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Friday, 29 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 10:57am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 10:57am
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 9:54am
Story Linux Foundation and Linux Announcements Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 9:33am
Story Firefox 46, Vivaldi 1.1, Homeless Thunderbird Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 9:24am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 9:15am
Story GParted 0.26.0 Launches with Read-Only Support for LUKS Encrypted Filesystems Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 8:56am
Story Xubuntu 16.04 - quick screenshot tour Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 8:47am
Story OpenELEC fork LibreELEC 7.0.0 arrives with Kodi 16.1 Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2016 - 8:41am
Story OpenStack From Texas Roy Schestowitz 1 27/04/2016 - 8:39am

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • It's Been Four Years Since Revealing Many Early Steam Linux Details

    I just realized this morning it's been four years since I was out at Valve HQ learning the early, exclusive details about their Steam Linux plans (and what would become SteamOS and Steam Machines) from Gabe Newell and their Linux cabal.

    If you weren't a Phoronix reader back then, there's our exclusive (from the time) Valve's Gabe Newell Talks Linux Steam Client, Source Engine article. It's some fun weekend reading or to reminisce!

  • Vector 36 physics racer available for Linux and SteamOS

    A really impressive new indie game is now available for Linux, Steam, Mac and Windows PC. Vector 36, a futuristic physics-based racing game, now been made available for Linux and SteamOS.

  • The Other 99, a single-player action and survival game coming soon to Linux

    The Other 99 looks like a pretty good entry to the single-player action & survival section, and it's releasing into Early Access with Linux support soon.

    I generally much prefer the single-player survival games (apart from Don't Starve), as they are able to focus on a much nicer user experience.

    With a lot of survival games now available on Linux, it will have to be pretty good to stand out from the crowd. The teaser trailer certainly has me intrigued.

  • Solar Division, a blend of RTS and Tower Defence in space out now for Linux

    I am a bit of a sucker for space strategy games and Solar Division certainly looks unique enough to give it a mention. It's also not in Early Access, it's a full game, so that's nice.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 34 Best Free Linux Backup Software

    You may have read the story about a man deleting his entire company with one mistaken piece of code: accidentally misusing rm -rf in Ansible. It was a fairly obvious hoax designed to be a viral marketing effort. It achieved that goal as scores of media sources carried the story. But at least it will have alerted readers to the importance of making sure their data is safe. But remember, human error is not the only source of data loss. Other ways of losing data include mechanical damage to RAID or disks, file system corruption, theft, fire, as well as viruses and malware.

  • MuPDF 1.9 Brings Changes

    As you may know, MuPDF is a free, open-source, lightweight PDF viewer written in C, with all the basic features of any other PDF viewer and vim-like keybinds.

  • Kodi 16.1 – Jarvis – Mark XVI

    Once a ‘final’ version is released some new bugs and/or problems usually appear out of nowhere, and this release is no exception. Even though tens of thousands of users were already testing the 16.0 version before release and we as team trying very hard to prevent any problems, as soon as millions start using the released version some problems we either did not think of or which we did not notice before pop up. To counter some of these new issues, we’re bringing you this maintenance release called 16.1 which has some additional fixes on top of the 16.0

  • Wireshark 2.0.3 Release Notes

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This is why we can't have safe cancellation points
  • Gentoo on my Tesla
  • Lessons learned: Five years of colocation

    Back in 2011, I decided to try out a new method for hosting my websites and other applications: colocation. Before that, I used shared hosting, VPS providers (“cloud” wasn’t a popular thing back then), and dedicated servers. Each had their drawbacks in different areas. Some didn’t perform well, some couldn’t recover from failure well, and some were terribly time consuming to maintain.

    This post will explain why I decided to try colocation and will hopefully help you avoid some of my mistakes.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Google Summer of Code 2016

Filed under
Google
OSS
GNOME
  • Google Summer of Code 2016 Projects Announced

    Google announced this week the participating student projects for this year's Summer of Code.

  • GSoC 2016 at coala

    coala participates in this GSoC under the PSF umbrella. This year we got a stunning number of 8 GSoC projects just working with us.

  • GSoC 2016 is Starting at GNOME

    Dear GSoC Students, dear GNOME community – and especially dear rejected students,

    Google Summer of Code 2016 is starting. GNOME has accepted 21 students – we are thrilled to work with you people!

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Screenshots/Screencasts

Filed under
Reviews

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Refactoring the open-source photography community

    Generally speaking, most free-software communities tend to form around specific projects: a distribution, an application, a tightly linked suite of applications, and so on. Those are the functional units in which developers work, so it is a natural extension from there to focused mailing lists, web sites, IRC channels, and other forms of interaction with each other and users. But there are alternatives. At Libre Graphics Meeting 2016 in London, Pat David spoke about his recent experience bringing together a new online community centered around photographers who use open-source software. That community crosses over between several applications and libraries, and it has been successful enough that multiple photography-related projects have shut down their independent user forums and migrated to the new site, PIXLS.US.

  • Is Firefox Search Worth $375M/Year to a Yahoo Buyer?

    That’s because Mozilla is highly dependent on a five-year contract with Yahoo, signed in December 2014, where it receives about $375m per year to make Yahoo the default search provider in the Firefox browser on the desktop. From 2004 to 2014, that contract was exclusively with Google; now it’s Yahoo in the US, Google in Europe, Yandex in Russia and Baidu in China.

  • How to build a Linux router, Internet of Things devices, and more news
  • Aravena's Small Step, Open Source's Big Leap

    Aravena’s recent initiative to open-source four of his built projects goes a long way to promoting the public and social benefits of collaboration and information-sharing.

  • CERN Makes 300TB of Large Hadron Collider Data Public

    CERN has recently released the data from the famous 2011 experiment probing the fundamental structure of the Universe to the public. These raw and processed data can be analyzed and verified using CERN Linux virtual environment on a virtual machine.

  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access

    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public.

    The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).

  • Lawsuit Filed Over PACER Fees

    For many years we've pointed out that the fees charged by PACER were clearly outside what the law allows. If you don't know, PACER is the electronic filing system for the federal court system. It is great that all filings in federal cases are available online, but the interface looks like it was designed in 1998, the search is ridiculous, and (worst of all) the system charges you 10 cents per page of download -- excluding judicial opinions, but including HTML pages including search results and docket reports. There is a cap of $3 per document, but that means that every time I call up PACER on a big case -- say the Apple/DOJ encryption battle, there are so many filings that just to look at the docket is basically $3. That adds up.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Timezones for programmers

    Timezones are typically based on geographical locations. For example, we have the IANA timezone America/Chicago which can represent Central Time for the United States.

  • When to Rewrite from Scratch - Autopsy of a Failed Software

    It was winter of 2012. I was working as a software developer in a small team at a start-up. We had just released the first version of our software to a real corporate customer. The development finished right on schedule. When we launched, I was over the the moon and very proud. It was extremely satisfying to watch the system process couple of million of unique users a day and send out tens of millions of SMS messages. By summer, the company had real revenue. I got promoted to software manager. We hired new guys. The company was poised for growth. Life was great. And then we made a huge blunder and decided to rewrite the software. From scratch.

  • Doing things that scale

    In the software world, and with internet, we can do a lot of things that scale.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Why I gave your paper a Strong Reject

    Writing a bunch of wordy bullshit that doesn't mean anything. Trust me, you're not going to wow and amaze the program committee by talking about dynamic, scalable, context-aware, Pareto-optimal middleware for cloud hosting of sensing-intensive distributed vehicular applications. If your writing sounds like the automatically-generated, fake Rooter paper ("A theoretical grand challenge in theory is the important unification of virtual machines and real-time theory. To what extent can web browsers be constructed to achieve this purpose?"), you might want to rethink your approach. Be concise and concrete. Explain what you're doing in clear terms. Bad ideas won't get accepted just because they sound fancy.

  • Computer System Security Policy Debate (Follow-up)

    The challenge is that political people see everything as a political/policy issue, but this isn’t that kind of issue. I get particularly frustrated when I read ignorant ramblings like this that dismiss the overwhelming consensus of the people that actually understand what needs to be done as emotional, hysterical obstructionism. Contrary to what seems to be that author’s point, constructive dialogue and understanding values does nothing to change the technical risks of mandating exceptional access. Of course the opponents of Feinstein-Burr decry it as technologically illiterate, it is technologically illiterate.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Teach an old PC new tricks

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you're looking for a modern OS to replace XP that will run smoothly on your old PC, then Linux is the answer. We'd recommend that you choose Ubuntu as your Linux distribution of choice, and download the latest LTS version, currently 12.04, which will be supported until 2017. It's relatively straightforward to install.

Read more

Top 5 reasons why you should move to Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux is still regarded as the OS that mostly “geeks” use. Further, when it comes to servers and mainframe computers, Linux is the dominant OS. Basically, people abstain from using Linux because they consider it’s too complex to work with.

While part of it might hold true, the fact is that Linux has come a long way, and is no longer considered to be complex as it used to be. Actually, there are quite a few reasons why you should be using Linux.

Read more

More Leftovers for Ubuntu Release

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 16.04 Makes Ubuntu Exciting Again

    Ubuntu hasn’t had the best reputation among Linux users over the past few years–with some even going so far as to call it “boring”. If you’ve been hesitant to try it out, then hold on to your seats–Ubuntu 16.04 “Xenial Xerus” is not only an exciting release, but one that has the potential to be a game changer for the Linux ecosystem.

  • Download Linux Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus)
  • Important 20 Tweaks/Things To Do After Install Of Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial is an exciting release for many users who prefer to use LTS version, it has new application packages and features. Canonical is trying to improve Ubuntu by time and seems they are succeeding, unlike previous releases this release got some new features and improvements which I had shared in previous post. Unity 8 with Mir is not replaced yet but it will be available for testing in 16.04 Xenial, Unity 7.4 is much improved, faster, responsive and many other things for release info checkout this post. It's been a tradition now that whenever a new Ubuntu version come out users look forward to tweak it or smooth some rough edges and somehow to make their experience much better with Ubuntu, I am not trying to say Ubuntu isn't perfect 'for sure it is' but a user like me may need some other things to be done after a fresh install and make it much better than any other OS available out there. Everything shared below is tested and works fine, so hopefully you won't get any problem with them and if you encounter any problem feel free to ask. Lets start .....

  • Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus Features Overview (Screenshots) and Download Links
  • Firefox is the default browser for Linux users on Ubuntu, new snap format coming soon

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • A Usability Guy’s Journey to Creating his First KDE Tool – Part 1: Baby Steps

    These two may sound completely unrelated at first, but they both were key in sending me down this path. This article will tell the story behind 1, which is about my very first code commit to KDE. I will go into quite some detail because I feel that my journey may provide some insights for KDE.

    This story started on April 6th. I was discussing with Aleix Pol about actual vs. perceived performance in Plasma and other KDE software. One thing we agreed on was that animation speed has a big impact on perceived performance. During that discussion, we found out that the setting for the animation speed is almost impossible to find in System Settings, because it sits in a module where you would not expect it to be (Display and Monitor > Compositor), and searching for “animation speed” points you to the wrong module (this was due to an oversight when the “Desktop Effects” module was split in two and the search keywords were not adapted). The “it sits in an unexpected module” problem is about to be fixed by moving it into the “Workspace behavior” module, but first I wanted the actual bug with the search pointing to the wrong module to be fixed.

    At first, as usual, I wrote a bug report about it. Then, Aleix, being a cunning little Spaniard (*scnr*, I know you’re Catalonian), said these fateful words: “You could fix this one yourself!”. Now the cunning part was that he knew I could not defend myself by saying “But I don’t know C++ …” because the search keywords are defined in .desktop files, easily read- and writable for mere mortals like me. So, without any good argument why I couldn’t, I set out to fix it myself.

    The first obstacle on my journey was that even after years of being a KDE contributor, I still did not have a KDE developer account. The reason is simple: My contributions usually come in the form of text and mockups, not code. I describe my ideas in wiki pages, emails, forum posts, chats, review requests, bug reports, blog posts, …, but not in repositories. For this simple patch, I could have just put it up on Reviewboard or Phabricator and have someone else commit it, but if I was going to contribute code, I wanted to do it properly™.

  • It has happened!

    I have been selected for the Google Summer of Code!

    For the better part of the summer vacation, I will now be committing myself to write code for KDE to implement my project idea of implementing a virtual folder in Dolphin to make it easier to select files.

  • GSoC project accepted, now what?

GNOME News

  • This GNOME Shell Extension Makes It Easy To Track Timezones

    It is often difficult for open-source projects to keep track of where, and what timezone team members are working in.

    This problem is one a nifty new GNOME Shell extension, inspired by Timezone.io, aims to solve.

  • How To Install GNOME 3.20 In Ubuntu GNOME 16.04 (Xenial Xerus)

    Now that Ubuntu GNOME 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) is out, you may want to install the latest GNOME 3.20. I won't get into details about what's new in GNOME 3.20 since I've already covered that.

  • [Older] Reflecting on Feedback

    While at last month's Cambridge Hackfest, members of the GNOME Documentation Project team talked with Cosimo Cecchi of Endless Mobile about the user help in their product. As it turns out, they are shipping a modified version of Yelp, the GNOME help browser, along with modified versions of our own Mallard-based user help.

  • API vs ABI

    Example of an ABI break only: when the size of a public struct changes.

    Example of an ABI and API break: when a function is renamed.

    Example of an API break only: CSS in GTK+ 3.20.

    That’s it.

  • Another GTK+ ABI Break

    It is a familiar situation: a distribution updates Gtk+ to a supposedly-compatible version and applications, here Gnumeric, break.

  • Manage Your Apps & Jumplists on GTK-based Linux Distros with MenuLibre

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • State of Sway - April 2016

    Since the previous State of Sway, we have accomplished quite a bit. We are now shipping versioned releases of sway, which include support for window borders, input device configuration, more new features, and many bug fixes and stability improvements. I’m also happy to say that Sway 0.5 has landed in the Arch Linux community repository and I’m starting to hear rumors of it landing in other Linux distros as well.

  • Buku 1.9
  • What's new in MythTV 0.28

    The MythTV project released its latest stable version, 0.28, on April 11. While there are a few entirely new features worthy of users' attention, most of the changes are incremental improvements. But the improved components include services like Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) support, where MythTV has lagged behind other open-source media centers like Kodi, and the external API, which will hopefully make MythTV more developer-friendly. MythTV remains the most widely used open-source digital video recorder (DVR) but, as cord-cutting trends increase, it will need to offer more functionality to continue attracting users.

  • The incestuous relations among containers orchestration tools
  • FreeCAD Release notes 0.16

    FreeCAD now supports touchscreen 3D navigation. This makes it possible to use FreeCAD without a mouse on a convertible laptop with touchscreen and pen, away from a desk.

  • Use WhatsApp On Your Linux Desktop With Whatsie

    Whatsie features native desktop notifications, themes (besides the default theme, the current version ships with 7 extra themes), spell checker and keyboard shortcuts.

  • QEMU 2.6 Is Due In Just Over One Week With Many New Features

    QEMU 2.6-RC3 was released this week and QEMU 2.6.0 should be officially released at the beginning of May.

  • Wireshark 2.0.3 Free and Popular Network Scanner Released with Over 40 Bug Fixes

    Wireshark, the world's most popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform network protocol analyzer software used by security experts for troubleshooting, development, analysis, and education purposes, has been updated to version 2.0.3.

    Wireshark 2.0.3 comes two months after the release of Wireshark 2.0.2, the second maintenance build in the stable 2.0 series of the software, announced at the end of February 2016, and promises to patch nine security vulnerabilities, fix 41 bugs reported by users, and improve the protocol support (see below for details).

  • Opera Browser Adds Free and Unlimited VPN

    Opera has become the first major browser to add a free VPN client to its web browser. The VPN offers AES-256 encryption and allows users to browse the Internet privately. In addition, the free VPN also helps to circumvent website blockades, a feature many torrent users will appreciate.

Aquaris M10 HD Ubuntu Edition review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

A few months ago when the Aquaris M10 with Ubuntu was announced I was very excited. First of all the first device with convergence, a dream of Canonical even before Microsoft told a word about "one (scaled down) Windows". But also the first (commercial) tablet with the Linux kernel. And of course an ARM chip! We all know what happened to WinRT, but there is one difference here. It's ubuntu. They have the source of 99% of the packages people use + they have official ports to ARM already available! (I even use those to host this blog) So with XMir it is able to run all those apps.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus)

LXD 2.0 is released

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More in Tux Machines

Octa-core Cortex-A53 hacker SBC sells for $60

FriendlyARM’s $60, open spec “NanoPC-T3” SBC runs Android or Linux on an octa-core Cortex-A53 SoC packed with wireless and media interfaces, plus 8GB eMMC. The over-caffeinated board builders at Guangzhou, China-based FriendlyARM have shipped their highest-end hacker board yet. The NanoPC-T3 is almost identical to the NanoPC-T2 board, but swaps out the quad-core, Cortex-A9 Samsung S5P4418 SoC for a layout-compatible S5P6818 with eight Cortex-A53 cores that can be clocked dynamically from 400MHz to 1.4GHz. Last month, FriendlyARM’ unveiled an $11, quad-core NanoPi M1 single board computer with similarly open source hardware and Android and Linux software. Read more

today's leftovers

Linux and Graphics

Security Leftovers

  • Cockpit 0.104
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. There’s a new release every week. Here are the highlights from this weeks 0.104 release.
  • FFmpeg 3.0.2 "Einstein" Multimedia Framework Released with Updated Components
    Today, April 28, 2016, the development team behind the popular FFmpeg open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has released the second maintenance release in the stable FFmpeg 3.0 "Einstein" series. FFmpeg 3.0 was a massive release announced in mid-February, which brought in numerous existing changes, including support for decoding and encoding Common Encryption (CENC) MP4 files, support for decoding DXV streams, as well as support for decoding Screenpresso SPV1 streams.
  • Using bubblewrap in xdg-app
    At the core of xdg-app is a small helper binary that uses Linux features like namespaces to set up sandbox for the application. The main difference between this helper and a full-blown container system is that it runs entirely as the user. It does not require root privileges, and can never allow you to get access to things you would not otherwise have.
  • Build System Fallbacks
    If you are using Builder from git (such as via jhbuild) or from the gnome-builder-3-20 branch (what will become 3.20.4) you can use Builder with the fallback build system. This is essentially our “NULL” build system and has been around forever. But today, these branches learned something so stupidly obvious I’m ashamed I didn’t do it 6 months ago when implementing Build Configurations.
  • Node.js version 6 is now available