Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 19 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Igalia, Intel, AMD and More Roy Schestowitz 16/09/2018 - 12:56am
Story It's Looking Like WireGuard Could Be Ready In Time For Linux 4.20~5.0 Roy Schestowitz 16/09/2018 - 12:51am
Story KDE: Elisa, Krita and KDE Itinerary Roy Schestowitz 16/09/2018 - 12:49am
Story Programming: Masters and slaves, backing the wrong horse, and Julia Roy Schestowitz 16/09/2018 - 12:44am
Story Security: HackRF, WPScan, BGP Roy Schestowitz 16/09/2018 - 12:42am
Story Stop using GitHub as a measure of open source contributions Roy Schestowitz 16/09/2018 - 12:33am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2018 - 7:12pm
Story Troubleshooting With Git - Git Series Part 3 Mohd Sohail 15/09/2018 - 11:39am
Story A Summary of deepin 15.6 and 15.7 Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2018 - 10:01am
Story Behind the GNOME 3.30 Release Video Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2018 - 9:55am

Games: Super Combat Fighter, Akane, Valve's Steam Play and Proton, Paratopic, Turok 2: Seeds of Evil

Filed under
Gaming
  • Linux will get another fighting game with Super Combat Fighter currently on Kickstarter

    One genre we certainly don't have enough in is fighting games, so I'm pleased to see that Super Combat Fighter [Official Site] will be released for Linux.

    Initially, the Kickstarter didn't actually mention Linux support.

  • Akane is an addictive blood-soaked slasher that's now out with Linux support

    The blood-soaked neon-fuelled slasher Akane [Official Site] released with Linux support, I took a look to see of it's worth your pennies. Note: Personal purchase.

    They did have a bit of a launch mess-up when it came to the Linux version, where it resulted in an empty download. I messaged them how to fix it and they managed to get it going quickly enough.

  • Game porter Ethan Lee gives his thoughts on Valve's Steam Play and Proton

    For today's article I spoke to Ethan Lee, developer of FNA and who has ported something around 40+ titles to Linux. He also recently helped get Dust: An Elysian Tail ported to the Nintendo Switch and so he certainly knows his stuff.

    As a reminder, you can see my initial thoughts about it all here. I did speak to game porters Feral Interactive in that article, although they only gave one line about plans not changing (which is good to know). Aspyr Media didn’t give a public comment for it and Virtual Programming still aren’t replying to our emails.

    If you missed it, you can also see our interview with the creator of DXVK, one of the projects that makes up Steam Play. Again, this article was supposed to be part of a larger one, but given Ethan Lee's thoughts here (and all the work he's done for Linux gaming) I felt it deserved an article by itself.

  • Paratopic, an atmospheric retro-3D horror adventure is out and it's a really strange experience

    Developer Arbitrary Metric have put out a rather interesting retro-3D horror title with Linux support and it's quite an experience. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    This is actually the "Definitive Cut edition" (the previous version didn't have a Linux version), which includes new areas to visit as well as the usual tweaks and improvements you would expect from an updated version.

  • Turok 2: Seeds of Evil is now officially available on Linux, more coming from Icculus

    As a reminder, this isn't the original Turok 2 but an enhanced version from Nightdive Studios that was ported to Linux by Ryan "Icculus" Gordon in beta form back in July.

Red Hat News (Financial Results Imminent)

Filed under
Red Hat

The Current Linux Performance On 22 Intel / AMD Desktop Systems

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For your Linux benchmark viewing pleasure today are test results from twenty-two distinct Intel / AMD systems when running a recent release of the performance-optimized Clear Linux distribution and the hardware spanning from old AMD FX and Intel Core i3 Haswell CPUs up through the high-end desktop Core i9 and Threadripper processors.

Read more

Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Coming hot on the heels of the latest Linux kernel security update released by Canonical on Tuesday, the new Linux kernel live patch security update fixes a total of five security vulnerabilities, which are documented as CVE-2018-11506, CVE-2018-11412, CVE-2018-13406, CVE-2018-13405, and CVE-2018-12233.

These include a stack-based buffer overflow (CVE-2018-11506) discovered by Piotr Gabriel Kosinski and Daniel Shapira in Linux kernel's CDROM driver implementation, which could allow a local attacker to either execute arbitrary code or cause crash the system via a denial of service.

Read more

The Current Linux Performance On 22 Intel / AMD Desktop Systems

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Is the ‘commons clause’ a threat to open source?

Filed under
OSS
Legal

There are discussions on various forums regarding this clause with conflicting views. So, I will try to give my views on this.

Opposers of the clause believe a software becomes propriety on applying commons clause. This means that any service created from the original software remains the intellectual property of the original company to sell.

The fear is that this would discourage the community from contributing to open-source projects with a commons clause attached since the new products made will remain with the company. Only they will be able to monetize it if they choose to do so.

On the one hand, companies that make millions of dollars from open source software and giving anything back is not in line with the ethos of open source software. But on the other hand, smaller startups and individual contributors get penalized by this clause too.

What if small companies contribute to a large open source project and want to use the derived product for their growth? They can’t anymore if the commons clause is applied to the project they contributed to. It is also not right to think that a contributor deserves 50% of the profits if a company makes millions of dollars using their open source project.

Read more

Support for a LoRaWAN Subsystem

Filed under
Development
Linux

Sometimes kernel developers find themselves competing with each other to get their version of a particular feature into the kernel. But sometimes developers discover they've been working along very similar lines, and the only reason they hadn't been working together was that they just didn't know each other existed.

Recently, Jian-Hong Pan asked if there was any interest in a LoRaWAN subsystem he'd been working on. LoRaWAN is a commercial networking protocol implementing a low-power wide-area network (LPWAN) allowing relatively slow communications between things, generally phone sensors and other internet of things devices. Jian-Hong posted a link to the work he'd done so far: https://github.com/starnight/LoRa/tree/lorawan-ndo/LoRaWAN.

He specifically wanted to know "should we add the definitions into corresponding kernel header files now, if LoRaWAN will be accepted as a subsystem in Linux?" The reason he was asking was that each definition had its own number. Adding them into the kernel would mean the numbers associated with any future LoRaWAN subsystem would stay the same during development.

Read more

So-called 'IoT' with GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • How to turn on an LED with Fedora IoT

    Do you enjoy running Fedora, containers, and have a Raspberry Pi? What about using all three together to play with LEDs? This article introduces Fedora IoT and shows you how to install a preview image on a Raspberry Pi. You’ll also learn how to interact with GPIO in order to light up an LED.

  • Nucleo boards takes ST's 8-bit MCUs to open-source IoT projects

    STMicroelectronics has introduced two STM8 Nucleo development boards, letting the 8-bit world experience the ease of access and extensibility already proven with the STM32 Nucleo range.

    Leveraging the formula that has kickstarted countless STM32 embedded projects, the STM8 Nucleo boards give full access to all STM8 MCU I/Os through ST morpho headers, and contain Arduino Uno connectors that simplify functional expansion by accessing the vast ecosystem of open-source Arduino-compatible shields.

Security: Windows, EMC, Apache and Tor

Filed under
Security

Meet TUXEDO Nano V8: A Power-packed Linux Mini PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

TUXEDO Computers is known for building custom PCs or notebooks. They focus on Linux-powered systems while making sure that the hardware configuration they put together is completely compatible with Linux distributions.

Recently, they pulled the curtains off a new product and revealed the TUXEDO Nano – which is a Linux-based mini PC (just about the size of a Rabbit or even smaller).

Fret not, it is only smaller in the dimensions you measure with, you won’t be disappointed by the computing power it has to offer.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Chromebooks Are Getting Local File Sharing Support

    An upcoming Chrome OS update will add support for SMB shares, meaning Chromebooks will have access to files shared from Windows, macOS, and Linux computers.

    The feature is part of Chrome OS Canary right now, and will come to most Chromebooks with Chrome OS 70 on October 23. A screenshot of the feature in action, seen above, was posted by Google Employee François Beaufort on Google+ yesterday.

  • 5 Ridiculous Windows 10 Headlines That Will Have You Running To Linux
  • An interview with the developer of DXVK, part of what makes Valve's Steam Play tick

    What started as a large article talking to developers about Steam Play required splitting off before it became too big. For now, I give you a chat with the developer of DXVK, Philip Rebohle.

    For those that aren't quite up to speed, DXVK is a project that provides a Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation for Wine. It's part of what makes Valve's Steam Play "Proton" work. In simple terms, games built to run on Windows via DirectX can be run with DXVK/Proton, so that they can be played on Linux.

  • Game store itch releases a brand new client, plus a small interview

    Game store itch.io are doing some fantastic things and so it's time to highlight it a bit. They just released a massive overhaul to their open source client!

    Here's how the new and improved client looks, pretty slick right? It's blazingly fast too, from clicking the itch application button to actually logging in took around 2-3 seconds. When you want to just play your game, that's the kind of speed you want to enable you to quickly get going.

  • Last week’s [Slackware] updates: Chromium and VLC

    Last week the Chrome (and Chromium) update to release 69 was in the news. The UI changed significantly, sporting more of Google’s material design elements. Also the password manager has been improved: it will suggest random passwords in cases where you have to create a Web account and will offer to remember the random password in its vault so you don’t have to write it down or remember it (you’ll have to be signed into your Google account to be able to use this feature though).
    The ‘omnibox‘ (the area where you type your URLS and search queries) is more powerful now, showing many more related results while you are typing.
    My package for Chromium supports direct playback of H.265/HEVC video by the way, and has done so for the past releases. Check it out for instance on https://www.h265files.com/embed-h265-video.php . Not many other browsers (even other distros’ Chromium browsers) will do that.

  • Cloudera Launches an End-to-End, Open, Modular IoT Architecture with Red Hat and Eurotech to Accelerate IoT Deployments

    Architecture enables end-to-end analytics pushing machine learning and intelligence to the ‘edge’ to support real-time decision-making

    Cloudera, Inc. (NYSE : CLDR ), the modern platform for machine learning and analytics optimized for the cloud, today announced the launch of an end-to-end, open source Internet of Things (IoT) architecture in collaboration with Red Hat and Eurotech. Enterprises now have a modern IoT architecture that is scalable, secure, and technologically advanced without vendor lock-in.

  • ‘Open Hybrid’ Initiative Targets Big Data Workloads

    ortonworks, IBM and Red Hat today announced they’re banding together to build a consistent hybrid computing architecture for big data workloads. Dubbed the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative, the program pledges simplicity of deployment and freedom of movement for data apps.

    The rapid ascent of cloud computing platforms like AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud has given enterprises abundant new options for storing data and deploying processing-intensive applications, such as deep learning and real-time stream processing. Throw in the progress being made at the edge, with sensors and speedy ARM chips collecting and processing massive amounts of data, and you have the makings of a computing revolution.

    While the computing possibilities in the cloud and on the edge may appear bountiful, the reality is that the underlying architectures for building apps that can span these three modes are just starting to come together. Enterprises today face a dearth of repeatable patterns to guide their developers, administrators, and architects, who are tasked with building, deploying and maintaining hybrid that span not just the cloud and the edge, but traditional on-prem data centers too.

  • How to overcome two major challenges with digital transformation

    Business leaders of all stripes, not only CIOs, are talking about Digital Transformation these days. Even the World Economic Forum is publishing White Papers on the Digital Transformation of Industries. Even still, whether it’s Netflix passing over the 120 Million Monthly Subscribers mark while still managing 25% Year-on-Year growth, or Peloton stealing gym memberships with over a 100% year-on-year growth rate, it’s clear that businesses need to deliver better and more holistic experiences to customers through digital channels in order to succeed.

    However, organizations often struggle on their digital transformation journey in two fundamental areas. First, in the ability to fund transformational projects. Second, defining and implementing a strategy that ensures their organizations have the skills necessary for the transformational projects.

  • Observe the Analyst’s Thoughts: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Fedora at FrOSCon 2018 – Event report
  • Bring back the headphone jack: Why USB-C audio still doesn't work

     

    Smartphone makers, it’s time to have that come-to-Apple moment, where we tell you that it’s time to put the 3.5mm analog headset jack back on the phone—at least until you get your USB-C audio act in order. After plugging in a fistful of USB-C dongles and USB-C headsets into a stack of USB-C phones, I’ve discovered that it’s a mess, especially for third-party headsets. Here's why.

HopHacks at Johns Hopkins

Filed under
OSS
  • HopHacks participants will pursue solutions for cities

    More than 300 undergraduate and graduate students from across the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University this weekend for HopHacks, an annual hackathon event that challenges students to work intensively on a technology- or software-based design.

    Held every fall and spring on the university's Homewood campus, this year's HopHacks features a new design track: the Civic Hack challenges participants to develop apps aimed at improving urban living.

  • HopHacks adds civic track, using open source platform from Paris

    HopHacks is adding a design track focused building technology to improve city life at its fall event.

    The 36-hour student hackathon is scheduled to be held at Johns Hopkins’ Homewood campus from Sept. 14-16. Registration is already closed, according to its website, but there’s some news relevant to all of Baltimore to pass along. For the first time in the series, the biannual event will include a Civic Hack design track among the options for building, according to the JHU Hub.

Debian and Ubuntu: Decommissioned Mirror, TeX Live, and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • PSA: the.earth.li ceasing Debian mirror service

    This is a public service announcement that the.earth.li (the machine that hosts this blog) will cease service as a Debian mirror on 1st February 2019 at the latest.

    It has already been removed from the official list of Debian mirrors. Please update your sources.list to point to an alternative sooner rather than later.

  • Debian/TeX Live binaries update 2018.20180907.48586-1

    A new set of TeX Live binaries has been uploaded to Debian, based on the Subversion status as of 7 September (rev 48586). Aim was mostly fixing a bug of (x)dvipdfm(x) introduced by a previous upload. But besides fixing this, it also brought the new version of dvisvgm (2.5) into Debian.

    [...]

    The current sources also contain another cherry picked bug fix for dvipdfmx, but unfortunately I will have to stop now using the subversion tree as is, due to the inclusion of an intermediate luatex release I am not convinced I want to see in Debian before the proper release of TeX Live 2019. That means, from now on I have to cherry pick till the next TeX Live release.

  • How to install the Dolibarr ERP/CRM on Ubuntu 18.04
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 544

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 544 for the week of September 3 – 9, 2018.

  •  

Linux App Release Roundup: HandBrake, GPaste, Qtractor, FreeFileSync

Filed under
Linux

A quick roundup on the four Linux apps which sees new release.

Linux ecosystem always thriving with app updates and development of free apps. In last couple of days, a number of apps sees major updates/bug fixes. These apps ranging from a video converter, clipboard manager, digital audio workstation and a file synchronization. Here’s what’s new on these apps and installation guide.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Does Publicly Shaming Companies Improve Security?

    ou might think security teams inside big companies hate it when researchers and the press point out vulnerabilities, but that’s not always the case.

    Security teams are just one voice among many, and often they have trouble convincing bosses that security and privacy should be a priority. An embarrassing story in the press can change that quickly.

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Mozilla Security Blog: Protecting Mozilla’s GitHub Repositories from Malicious Modification

    At Mozilla, we’ve been working to ensure our repositories hosted on GitHub are protected from malicious modification. As the recent Gentoo incident demonstrated, such attacks are possible.

    Mozilla’s original usage of GitHub was an alternative way to provide access to our source code. Similar to Gentoo, the “source of truth” repositories were maintained on our own infrastructure. While we still do utilize our own infrastructure for much of the Firefox browser code, Mozilla has many projects which exist only on GitHub. While some of those project are just experiments, others are used in production (e.g. Firefox Accounts). We need to protect such “sensitive repositories” against malicious modification, while also keeping the barrier to contribution as low as practical.

    This describes the mitigations we have put in place to prevent shipping (or deploying) from a compromised repository. We are sharing both our findings and some tooling to support auditing. These add the protections with minimal disruption to common GitHub workflows.

    The risk we are addressing here is the compromise of a GitHub user’s account, via mechanisms unique to GitHub. As the Gentoo and other incidents show, when a user account is compromised, any resource the user has permissions to can be affected.

Openwashing iPhone With "HeadGaze" and Microsoft Openwashing Itself

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
OSS

Server: Ubuntu Server, Canonical's Embrace of Buzzwords and LF on Storage

Filed under
Server
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 11 September 2018

    Cloud-init version 18.3.39 adds jinja template support for user-data scripts and cloud config. As part of this feature, any cloud metadata crawled by cloud-init is presented as template variables. Any cloud-provided metadata such as ip addresses, hostname, region, availability_zone can be referenced in user-data cloud config or scripts without having to crawl and parse metadata in separate tooling.

    Since cloud-init generalizes some of this instance metadata across all clouds, it now allows user-data to be more flexible when deploying to different cloud platforms. See Using instance metadata for more information.

  • What is multi-cloud?

    Tech companies, Canonical included, have a problem. That problem is living in buzzwords and jargon, and then assuming everyone knows what we are talking about.

    At Canonical we call them ‘Canonicalisms’, other companies have their own names for it.

    Whilst we can joke about it, this over-reliance on jargon is a genuine barrier to our audience, developers, customers, people in need of technical help, people in need of assistance in understanding what all these buzzwords are. The jargon is a barrier to people understand what something like the cloud is, in its many different guises, and how these different architectures and strategies can be used for tangible business benefits.

    Fortunately, that’s a problem which is solvable.

    Canonical has decided to produce a whitepaper that details everything you need to know to understand every type of cloud from public to private and managed to multi-cloud. But, we haven’t stopped there, because these technologies don’t live in a bubble, they’re connected to technologies such as Kubernetes, containers, serverless computing, servers and virtual machines.

    Still, understanding the basics about these different technologies is only a piece of the picture, which is why we’ve also included guidance on the best strategies to use, use cases, when and where to deploy and make it a success.

  • Know Your Storage: Block, File & Object

    Dealing with the tremendous amount of data generated today presents a big challenge for companies who create or consume such data. It’s a challenge for tech companies that are dealing with related storage issues.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

What’s New in Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Ubuntu budgie. As part of Ubuntu 18.04 flavor this release ships with latest Budgie desktop 10.4 as default desktop environment. Powered by Linux 4.15 kernel and shipping with the same internals as Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), the Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS official flavor will be supported for 3 years, until April 2021. Prominent new features include support for adding OpenVNC connections through the NetworkManager applet, better font handling for Chinese and Korean languages, improved keyboard shortcuts, color emoji support for GNOME Characters and other GNOME apps, as well as window-shuffler capability. Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS also ships with a new exciting GTK+ theme by default called Pocillo, support for dynamic workspaces, as well as a “minimal installation” option in the graphical installer that lets users install Ubuntu Budgie with only the Chromium web browser and a handful of basic system utilities. Read more

Red Hat: Boston, US Government, OpenShift Route, VirtualBox and More

  • BU Spark! teams up with Red Hat, hosts software design workshop
    Students traveled across Boston to its Fort Point neighborhood to attend a BU Spark! workshop about interaction design Friday. There they delved into interaction design and explored how to develop user-friendly software. BU Spark! and Red Hat Inc. hosted the Interaction Design Bootcamp jointly at Red Hat’s Boston office. BU students and Spark! Interaction design fellows attended. Red Hat is a software company that specializes in information technology and has a research relationship with Boston University that includes educational elements. The programs taught by Red Hat focus on user experience design, one of Red Hat’s specializations, according to their website.
  • Open source can spark innovative business transformation in government, Red Hat leaders say
    The federal government, largely hamstrung by legacy systems, is in need of a major digital transformation. Open source technology can be the spark that sets off that revolution, leaders from open-source software company Red Hat said Tuesday. “The types of technologies that you choose matter,” said Mike Walker, global director of Open Innovation Labs at Red Hat. “It will influence the way your business operates and open new doors to new business process, and ultimately allow you to become a software company that can achieve some of those innovations and reductions in cost and time.”
  • Kubernetes Ingress vs OpenShift Route
    Although pods and services have their own IP addresses on Kubernetes, these IP addresses are only reachable within the Kubernetes cluster and not accessible to the outside clients. The Ingress object in Kubernetes, although still in beta, is designed to signal the Kubernetes platform that a certain service needs to be accessible to the outside world and it contains the configuration needed such as an externally-reachable URL, SSL, and more. Creating an ingress object should not have any effects on its own and requires an ingress controller on the Kubernetes platform in order to fulfill the configurations defined by the ingress object. Here at Red Hat, we saw the need for enabling external access to services before the introduction of ingress objects in Kubernetes, and created a concept called Route for the same purpose (with additional capabilities such as splitting traffic between multiple backends, sticky sessions, etc). Red Hat is one of the top contributors to the Kubernetes community and contributed the design principles behind Routes to the community which heavily influenced the Ingress design.
  • VirtualBox DRM/KMS Driver Proceeding With Atomic Mode-Setting Support
    The "vboxvideo" DRM/KMS driver for use by VirtualBox guest virtual machines that has been part of the mainline Linux kernel the past several cycles will soon see atomic mode-setting support. Hans de Goede of Red Hat, who has been stewarding this driver into the Linux kernel after Oracle has failed to do so, is tackling the atomic mode-setting as his latest advancement to this driver important for a VirtualBox desktop VM experience. Published today were initial patches preparing the move to atomic mode-setting but not yet the full migration to this modern display API that offers numerous benefits.
  • A Roadblock Ahead? – Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Ingersoll-Rand Plc (IR)
  • Red Hat Shares Have Even Upside-Downside Profile, JPMorgan Says In Downgrade
  • Earnings Preview: Red Hat poised to deliver earnings growth for Q2
  • J.P. Morgan Securities Slams Red Hat Stock With Downgrade Before Earnings
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Moves Lower on Volume Spike for September 18

IBM Looking to Distract From Recent Reports That it Helped Police Racially Profile the Public (by Openwashing)

Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics

  • Linux Patches Surface For Supporting The Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5
    Last year Creative Labs introduced the Sound BlasterX AE-5 PCI Express gaming sound card while finally there are some patches pending for supporting this high-end sound card in Linux. Connor McAdams who most recently got the Creative Recon3D support into good shape on Linux has now been working on getting the Sound BlasterX AE-5 working well on Linux.
  • Blockchain Training Takes Off
    Meanwhile, job postings related to blockchain and Hyperledger are taking off, and knowledge in these areas is translating into opportunity. Careers website Glassdoor lists thousands of job posts related to blockchain.
  • AMD Picasso Support Comes To The RadeonSI OpenGL Driver
    Last week AMD sent out initial support for yet-to-be-released "Picasso" APUs with the Linux AMDGPU kernel graphics driver. Today on the user-space side the support was merged for the OpenGL RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. Picasso details are still fairly light but they are expected to be similar to Raven Ridge and for the AM4 processor socket as well as an edition for notebooks. On the same day as publishing the Picasso AMDGPU kernel patches, AMD also went ahead and published the Linux patches for the "Raven 2" APUs too.
  • The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Arrives For Linux Benchmarking
    It looks like NVIDIA has their launch-day Linux support in order for the GeForce RTX 2080 "Turing" graphics cards slated to ship later this week as arriving today at Phoronix was the RTX 2080 Ti. The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is NVIDIA's new flagship desktop GPU with the Turing GPU architecture, 4352 CUDA cores, a 1635MHz boost clock speed rating for this Founder's Edition model, 11GB of GDDR6 video memory yielding a 616 GB/s memory bandwidth rating, and designed to suit real-time ray-tracing workloads with their RTX technology. Pricing on the RTX 2080 Ti Founder's Edition is $1,199 USD. Last week NVIDIA published more details on the Turing architecture for those interested as well as on the new mesh shader capability.