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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 21 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Two-in-one DNS server with BIND9 srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 5:26pm
Story Help save the endangered time servers srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 5:23pm
Story CLI Magic: Patching the differences srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 2:26pm
Story Howto: Recovering grub boot loader password srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 2:25pm
Story American Steel Realizes Benefits from Linux Infrastructure srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 2:24pm
Story FUD Alert: OSDL Sacrifices Credibility to Make a Point srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 2:21pm
Story The `Soft' Component srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 2:19pm
Story Dvorak: Will Apple Adopt Windows? srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 2:17pm
Story Microsoft keeps eye on open-source prize srlinuxx 20/02/2006 - 2:15pm
Story Flock 0.5.11 Released srlinuxx 1 20/02/2006 - 4:20am

Diamonds are a girl's best friend

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Oh man, an astronomer at Princeston states that some planets in our galaxy may have a thick layer of diamonds just below the surface. Woohoo! Where's my spacesuit? Oh, none in our solar system though. Figures. Story at Reuters.

New Slack is Out

Filed under
Slack

Despite recent health issues for Patrick, Slackware Linux 10.1 has been release with mostly bug fixes and a few updates. Details and changelog on Slackware.com.

On a related note, here's a nice little summary.

More Summit Notes

Filed under
OSS

Information Week has another story covering last weeks Open Source Summit with quotes from Linus and others on the future plans for the kernel, the patent issues, and standards. A nice read.

Night that the Lights went Out in TN

Filed under
Sci/Tech
-s

We had about an hours down time this morning due to a fight between a 97 Ford Explorer and one of our old power poles. The pole lost. Well, actually you should have seen the other guy too - what a mess. There were splinters and glass everywhere. But our greedy electric company was their usual prompt self and got us back online in record time with little loss of revenue. I apologize for any inconvenience this must have caused. Big Grin Thanks.

Did SCO end up helping Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Here's a real nice article by Stuart Cohen on Businessweek Online exclaiming that SCO's legal maneuvers only made Linux stronger. It states SCO's litigation seemed to bring developers and the community together fighting for the cause. He says "we can thank SCO for helping to move Linux even faster from the fringe of the computer network to the heart of the data center."

Hackers homing in on Cellular Phones

Filed under
Sci/Tech

This story kinda hits home for me as I now work on a computer all day for cingular wireless (formerly AT&T in our branch). I guess this is why call volume has been increasing steadily lately. Here's the full story on Reuter's slow ass site.

Linux Kernel Security is Lacking?

Filed under
Linux

Seems Jason Miller is finding fault in the Linux kernel security bug fix procedure. He goes on and on about security and how security vulnerabilities are handled. Although he mentioned that Gentoo had an accessible security contact, that really didn't apply to things like the underlying kernel. You can read the rest of his article including his thoughts on how to improve the situation here on securityfocus.

ATI has released 64-Bit drivers

Filed under
Software

According to AMDZone and ATI's own site, ATI has released 64-bit drivers for XFree86 and Xorg. Here's a link the download page.

No Case - No Problem

Filed under
Hardware
Humor
-s

Just mount every thing on the wall! LOL Here's the discussion thread with pictures. Too funny.

2004 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

Browser of the Year - Firefox (77.12%)

Distribution of the Year - Slackware (19.36%)

LiveCD Distribution of the Year - Knoppix (57.69%)

Database of the Year - MySQL (53.51%)

Desktop Environment of the Year - KDE (58.25%)

I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works?

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

A little birdie told me that an update to the acclaimed PCLinuxOS Preview 8 is in the works and possibly due out next week. Details are a bit sketchy at this time, but it seems Tom has been hard at work updating the hardware detection and mklivecd scripts. Now don't get your hopes up, but I hear it might sport a newer 2.6.10 kernel, including patches to fix a little kvm switch problem. Of course it will include all kinds of application updates and other goodies. More on this as it develops.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

Filed under
MDV

Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

50 gmail invites?

Filed under
Google
Software

Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

Moooore Spam!

Filed under
Security

Spam has new way to evade security

E-mails via service providers clogging system

Yep, just what we need, more spam. Apparently they aren't as concerned with hiding from their isps as getting the mail out as they are now just sending it through their isps servers. Read the gory details here.

Linux leaders at open-source summit

Filed under
OSS

Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

Filed under
Movies
-s

Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

Filed under
Gaming
-s

Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Stadia Scepticism, Epic, Linux Gaming Report and More

  • Stadia is about the future of YouTube, not gaming

    Yesterday, Google announced plans for a new game-streaming service called Stadia. Besides the logo, the controller, and a single game — Doom Eternal — the announcement left us with more questions than answers. Primary in my mind has been the query of why Google needs to be in the gaming business at all. Isn’t it enough to dominate web search, ads, and browsers, smartphone operating systems, and maps? What part of our lives does Google not want to know about? And then it dawned on me that we might be looking at it from the wrong perspective: what if Stadia isn’t a case of Google aggressively entering a new business sphere, but rather a defensive one to protect its existing kingdom?

  • Google Stadia's Grand Vision for Gaming Clashes With America's Shitty Internet

    Slow speeds, usage caps, and overage fees could mar the long-awaited arrival of game streams.

  • Slow Broadband, Usage Caps Could Mar Google Stadia's Game Streaming Ambitions
    I can remember being at E3 in 2000 and being pitched on the idea of a sort of "dumb terminal" for gaming. As in, you wouldn't need a computer or game console in your home, since all of the actual game processing would be accomplished in the cloud then streamed to your TV via broadband. Most of these early pitches never materialized. Initially because cloud computing simply wasn't fully baked yet, but also thanks to America' shoddy broadband. Cloud-based game streaming is something the industry has continued to push for, though nobody has yet to truly crack the market. Onlive probably tried the hardest, though again a lack of real cloud horsepower and sketchy residential broadband prevented the service from truly taking off. Undaunted, Google took to the stage at the Game Developers Conference to unveil Stadia, a looming game streaming platform that will let gamers play top-shelf games on any hardware with a Chrome browser. Google insists that the service, when it launches this summer, will be able to drive games at up to 4K resolution and 60 frames per second seamlessly between multiple devices with no need for game consoles, high-end PCs, loading times, or installs. The whole presentation is available here:
  • Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney on PC store moderation: ‘We’re not in the porn business’

    Last year, Valve announced a hands-off approach to Steam that would allow anything onto the platform “except for things that we decide are illegal, or straight up trolling.” In addition to the Rape Day controversy, that policy has pushed Valve to take hardline stances on content revolving around child exploitation, school shootings, and most recently around tributes memorializing the New Zealand shooter. Sweeney, it seems, does not see the value it trying to protect content that pushes up against that amorphous line.

  • Linux Gaming Report and Purism Librem 15 | Choose Linux 5
    Jason goes deeper down the rabbit hole by exploring the state of Steam gaming on 9 different Linux distributions. Find out how Fedora compares to Pop!_OS. Plus, first impressions of Purism’s brand new Librem 15 v4 laptop.
  • Objects in Space released for Linux on Steam, needs you to disable Steam Play
    While the Linux version has been up on GOG for a little while, Steam was left a bit behind. Now the Linux version on Steam has been officially announced and released but there's an issue with Steam Play.
  • First-person roguelike 'Barony' released the Myths & Outcasts DLC recently, also now on GOG
    Barony is a game I hadn't honestly touched in a very long time, which all changed with the Myths & Outcasts DLC that released last month giving new ways to play. It's also now on GOG, so that's great.
  • Chasm, the adventure platformer from Bit Kid just had a big update giving more variety
    Chasm, the crowdfunded adventure platformer continues to see great post-release support with the latest big free update out now. While it's not a personal favourite of mine (I much prefer Dead Cells honestly), it's still a reasonably good game overall. In fact, it's far better than a lot of action/adventure platformers and it does look great.
  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive now has much better queue times for Danger Zone
    Following on from the tweak to Danger Zone to focus more on duos, Valve are still tweaking their Battle Royale mode in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive as well as the game as a whole. Firstly, for Danger Zone you should now see much better queue times for matchmaking. Before this patch, I could easily see queue times around 3 to 5 minutes (often the latter) even with a lot of people online which is not ideal and frankly that makes me (and no doubt others) get bored and look to play something else. Since this patch has dropped, I've played a good 30-40 matches and not a single one has hit even 2 minutes queue time (under 1 minute mostly now!) which is a pretty huge improvement.

Nuvola: Linux Desktop Music Player for Streaming Services

Take a look at features and installation of Nuvola Music Player, a music player for Linux desktop that plays streaming music services. Read more

LibreOffice 6.2.2 Office Suite Released with More Than 50 Fixes, Download Now

While LibreOffice 6.1 is still the recommended version for those who want a more stable and well-tested LibreOffice office suite, LibreOffice 6.2.2 is here for technology enthusiasts and early adopters who want to get a taste of the latest new features and innovations in the free and open-source office suite used by millions of computer users worldwide. "LibreOffice 6.2.2 represents the bleeding edge in term of features for open source office suites, and as such is not optimized for enterprise-class deployments, where features are less important than robustness. Users wanting a more mature version can download LibreOffice 6.1.5, which includes some months of back-ported fixes.," said Italo Vignoli. Read more

New PocketBeagle pocket sized Linux computer $29.95

If you are searching for an affordable and small yet powerful Linux computer, you may be interested in the new PocketBeagle Linux computer which offers just that for $29.95. The tiny computer is now available to purchase directly from the Adafruit online store and offers a powerful 1GHz AM3358 powered Linux single board computer with a tiny form factor and open source architecture. Read more