managed to bag a card and he's done plenty of testing as you can imagine. I will be referencing the green site due to other sites obviously focusing on Windows.