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Monday, 05 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Productivity hacks: Optimizing your workflow with open source

Filed under
OSS

Communication with your team is key.

For chat, IRC or Mattermost are great ways to stay in touch in real time. But chat can be a productivity killer if you feel like you have to be present at all times. Structure your day so that you only focus on necessary chat converstions; log off of chat when you need to focus on another task and set expectations with your team. Also, talk to your team about what types of things will be discussed on chat and what discussions are better for a different method, like a meeting.

For meetings, talking with people in person can be necessary and very helpful for getting things done, but meetings can also be a time sink. Try to set them for only 30 minutes and stick to it. If you need more time, then take it as needed. If you set an agenda (try Etherpad for this), stick to it. Use your calendar to track your time—check out these open source Google calendar alternatives.

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Managing devices in Linux

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Linux

There are many interesting features of the Linux directory structure. This month I cover some fascinating aspects of the /dev directory. Before you proceed any further with this article, I suggest that, if you have not already done so, you read my earlier articles, Everything is a file, and An introduction to Linux filesystems, both of which introduce some interesting Linux filesystem concepts. Go ahead—I will wait.

Great! Welcome back. Now we can proceed with a more detailed exploration of the /dev directory.

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Jose Bonilla: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat

Bonilla first got involved in the Fedora community when he was studying for the RHCSA (Red Hat Certified System Administrator) exam. He felt using Fedora was the best way to prepare for the exam. “One criteria I use when choosing any open sourced software is to examine the community.” Jose looks at the number of users, forums, blog posts, and issue resolution all as part of the community. The Fedora community exceeds all his expectations.

Jose would like to see more development of Cockpit. “I feel that web-based server administration tools are the future and perhaps the gateway for new interest in Linux administration.” Bonilla did not credit any single person for influencing his decision to contribute to Fedora. It was a “multitude of people and their stances,” he said. Bonilla commented that his “goal is to convince people, by example, that open source projects such as the Fedora Project are important and viable solutions to anyone’s computing needs.”

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What Is Rasberry Pi Project?

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Linux

The Raspberry Pi is a series of single-board, low-cost, high-performance computer first developed in the UK by the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The Raspberry Pi 3 is the sixth and latest iteration to be released in the series and it just keeps getting better.

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Lenovo Yoga Book (Android) review: A unique 2-in-1 for note-taking, drawing, and more

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Android
Reviews

Lenovo's Yoga Book is really great at being a tablet. As far as playing games and watching movies goes, I was as comfortable using the Yoga Book as I am with my iPad Air 2.

As far as productivity goes, this device wasn't for me. Of course, that doesn't mean that it's not for anyone. My version of productivity involves a keyboard (I type a lot, if you haven't guessed), while for others, it might involve switching between a keyboard and pen input, and for those people, the Yoga Book is nearly perfect.

Ultimately, Lenovo's Yoga Book is a truly innovative device, offering a number of features that aren't seen anywhere else. It is, of course, a first-generation product, and if Lenovo stays the course, the second-generation model will be a real winner.

I'd say that it's worth buying, as long as you know what you're getting. It's an excellent consumption tablet, and it's also fantastic for taking notes and drawing, as well as a bit of light typing.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 (Nev) and 8.10 (Erik) Get New Security Updates from Debian

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Today, November 27, 2016, the developers of the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux distribution announced the availability of new security updates for the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" and 8.15 "Nev" releases.

While the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" release is still in the works, it gets the same security update as Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik," which are being ported from the upstream repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" (a.k.a. Debian Stable) to Parsix GNU/Linux's own repos.

It's been a week since our previous report on the security updates pushed to the stable Parsix GNU/Linux repositories, and we're seeing updated versions of the Vim text editor, Apache Tomcat 7 and 8 Java Servlet Containers, as well as Wireshark network protocol analyzer.

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Maui 2.1 "Blue Tang" ISO Fixes Installer Issues, Includes Updated Packages

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GNU
Linux

It's been almost a month since the Maui 2 "Blue Tang" Linux distro arrived based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment, and now the first ISO respin is here.

Maui 2.1 is a refreshed installation medium for those who want to install the Ubuntu-based distribution on their personal computers, including various updated packages, but it mainly focuses on fixing various issues reported by users with the Calamares installer since Maui 2.

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Linux 4.9 RC7

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Linux
  • Linux 4.9-rc7

    Still on the regular Sunday release schedule, here's rc7.

    I think we got all the silly problems I was aware of fixed, and on the
    whole things are looking pretty good. In fact, if next week ends up
    being very quiet, this _might_ be the last rc, although honestly I
    strongly suspect I'll end up doing an rc8. It's been a big release,
    and rc7 could have been quieter. We'll see.

    I basically reserve the right to make up my mind next weekend.

    The changes in rc7 are mainly drivers, architecture and networking. In
    fact, most of the driver updates are networking drivers, so I guess I
    could say "mostly networking and architecture updates, with a
    smattering of other driver updates" (the main other driver areas being
    usb, gpu, hid, i2c, iommu). And we've got the usual small random
    stuff all over (core kernel, a eBPF fix, some filesystem fixes etc).

    The appended shortlog gives a reasonable view into what's up.

    Linus

  • Linus Torvalds Outs the Seventh RC for Linux Kernel 4.9, Might Be the Last One

    It's Sunday here is the US, and, for hardcore Linux users, this means that they test drive yet another RC (Release Candidate) build of the soon-to-be-released Linux 4.9 kernel.

    That's right, Linus Torvalds just made his weekly announcement to inform the Linux community on the immediate availability of the seventh Release Candidate (RC7) development milestone for the upcoming Linux kernel 4.9 series, which has been delayed for a week due to the size of the patch.

  • Linux 4.9-rc7 Kernel Released: Final In 1~2 Weeks

    The Linux 4.9-rc7 test kernel is now available although it's yet undecided whether there will be an RC8 before declaring it gold.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Feedback needed for our 'Linux Game Of The Year Award' that will start soon

    We've run a GOTY award for the last two years and this year will be no different! I am requesting feedback!

    The page is currently open, with the categories adjusted from last year: https://www.gamingonlinux.com/goty.php

    If you have a suggestion for a category, please let me know, but I don't want too many more as I think we already have a good selection going from feedback last year.

  • Valve seems to have removed the SteamPlay logo from Steam

    Something that didn't go unnoticed was that Valve has removed the SteamPlay logo from Steam store pages.

    This is interesting, as it was a partial source of confusion amongst SteamOS/Linux gamers. Plenty of us know how to easily identify games that have Linux support, but there was plenty who didn't. People were genuinely getting confused about it all and I don't blame them.

  • 2016 Holiday Gift Ideas For Linux Enthusiasts, Gamers

    If you are looking for any gift ideas this 2016 holiday season for a Linux gamer/enthusiast or just a casual user looking for some friendly PC hardware, here are my favorites for this holiday season.

  • Vendetta Online 1.8.398 MMORPG Adds Better Game Controller Support for Gear VR

    Guild Software announced a new update to their cross-platform, multiplayer Vendetta Online 1.8 MMORPG, versioned 1.8.398, which ships only a few days after the 1.8.397 maintenance update.

    As you might imagine, Vendetta Online 1.8.398 is a small patch addressing various issues reported by users from the previous point release, but also adding significant improvements to analog stick sensitivity for various game controllers made by Razer, Moga, SteelSeries, and Nyko, when playing the game with the Samsung Gear VR headset.

Red Hat Developer Toolset 6 released

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Development
Red Hat

On the one hand, businesses want the most stable operating systems. That's why Red Hat has Red Hat Enterpise Linux (RHEL). On the other, developers want the newest and fastest development tools. That's why Red Hat also puts out the community Fedora Linux distribution. But what if you want both? Red Hat has you covered with Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — “Cutting Edge” Fedora 25, Tor Phone, And VLC 360
  • Build Your Own Computer

    The computer’s abilities depend on the type of build-your-own system kit you have. Some computer kits intended to teach children (and other newcomers) the basics of hardware and software run on their own customized operating systems — which are often variations of the free, open-source Linux code.

    Raspberry Pi and Kano are two popular computer kits that provide beginners with the bare-bones components like low-cost motherboards and wireless-networking dongles. These computer boards can be connected to existing monitors and keyboards, or used with new equipment.

  • Japan Will Create a Supercomputer to Surpass China

    Japan is bound to develop a revolutionary supercomputer able to outcome China regarding technology. The costs of this new device will reach up to $173 million. The computer was planned to be ready for launching starting with next year. The program of the 130-petaflops computer looks very promising, the developers trying to overcome the technology used by China.

  • You might want to avoid the Nvidia 375.20 driver, Nvidia recommend downgrading

    Just a word of warning, the Nvidia 375.20 driver seems to have quite a number of issues in certain games bringing performance down a lot.

    Not everyone will have issues, as it seems only certain people are affected. Some people have reported no issues, while others are being given black screens or outright terrible performance.

  • Zorin OS 12 Core
  • Zorin OS 12 Overview
  • Maui 2.1 updated ISO
  • Volatility Watch on Shares of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Today, Zacks Investment Research Downgrade Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Hold
  • Intel Compute Sticks with Apollo Lake chips coming in 2017 (leaked roadmap)

    Intel’s Compute Stick is basically a fully functional, low-power PC crammed into a device that looks like an oversized USB flash drive. Plug it into the HDMI port on a TV, connect a power source, and you can run Windows, Linux, or other operating systems on a TV, monitor, or commercial display.

  • Neo900 Prototype version 2: Last Call for Review

    On November 8, 2016, the proto_v2 schematics were updated to the current version. We finished the last few improvements and our layouter is scheduling the layout to start in one week. We repeat our invitation to give the schematics a peer review: it's your last chance to peel your eyes on these schematics and be picky about details that our engineering team might have missed. Hopefully you won't find anything, but as Joerg says:

  • Alibaba’s YunOS overtakes Apple’s iOS as China’s second-largest smartphone operating system

    YunOS, the mobile operating system developed by Alibaba Group, is on track to corner a 14 per cent share of smartphone shipments in mainland China by the end of this year, pulling ahead of Apple’s iOS to become the second-largest operating system for that device in the market, according to analysts.

    The forecasts would confirm Alibaba’s claim earlier this year that YunOS had initially passed iOS on the mainland in the three months ended March 31.

    Despite the strong strides made by the Alibaba platform, Bernstein senior analyst Mark Li told the South China Morning Post

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Rspamd 1.4 has been released

    Today, after 4 months of development, we’ve released major updates for both Rspamd and Rmilter: Rspamd is updated to version 1.4 and Rmilter is updated to version 1.10. These updates include many new features, including Redis pool support, new modules, improved neural networks support, zstd compression for protocol and many other important improvements.

  • stress-ng 0.07.07 released

    stress-ng is a tool that I have been developing on-and-off for a few years. It is designed to stress kernels to force out bugs, stress CPU and memory and also contains some performance benchmarking metrics too.

  • Latest MiniTube 2.5.2 Version Available for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    MiniTube is beautiful, lightweight and a native YouTube client. With MiniTube you can watch YouTube videos by typing keyword into the search-box and MiniTube will immediately loads the results. It offers two type of searches: channel search and keyword search. It provides endless video stream, playback on MiniTube is smooth and instant, without a noticeable buffering time, as I tested. Minitube does not require the Flash Player.

  • Debian, Fedora 25, PHP, systemd, Humble Bundle, dply, Pipfile & more!
  • Commix, Trigger Happy, iocage, DNS, systemd-nspawn, ACME & more!
  • Photo Funnel: Drag-and-Drop Photo Copying Tool For Linux

    Sometimes you need to transfer and organize just a handful of specific photos and raw files from your camera, and a simple GUI tool can help your with that. This tool is just a short Bash shell script uses the YAD tool to generate a drag-and-drop floating palette. When you drop files onto the palette and press the Execute button, the script copies the selected files to the specified directory and organizes them using the ExifTool-based commands.

  • Spotify & Local Files problems on Linux

    Roughly a month ago, I reviewed Spotify here on OCS-Mag, testing the recently revived Ubuntu version. My experience was mixed. While the media player sported good looks and a sleek interface, the overall behavior was slightly erratic, culminating in crashes when trying to play local files.

    Since, I have spent more time exploring Spotify, not necessarily because I was enamored by its features and abilities, mostly because I felt it would be a worthy exercise for all those seeking the thrills of popular media streaming on Linux. Furthermore, like my past endeavors with Steam, Sketchup and alike, it’s part of a possibly Don Quixotic attempt to bridge the application gap between Windows and Linux, and give the users of the latter system some more freedom and choice. But there’s a cost. Sometimes, things do not work right away, or they do not work at all. This article is the diary of my journey.

  • Vivaldi Browser Sees New Stable Release

    Vivaldi, the browser aimed at power users, was updated to version 1.5 today, bringing support for bulk tab commands, smart-home lighting integration, and more.

    As a reminder, Vivaldi browser is built using open source technologies, like the Blink engine, Node.js, and React.js, but is not open source software. It includes features such as tab stacks, Opera-like Speed dial which supports multiple folders, as well as built-in notes, and a tool called Quick Commands, that can be used to search through the Vivaldi history, open tabs, settings, bookmarks and more.

  • Microsoft has been working hard on Skype for Linux: v1.13 released with more improvements

Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) and Steam

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian putting everything on the /usr

    Debian is preparing to revise its default file system mapping to bring it in in line with other major distributions (like Fedora and CentOS).

    Evidence of the shift can be found in the bootstrap option that's arrived in its unstable branch, where Debian dev Ansgar Burchardt posted news that mailing list announcement: “debootstrap in unstable can now install with merged-/usr, that is with /bin, /sbin, /lib* being symlinks to their counterpart in /usr.”

  • Distrowatch Rankings Compared: 2006 vs 2016
  • A Brief Introduction to LXC Containers

    I recently found myself needing a machine to compile binaries on for a CentOS server. I first considered actually spinning up a CentOS system on a VPS; however, that seemed a little overboard just for compiling, I then realized that this would be the perfect use for a container. I could have an identical system to the one where the binaries will be deployed on, and at little cost since it can simply be blown away when I’m done. In order to set up my compile machine I used LXC.

    LXC, or “Linux Containers”, are a set of tools for creating full-featured containers. Compared to other tools such as systemd-nspawn, LXC is much more complex, and it has been used to build projects such as Docker. Docker has since moved away from LXC, however LXC is still one of the huge players in the Linux container game. The Linux container project also brings LXD, a daemon that can be used to manage containers. LXD makes a larger use of system images, as opposed to templates, in order to allow quick deployment of containers. Together these projects allow easy deployment and management of containers, as well as as advanced features and customizability.

  • New snapd 2.18 release and new candidate core snap
  • What's new in Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) - an overview

    The Ubuntu 16.10 operating system was released last month. The new version, which is also called Yakkety Yak, came around six months after Canonical - the company behind Ubuntu - released version 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) of the Linux-based operating system.

    We've already discussed the changes that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS brought along, so in this article we'll be covering a quick overview of Ubuntu 16.10 desktop, essentially focusing on the major new features/changes it brings to the table when compared to version 16.04 LTS.

Android Leftovers

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Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS

  • Riot releases end-to-end encryption: get ready to chat securely!

    End-to-end encryption gives users true privacy, preventing anyone else from eavesdropping on conversations — even the very communications services they’re using. This is incredibly important for a decentralised ecosystem like Matrix on which Riot is built, where data can span across many different servers, and users should not have to trust any of those servers.

    End-to-end encryption is also a real differentiating feature from most other popular collaboration apps whose business models fundamentally rely on being able to read, analyse and profile your conversations.

  • Progress update for AtCore.

    A few days ago we hit a milestone in our development of AtCore. We are now able to properly install the libary for general use. Not only is installing a necessary for a libary that you plan to use within other stuff it also means that we can now focus our attention mostly on Atelier. We have now entered that magical time in development when the real world usage begins to drive its development. Thanks to everyone efforts we are almost ready for the next stage. Patrick has been doing reviews on every pull request. While he has been unable to help with as many commits as he would have liked to. His advice and direction in his reviews has been really helpful and has kept our style and code quality at a high level. Tomaz has been busy fixing up AtCore to be a proper KF5 libary with all the cmake deployment parts to go along with it. Most all of the cmake stuff has been written by Tomaz. Lays has been working on Atelier setup and getting all the non AtCore parts working. Thanks to her effort we are now able to use Atcore from Atelier!

    As for me i have been adding stuff to AtCore. Since our last progress update a few new things have been added. Emergency Stop this simply allows you to stop the printer using the emergency stop code.It also cleans up any the command queue. Pause/Resume when paused we store the current location of the head that that way after resume you can move your print head out of the way to access the model.Pause supports a comma seperated string of commands to be sent after pause. For my printer i use "G91,G0 Z1,G90,G1 X0 Y195" when pause this move my head up 1 mm and then pushes my model out toward the front fo the machine. This is useful if you want to maybe put a nut into printed part or change filament durring print and even to corrrect print defects while printing. We have also started to do lay ground work for more status info being picked out from the serial chatter. Setting of the firmware plugin can be done durring connect to force a specific plugin. A progress bar for printing progress. Some cleanup for autodetection of the plugin. There is still things to add to AtCore but it should provide enough for most use cases already!

  • NoScript is multi-process compatible now

    NoScript, the one must have add-on for Firefox if you ask me, has received an update recently that introduces full multi-process compatibility (e10s).

  • Firefox will only support WebExtensions by the end of 2017

    Mozilla announced a far reaching change coming to the organization's Firefox web browser in late 2017.

    The organization plans to cut support of all extension technologies but the rather new WebExtensions when Firefox 57 Stable is released.

  • LibreOffice Conference 2016: MS Office interoperability and automated bisection of regressions
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Beta Available For Beta Testing
  • Money in Open Source, and How Needle & Thread Will Be Profitable

    Money is one of the most difficult subjects to talk about when it comes to open source projects. It’s a basic fundamental truth that all open source projects need money to operate, and while open source software provides a plethora of benefits, I don’t think any reasonable person would tell you that a steady stream of income is one of them. Lots of people and organizations have presented different ideas and undertaken different experiments to try and maximize the amount of money coming in, while at the same time remaining open, fair, and accessible.

  • DragonFlyBSD Works On EFI Runtime ABI Support, But Still Experimental

    The next release of DragonFlyBSD will feature better EFI support.

    DragonFly lead developer Matthew Dillon has landed EFI runtime ABI support that was ported over from the FreeBSD code-base.

    This EFI runtime ABI support allows for querying and setting the time, scanning EFI BIOS variables, and more. This code was ported from FreeBSD but with various changes for DragonFlyBSD's different kernel interfaces.

  • Tear the wrapping paper off the 2016 Ethical Tech Giving Guide

    Electronics are popular gifts for the holidays, but people often overlook the restrictions that manufacturers slip under the wrapping paper. From surveillance to harsh rules about copying and sharing, some gifts take more than they give.

    The good news is that there are ethical companies making better devices that your loved ones can enjoy with freedom and privacy. Today, we're launching the 2016 Giving Guide, your key to smarter and more ethical tech gifts.

  • Become Michael Knight with Dashbot, an AI for your car

    The Dashbot uses the C.H.I.P. Pro, essentially a miniaturized single-board computer like the Raspberry Pi. The chip runs Linux and is completely open source for your hacking pleasure.

  • [Older] Samsung Joins the Eclipse Foundation

    We are proud to announce that Samsung has joined the Eclipse Foundation. The Eclipse Foundation is the leading open source organization whose projects are focused on building an open development platform comprised of extensible frameworks, tools, and runtimes for building, deploying, and managing software across the lifecycle. In tandem with Eclipse’s mission, Samsung provides an open and interoperable platform for IoT development through the Samsung ARTIK Smart IoT Platform.

  • How To Start Learning A Programming Language

    Have you ever wonder how everything works? From Smartphones Operating Systems to even each and every Linux Distro and every Operating System created by Microsoft and Apple. How does it play my favorite music? How does it save my files to the cloud? How does actually everything works? All this questions are answered with one big bolded and all capital “PROGRAMMING”.

  • [Re]discovering/correcting a ThinkPad supervisor password crack

    Don't believe it? I didn't either; it never worked for me. It turns out that's only because the contemporary instructions for how to do it are wrong, or rather, they've mutated into a form that only works on some machines. As originally discovered, the hack reliably unlocks any* ThinkPad up to and including the Ivy Bridge models.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Azure bug bounty Pwning Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    Acquired administrator level access to all of the Microsoft Azure managed Red Hat Update Infrastructure that supplies all the packages for all Red Hat Enterprise Linux instances booted from the Azure marketplace.

  • pledge(2) … or, how I learned to love web application sandboxing

    I use application-level sandboxing a lot because I make mistakes a lot; and when writing web applications, the price of making mistakes is very dear. In the early 2000s, that meant using systrace(4) on OpenBSD and NetBSD. Then it was seccomp(2) (followed by libseccomp(3)) on Linux. Then there was capsicum(4) on FreeBSD and sandbox_init(3) on Mac OS X.

  • [Older] Why is Apache Vulnerable by Default?

    Apache is the most popular web server on Earth, with a market share of 46.4% — well above Nginx (21.8%) and Microsoft IIS (9.8%). Thanks to Linux package managers like Yum and APT you can install and get it up and running in minutes. The core installation even features powerful modules for URL rewriting, user authentication, and more.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • List of Productive GNOME Shell Extensions for Daily Usage

    In this article I listed my favorite GNOME Shell Extensions (GSE) that I, myself, had ever used. GSE in GNOME is similar with Addons in Firefox, they add and extend desktop functionality with many features. I listed here GSE for screen recording, proxy, network indicator, and some more.

  • I spy, with my little eye, Gnome Pie

    Regardless of the factual conclusion of this article, you are already sold on it just based on the title. Anyway. Humans are really good at solving problems, especially, or possibly only, if they are linear. It is not a coincidence that we have manuals that follow through a simple top-down logic or that navigation systems use turn-by-turn instructions. Square root of 7443 anyone? But this is not a biology lesson. And yet, it is.

    Operating systems are designed to help users translate their linear thinking into instructions. When they do this successfully, we have what we call intuitive interfaces. When they don’t, we have nerdy things that no one wants to use. The system menu is probably the most important ingredient of any desktop, as it’s the gateway to all we do on a computer. Most of these solutions are linear. Things go bad otherwise. Just check my Fedora 18 review for a quick reminder. Windows 8 anyone? Now Linux wise, there’s also this thing called Gnome Pie. It’s a radical answer to the idea of a system menu, and a challenge to the whole linearity concept. Does it work?

today's howtos

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HowTos

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
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Ubuntu-Based ExTiX OS Updated for Intel Compute Sticks with Improved Installer

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Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.23 Snap Creator for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and 16.10

Canonical's Snappy development team have released a new maintenance version of the Snapcraft 2.x tool that lets applications developers package their apps as Snap packages for Ubuntu and other GNU/Linux distributions that support Snaps. Read more