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Monday, 09 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Rock Pi N10 SBC delivers AI-enhanced RK3399Pro starting at $99

Filed under
Android
Debian

Radxa’s “Rock Pi N10” SBC runs Debian or Android 8.1 on an RK3399Pro for $99 (4GB RAM/16GB eMMC), $129 (6GB/32GB), or $169 (8GB/64GB), with the RAM split between the 6x CPU cores and the up to 3-TOPS NPU. The SBC is built around a Vamrs VMARC RK3399Pro SoM.

Radxa has gone to Seeed to launch an open-spec, community-backed Rock Pi N10 SBC with an AI-enabled Rockchip RK3399Pro SoC delivered via Vamrs’ VMARC RK3399Pro SoM compute module. While the RK3399Pro is essentially a hexa-core RK3399 that adds an up to 3-TOPS NPU, the Rock Pi N10 is not just a Rock Pi 4 with an updated Pro SoC. Unlike that RK3399-based Raspberry Pi pseudo-clone, the Rock Pi N10 is a sandwich-style 100 x 100mm board. Despite the larger size, the feature set is very similar.

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Attacks, Openwashing, and Assimilation Tactics

Filed under
Misc

         

  • How a Patent on Sorting Photos Got Used to Sue a Free Software Group

           

             

    Taking and sharing pictures with wireless devices has become a common practice. It’s hardly a recent development: the distinction between computers and cameras has shrunk, especially since 2007 when smartphone cameras became standard. Even though devices that can take and share photos wirelessly have become ubiquitous over a period spanning more than a decade, the Patent Office granted a patent on an “image-capturing device” in 2018.

             

    A patent on something so commonplace might be comical, but unfortunately, U.S. Patent No. 9,936,086 is already doing damage to software innovation. It’s creating litigation costs for real developers. The creator of this patent is Rothschild Patent Imaging LLC, or RPI, a company linked to a network of notorious patent trolls connected to inventor Leigh Rothschild. We've written about two of them before: Rothschild Connected Devices Innovations, and Rothschild Broadcast Distribution Systems. Now, RPI has used the ’086 patent to sue the Gnome Foundation, a non-profit that makes free software.

  • News organizations are engaging more proactively in open-source journalism to rebuild trust in news media

    As news media skepticism grows worldwide and digital tools become increasingly robust and available, reporters and news organizations are engaging more proactively in open-source journalism — a practice in which reporters investigate and construct stories based on publicly available data, including via social media, per The New York Times.

    As digital resources and social media have given all people a public, open platform to communicate, user-generated content has become primary source material and created a trail for open-source journalists to investigate. And by performing investigative research in this way, reporters can more easily connect directly to visual evidence on the web, rather than refer to private sources.

  • It's Hipp to be square: What happened when SQLite creator met GitHub

    There are two notable points in Hipp's report. For one, he feels that Git could be improved. He considers the Git Rebase command, which alters or removes the history of a commit, to be harmful. Since Git's own documentation of Rebase is full of warnings about misuse, this is not surprising, though there are circumstances where it can be useful. Hipp is also keen to see a means of revising the comments on previous check-ins because of the importance of documentation.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • tee is broken?

    Just found a highly surprising behavior in a core tool I've used for decades, so clearly I'm making a note here.

    [...]

    Answer time! After a tee, a single writer parent feeds two reader children. If a child exits before reading all the data, then when the parent tries to feed that dead child, the parent will get a SIGPIPE. And apparently the default behavior of tee in GNU coreutils (and in the zsh multios redirection) is to give up and to stop feeding all the children at that point. So the second child (wc -l in the examples) ends up with incomplete input. No errors are thrown anywhere, and there's no indication at all that any data was truncated. Lots of the data is just silently missing.

  • 4 ways to control the flow of your awk script

    There are many ways to control the flow of an awk script, including loops, switch statements and the break, continue, and next commands.

  • Qt 5.14.0 RC released

    Qt 5.14.0 RC is released today. As usual you can get it by using online installer (for new installations) or by using maintenance tool (existing online installation). And in addition there is also offline installers in qt account or download.qt.io for users who can't use online ones. Delta to beta3 as an attachment.

    Target is to release Qt 5.14.0 12th December so please test RC now & report all new release blockers immediately. Also make sure those are visible in release blocker list (https://bugreports.qt.io/issues/?filter=21539). But remember that Qt 5.14.1 is also coming soon so we can fix most of findings there and fix only real blockers in '5.14.0'.

  • Qt 5.14 On Track For Releasing Next Week With New Scenegraph Renderer, Better HiDPI

    While missing the original release target of the end of November, The Qt Company is buttoning up Qt 5.14 for debut next week. Today, however, marks the release candidate availability for those wanting to test out this forthcoming Qt5 release prior to more of the development efforts shifting to Qt 6.0.

  • Rust 2020

    Technically speaking, it’s past the deadline for #rust2020 posts, but I’m running late this year, and I’m going to post something anyway. In this post, I am focusing on what I see as the “largest scale” issues, and not on technical initiatives. If I have time, I will try to post a follow-up talking about some of the key technical initiatives that I think we should focus on as well.

  • Automatically downloading nursery photos from ParentZone using Selenium

    My son goes to a nursery part-time, and the nursery uses a system called ParentZone from Connect Childcare to send information between us (his parents) and nursery. Primarily, this is used to send us updates on the boring details of the day (what he’s had to eat, nappy changes and so on), and to send ‘observations’ which include photographs of what he’s been doing at nursery. 

  • Auto-generating API specifications as OpenAPI, WSDL and Sphinx

    Let's consider the services below - they represent a subset of a hypothetical API of a telecommunication company. In this case, they are to do with pre-paid cards. Deploy them on your servers in a module called api.py.

    Note that their implementation is omitted, we only deal with their I/O, as it is expressed using SimpleIO.

    What we would like to have, and what we will achieve here, is a website with static HTML describing the services in terms of a formal API specification.

  • GUI Automation using Pyautogui, Python

    PYAUTOGUI is an automation module provided by Python for controlling keyboard and mouse functions via program. This module has almost all the functions which can be performed by keyboard and mouse. We can use these functions to automate mouse and keyboard actions.

  • Beautiful Soup: Build a Web Scraper With Python

    The incredible amount of data on the Internet is a rich resource for any field of research or personal interest. To effectively harvest that data, you’ll need to become skilled at web scraping. The Python libraries requests and Beautiful Soup are powerful tools for the job. If you like to learn with hands-on examples and you have a basic understanding of Python and HTML, then this tutorial is for you.

  • Tensorflow 2.0: Solving Classification and Regression Problems

    After much hype, Google finally released TensorFlow 2.0 which is the latest version of Google's flagship deep learning platform. A lot of long-awaited features have been introduced in TensorFlow 2.0. This article very briefly covers how you can develop simple classification and regression models using TensorFlow 2.0.

  • Two New Typosquatting Libraries Found on PyPI

    Two new malicious packages were found on the Python Packaging Index (PyPI) that were designed to steal GPG and SSH keys according to ZDNet. The packages were named python3-dateutil and jeIlyfish where the first “L” is actually an I. These two libraries mimicked the dateutil and jellyfish packages respectively.

  • Framework Patterns

    A software framework is code that calls your (application) code. That's how we distinguish a framework from a library. Libraries have aspects of frameworks so there is a gray area.

    My friend Christian Theune puts it like this: a framework is a text where you fill in the blanks. The framework defines the grammar, you bring some of the words. The words are the code you bring into it.

    If you as a developer use a framework, you need to tell it about your code. You need to tell the framework what to call, when. Let's call this configuring the framework.

    There are many ways to configure a framework. Each approach has its own trade-offs. I will describe some of these framework configuration patterns here, with brief examples and mention of some of the trade-offs. Many frameworks use more than a single pattern. I don't claim this list is exhaustive -- there are more patterns.

    The patterns I describe are generally language agnostic, though some depend on specific language features. Some of these patterns make more sense in object oriented languages. Some are easier to accomplish in one language compared to another. Some languages have rich run-time introspection abilities, and that make certain patterns a lot easier to implement. A language with a powerful macro facility will make other patterns easier to implement.

    Where I give example code, I will use Python. I give some abstract code examples, and try to supply a few real-world examples as well. The examples show the framework from the perspective of the application developer.

  • Django 3 taps Python async to speed web apps

    Django 3.0, the newest version of the Python framework that allows fast creation of database-backed websites and web services, now supports Python async, one of the most powerful new features in Python to make websites and network services faster.

    Async allows Python programs, especially networking apps, to run more efficiently, but existing applications must be rewritten to use it. Django 3 will only work with Python 3.6 and later versions, the better to work with Python’s async programming features. 

    A key way Django provides support for async is via ASGI, a protocol that serves as a standard interface between asynchronous Python applications and async-capable web servers. Previously, Django only supported WSGI, which only supported synchronous web applications. Django 3 will only allow async features to run in an app if it’s deployed as ASGI.

  •                    

  • CSS: An Art, a Science, a Nightmare (Overview of CSS Concepts)

                         

                           

    Some people think CSS is really hard and it's too much of a hassle to learn. Some people think that since it's not a programming language (or is it?), it's so easy that you don't even have to bother learning it. Ultimately, there's a lot to CSS, but it doesn't have to be overwhelming. If you learn a few key concepts, you should feel confident looking at or thinking of any design and turning it into reality.

                           

    I'm going to go over some of the parts of CSS that are important on a daily basis, and give some of tips and tricks I've come to learn over the years.

  •                    

Talks and Events: Linux Vendor Firmware Service at OSFC, GNOME.Asia Summit 2019 and Laura Czajkowski on Booths

Filed under
OSS
  • Richard Hughes: OSFC 2019 – Introducing the Linux Vendor Firmware Service

    A few months ago I gave a talk at OSFC.io titled Introducing the Linux Vendor Firmware Service.

  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2019

    Back from Gresik more than one month, here is my late report for GNOME.Asia Summit 2019.

    This year, GNOME.Asia Summit 2019 was held in Universitas Muhammadiyah Gresik. It’s my seventh GNOME.Asia Summit that I attend.

  • Laura Czajkowski: The Do’s and Don’ts of Booth Duty

    Allow enough time: We are all busy but we must allow enough time to do each event properly. For example, arrive the evening before rather than the morning of the conference. Things often go wrong; let’s give ourselves enough time to fix a delayed flight or lost bag of cables.

    Be punctual!Show up way before the attendees. Remember, you’re on duty as a representative of your organisation, so you should be on the show floor 30 mins before it opens for a final briefing and to find out where everything is.

    Demos: The demo Gods can be cruel. Check your display each morning to make sure it (still) works.

    Dress code: We live in the world of Insta we are professionals., Figure out if your organisation has a preferred way dress code for an event, e.g. if there is a specific t-shirt that needs to be worn for a launch. Trust me when I say this, wear comfortable shoes, I’d go as far as to say bring alternative shoes for different days. Standing is difficult, make it easier on your little twinkle toes!

    Be prepared: If you are in charge of a demo, make sure the laptop is set up and ready the day before, turning up to the event to get it setup or installed is not a good use of your time. Make sure the laptop is charged the night before. Bring your charger with you, not everyone has the same connector and an adaptor if you’re travelling in a different country to be on the safe side!

REAPER Digital Audio Workstation 6.0 Adds FX Plug-in Embedding, Improved HiDPI Support

Filed under
Software

REAPER, a digital audio workstation and MIDI sequencer software for Windows, macOS and Linux, was updated to version 6.0 recently, getting support for embedding small versions of some plugins into the tracks and mixer panels, new auto-stretch timebase, improved support for Retina / HiDPI displays, and more.

Initially released back in 2005, REAPER (Rapid Environment for Audio Production, Engineering, and Recording) is developed by Cockos, an American digital audio technology company founded by Justin Frankel of Winamp and Gnutella peer-to-peer network fame.

The music production application had its first native experimental Linux release back in July 2018, and since then it has continued to improve, though it's still considered experimental on Linux.

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Devices: ROCK PI, OnLogic and RISC-V ISA-Based GPU

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Third Point Release for UCS 4.4

Filed under
Debian

As always, the errata updates of the past months have resulted in many small and large innovations, which we have collected and released with the release of UCS 4.4-3. I would like to give you an overview of the most important new features and an outlook on what we are currently working on. Important new features include better checking of required resources during installation, avoidance of Windows Explorer crashes with extended file system permissions, documentation of best practices in dealing with Windows printer drivers and printer settings, and improvements to the Samba 4 Connector.

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Proxmox VE 6.1 released!

Filed under
Debian

We are very excited to announce the general availability of Proxmox VE 6.1.

It is built on Debian Buster 10.2 and a specially modified Linux Kernel 5.3, QEMU 4.1.1, LXC 3.2, ZFS 0.8.2, Ceph 14.2.4.1 (Nautilus), Corosync 3.0, and more of the current leading open-source virtualization technologies.

This release brings new configuration options available in the GUI which make working with Proxmox VE even more comfortable and secure. Editing the cluster-wide bandwidth limit for traffic types such as migration, backup-restore, clone, etc. is possible via the GUI. If the optional package ifupdown2 of the Debian network interface manager is installed, it’s now possible to change the network configuration and reload it in the Proxmox web interface without a reboot. We have improvements to 2-factor authentication with TOTP and U2F.

The HA stack has been improved and comes with a new 'migrate' shutdown policy, migrating running services to another node on shutdown.

In the storage backend, all features offered by newer kernels with Ceph and KRBD are supported with version 6.1.

We have some notable bug fixes, one of them being the QEMU monitor timeout issue or stability improvements for corosync. Countless other bugfixes and smaller improvements are listed in the release notes.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Rate Top-Notch, Get Krita, QEMU, Mesa Updates

Filed under
SUSE

Closing out the month, there were two snapshots with version upgrades and one snapshot (20191127) that produced some minor changes to a couple Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) packages.

The first Tumbleweed snapshot for December arrived with the 20191202 snapshot. Updated were also made to ALSA with the update of the 1.2.1.1 versions of alsa-plugins, alsa-utils and asla, which dropped 25 patches and fixed regressions for the UCM parser. GNOME had several package updates for gedit, evolution and more. The 3.34.2 version of gnome-software fixed a potential threading crash when using flatpak and had an upstream fix for fwupd. An updated version of ModemManager 1.12.0, which is a DBus-activated daemon that controls mobile broadband devices and connections, had a large amount of improvements and changes to include adding support for Mobile Station Based Assisted-GPS in addition to Mobile Station Assisted Assisted-GPS. Revision control tool mercurial 5.2 made some backwards compatibility changes and added some new feature extensions with its quarterly release. The update of perl 5.30.1 triggered an issue recorded on the snapshot reviewer because the newer version and patch that came in it is problematic for embedded Perl usage. Several other packages were updated in the snapshot to include qemu 4.1.93, re2 20191101, xen and xorg-x11-server. The one major version change in the snapshot was an update to terminal multiplexer tmux 3.0a; the major release that allows its users to easily switch between several programs in one terminal offers new features like added support for the SD (scroll down) escape sequence and for underscore colors.

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More OpenSUSE: Etherpad updated

Kernel: New Features and Fixes Added to Linux 5.5

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.5 Provides Knob To Toggle ASPM Link States Individually - Better Power-Savings

    ASPM can be a big boost to help power-savings on Linux laptops and desktops as shown by a prominent kernel regression a number of years ago. However, a number of Linux drivers are forced to disable Active State Power Management (ASPM) due to quirky/buggy hardware where it ends up not being sane to enable that power-saving feature by default. But with the Linux 5.5 kernel is support for toggling ASPM link states via sysfs as an easy-to-perform manner for achieving better power-savings with friendly devices.

  • AMDGPU Fixes For Linux 5.5 Include AMDKFD For PowerPC, Fix For Old ATI R100/R200 GPUs

    Following last week's big batch of DRM graphics driver updates for the Linux 5.5 merge window, AMD and the community engaging in Linux 5.5 testing have now sent in their first round of fixes for this next version of the Linux kernel.

  • Linux 5.5 Begins Plumbing Secure Boot Infrastructure For POWER9

    With the PowerPC changes for the Linux 5.5 kernel comes the initial infrastructure work on preparing to be able to handle a Secure Boot implementation for POWER9 hardware.

    With Linux 5.5 the initial groundwork is laid for supporting POWER9 Secure Boot but the actual IBM POWER9 firmware support for offering this functionality isn't yet released. As such, moving to Linux 5.5 alone won't impose any potential Secure Boot restrictions on existing users.

Software: Birdtray 1.7.0 Released, Curl at 10,000,000,000 and GStreamer 1.16.2

Filed under
Software
  • Thunderbird Tray Icon Email Notifier Birdtray 1.7.0 Released

    Birdtray, a Thunderbird tray icon for Linux (Xorg) and Windows that shows the number of unread emails, has seen a new major release. For the Birdtray 1.7.0 release, the developers have added translation support, the ability to draw a border around the number of unread emails in the tray, a new Birdtray icon, and more.

    Birdtray is a Firetray (which has been discontinued) alternative that shows Thunderbird in the tray, with an unread email counter on top of the icon; the tray icon can be set to flash when new email are received. However, unlike Firetray, Birdtray is a standalone application, and not a Thunderbird extension. Other Birdtray features include support for multiple email accounts, it can hide and restore the Thunderbird window (so it closes to the tray), and is highly configurable.

  • Daniel Stenberg: Daily web traffic

    By late 2019, there’s an estimated amount of ten billion curl installations in the world. Of course this is a rough estimate and depends on how you count etc.

    There are several billion mobile phones and tablets and a large share of those have multiple installations of curl. Then there all the Windows 10 machines, web sites, all macs, hundreds of millions of cars, possibly a billion or so games, maybe half a billion TVs, games consoles and more.

  • GStreamer 1.16.2 stable bug fix release

    The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the second bug fix release in the stable 1.16 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

    This release only contains bugfixes and it should be safe to update from 1.16.x.

ARM Linux on AWS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Hardware
  • Amazon Talks Up Big Performance Gains For Their 7nm Graviton2 CPUs

    If Amazon's numbers are accurate, Graviton2 should deliver a big performance boost for Amazon's ARM Linux cloud potential. Graviton2 processors are 7nm designs making use of Arm Neoverse cores. Amazon says they can deliver up to seven times the performance of current A1 instances, twice the FP performance, and support more memory channels as well as doubling the per-core cache.

  • AWS announces new ARM-based instances with Graviton2 processors

    AWS has been working with operating system vendors and independent software vendors to help them release software that runs on ARM. ARM-based EC2 instances support Amazon Linux 2, Ubuntu, Red Hat, SUSE, Fedora, Debian and FreeBSD. It also works with multiple container services (Docker, Amazon ECS, and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service).

  • Coming Soon – Graviton2-Powered General Purpose, Compute-Optimized, & Memory-Optimized EC2 Instances

    We launched the first generation (A1) of Arm-based, Graviton-powered EC2 instances at re:Invent 2018. Since that launch, thousands of our customers have used them to run many different types of scale-out workloads including containerized microservices, web servers, and data/log processing.

  • AWS EC2 6th Gen Arm Instances are 7x Faster thanks to Graviton 2 Arm Neoverse N1 Custom Processor

    Last year Amazon introduced their first 64-bit Arm-based ECS2 “A1” instances which were found to deliver up to 45% cost savings over x86 Instances for the right workloads.

  • AWS launches Braket, its quantum computing service

    With Braket, developers can get started on building quantum algorithms and basic applications and then test them in simulations on AWS, as well as the quantum hardware from its partners. That’s a smart move on AWS’s part, as it’s hedging its bets without incurring the cost of trying to build a quantum computer itself. And for its partners, AWS provides them with the kind of reach that would be hard to achieve otherwise. Developers and researchers, on the other hand, get access to all of these tools through a single interface, making it easier for them to figure out what works best for them.

Norbert Preining on Debian Breaking Unison and Ben Hutchings on Debian LTS

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian breaking Unison (again) [Ed: Norbert Preining talks about the real issues, even at risk to his speech inside Debian]

    Congratulations – Debian/sid now contains a unison binary that is incompatible with Debian/buster, the stable release. That means, everyone who relies on unison for file synchronization across servers (running buster) and development machines (running sid) is now busted. Trying to use the new binary from sid on buster also doesn’t work, due to GLIBC incompatibility.

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, November 2019

    I was assigned 24.5 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 0.5 hours from October. I worked 21.25 hours this month, so will carry over 3.75 hours to December.

    I released Linux 3.16.76, rebased the Debian package onto that, and sent out a request for testing.

Red Hat: State of syslog-ng on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8, AMQ Streams and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Peter Czanik: State of syslog-ng on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8

    Version 3.23.1 of syslog-ng is now available in EPEL 8. EPEL stands for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux, a repository for RHEL (and CentOS) containing packages not available in RHEL. The packages in the repository are maintained by Fedora package maintainers, not Red Hat, but thanks to their high-quality standards, packages from this repository are often used even by companies, which otherwise do not allow 3rd party repositories.

    As you can see, EPEL 8 does not use the latest available syslog-ng version, but the one available at the time EPEL 8 was created. This means that EPEL 8 will likely contain syslog-ng 3.23.1 forever, that is, until EPEL 8 is EoL. There are rumors, however, that once a new RHEL minor version is available, you will be able to upgrade the syslog-ng package in EPEL.

    The syslog-ng package in EPEL 8 is missing a few features due to missing dependencies. These include all the Java-based destination drivers (HDFS, Elasticsearch, Kafka). Elasticsearch is now also supported by the HTTP destination of syslog-ng. There is a C-based Kafka destination driver in syslog-ng, but as librdkafka is too old in RHEL, it is also unavailable in EPEL.

  • Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 1

    Red Hat AMQ Streams is an enterprise-grade Apache Kafka (event streaming) solution, which enables systems to exchange data at high throughput and low latency. AMQ Streams is available as part of the Red Hat AMQ offering in two different flavors: one on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux platform and another on the OpenShift Container Platform. In this three-part article series, we will cover AMQ Streams on the OpenShift Container Platform.

    To get the most out of these articles, it will help to be familiar with messaging concepts, Red Hat OpenShift, and Kubernetes.

  • Taking The PCI Express To Malleable Systems

    It took decades for server virtualization to go mainstream, making their way from hardware and software partitions on mainframes three decades ago down to proprietary and Unix systems two decades ago to X86 servers with VMware, XenServer, Microsoft, and Red Hat all doing their part. We are at the very front end of a different kind of server virtualization now, comprised of disaggregation and composability, and hopefully this time around it will not take three decades to mainstream it.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Security: Updates, Tips and Breaches

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (intel-ucode and libtiff), Debian (exiv2), Oracle (SDL), Red Hat (kernel, patch, and python-jinja2), and Ubuntu (graphicsmagick, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-5.0, linux-gcp, linux-gke-5.0, linux-hwe, linux-kvm, linux-oem-osp1, linux-oracle, linux-oracle-5.0, linux-raspi2, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-gcp, linux-gke-4.15, linux-hwe, linux-kvm, linux-oem, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-5.3, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, and sqlite3).

  • How to validate your security measures

    In parts one and two of this series, I walked you through hardening your system by identifying unneeded services, and then segmenting and firewalling. Now that you’re all locked down, let’s talk about how we might validate that all of that hard work is actually providing the desired results. In this final installment, we'll talk about how to scan your network for open ports, and we’ll even touch on vulnerability scanning.

  • Mixcloud Breach Exposes 20 Million Accounts — Mixcloud Responds

    Hackers have managed to breach Mixcloud and expose over 20 million user data accounts. Mixcloud confirmed the breach over the Thanksgiving weekend.

  • Security attacks: 3 habits of the most resilient companies

    What is the difference between a firm that is resilient against cyber threats and one that is vulnerable? What strategies and technologies ensure that a company can continue its day-to-day operations even as it faces a growing list of cyber threats?

    When my team started compiling research to develop PwC’s latest Digital Trust and Insights report, we hoped to answer these questions. We expected to find differences between businesses that are resilient and those that are not, but we were surprised to see the stark differences in the actions and strategies taken by the two groups.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly, LINUX Unplugged, mintCast, Podcast With Audacity on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

MX Linux MX-19 petito feo - The longest mile

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Well, well, well. MX linux MX-19 petito feo is a nice distro. It has a lot of great elements. But ... it also has a lot of annoyances as well as problems that weren't there in the previous edition. Overall, you get very decent connectivity and media out of the box, and the live session data save is a big plus. That said, Samba sharing ease is not there anymore, and the Firefox profile wasn't ported. Customization was quite annoying, and there were actual application errors.

I do like MX Linux, and it is improving in many aspects. It feels cleaner, more consistent, the MX Tools package is becoming more useful and powerful, and the application selection is respectable. But these are offset with problems that didn't exist in the past, and they make me feel that the development team might have found themselves trapped, plateauing. I hope this is a one-time glitch. All in all, 7.75-8/10, definitely worth testing, but for now, I believe Continuum was better put together, by ever so slight margin. Let's hope this ain't the end of a long, beautiful run. To be continued.

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today's leftovers

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 5 is Generally Available

    As you know, SUSE Linux Enterprise service packs are released on a yearly cadence. Service Pack 5 is the next service pack since the release of Service Pack 4 in Dec 2018. In addition, Service Pack 5 is also the last service pack for SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 release. With the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 5 on December 9th, general support for SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 will end on June 30th, 2020. Customers wishing to maintain support of their SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 installations after June 30, 2020 can continue support through the purchase of Long Term Service Pack Support. [...] If you are currently running SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP4, you can migrate to Service Pack 5 as part of your active subscription until June 30, 2020.

  • Developing Leaderboard for GNOME Hackers

    After completing my Google Summer of Code assignment, I had an idea in my mind for a project where the hard-working people on GNOME, known as GNOME Hackers, could be appreciated based on the amount of work they do for the FLOSS community. In the quest for the same, I wrote a leaderboard web app, GNOME Hackers. It was an awesome experience and I utilized my weekends very well by learning many new things. I will give a brief of them below.

  • Counting down the days using bash

    Need to know how many days there are before some important event? Let Linux bash and the date command help with that!

  • How to Boost Your Programming Skills

    Anyone with an old computer that they don't use anymore should install Ubuntu on it in order to improve their programming skills. It's a free Linux-based operating system that can run on a wide range of hardware. Successfully using Ubuntu will require you to learn more about Python, which is considered one of the most simplified and beginner-friendly programming languages in use today. - Bryce Welker, The Big 4 Accounting Firms

  • Canonical sponsors WSLConf at Microsoft HQ [Ed: Mark Shuttleworth donates money to Microsoft's attacks on GNU/Linux]

    Canonical is announcing today it will be a featured sponsor of WSLConf, the first conference dedicated to the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) platform. WSLConf is scheduled for March 10th-11th, 2020 and is being held on the campus of Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Washington. The conference brings together developers, start-up founders, academics, enterprise, community members, and teams from Microsoft and Canonical around Windows Subsystem for Linux. The conference will include two densely-packed days of presentations and workshops on the latest developments on the rapidly evolving platform.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Secure your addons.mozilla.org account with two-factor authentication

    Accounts on addons.mozilla.org (AMO) are integrated with Firefox Accounts, which lets you manage multiple Mozilla services from one login. To prevent unauthorized people from accessing your account, even if they obtain your password, we strongly recommend that you enable two-factor authentication (2FA). 2FA adds an extra layer of security to your account by adding an additional step to the login process to prove you are who you say you are. When logging in with 2FA enabled, you will be asked to provide a verification code from an authentication application, in addition to your user name and password. This article on support.mozilla.org includes a list of supported authenticator applications. Starting in early 2020, extension developers will be required to have 2FA enabled on AMO. This is intended to help prevent malicious actors from taking control of legitimate add-ons and their users. 2FA will not be required for submissions that use AMO’s upload API. Before this requirement goes into effect, we’ll be working closely with the Firefox Accounts team to make sure the 2FA setup and login experience on AMO is as smooth as possible. Once this requirement goes into effect, developers will be prompted to enable 2FA when making changes to their add-ons.

  • Embracing digital transformation with containerisation and Kubernetes

    While digital transformation is creating new business opportunities, it is also bringing a host of challenges and technological barriers with its wave of progress. With changes ongoing and always around the corner, organisations are having to re-evaluate how they can modernise their often-out-dated digital infrastructure in order to keep up. Is there any way to make the transition simpler? Enter Kubernetes. The word is taken from ancient Greek, where it translates as ‘helmsman’ or ‘pilot’. So, it makes sense that your IT business strategy can be guided, not through the Aegean, but through the waters of digital transformation towards stability and efficiency. What began life as Google’s original open source container-orchestration system, has now paved the way for a reliable precedent to automating, controlling and extending modern IT applications.

  • Datacenters Are Hungry For Servers Again

    Server consumption is a pretty good proxy for how enterprises of all shapes and sizes feel about their particular business. And judging by the number of machines and the aggregate revenue they drove in the third quarter – despite all of the uncertainty in the world – they must be feeling pretty good.

Devices: Btlejack, I2C, Congatec

  • Sniff, jam and hijack Bluetooth Low Energy devices with Btlejack

    Bluetooth Low Energy Swiss-army knife or Btlejack is a small software client designed to be used with the BBC Micro:Bit mini PC and can be used with one or more devices running a dedicated firmware. Once installed you will be able to sniff, jam and hijack Bluetooth Low Energy devices. Current version of this tool (2.0) supports BLE 4.x and 5.x. “Btlejack relies on one or more BBC Micro:Bit. devices running a dedicated firmware. You may also want to use an Adafruit’s Bluefruit LE sniffer or a nRF51822 Eval Kit, as we added support for these devices. The BLE 5.x support is limited, as it does only support the 1Mbps Uncoded PHY and does not support channel map updates.” “You need a UNIX based system (for example a Raspberry Pi). If you use the BBC Micro:Bit, you will need one to three Micro:Bit devices (three devices recommended) and for each device one free USB port. The power consumption of a Micro:Bit is rather low, so you can use a single USB port and a passive hub for powering the three recommended units.”

  • I2CMini is tiny USB to I2C Bridge for your PC or SBC (Crowdfunding)

    Last year, we wrote about Excamera Labs SPIDriver tool to control and monitor SPI devices from your computer, but this year the company launched another similar product for I2C: I2CDriver.

  • Congatec Conga-SMX8-Nano SMARC 2.0 CoM Features NXP i.MX 8M Nano Processor

    Congatec Announces Ultra-Low-Power SMARC 2.0 CoM Congatec has come out with a new CoM, the Conga-SMX8-Nano that carries up to 4x ARM Cortex-A53 and 1x Cortex-M7 cores with a full spectrum of options...

China orders officials to remove foreign tech from computers

China began building its own operating system to replace Microsoft Windows or iOS in 2013, with the help of a British company Canonical. Canonical was founded by South African entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth to market commercial support and related services for Ubuntu, a Linux-based operating system which is open-source and not owned by an individual or company. Canonical provided technical support to build Chinese users an Ubuntu open-source operating system named Kylin, at the request of the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology. Earlier this year the US banned American companies from doing business with Chinese telecommunications company Huawei. Google, Intel and Qualcomm stopped working with the technology company. Prime Minister Boris Johnson hinted that the future of Chinese technology companies in the UK could be on the line after vowing not to involve Huawei in upcoming 5G networks if it would create a rift with security allies like the US. Read more

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