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Friday, 19 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux 5.3: XFS, Networking and NVIDIA's Graphics Driver

Filed under
Linux
  • XFS Gets Cleaned Up In Linux 5.3 Kernel Development Activity

    While not too eventful on the end-user feature front, the XFS file-system has seen another round of clean-ups with the ongoing Linux 5.3 merge window.

    XFS maintainer Darrick Wong characterized the feature work for XFS in Linux 5.3 as "significant amounts of consolidations and cleanups in the log code; restructuring of the log to issue struct bios directly; new bulkstat ioctls to return v5 fs inode information (and fix all the padding problems of the old ioctl); the beginnings of multithreaded inode walks (e.g. quotacheck); and a reduction in memory usage in the online scrub code leading to reduced runtimes."

  • Networking Changes For Linux 5.3 Bring New Google Driver But No WireGuard

    The networking subsystem updates were sent out on Wednesday for the Linux 5.3 kernel and include a bunch of improvements to many different drivers.

    The networking changes are heavy as usual and include improvements to pretty much all of the common networking drivers.

  • NVIDIA's Graphics Driver Will Run Into Problems With Linux 5.3 On IBM POWER

    For those using the NVIDIA proprietary graphics driver on an IBM POWER system, it could be a while before seeing Linux 5.3+ kernel support. Upstream has removed code depended upon by the NVIDIA binary driver for supporting the POWER architecture and as is the case they don't care that it will break NVIDIA driver support since it's binary/out-of-tree.

    The POWER changes for Linux 5.3 remove NPU DMA code. In the pull request they do acknowledge this DMA code is "used by the out-of-tree Nvidia driver, as well as some other functions only used by drivers that haven't (yet?) made it upstream."

antiX-19-b2-full (64 and 32 bit) available

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Our second beta build of the upcoming antiX-19 release, based on Debian Buster and systemd-free.

Changes since beta1.

* Inclusion of connman-bluetooth-firmware
* New app – App Select – Quickly find all installed apps.
* 4.9.182 ‘Sack Panic’ patched kernel
* New ‘antiX’ category added to menu
* New themes, icons and wallpaper
* Various bugfixes.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • London Launches Open Source App for Homebuilding

    Bryden Wood, Cast, and the Mayor of London have launched a new app to speed up the capital’s home building. The freely-available app, titled PRISM, is aimed at the design and construction of high-quality, factory-built homes to address the current demand of 50,000+ houses per year.

  • Facebook just released this new open source JavaScript engine
  • Amazon, Microsoft Wage War Over the Pentagon’s ‘War Cloud’

    Amazon and Microsoft are battling it out over a $10 billion opportunity to build the U.S. military its first “war cloud” computing system. But Amazon’s early hopes of a shock-and-awe victory may be slipping away.

    Formally called the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure plan, or JEDI, the military’s computing project would store and process vast amounts of classified data, allowing the Pentagon to use artificial intelligence to speed up its war planning and fighting capabilities. The Defense Department hopes to award the winner-take-all contract as soon as August. Oracle and IBM were eliminated at an earlier round of the contract competition.

    But that’s only if the project isn’t derailed first. It faces a legal challenge by Oracle and growing congressional concerns about alleged Pentagon favoritism toward Amazon. Military officials hope to get started soon on what will be a decade-long business partnership they describe as vital to national security.

    “This is not your grandfather’s internet,” said Daniel Goure, vice president of the Lexington Institute, a defense-oriented think tank. “You’re talking about a cloud where you can go from the Pentagon literally to the soldier on the battlefield carrying classified information.”

    Amazon was considered an early favorite when the Pentagon began detailing its cloud needs in 2017, but its candidacy has been marred by an Oracle allegation that Amazon executives and the Pentagon have been overly cozy. Oracle has a final chance to make its case against Amazon — and the integrity of the government’s bidding process — in a court hearing Wednesday.

    “This is really the cloud sweepstakes, which is why there are such fierce lawsuits,” said Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives.

  • Fernando Corbató, a Father of Your Computer (and Your Password), Dies at 93

    Fernando Corbató, whose work on computer time-sharing in the 1960s helped pave the way for the personal computer, as well as the computer password, died on Friday at a nursing home in Newburyport, Mass. He was 93.

    His wife, Emily Corbató, said the cause was complications of diabetes. At his death he was a professor emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Dr. Corbató, who spent his entire career at M.I.T., oversaw a project in the early 1960s called the Compatible Time-Sharing System, or C.T.S.S., which allowed multiple users in different locations to access a single computer simultaneously through telephone lines.

  • Do you need a workstation? Do you care?

    Once upon a time — a long time ago — if you needed a workstation, you knew who you were and you knew how to get it: ask IT. Alternatively: whine, bully, and demand it from IT. And the machine you got would have a RISC-based processor, a customized UNIX operating system, and would likely be a branded model and possibly customized for your job and applications.

    [...]

    Microsoft allied with Intel to destroy the specialized workstation market, and thus began the long confusing story of Windows workstations.

today's howtos and programming leftovers

Filed under
Development
HowTos

Proprietary Software Insecurity

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • Why recent hacks show Apple’s security strength, not its weakness [Ed: Spinning bug doors as a strength? Apple has its share of liars coming to the rescue of proprietary software (not the first such bug). Moving from Microsoft to Apple "for security" is like swapping vodka for rum to cure one's liver.]

    It might be tempting to follow that line of thinking in light of two recent stories of vulnerabilities affecting the Mac and the Apple Watch. In the first instance, the Zoom video-calling app could be abused to let someone spy on you through your webcam. In the second, a flaw in Apple’s Walkie Talkie app could let a hacker eavesdrop on your iPhone conversations. They’re both troubling security issues.

  • Eavesdropping Concerns Cause Apple Watch’s Walkie-Talkie App to Be Disabled

    Just like any other Internet of things device, it’s important to remember that smartwatches are still devices. And many cool features can also be used for unethical purposes. There is always another side of the coin.

    This is what Apple Watch users found this week when Apple disabled the Walkie-Talkie app when it was discovered that it allowed users to listen in on each other’s iPhone calls without the other person’s knowledge.

  • 250M Accounts Affected By ‘TrickBot’ Trojan’s New Cookie Stealing Ability

    Popular malware TrickBot is back and this time it has learned some new capabilities like stealing cookies. So far, it has infected around 250 million Gmail accounts.

    As per the research firm Deep Instinct, among the affected accounts, some belonging to the governments of the US, the UK, and Canada have also fallen victim to TrickBot.

  • TrickBooster – TrickBot’s Email-Based Infection Module - Deep Instinct

    Seeing a signed malware binary delivered to a customer environment prompted us to investigate further. We analyzed the malware sample and found swaths of PowerShell code in its memory. Analysis of this PowerShell code immediately led us to the conclusion that we are dealing with a mail-bot.

  • A better zip bomb

    This article shows how to construct a non-recursive zip bomb that achieves a high compression ratio by overlapping files inside the zip container. "Non-recursive" means that it does not rely on a decompressor's recursively unpacking zip files nested within zip files: it expands fully after a single round of decompression. The output size increases quadratically in the input size, reaching a compression ratio of over 28 million (10 MB → 281 TB) at the limits of the zip format. Even greater expansion is possible using 64-bit extensions. The construction uses only the most common compression algorithm, DEFLATE, and is compatible with most zip parsers.

Some Cool Applications Developed by TeejeeTech!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Linux is a kernel that is currently experiencing many developments. As a user, we might want to try other kernels or upgrade the latest kernel to a computer system. Users need to be careful when changing the kernel, because this section is one of the important parts of a computer system.

But you can use Ukuu to make it easier to install and replace the kernel, because this application is an easy-to-use GUI Tool.

Based on the information I got on the Teejectech web, Starting from version 19.01, Ukuu turned into a paid license. This is because of the lack of donations needed to continue developing this application. But for those of you who have donated to Ukuu in the past, you can contact Teejeetech via email if you want to request a paid license from this application.

Read more

Games in GNOME, New KDE Plasma5 for Slackware and KDE Wiki

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
Slack
  • Andrei Lisita: Getting closer

    Since my last blog post I have been on a short vacation but I have also managed to make some progress on my GSoC project again with guidance from my mentor.

    [...]

    Every savestate also has a creation date which is displayed in the menu, but that’s certainly not as eye-catching as the screenshots.

    There are still many missing features and things that need improving (such as the date formatting) but with every commit I feel that I am getting closer to the finished project.

  • KDE Plasma5 for Slackware, introducing Qt 5.13 in the July’19 update

    Now that all major components of the KDE software stack have fresh new releases, I bundled them for Slackware-current and voila: KDE-5_19.07.

    I have uploaded KDE-5_19.07 to my ‘ktown‘ repository. As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a full installation of Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2.

  • The new userbase wiki

    When you find a kool feature in KDE software, you can write a small tutorial or just a small paragraph about it and the KDE Userbase Wiki is the right place to publish it. You don’t need to know how to code, have perfect English or know how MediaWiki’s formatting work, to contribute. We also need translators.

Games: RetroArch, Cortex Command, Psychonauts 2, Fate Hunters, OpenHMD and Rings of Saturn

Filed under
Gaming
  • RetroArch will be Steam’s biggest emulation launch yet, coming July 30

    De Matteis tells Ars that this Steam version has been in the works "for a few months now," and he expresses specific interest in using Steamworks' Web API for future RetroArch builds. If such features are built, he says, that would create a fork in RetroArch's build distribution; until then, what you download from RetroArch's official site will be identical to the builds on Steam. (In a long-story-short explanation, De Matteis says that the Web API may prove necessary for the following red-tape reason: "There are certain licensing 'how many angels can stand on the head of a pin' issues that pertain to the Steamworks SDK and how the GPL license interprets what constitutes a system library or not.")

    [...]

    In addition to answering our questions, De Matteis coughed up one interesting bit of additional news. The 1997 N64 racing game Extreme-G may receive a retail Steam launch at an undetermined point in the future, and should this come to pass, RetroArch and its Mupen64plus emulator will power the game's Steam version. (De Matteis described this process as "talks," as opposed to a confirmed retail launch.) This would be a wholly separate download from RetroArch's free Steam download, and it would require publisher Throwback Entertainment to abide by a GPL license for the emulator front-end. "We went to great lengths to ensure all involved parties like Mupen64plus were kept in the loop on this and to make sure we got their approval," De Matteis says.

  • Cortex Command from Data Realms goes open source

    Cortex Command, a side-scrolling 2D action game originally released back in 2012 has now officially gone open source.

    In the announcement, it seems this is part of a marketing drive for their new game Planetoid Pioneers Online. Quite a nice way to do it though, I'm certainly not complaining. I think it would be great if more developers did this to their older games to help them live on.

  • Double Fine Productions have delayed Psychonauts 2 until next year, all versions still planned

    Double Fine Productions announced on their Fig campaign for Psychonauts 2 that there's going to be a delay, with it now due in 2020.

    Let's get to the good news first, they continue to confirm all previously mentioned platforms will be delivered which obviously includes the Linux version, just like they said before. As for the delay, they simply said it will be "next year" with no clear roadmap being given out yet.

  • Fate Hunters, another roguelike card-game with Linux support is leaving Early Access soon

    Another possible game to look at if you enjoy the likes of Slay the Spire, as Fate Hunters from Tower Games has Linux support.

  • OpenHMD version 0.3.0 is out, almost three years after the last version

    The team behind OpenHMD have now officially announced version 0.3.0, which comes with a huge amount of changes and new hardware support.

    What exactly is OpenHMD? Its aim is to provide a FOSS API and drivers for hardware like Virtual Reality Headsets and Controllers. They're hoping to support as many devices as they possibly can, while also being cross-platform.

    From this release they now support: 3Glasses D3 (first-party support from 3Glasses), Oculus Rift CV1 (rotational), HTC Vive and HTC Vive Pro (rotational), NOLO VR (Positional including Controller support), Windows Mixed Reality HMD support (rotational), Deepoon E2, GearVR Gen1. Sadly PSVR is currently disabled due to issues, sounds like it may return later though.

  • Top-down hard sci-fi space game "Rings of Saturn" to launch in Early Access next month

    Kodera Software have released a new trailer for their hard sci-f game Rings of Saturn, with a release date teaser for Steam Early Access included.

Fedora vs. Ubuntu: Linux Distros Compared

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Fedora is a free and open source Linux-based operating system that has been around since 2003. Red Hat, the world’s largest open source company prior to being bought by IBM, sponsors the project. Fedora serves as the foundation for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, a version of Linux intended for companies and servers rather than personal desktop use.

Ubuntu became the most popular Linux-based operating system not long after launching in 2004. Billionaire Mark Shuttleworth created a company called Canonical whose purpose was to create a version of Linux for general computer users. Ubuntu was that desktop.

Read more

Top 5 Linux Distros That Are Worth Your Attention

Filed under
Linux

For users who do not know, Linux is a family of open source operating systems which is available in a large number of variations which are often referred to as “distros”. The word “open source” means that every Linux user holds the right to alter or redistribute their very own customised version of Linux with or without a charge.

To make it easier to understand, the core of the OS which is the “Linux Kernel” can be referred to as a universal engine. While users have the option to choose the type of car body or the features that they desire, as per their wants and requirements. Due to its open source nature, the Linux Core is picked up by several organisations or even small group of computer nerds that have developed their very own “distro’s”. Out of hundreds of registered Linux flavours, we have compiled a list of top 5 options that you must check out.

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KDE Frameworks 5.60.0

Filed under
KDE

KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page.

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

Read more

Also: KDE Frameworks 5.60 Released With Many Changes & Fixes

KDE Itinerary - Vector Graphic Barcodes

Filed under
KDE

I have previously written about why we are interested in barcodes for the KItinerary extractor. This time it’s more about the how, specifically how we find and decode vector graphic barcodes in PDF files, something KItinerary wasn’t able to do until very recently.

While PDF is a vector graphics format, most barcodes we encounter in there are actually stored as images. Technically this might not be the cleanest or most efficient way, but it makes KItinerary’s life very easy: We just iterate over all images found in the PDF, and feed them into the barcode decoder.

It’s of course a bit more complicated to make this as efficient as possible, but conceptually you could script this with Poppler’s pdfimages command line tool and ZXing with just a few lines of code.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 60
  • Sweden’s digitalisation hub adopts open source policy [iophk: DIGG includes a bit of licensing FUD against GPL and copyleft]

                       

                         

    DIGG (Myndigheten för digital förvaltning, or agency for digital government) was founded in September 2018.
     

                         

    Its open source software development policy aims to standardise and regulate ownership and set the conditions for sharing.

  • University of California Loses Access to New Content in Elsevier Journals

    In a statement released Wednesday, UC’s Academic Council encouraged those at the university who might require access to Elsevier’s content to use alternative access methods, such as online repositories where authors deposit free-to-read copies of their papers, and to “refrain from any new independent subscriptions to Elsevier journals.”

    Over the last few months, Elsevier has established nationwide licensing agreements in Norway and Poland, and is close to making such a deal in Hungary. However, it remains in a stalemate in negotiations with consortia of libraries and research institutions in Germany and Sweden. Those groups have also cancelled their subscriptions with the publisher.

OpenShift and Fedora Program Management Under IBM

Filed under
Red Hat
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: Quay v3 Release Update and Road Map

    In this briefing, Dirk Herrmann, Red Hat’s Quay Product Manager walks through Quay v3.0’s features, and discusses the road map for future Quay releases, including a progress update on the open sourcing of Quay.

    Built for storing container images, Quay offers visibility over images themselves, and can be integrated into your CI/CD pipelines and existing workflows using its API and other automation features. Quay was first released in 2013, as the first enterprise hosted registry. Six years later, we’ve celebrated the first major release of the container registry since it joined the Red Hat portfolio of products through the acquisition of CoreOS in 2018.

  • FPgM report: 2019-28

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. I am on PTO the week of 15 July, so there will be no FPgM report or FPgM office hours next week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Adjusting the Scope of our Security Vulnerability Disclosure Program

    At EFF we put security and privacy first. That's why over three years ago we launched EFF's Security Vulnerability Disclosure Program. The Disclosure Program is a set of guidelines on how security researchers can tell EFF about bugs in the software we develop, like HTTPS Everywhere or Certbot. When we launched the program, it was a bit of an experiment. After all, as a lean, member-driven nonprofit, we can't give out the tremendous cash rewards that large corporations can provide for zero days. Instead, all we can offer security researchers in return for their hard work is recognition on our EFF Security Hall of Fame page and other non-cash rewards like EFF gear or complimentary EFF memberships.

    Despite the limited rewards, the program has been a tremendous success. As of June 1, 2019, we've had over seventy different security researchers report valid security vulnerabilities to us, as you can see on our Security Hall of Fame page.

  • Court: Computer Experts May Examine Georgia Voting Systems

    A federal court in Georgia has ruled that Georgia election officials must allow the Coalition for Good Governance to review the state's election management databases. The Coalition argued that the databases "provide the roadmap that needs to be analyzed to identify flaws" in the state election system.

  • Hackers breach Canonical GitHub account [Ed: They breached a Microsoft GitHub account, but never blame Microsoft for anything...]

    Hackers compromised credentials to break into a Canonical Ltd. GitHub account...

Software: GNU Rush, Gis Weather, GNOME’s Weather App, Fork Awesome Sprites for Beast

Filed under
Software
  • GNU Rush Version 2,1

    Version 2.1 is available for download from GNU and Puszcza archives.
    This version fixes several minor bugs that appeared in previous release 2.0.

  • Customizable Weather Widget ‘Gis Weather’ 0.8.4 Released

    Gis Weather is an open-source desktop weather widget and indicator applet with highly customizable user interface.

  • A Brighter Future is Forecast for GNOME’s Weather App

    A wave of usability improvements are on the horizon for the humble GNOME Weather app.

    The current version of the meteorological must-have might have made my list of the best weather apps for Ubuntu and Linux Mint, but I quipped “aspects of its layout bug me”.

    And it seems I’m not alone.

    [...]

    Horizontal pagination seems like a logical introduction, as does separating hourly forecasts from the 10 day forecast.

    Relaying “current conditions” remains prominent in the redesign, but not at the expense of the overall layout.

    And while I like that the proposed redesign mentions the yr.no weather service that’s used as the backend, I especially like that the client as a whole makes better use of the data that this free service provides.

  • Fork Awesome Sprites for Beast

    The Font Awesome 5 package has some other nice features though, since it’s now based on an SVG icon set, it ships 3 large sprite files that can be used to address individual icons via anchors. For Beast, I decided to stick with the Font Awesome 4 look for now, but since there are good reasons not to use icon fonts and I had the infrastructure for using sprite icons already in place, I looked into ways to generate an SVG sprite file for Font Awesome 4.

    Around February 2018, Julien Deswaef and a few others decided to fork the Font Awesome 4 project as Fork-Awesome. Since then, Fork-Awesome has incorporated new icons and also generated an SVG icon set. Since it is forked from Font Awesome, it has all the Font Awesome 4 icons and can be used as a drop in replacement.

Kernel: F2FS and Compressed Firmware Files

Filed under
Linux
  • F2FS Gains Native SWAP File Support, Other Improvements

    F2FS remains a very interesting file-system and has seen particularly good adoption on newer Android devices while it continues to shine as well for laptop and desktop SSD storage. With Linux 5.3 there is finally native SWAP file support for F2FS that can make use of direct I/O for better swapping performance. F2FS is also getting the ability to pre-allocate physical blocks in a pinned file to avoid fragmentation in append-only workloads, more sanity checks, and a variety of bug fixes.

  • Linux 5.3 Picks Up Support For Compressed Firmware Files - Measurable Storage Savings

    SUSE's Takashi Iwai has been working on support for loading compressed firmware files and with the Linux 5.3 driver core patches there is this support. On his own system, he started out with /lib/firmware occupying over 400MB of the disk. When making use of XZ compression, this dropped to around 130MB in total. Thus easily being able to shave off several hundred megabytes from the disk due to all these firmware blobs is an easy win.

    The firmware files remain compressed on disk while at firmware loading time into the kernel the decompression is done. Only XZ compression is currently supported. When the CONFIG_FW_LOADER_COMPRESS option is enabled, the kernel will first try to load a firmware file of the original name but otherwise falls back trying to load any file with the same name appended by the .xz extension.

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More in Tux Machines

Neon: A Wannabe Linux Distro For KDE Lovers

KDE Neon is a bit of an oddball Linux thing. Linuxland has an impressive collection of oddball things. Neon looks and feels much like a Linux distribution, but its developers assert quite openly on their website that Neon is not a real Linux distro. It just installs and functions like one -- sort of. That can make deciding to use it a little confusing. Neon appears to be a Linux operating system. It boots your computer. It displays a full desktop environment. It runs *some* applications so you can go about your computing tasks much like using any other -- ahh -- real Linux distribution. That last part is a clue to what makes KDE Neon different. Getting somewhat technical for a minute, KDE Neon is more of a specialty offering than a fully endowed operating system. Other distros support a wide range of applications from the same software format type. For example, Ubuntu runs .Deb formatted packages from the Debian Linux family. All .Deb packages will run on Ubuntu- and other Debian-based distros. Which desktop environment is used does not matter, be it KDE, Xfce, GNOME or whatever. Ditto for RPM-based Linux distributions, like Fedora and Red Hat. All you need is a package management tool or knowledge of the commands for apt, yum or pacman, depending on the distribution's Linux family. However, that is a skill set that lots of Linux users never had to learn. Not so with KDE Neon. Neon runs only a specific category of KDE applications: the latest. Neon's developers assert that their "pseudo" distro does not support most other software. In fact, non-KDE packages most likely will not even install on Neon. Read more

Hardware With GNU/Linux

  • Linux Foundation ? where do thou go? ? Stay out of the Desktop and you shalt be paid
  • Acer Chromebook R 11 C738T
  • Samsung Chromebook 3 - XE500C13-K02US
  • Acer Chromebook 14
  • HP Chromebook 11 G5 - X9U02UT
  • Acer Chromebook Spin 15
  • HP Chromebook x2
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C213SA
  • Samsung Chromebook Plus - XE513C24-K01US
  • Samsung Chromebook Pro - XE510C25-K01US
  • ASUS Chromebit CS10
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C434 - C434TA-DSM4T
  • Lenovo Chromebook S330 - 81JW0001US
  • Data in a Flash, Part IV: the Future of Memory Technologies

    As it relates to memory technologies, the future looks very promising and very exciting. Will the SSD completely replace the traditional spinning HDD? I doubt it. Look at tape technology. It's still around and continues to find a place in the archival storage space. The HDD most likely will have a similar fate. Although until then, the HDD will continue to compete with the SSD in both price and capacity.

  • Jonathan McDowell: Upgrading my home server

    At the end of last year I decided it was time to upgrade my home server. I built it back in 2013 as an all-in-one device to be my only always-on machine, with some attempt towards low power consumption. It was starting to creak a bit - the motherboard is limited to 16G RAM and the i3-3220T is somewhat ancient (though has served me well). So it was time to think about something more up to date. Additionally since then my needs have changed; my internet connection is VDSL2 (BT Fibre-to-the-Cabinet) so I have an BT HomeHub 5 running OpenWRT to drive that and provide core routing/firewalling. My wifi is provided by a pair of UniFi APs at opposite ends of the house. I also decided I could use something low power to run Kodi and access my ripped DVD collection, rather than having the main machine in the living room. That meant what I wanted was much closer to just a standard server rather than having any special needs. The first thing to consider was a case. My ADSL terminates in what I call the “comms room” - it has the electricity meter / distribution board and gas boiler, as well as being where one of the UniFi’s lives and where the downstairs ethernet terminates. In short it’s the right room for a server to live in. I don’t want a full rack, however, and ideally wanted something that could sit alongside the meter cabinet without protruding from the wall any further. A tower case would have worked, but only if turned sideways, which would have made it a bit awkward to access. I tried in vain to find a wall mount case with side access that was shallow enough, but failed. However in the process I discovered a 4U vertical wall mount. This was about the same depth as the meter cabinet, so an ideal choice. I paired it with a basic 2U case from X-Case, giving me a couple of spare U should I decide I want another rack-mount machine or two.

New Releases of GNU/Linux: Clonezilla, EasyOS and ARCOLINUX

OSS Leftovers

  • Kubernetes: The retro-style, Wild West video game

    The Kubernetes API is amazing, and not only are we going to break it down and show you how to wield this mighty weapon, but we will do it while building a video game, live, on stage. As a matter of fact, you get to play along.

  • Celebrating Kubernetes and 5 Years of Open Source

    5 years ago, Kubernetes was born and quickly became one of the most important open-source platform innovations. Today, its Github repository boasts 55,384 stars and 2,205 contributors! We?re not just celebrating Kubernetes and how much easier it makes our lives, but we?re also celebrating the open-source community that added to the container management tool; making it what it is today. When you have an entire community working together to innovate and improve, the possibilities are endless.

  • Public Statement on Neutrality of Free Software

    F-Droid won’t tolerate oppression or harassment against marginalized groups. Because of this, it won’t package nor distribute apps that promote any of these things. This includes that it won’t distribute an app that promotes the usage of previously mentioned website, by either its branding, its pre-filled instance domain or any other direct promotion. This also means F-Droid won’t allow oppression or harassment to happen at its communication channels, including its forum. In the past week, we failed to fulfill this goal on the forum, and we want to apologize for that.

  • What open-source culture can teach tech titans and their critics
                   
                     

    Yet Mozilla turns out to be much more consequential than its mixed record and middling numbers would have you believe. There are three reasons for this.  

  • Request Travel Support for the openSUSE.Asia Summit

    The Travel Support Program (TSP) provides travel sponsorships to openSUSE community who want to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit and need financial assistance. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be in Bali, Indonesia, at Information Technology Department, Faculty of Engineering, Udayana University on October 5 and 6. The goal of the TSP is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit!

  • An Indian research university has assembled 73 million journal articles (without permission) and is offering the archive for unfettered scientific text-mining

    The JNU Data Depot is a joint project between rogue archivist Carl Malamud (previously), bioinformatician Andrew Lynn, and a research team from New Delhi's Jawaharlal Nehru University: together, they have assembled 73 million journal articles from 1847 to the present day and put them into an airgapped respository that they're offering to noncommercial third parties who want to perform textual analysis on them to "pull out insights without actually reading the text."

    This text-mining process is already well-developed and has produced startling scientific insights, including "databases of genes and chemicals, map[s of] associations between proteins and diseases, and [automatically] generate[d] useful scientific hypotheses." But the hard limit of this kind of text mining is the paywalls that academic and scholarly publishers put around their archives, which both limit who can access the collections and what kinds of queries they can run against them.

  • The plan to mine the world’s research papers [iophk: this is the kind of collection that Aaron Swartz died over, effectively killed]