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Wednesday, 22 Oct 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 7:55am
Story HP to shutter webOS cloud services Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 7:51am
Story All current Nexuses, including Nexus 4 and 2012 Nexus 7, will get Lollipop Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 7:39am
Story Sager NP2740 Review - A Linux Powerhouse Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 7:37am
Story Italian consumers shouldn’t have to pay for software they don’t want – Letter to Regulators Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:38am
Story Will Android and Chrome marry? Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:35am
Story Elive 2.3.9 beta released Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:32am
Story Mobile pico projector does surround sound too Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:28am
Story The Free Software Foundation opens nominations for the 17th annual Free Software Awards Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:22am
Story For Gentoo Linux Initiates, Iron Penguin May Be Too Heavy Roy Schestowitz 17/10/2014 - 9:54pm

KDE Plasma 5 Now Available for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn)

Filed under
KDE

A lot of users are anxious to use the latest Plasma desktop because it's quite different from the old one. We can call it "the old one" even if the latest branch, 4.14.x, is still maintained until November.

The KDE developers split the project into three major components: Plasma, Frameworks, and Applications. Plasma is actually the desktop and everything that goes with it, Frameworks is made up of all the libraries and other components, and Applications gathers all the regular apps that are usually KDE-specific.

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Manjaro Unity Community Edition Is Arch Linux-Based and Powered by Unity

Filed under
Linux

Manjaro Unity Community Edition is a new respin of the Manjaro Linux distro, an operating system based on Arch Linux. This is one of the few distros outside of the Ubuntu ecosystem to adopt Unity, so it should be a very interesting experiment.

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The Big DRM Graphics Driver Changes Land In Linux 3.18

Filed under
Linux

The much anticipated DRM feature pull was merged over the night for the Linux 3.18 kernel that's now in its early stages of development.

Highlights of the graphics / Direct Rendering Manager driver changes for the Linux 3.18 merge window include:

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Self-documentation of code

Filed under
Development

The inadequacy or lack of documentation of software is a recurring issue. This applies just as often to proprietary software as it does to free software. Documentation of code has two main purposes: to make the code readable for other programmers, and to make the code useable. Good documentation of free software is vital for users, and contributing to the documentation (or translation to a minority language) of a free software project is a good way to get involved for those who don’t know where to start, or how to program, and want to know how it’s done. The problem is a shortage of recruits.

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LXQT 0.8.0 RELEASED WITH FULL QT5 SUPPORT, VARIOUS IMPROVEMENTS

Filed under
KDE

LXQt 0.8.0 ships with full Qt5 support (and the Lubuntu daily PPA already provides packages built with Qt5) however, Qt4 is still supported. For the next release though, Qt4 will be "dropped entirely", mentions the release announcement.

With this LXQt release, PCManFM (Qt), which was the first LXDE component to use Qt, has received support for single-click to active items, drag & drop support on the desktop, Ark archive manager integration as well as improved readability in icon view. Here's a screenshot with the latest PCManFM (Qt) 0.8.0:

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Can GNOME Make a Comeback?

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GNOME

Five years ago, GNOME was the main contender for the Linux desktop. It battled KDE, and, more often than not, came out on top. Today, it is down -- if far from out -- to the extent that any observer has to ask: Can GNOME ever regain its former predominance?

True, GNOME technology still dominates the desktop, with Cinnamon, GNOME, MATE, and Unity all using GNOME-based applications and utilities. However, the last few years have not been kind to the former giant.

First, the early releases of GNOME 3 were different enough that many users deserted it after a quick glance, turning to Xfce and Linux MInt's Cinnamon and MATE -- neither of which would probably exist otherwise. In the Linux Journal's Readers' Choice Awards of 2013, GNOME was the choice of only 14%. It did even worse in the 2013 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards, with only 10%. By themselves, these are hardly definitive numbers, but their consistency is enough to make them ominous.

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Good Karma

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If you are doing it yourself or if you hire someone, you might still need to know how to install GNU/Linux. There are literally hundreds of sources of GNU/Linux. I’ve been using GNU/Linux for many years and only dealt with a few of them. You can hunt for a distribution of GNU/Linux at Distrowatch. You can get the software by downloading an image file of a CD and burning a CD, buying a CD or receiving a copy from a friend, or getting files to put on a USB drive… or… That’s why geeks are useful.

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What’s new in the graphics stack in Fedora 21?

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Red Hat

Every release of Fedora introduces a wide range of updates to the graphics stack from a wide range of upstream projects. Fedora 21 includes a range of updates and feature enablement to many elements of the graphics stack, including: new 2D & 3D driver support, updates to the X Server, and updates to the kernel. All these updates make even more devices perform better under Fedora than ever before.

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Linux Foundation Initiatives

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • OpenDaylight Helium gets out of the gate

    OpenDaylight is an open source SDN controller. In its short lifetime, OpenDaylight has gained support from a diverse set of companies and individuals who are eager to see an open source controller serve the networking needs of traditional IT, cloud infrastructure platforms, traditional virtualization management, and fleets of containers. Cisco released the initial code in 2013 and the project now includes 41 paying members.

  • OPNFV Project Begins Planning Open Source NFV Solutions

    The Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV), the collaborative partnership for advancing open source software-defined networking and data centers that the Linux Foundation announced last month, is now officially live. Here's what it's up to so far, and what it hopes to becomes over the coming months and years.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 Debuts with Support on RHEL 7

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat is out today with the latest version of its Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 (RHEL) platform, as well as now providing support for users of the newer Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 to run RHEL 6 apps in a container.

RHEL 6.6 is the latest iteration of the RHEL 6 platform which first debuted in Red HatNovember of 2010. In June of this year, Red Hat launched Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as RHEL 6's successor. The new RHEL 6.6 release benefits from some of RHEL 7's innovations.

Steve Almy, product manager for Red Hat's Platform Business Unit, explained to ServerWatch that in In RHEL 6.6, Red Hat has added support to enable a cross-realm Kerberos trust, through a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 server.

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Jono Bacon: Open Source is Where Society Innovates

Filed under
OSS

Throughout history, social and technological progress has been the result of people working together for change. Today community is just as important and instrumental as ever – enabled by the internet and social media, said Jono Bacon, senior director of community at XPRIZE and former Ubuntu community manager, in his keynote Tuesday at LinuxCon and CloudOpen Europe in Dusseldorf.

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LLVMLinux Works To Make More Code Clang-Compatible With Linux 3.18

Filed under
Linux

On top of some separate patches to make the mainline 64-bit ARM Linux kernel closer to building under Clang, a separate pull request was sent in for the Linux 3.18 kernel that works to make other areas of the kernel's massive code-base more compatible with the LLVM/Clang compiler.

The LLVMLinux project remains dedicated to making the Linux kernel compatible with LLVM's Clang as an alternative to using GCC. Using this alternative compiler can yield faster build times, lower memory usage, static analysis capabilities, and for making the kernel's code more portable across compilers. Read more in my recent Building The Linux Kernel With LLVM's Clang Yields Comparable Performance article.

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Cumulus Linux 2.5: A Cisco-killer in the data center

Filed under
Linux

Cumulus Linux 2.5, designed for white-box data center hardware, helps Hadoop, VMware, and OpenStack users ramp up their networking

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With This Tiny Box, You Can Anonymize Everything You Do Online

Filed under
OSS
Security

No tool in existence protects your anonymity on the Web better than the software Tor, which encrypts Internet traffic and bounces it through random computers around the world. But for guarding anything other than Web browsing, Tor has required a mixture of finicky technical setup and software tweaks. Now routing all your traffic through Tor may be as simple as putting a portable hardware condom on your ethernet cable.

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Where new European Commission leaders stand on open source

Filed under
OSS

Many policy makers at senior levels—particularly those without experience in ICT—are not expected to have a firm grasp of issues surrounding open source and open standards. Nonetheless, Ansip displayed facility on these issues during his hearing, calling for software produced by the EC to be made open source. When he was initially asked about "free software," he responded by talking about "open source." Although a minor point, it provides indication that he is not new to these issues.

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Linux Mint 17 Now Lets Users Bookmark Folders in a Different Sidebar Section

Filed under
Linux

The ability to bookmark drives or other locations in the file manager should be something standard. Surprisingly, it's not a feature that's present everywhere and it lacks flexibility. Let's take the example of Ubuntu, which is used as the base of Linux Mint. Users can make bookmarks, even if it's a Samba directory, but they can't move them. This can be annoying, if you really want the power to change everything you want.

Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, but it doesn't use the same file manager. In Ubuntu it's Nautilus (Files) from the GNOME project, but on Linux Mint it's Nemo. The two are very different and they provide various options for their users.

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Nearly all of Romania’s universities use Moodle

Filed under
OSS

The vast majority (85 percent) of Romania’s 105 universities are now using Moodle, an open source e-learning platform, reports the country’s Moodle community manager, Herman Cosmin. “They appreciate its world-wide community and the involvement of the national community.”

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JIT Support Is Closer To Landing For GCC

Filed under
Development
GNU

Since last year there's been an initiative for an embeddable GCC JIT compiler and ambitions to mainline the JIT support with LLVM long having been promoted for its Just-In-Time compilation abilities. Now with new patches, GCC JIT is a step closer to being mainlined.

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Rolling-release testing

Filed under
GNU
Linux

At the time of writing each operating system in my trial has been up and running for a few days. About once a week I will update each system and take note of what does or does not work. At the moment I plan to focus on whether each system is still able to boot after an update, whether I will be able to login to a graphical desktop and browse the web using Firefox and edit documents using LibreOffice. I am open to suggestions as to other tests readers may want me to perform. During this trial I will be posting observations on events as they happen on my Twitter feed as regular updates seem appropriate for a trial involving rolling-release distributions. I will also post updates on the experience here on weeks when something of significance happens.

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Open source streamlines pension system Croatia

Filed under
OSS

Using open source software allows Croatia to connect its e-government services, making disparate systems interoperable. Free software gives the country's Central Registry of Affiliates, which provides technical support for supplementary (second pillar) pensions, the means to tie its e-certificate system to the national ID service. "It shows that free and open source solutions can be combined with less open ICT systems", says Darko Topolko, director at Ultima, a Croatian ICT service provider.

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