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Sunday, 19 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Portable, open source retro game player runs Linux and Arduino Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 10:29pm
Story Why serverless computing makes Linux more relevant than ever Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 6:38pm
Story Kodi 17 "Krypton" Media Center Gets Its Last Update, Kodi 18 "Leia" Coming Next Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 6:34pm
Story The Road to the GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Continues, Second Snapshot Is Out Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 6:33pm
Story Linux-on-i.MX6 Pico-ITX SBC has 40-pin GPIO header Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 6:31pm
Story Desktop: Microsoft E.E.E., Dell, and Linux Mint 18.3 Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:27pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:25pm
Story Servers: HPC, Red Hat, Fedora Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:23pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 4:15pm
Story Red Hat: OpenStack, Container, SAP, Fedora 27 Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:27pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Audio/Video: Unleaded Hangout, Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

Linux Bugs and Features

Filed under
Linux
  • Fixes MIA for Many Linux Kernel Flaws [Ed: But these are not very severe bugs as they require physical access to the machine to exploit]

    A Google code security researcher's recent discovery of 14 flaws in Linux kernel USB drivers led to last-minute fixes in the Linux 4.14 release candidate code set for distribution on Sunday.

    The flaws, which Google researcher Andrey Konovalov disclosed earlier this week, affect the Linux kernel before version 4.13.8.

    All 14 have available fixes. However, they are part of a much larger group of 79 flaws affecting the Linux kernel's USB drivers, some of which remain unpatched.

    Within this larger group of coding flaws, 22 now have a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures number, and fixes are available for them.

  • We Could See WireGuard Upstreamed In The Linux Kernel In 2018

    WireGuard is the effort led by Jason Donenfeld to provide a next-gen secure network tunnel for the Linux kernel. Jason has laid out plans and next steps for getting this interesting project merged into the upstream Linux kernel.

Software: Kdenlive, ucaresystem, FFmpeg, Calibre, NetworkManager

Filed under
Software
  • Kdenlive 17.08.3 released

    The last dot release of the 17.08 series is out with minor fixes. We continue focus on the refactoring branch with steady progress towards a stable release.

  • ucaresystem core 4.2.3 : One installer for Ubuntu and Debian based distributions

    I am pleased to announce that ucaresystem core version 4.2.3 has been released with some cool features. Now either you have an Ubuntu or Debian based distribution, you just need only one deb package installer.

  • FFmpeg Lands NVDEC-Accelerated H.264 Decoding

    NVIDIA has been shifting their focus from VDPAU for GPU-accelerated video decoding to instead the NVIDIA Video Codec SDK that offers NVENC for encoding and NVDEC for video decoding. FFmpeg has landed initial NVDEC support.

    NVIDIA has been transitioning their focus with Linux video acceleration from using the Video Decode and Presentation API for Unix (VDPAU) to the cross-platform, CUDA-based Video Codec SDK with NVENC/NVDEC while VDPAU continues to be supported for the time being.

  • Calibre Open-Source eBook Management App Now Supports the New Nook Glowlight 3

    A new update of the open-source and cross-platform Calibre ebook management software is now available for download, and it brings support for the new Nook Glowlight 3 e-reader.

    Calibre 3.12 is out, and it introduces a driver for the new Nook Glowlight 3, a 6-inch e-reader with a Carta E-ink screen with touchscreen and color-changing front light. This means that you'll be able to connect your Nook Glowlight 3 e-reader to Calibre to sync e-books.

    Furthermore, Calibre 3.12 now lets users specify extra file formats that the application doesn't support by default for wireless sending in the wireless driver, as well as to configure metadata fields that are displayed in the Book Details pop-up window by clicking on the "Configure" link at the bottom.

  • NetworkManager 1.10 Released With OpenVSwitch & WPS Connection Support

    NetworkManager 1.10 was released today as the newest version of this commonly used Linux network management utility.

Games: Cattails, Devader, Far-Out, DRM, Games for the Brain, Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • What are you playing this weekend?

    There's been a lot of really great releases for Linux lately, it's getting incredibly hard to choose what to play.

  • Like cats? Cattails is a 2D RPG with light survival elements where you're a feral cat

    I was just casually browsing through my long list of things to cover, when I came across Cattails [Steam, Official Site] and the whole idea instantly caught my interest

  • Devader is an absolutely nuts shooter coming to Linux early next year

    Get ready to defend a dying civilization in Devader [Steam, Official Site], as this absolutely nuts shooter is coming to Linux early next year.

    The game was originally made for a game-jam back in December 2015 and has ended up turning into a full game. Interestingly, it seems the developer is using Javascript to develop it. If you're interested in seeing how the game has progressed, the developer put up a bunch of albums on imgur.

  • Hardcore retro-futuristic adventure game Far-Out looks awesome, coming to Linux

    Continuing my search for Linux games to come next year, I came across Far-Out [Steam, Official Site], a hardcore retro-futuristic adventure game and damn it looks good. It's being developed by one person, so I'm quite eager to see what they've been able to achieve.

    In this classic mix of horror and adventure, you play as geneticist Zack Paterson, the lone survivor of the Selene. Find out what happened to the ship and the crew and possibly escape. The developer said they've been inspired by games like The Dig, Space Quest, Full Throttle, Blade Runner and more.

  • DRM Strikes Again: Sonic Forces Just Plain Broken Thanks To Denuvo

    You may recall that Sega released its title Sonic Mania earlier this year, without bothering to inform anyone that the game came laden with Denuvo DRM and an always-online requirement. While Sega eventually patched the always-online requirement out, Denuvo remained, as did a hefty number of viciously negative Steam reviews from gamers that couldn't play the game as they intended or who were simply pissed off that DRM like Denuvo was included without mention to the public.

  • PSA: Sonic Forces' PC port is a hot mess

    Sonic Forces has already had a bit of an uphill battle to face releasing after Sonic Mania, but it looks like PC users are going to have an even rougher time of it. Thanks to the magic of Denuvo DRM, most users can't even progress past the second level in the game. Upon reaching the first mission with your custom avatar, the game promptly crashes with little explanation. Sega has been diligent in quickly issuing a patch, at least.

    Another big problem comes from some messed up calculations with the framerate limiter. For some reason, capping the framerate at 60 results in the game playing at half speed, around roughly 32 FPS. Using the 30 FPS cap results in 22 frames per second, which is what the cutscenes are locked to. As you can clearly tell from just a numerical standpoint, this is making things look ultra weird for a lot of people. At least Forces has an unlocked framerate option, but cutscenes are pretty much busted for the time being.

  • Simon Tatham’s Portable Puzzle Collection – Games for the Brain

    I recently published an article identifying 13 fun open source puzzle games. Each game is worth downloading. As a reader pointed out, the article didn’t include an exquisite puzzle collection. That’s Simon Tatham’s Portable Puzzle Collection. Let’s call it the Puzzle Collection for brevity.

    Every game in this Puzzle Collection is published under an open source license. And the collection is portable. What does that mean? Well, the games run on almost every modern operating system. Besides Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, you can play the games on anything that supports Java, or JavaScript. They can also be played on the web.

  • Wine 2.21 is out with Direct 3D indirect draws support, also fixes for The Witcher 3 and NieR:Automata

    The latest and greatest from the Wine development team is now available with Wine 2.21 which include support for Direct 3D indirect draws.

GNOME: Builder, LibreOffice, Outreachy 2017

Filed under
GNOME
  • Code indexing in Builder

    Anoop, one of Builder’s GSoC students this past summer, put together a code-index engine built upon Builder’s fuzzy search algorithm. It shipped with support for C and C++. Shortly after the 3.27 cycle started, Patrick added support for GJS. Today I added support for Vala which was rather easy given the other code we have in Builder.

  • Simplifying contributions

    Every release of both GNOME and Builder, we try to lower the barrier a bit more for new contributions. Bastian mentioned to me at GUADEC that we could make things even simpler from the Builder side of things. After a few mockups, I finally found some time to start implementing it.

  • gtk3 + broadway + libreoffice

    Out of the box in Fedora 26 I see that our gtk3 version of LibreOffice mostly works under broadway so here's libreoffice displaying through firefox. Toolbar is toast, but dialogs and menus work.

  • Outreachy 2017 Participants Selected For Winter 2017 Open-Source Work

    The Outreachy participants for the Winter 2017 internship program for "underrepresented people in tech" have been named.

    There are 42 interns that were selected for the internship period running from December to March. The selected women and other underrepresented groups in the Linux/open-source world will be working on items including...

Devices: Linux-based Ethernet Gear, Tizen, Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

A look at Arch Linux based Antergos

Filed under
Reviews

So, I’ve mentioned a few times for my love of Arch Linux and Manjaro, but there is another player in the mix that deserves due diligence, and has actually won over my personal use vote as well; Antergos.

The main difference between Antergos and Manjaro is updates and repositories. Manjaro holds updates for further testing, Antergos does not, and Antergos uses the Arch repos directly.

That said, when you are finished installing Antergos, you are essentially left with an Arch Linux system that has a few extra bells and whistles installed, where as Manjaro is Manjaro, based on Arch. This is over-simplifying, but the essential core difference.

Antergos can be downloaded from the homepage, and comes in either a minimal ISO or a live ISO. Both are graphically bootable and use graphical installers, it’s just that one will allow you to boot into a live system and try things first, the other will not.

The installation tool is very simple to use, and anyone with prior installation experience will have absolutely no problems using it.

Read more

Also: Arch Linux Ends Support for 32-Bit Systems

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.5 and Intel

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 17.2.5 Released

    The fifth point release to Mesa 17.2 is now available with the latest fixes while the Mesa 17.3 official release is imminent.

  • mesa 17.2.5

    Mesa 17.2.5 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    In Mesa Core a GL error related to the ARB_ES3_1_compatibility spec
    noticed with the GFXBench 5 Aztec Ruins has been corrected.

    The GLSL compiler is not giving a linker error for mismatching uniform
    precision with GLSL ES 1.00 any more. This enables, specially, several
    Android applications which violate this rule, like Forge of Empires,
    for example.

  • Intel Posts Patches For SPIR-V Generation From Mesa's GLSL Compiler

    Longtime Intel open-source graphics driver developer Ian Romanick has posted his initial set of patches for what he calls "the first of the real SPIR-V work."

  • Intel Begins Testing Early Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 4.16

    Linux 4.14 isn't even out the door yet but with the DRM-Next feature period over in preparation for the Linux 4.15 merge window, Intel open-source developers are already prepping code improvements that will in turn target Linux 4.16.

    Rodrigo Vivi announced the updated drm-intel-testing code today as the start of new feature material that will eventually find its way into the Linux 4.16 kernel next year.

Wine 2.21 Released

Filed under
Software
  • Wine 2.21 Released

    The Wine development release 2.21 is now available.

  • Wine 2.21 Supports Direct3D Indirect Draws, More ARM Work

    Alexandre Julliard has released the latest bi-weekly development snapshot of Wine as this project approaches its Wine 3.0 release around the end of the year.

  • Wine 2.21 Fixes More Witcher 3 Issues, Improves Serial Port Detection on Linux

    Wine, the open-source compatibility layer for running Windows apps and games on Linux-based and UNIX-like operating systems, has been updated today to version 2.21.

    Wine 2.21 is a development release coming eleven days after the previous milestone, Wine 2.20, to add a bunch of enhancements, such as indirect draws support in Direct 3D, better serial port detection on GNU/Linux systems, as well as better DPI scaling in the Shell Explorer.

12-Way Graphics Card OpenCL Comparison With AMDGPU-PRO 17.40 ROCm, NVIDIA 384.98

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the recent testing of the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti being our new graphics card up for Linux benchmarking as well as having a new NVIDIA Linux graphics driver release, hare are OpenCL benchmarks of 12 graphics cards using the latest AMDGPU-PRO 17.40 and NVIDIA 384.98 Linux drivers on Ubuntu x86_64.

Read more

Android at 10: How Google won the smartphone wars

Filed under
Android

Part One It was an anniversary that prompted much reflection. The Platform had completely triumphed and was now ubiquitous, relied on by people all over the world. You could find the Platform in almost every conceivable kind of device, from cars to TVs. Although Apple had once been the pioneer, it now had to settle for life in the Platform's shadow: as a high-margin boutique, catering to a wealthy minority. The Platform was what everyone else used.

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Red Hat CTO Details the Next Waves of IT Innovation

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat is involved in a number of areas of IT that use its Linux operating system as a base. Providing direction on many of those areas of IT is Red Hat Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Chris Wright.

Wright has been with Red Hat since 2005 and was officially promoted to the role of CTO in October 2017. Wright is only the second CTO in Red Hat's history, following Brian Stevens, who held the position from 2001 until 2014, when he left to join Google.

In a video interview with eWEEK, Wright discusses some of the future technology directions for his company, including what's next for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), where machine learning and artificial intelligence are headed, and what the most exciting areas of innovation are likely to be in the years ahead.

"At the end of the day, RHEL is about running enterprise workloads on a stable long-term supported platform, and that's the core focus," Wright said. "We're doing some enablement of new hardware and have had a preview release for RHEL on ARM."

Read more

Also: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Position Lessened by Mizuho Securities USA LLC

Omega2-based smart clock Bluetooth speaker has gesture controlled streaming

Filed under
Linux

Onion’s “Oboo Smart Clock” BT music streamer is built on its Linux-driven Omega2 COM, and offers 3W speakers, device charging, and WiFi-based info updates.

Onion used Kickstarter to launch its original, Linux-driven Omega and last year’s Omega2 computer-on-modules, and it has returned for a KS three-peat with its Omega2 based Oboo Clock. The bedside smart clock and Bluetooth music player has so far received $64,000 in funding, over twice the $25,000 goal. The campaign extends to Dec. 1, and shipments are due in June.

Read more

Firefox 57: Good news? It's nippy. Bad news? It'll also trash your add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF

Open Source Insider Mozilla plans on November 14 to start rolling out Firefox 57, a massive update that just might send many of its users scurrying for the LTS release.

First the good news. Firefox 57 is faster, quite noticeably so, thanks to improvements to what Mozilla calls Project Quantum. Quantum encompasses several smaller projects in order to bring more parallelisation and GPU offloading to Firefox. That's developer speak for using more of that really fast GPU you've got. And again, the results are noticeable (some of them have already rolled out).

Read more

Apollo Lake based in-vehicle PC supports CAN or OBDII+ telematics

Filed under
Linux

Acrosser’s rugged, Linux-ready “AIV-APL1V1FL” in-vehicle PC has a quad Pentium N4200 with 2x SATA bays, 3x mini-PCIe, and CAN or OBDII+ J1939 telematics.

Acrosser’s fanless AIV-APL1V1FL computer is designed for fleet management, much like earlier models such as the wider-frame AIV-HM76V1FL (Intel 3rd Gen Intel Core “Ivy Bridge”) and AVI-QM97V1FL (5th Gen Core “Broadwell”) computers. The AIV-APL1V1FL instead adopts an Intel Pentium N4200 from the Apollo Lake generation. Like the previous models it offers a CAN 2.0A/2.0B port for plugging into a truck’s telematics system, and it also gives you the option of swapping that out for a OBDII+ J1939 telematics port.

Read more

Software: GNU Time, Lizard, NetworkManager, Notes Up, SReview

Filed under
Software
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Announcing Season of KDE 2018

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How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

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today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.