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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 20 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Did SCO end up helping Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Here's a real nice article by Stuart Cohen on Businessweek Online exclaiming that SCO's legal maneuvers only made Linux stronger. It states SCO's litigation seemed to bring developers and the community together fighting for the cause. He says "we can thank SCO for helping to move Linux even faster from the fringe of the computer network to the heart of the data center."

Hackers homing in on Cellular Phones

Filed under
Sci/Tech

This story kinda hits home for me as I now work on a computer all day for cingular wireless (formerly AT&T in our branch). I guess this is why call volume has been increasing steadily lately. Here's the full story on Reuter's slow ass site.

Linux Kernel Security is Lacking?

Filed under
Linux

Seems Jason Miller is finding fault in the Linux kernel security bug fix procedure. He goes on and on about security and how security vulnerabilities are handled. Although he mentioned that Gentoo had an accessible security contact, that really didn't apply to things like the underlying kernel. You can read the rest of his article including his thoughts on how to improve the situation here on securityfocus.

ATI has released 64-Bit drivers

Filed under
Software

According to AMDZone and ATI's own site, ATI has released 64-bit drivers for XFree86 and Xorg. Here's a link the download page.

No Case - No Problem

Filed under
Hardware
Humor
-s

Just mount every thing on the wall! LOL Here's the discussion thread with pictures. Too funny.

2004 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

Browser of the Year - Firefox (77.12%)

Distribution of the Year - Slackware (19.36%)

LiveCD Distribution of the Year - Knoppix (57.69%)

Database of the Year - MySQL (53.51%)

Desktop Environment of the Year - KDE (58.25%)

I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works?

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

A little birdie told me that an update to the acclaimed PCLinuxOS Preview 8 is in the works and possibly due out next week. Details are a bit sketchy at this time, but it seems Tom has been hard at work updating the hardware detection and mklivecd scripts. Now don't get your hopes up, but I hear it might sport a newer 2.6.10 kernel, including patches to fix a little kvm switch problem. Of course it will include all kinds of application updates and other goodies. More on this as it develops.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

Filed under
MDV

Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

50 gmail invites?

Filed under
Google
Software

Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

Moooore Spam!

Filed under
Security

Spam has new way to evade security

E-mails via service providers clogging system

Yep, just what we need, more spam. Apparently they aren't as concerned with hiding from their isps as getting the mail out as they are now just sending it through their isps servers. Read the gory details here.

Linux leaders at open-source summit

Filed under
OSS

Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

Filed under
Movies
-s

Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

Filed under
Gaming
-s

Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: Fedora at CLT 2019, LF's Open Networking Summit and Cloud Foundry Summit on Serverless, Knative, Microservices

  • Fedora will be at CLT 2019
    The Fedora Project will be at the Chemnitzer Linux Tage 2019. So far, Robert Scheck and I will make it happen. As we pretty much did it for the last 10 years.
  • The Linux Foundation Announces the 2019 Open Networking Summit North America Speaking Schedule
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has announced the keynote speakers and session line-up for Open Networking Summit North America (ONS), taking place April 3-5 in San Jose, Calif. The full lineup of sessions can be viewed here, and features speakers from AT&T, China Mobile, Ericsson, Google, Huawei, Intel, KPMG, Nokia, Red Hat, Target, and more. “The Open Networking Summit is a chance to bring together the entire open networking community – from telco providers to cloud providers – to share best practices and discuss how we can work together to advance networking technology,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge & IoT, the Linux Foundation. “Gathering the industry’s foremost innovators and technologists, ONS is a must-attend event for collaboration and knowledge sharing.”
  • 6 Must-Attend Talks at Cloud Foundry Summit on Serverless, Knative, Microservices
    That’s a lot of technical content, so make sure to also get your ideal ratio of business impact content and check out the User Stories track.

Graphics: TuxClocker and VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable

  • TuxClocker: Another GPU Overclocking GUI For Linux
    Adding to the list of third-party GPU overclocking utilities for Linux is TuxClocker, a Qt5-based user-interface currently with support for NVIDIA graphics cards and experimental support for AMD GPUs.  TuxClocker is a Qt5 overclocking tool that supports adjusting not only the memory/core frequencies but also the power limit, fan speed, and other tunables based upon the GPU/driver in use. There is also graph monitors to show the power and temperature limit, where supported, among other features.  TuxClocker offers similar functionality to other third-party, open-source Linux GPU overclocking software though where as most utilities focus just on NVIDIA or AMD hardware, TuxClocker is pursuing both. Currently their stable release supports just NVIDIA GPUs but the development code has AMD Radeon support in the works.
  • Intel Wires VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable Into Their Vulkan Driver, Helping DXVK
    Intel's open-source ANV Vulkan driver now supports the VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable that was designed in part to help the DXVK project for mapping Direct3D atop of the Vulkan API.

Programming Leftovers

  • Packaging PyQt5 apps with fbs
    fbs is a cross-platform PyQt5 packaging system which supports building desktop applications for Windows, Mac and Linux (Ubuntu, Fedora and Arch). Built on top of PyInstaller it wraps some of the rough edges and defines a standard project structure which allows the build process to be entirely automated. The included resource API is particularly useful, simplifying the handling of external data files, images or third-party libraries — a common pain point when bundling apps.
  • Infrastructure monitoring: Defense against surprise downtime
    There are a number of tools available that can build a viable and strong monitoring system. The only decision to make is which to use; your answer lies in what you want to achieve with monitoring as well as various financial and business factors you must consider. While some monitoring tools are proprietary, many open source tools, either unmanaged or community-managed software, will do the job even better than the closed source options. In this article, I will focus on open source tools and how to use them to create a strong monitoring architecture.
  • GSlice considerations and possible improvements
    The paper Mesh: Compacting Memory Management for C/C++ Applications is about moving memory allocations for compaction, even though the memory pointers are exposed. The idea is to merge allocation blocks from different pages that are not overlapping at page offsets, and then letting multiple virtual page pointers point to the same physical page. Some have asked about the applicability to the GSlice allocator.
  • plprofiler – Getting a Handy Tool for Profiling Your PL/pgSQL Code
  • Reading and Writing Files in Python (Guide)
  • Today is a Good Day to Learn Python

Security Leftovers

  • Wi-Fi ‘Hiding’ Inside USB Cable: A New Security Threat On The Rise?
    Today, the world has become heavily reliant on computers owing to the various advantages they offer. It has thus become imperative that we, as users, remain updated about the various threats that can compromise the security of our data and privacy. A recent report published by Hackaday details a new threat that might just compromise the integrity of devices. At first glance, the O.MG cable (Offensive MG Kit) looks like any other USB cable available in the market. It is what lurks within that is a cause for concern.
  • WiFi Hides Inside a USB Cable [Ed: There are far worse things, like USB devices that send a high-voltage payload to burn your whole motherboard. Do not use/insert untrusted devices from dodgy people.]
  • The Insights into Linux Security You May Be Surprised About
    Linux has a strong reputation for being the most secure operating system on the market. It’s been like that for many years, and it doesn’t seem like Windows or macOS are going to overtake it anytime soon. And while the operating system’s reputation is well-deserved, it can also be harmless experienced users. The problem is that some seem to put too much trust in the capabilities of Linux by default. As a result, they often don’t pay enough attention to the manual aspect of their security. Linux can help you automate your workflow to a large extent, but it still requires a manual touch to keep things going well. This is even truer when it comes to security.
  • One Identity Bolsters Unix Security with New Release of Authentication Services
    Unix systems (including Linux and Mac OS), by their very nature, have distinct challenges when it comes to security and administration. Because native Unix-based systems are not linked to one another, each server or OS instance requires its own source of authentication and authorization.
  • Book Review – Linux Basics for Hackers
    With countless job openings and growth with no end in sight, InfoSec is the place to be. Many pose the question, “Where do I start?” Over his years of training hackers and eventual security experts across a wide array of industries and occupations, the author ascertains that one of the biggest hurdles that many up-and-coming professional hackers face is the lack of a foundational knowledge or experience with Linux. In an effort to help new practitioners grow, he made the decision to pen a basic ‘How To’ manual, of sorts, to introduce foundational concepts, commands and tricks in order to provide instruction to ease their transition into the world of Linux. Out of this effort, “Linux Basics for Hackers” was born.
  • Security updates for Wednesday