Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 23 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story DistroWatch The Best Website For Distro Hoppers Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2018 - 7:25pm
Story Diversity in open source highlights from 2015 Roy Schestowitz 21/12/2015 - 5:33pm
Story Do you need programming skills to learn Linux? Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 11:12am
Story Docker security in the future Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2015 - 1:30am
Story Docker security with SELinux Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 4:27pm
Story Drupal creator on saving the open web Roy Schestowitz 31/03/2016 - 10:35am
Story Dynamic Ubuntu Theme srlinuxx 16/03/2010 - 1:58am
Story Earning a living from open source software Roy Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 10:27am
Story Easing into open source Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 11:17am
Story Elementary OS 0.4 'Loki' Review | An Easy To Use Linux Distribution Roy Schestowitz 11/10/2016 - 2:18am

CompuLab Turns An 8-Core/16-Thread Xeon, 64GB RAM, NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 Into Fan-Less Computer

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Three years ago we checked out the CompuLab Airtop as a high-performance fanless PC. Back then it was exciting to passively cool an Intel Core i7 5775C, 16GB of RAM, SATA 3.0 SSD, and a GeForce GTX 950 graphics card. But now in 2019 thanks to the continued design improvements by CompuLab and ever advancing tech, their newly-launched CompuLab 3 can accommodate an eight-core / sixteen-thread Xeon CPU, 64GB of RAM, NVMe SSD storage, and a NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 graphics card without any fans!

The Airtop 3 just arrived from Israel earlier this month and I've begun putting it through its paces with our Linux benchmarks. Over the weeks ahead I'll begin posting more benchmarks from this passively-cooled, industrial-grade PC with Intel Xeon E-2288G processor and RTX 4000 Turing graphics, but given the reader interest when CompuLab announced the Airtop 3 back in April, I'm just sharing some initial impressions and first round of performance data today.

Read more

Kernel: Systemd 243 and Linux 5.3

Filed under
Linux
  • Systemd 243 Is Getting Buttoned Up For Release With New Features & Fixes

    While it would have been nice seeing this next systemd release sooner due to the Zen 2 + RdRand issue with systemd yielding an unbootable system (that is now also being worked around with a BIOS upgrade), the systemd 243 release looks like it will take place in the near future.

  • VIRTIO-IOMMU Driver Merged For Linux 5.3 Kernel

    With the VirtIO standard for cross-hypervisor compatibility of different virtualized components there is a virtual IOMMU device that is now backed by a working driver in the Linux 5.3 kernel.

    The VirtIO specification provides for a virtual IOMMU device as of the v0.8 specification that is platform agnostic and manages direct memory accesses from emulated or physical devices in an efficient manner.

  • Linux Kernel Looks To Remove 32-bit Xen PV Guest Support

    Coming soon to a kernel near you could be the removal of 32-bit Xen PV guest support as better jiving with Xen's architectural improvements and more of the Linux/open-source community continuing to shift focus to 64-bit x86 with trying to finally sunset 32-bit x86.

Google, Money and Censorship in Free Software communities

Filed under
Google
Web
Debian

Alexander Wirt (formorer) has tried to justify censoring the mailing list in various ways. Wirt is also one of Debian's GSoC administrators and mentors, it appears he has a massive conflict of interest when censoring posts about Google.

Wirt has also made public threats to censor other discussions, for example, the DebConf Israel debate. The challenges of holding a successful event in that particular region require a far more mature approach.

Why are these donations and conflicts of interest hidden from the free software community who rely on, interact with contribute to Debian in so many ways? Why doesn't Debian provide a level playing field, why does money from Google get this veil of secrecy?

[...]

Google also operates a mailing list for mentors in Google Summer of Code. It looks a lot like any other free software community mailing list except for one thing: censorship.

Look through the "Received" headers of messages on the mailing list and you can find examples of messages that were delayed for some hours waiting for approval. It is not clear how many messages were silently censored, never appearing at all.

Recent attempts to discuss the issue on Google's own mailing list produced an unsurprising result: more censorship.

Read more

IBM, Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • OpenShift 4: Image Builds

    One of the key differentiators of Red Hat OpenShift as a Kubernetes distribution is the ability to build container images using the platform via first class APIs. This means there is no separate infrastructure or manual build processes required to create images that will be run on the platform. Instead, the same infrastructure can be used to produce the images and run them. For developers, this means one less barrier to getting their code deployed.

    With OpenShift 4, we have significantly redesigned how this build infrastructure works. Before that sets off alarm bells, I should emphasize that for a consumer of the build APIs and resulting images, the experience is nearly identical. What has changed is what happens under the covers when a build is executed and source code is turned into a runnable image.

  • libinput's new thumb detection code

    The average user has approximately one thumb per hand. That thumb comes in handy for a number of touchpad interactions. For example, moving the cursor with the index finger and clicking a button with the thumb. On so-called Clickpads we don't have separate buttons though. The touchpad itself acts as a button and software decides whether it's a left, right, or middle click by counting fingers and/or finger locations. Hence the need for thumb detection, because you may have two fingers on the touchpad (usually right click) but if those are the index and thumb, then really, it's just a single finger click.

    libinput has had some thumb detection since the early days when we were still hand-carving bits with stone tools. But it was quite simplistic, as the old documentation illustrates: two zones on the touchpad, a touch started in the lower zone was always a thumb. Where a touch started in the upper thumb area, a timeout and movement thresholds would decide whether it was a thumb. Internally, the thumb states were, Schrödinger-esque, "NO", "YES", and "MAYBE". On top of that, we also had speed-based thumb detection - where a finger was moving fast enough, a new touch would always default to being a thumb. On the grounds that you have no business dropping fingers in the middle of a fast interaction. Such a simplistic approach worked well enough for a bunch of use-cases but failed gloriously in other cases.

  • 21 to 1: How Red Hat amplifies partner revenue

    At Red Hat Summit, we announced new research from IDC looking at the contributions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) to the global economy. The study, sponsored by Red Hat, found that the workloads running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux are expected to "touch" more than $10 trillion worth of global business revenues in 2019 - powering roughly 5% of the worldwide economy. While that statistic alone is eye popping, these numbers, according to the report, are only expected to grow in the coming years, fueled by more organizations embracing hybrid cloud infrastructures. As a result, there is immense opportunity for Red Hat partners and potential partners to capitalize on the growth and power of RHEL.

  • Executing .NET Core functions in a separate process [Ed: IBM/Red Hat is pushing Microsoft patent traps again (and yes, Microsoft still suing]
  • DevNation Live: 17-million downloads of Visual Studio Code Java extension [Ed: Also celebrating for Microsoft again (as if helping the proprietary MSVS 'ecosystem' is their goal now)]
  • The NeuroFedora Blog: NEURON in NeuroFedora needs testing

    We have been working on including the NEURON simulator in NeuroFedora for a while now. The build process that NEURON uses has certain peculiarities that make it a little harder to build.

    For those that are interested in the technical details, while the main NEURON core is built using the standard ./configure; make ; make install process that cleanly differentiates the "build" and "install" phases, the Python bits are built as a "post-install hook". That is to say, they are built after the other bits in the "install" step instead of the "build" step. This implies that the build is not quite straightforward and must be slightly tweaked to ensure that the Fedora packaging guidelines are met.

Software: Genome Browsers, EtherCalc and Curl

Filed under
Software
  • Best Free Web Based Genome Browsers

    In the fields of molecular biology and genetics, a genome is the genetic material of an organism. It consists of DNA (or RNA in RNA viruses). Each genome contains all of the information needed to build and maintain that organism. In humans, a copy of the entire genome—more than 3 billion DNA base pairs—is contained in all cells that have a nucleus. The study of the genome is called genomics.

    In bioinformatics, a genome browser is a graphical interface for display of information from a biological database for genomic data. They are important tools for studying genomes given the vast amounts of data available. They typically load very large files, such as whole genome FASTA files and display them in a way that users can make sense of the information there. They can be used to visualize a variety of different data types.

    Genome browsers enable researchers to visualize and browse entire genomes with annotated data including gene prediction and structure, proteins, expression, regulation, variation, comparative analysis, etc. They use a visual, high-level overview of complex data in a form that can be grasped at a glance and provide the means to explore the data in increasing resolution from megabase scales down to the level of individual elements of the DNA sequence.

    There’s a wide range of web based genome browsers. We’re going to restrict our selection to the top 4.

  • Get going with EtherCalc, a web-based alternative to Google Sheets

    EtherCalc is an open source spreadsheet that makes it easy to work remotely and collaborate with others.

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl 7.65.2 fixes even more

    Six weeks after our previous bug-fix release, we ship a second release in a row with nothing but bug-fixes. We call it 7.65.2. We decided to go through this full release cycle with a focus on fixing bugs (and not merge any new features) since even after 7.65.1 shipped as a bug-fix only release we still seemed to get reports indicating problems we wanted fixed once and for all.

    Download curl from curl.haxx.se as always!

    Also, I personally had a vacation already planned to happen during this period (and I did) so it worked out pretty good to take this cycle as a slightly calmer one.

    Of the numbers below, we can especially celebrate that we’ve now received code commits by more than 700 persons!

100 Essential Linux Commands for Every User

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Normal Linux user knows almost all the basic Linux day-to-day use commands to perform basic task such as installing any application, copying files from one directory to another, etc. But in this article I’m going to list 100 essential Linux commands which can be useful for every Linux user right from the noobs to the professional Linux developers and system administrators.So before wasting any time let’s get started with this huge list of essential Linux commands.

Read more

Sparky 5.8 “Nibiru”

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

There are new live/install media of SparkyLinux 5.8 “Nibiru” available to download.
This is the 1st release of the new stable line, which is based on the Debian 10 “Buster”.

Changes:
– based on Debian 10 stable “Buster” now, repositories changed from ‘testing’ to ‘stable’
– system upgraded from Debian stable “Buster” repos as of July 14, 2019
– Linux kernel 4.19.37-5 (i686 & amd64)
– Linux kernel 4.19.57-v7+ (ARMHF)
– the Calamares installer updated up to version 3.2.11
– apt-daily.service disabled
– sparky-tube installed as dafault
– removed old 3rd party repositories
– added obconf-qt (LXQt edition)
– nm-tray installed instead of network-manager-gnome (LXQt edition)
– network-manager added to CLI ARMHF image
– small fixes

Read more

OPNsense 19.7 "Jazzy Jaguar" released

Filed under
OS
Security

For four and a half years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through
modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple
and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD
security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear
and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

19.7, nicknamed "Jazzy Jaguar", embodies an iteration of what should be
considered enjoyable user experience for firewalls in general: improved
statistics and visibility of rules, reliable and consistent live logging
and alias utility improvements.  Apart from the usual upgrades of third
party software to up-to-date releases, OPNsense now also offers built-in
remote system logging through Syslog-ng, route-based IPsec, updated
translations with Spanish as a brand new and already fully translated
language and newer Netmap code with VirtIO, VLAN child and vmxnet support.

Last but not least we would like to thank m.a.x. it for their sponsorship
of the default gateway priority switching feature and their continued work
of writing and maintaining plenty of community plugins.  This time around,
Maltrail, Netdata and WireGuard VPN have been freshly added to the mix.


Read more

From Linux to cloud, why Red Hat matters for every enterprise

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

In 1994, if you wanted to make money from Linux, you were selling Linux CDs for $39.95. By 2016, Red Hat became the first $2 billion Linux company. But, in the same year, Red Hat was shifting its long-term focus from Linux to the cloud.

Here's how Red Hat got from mail-order CDs to the top Linux company and a major cloud player. And, now that Red Hat is owned by IBM, where it will go from here.

Read more

When Choosing Your Commercial Linux, Choose Wisely!

Filed under
Linux

“Linux is Linux is Linux,” is a direct quote I heard in a meeting I had recently with a major multi-national, critical-infrastructure company. Surprisingly and correctly, there was one intelligent and brave engineering executive who replied to this statement, made by one of his team members, with a resounding, “That’s not true.” Let’s be clear, selecting a commercial Linux is not like selecting corn flakes. This is especially true when you are targeting embedded systems. You must be considering key questions regarding the supplier of the distribution, the criticality of the target application, security and life-cycle support for your product.

Read more

Security and Spying With Listening Devices (Google, Amazon, Microsoft)

Filed under
Security
  • Was DNS intentionally designed to be insecure?

    but noone considered that now-controversial near-truism at all when the core internet protocols were first designed and implemented. the idea of abuse was considered novel in the 1990's when commercialization and privatization brought abuse into the internet world and burst the academic bubble. a lot of old timers blamed AOL and MSN and even Usenet for the problems, but in actuality, it's what humans _always_ do at scale. putting the full spectrum of human culture atop a technology platform designed for academic and professional culture should have been understood to be a recipe for disaster.

  • Smart meters in England are mysteriously switching to Welsh

    Bulb says that the problem has occurred in around 200 cases and that it takes five steps to fix it, though if you don't know Welsh, you'll need to get Bulb to talk you through it by way of numbers of button pushes.

    "While we think Welsh is a great language, we understand that in many cases people will want their display to be in English." it jibbered in a statement.

  • 'Defnydd heddiw': Smart meter displays in England turn Welsh in bizarre language glitch

    One customer, James Tombs, who lives well over 100 miles from the Welsh border, in West Sussex, told us: "I don't live in Wales and don't know Welsh. One day I saw my meter was in Welsh but ignored it as I was busy. I then came back to it later and realised that the screen was locked, the buttons didn't do anything and the unit wasn't updating. The clock was stuck at 15.47.

  • iOS 13 beta exposes iCloud Keychain passwords and usernames

    This allows for access to iCloud Keychain passwords, which pretty much means access to a whole suite of usernames and passwords stored by Apple's cloud service. We can envision the potential for another iCloud hack, only with leaked nudes of early adopter Apple fanatics rather than celebs indulging their promiscuous sides.

  • Windows 10 will soon allow third-party voice assistants to take precedence over Cortana

    Watch out for the change is 19H2 - which will be the first bi-annual update to the operating system to be a patch rollup, similar to the old Service Packs, instead of a full new build.

  • Google Home integrations are borking left, right and centre

    So what's the problem? Well, from the sound of the workaround, it appears that Google has been mucking about with the API under the hood again.

  • Google Assistant currently can’t connect to Philips Hue lights, fix is in the works

    For the past several months, Google Home owners have been encountering spotty issues between Assitant and Philips Hue products. In recent weeks especially, this problem has only gotten worse, and currently, the two products can’t talk to each other whatsoever. For most users, this results in attempting to unlink and relink a Hue account to Assistant, but that only results in an error when trying to relink the two accounts.

Krita 4.2.3 Released

Filed under
KDE

Today we’re releasing Krita 4.2.3. This is mostly a bug fix release, but has one new feature: it is now possible to rotate the canvas with a two-finger touch gesture. This feature was implemented by Sharaf Zaman for his 2019 Google Summer of Code work of porting Krita to Android. The feature also works on other platforms, of course.

The most important bug fix is a workaround for Windows installations with broken, outdated or insufficient graphics drivers. The core of the issue is that our development platform, Qt, in its current version needs a working OpenGL or Direct3D installation as soon as there is a single component in the application that uses QML, a technology for creating user interfaces. We have managed to work around this issue and especially users of Windows 7 systems that have become a bit messy should be able to run Krita again.

Read more

Games: Eagle Island, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS, Robo Instructus, Ion Fury, TRI: Of Friendship and Madness

Filed under
Gaming
  • The lovely rogue-lite platformer "Eagle Island" can now be picked up on GOG, Linux build soon

    Heads up GOG fans, Eagle Island from Pixelnicks is now available to pick up from GOG with the Linux build expected soon.

  • Total War: THREE KINGDOMS new "Eight Princes" DLC is set 100 years after the main game

    Releasing soon, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS is to get an "Eight Princes" DLC set 100 years after the Three Kingdoms period began.

    Announced yesterday, Creative Assembly are moving quickly to add in a whole lot more content to THREE KINGDOMS and it does sound pretty sweet.

    It will feature: an entirely new campaign; eight new playable princes with "substantially different" play-styles with unique buildings, assignments and court options; along with new elite units like cataphracts; four new alignments Wealth, Spirit, Might, and Mind and more.

  • Guide a robot with simple programming in "Robo Instructus", out now

    Robo Instructus from Big AB Games, which is mainly a solo-operation, is a puzzle game where you need to guide a robot using a simple programming language.

    Is it odd to think programming can be relaxing? If so, I guess I'm pretty strange in that way. Even if you don't know any programming, Robo Instructus walks you through things quite easily and getting started with it is pretty quick.

  • Grab Ion Fury (previously Ion Maiden) before the price shoots up tomorrow

    Interested in slick retro first-person shooters? You may want to act fast as the price of Ion Fury (previously Ion Maiden) goes up tomorrow.

    Currently in Early Access, Ion Fury offers a very good preview campaign to play through while you wait for the full release on August 15th. The price is currently around $19.99 but from tomorrow they will bump it up to $24.99.

  • TRI: Of Friendship and Madness returns to GOG with Linux support

    After being previously removed from the DRM-free store GOG, TRI: Of Friendship and Madness has now made a return with full Linux support included.

8 Top Ubuntu server Web GUI Management Panels

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Server with command-line interface might sound little bit wired to newbies because of no previous familiarization. Thus, if you are new to Ubuntu Linux server running on your local hardware or some Cloud hosting and planning to install some Linux Desktop Graphical environment (GUI) over it; I would like to recommend don’t, until and unless you don’t have supported hardware. Instead, think about free and open-source Ubuntu server Web GUI Management panels.

Moreover, for a moment, you can think about Desktop Graphical environment for your local server but if you have some Linux cloud hosting server, never do it. I am saying this because Ubuntu or any other Linux server operating systems are built to run on low hardware resources, thus even old computer/server hardware can easily handle it. GUI means more RAM and hard disk storage space.

Read more

Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish reaches end of life on Thursday, upgrade now

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical, earlier this month, announced that Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish will be reaching end-of-life status this Thursday, making now the ideal time to upgrade to a later version. As with all non-Long Term Support (LTS) releases, 18.10 had nine months of support following its release last October.

When distributions reach their end-of-life stage, they no longer receive security updates. While you may be relatively safe at first, the longer you keep running an unpatched system, the more likely it is that your system will become compromised putting your data at risk. If you’d like to move on from Ubuntu 18.10, you’ve got two options; you can either perform a clean install of a more up-to-date version of Ubuntu or you can do an in-place upgrade.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Top 20 Best Instant Messaging Programs For Linux in 2019

Instant messaging programs allow users to make real-time communication between more than one person at a time. Like other popular platforms, Linux also has a lot of high-quality instant messaging clients for its users. There are different kinds of tools that support single or multiple protocols based on their characteristics. But each of the software is quite similar in a way to communicate with your friends, colleagues, and clients. Read more Also: This Open Source App Lets You Share Files Between PC & Smartphones Easily

today's howtos

Fedora 31 To Ship With Golang 1.13, Limiting Scriplet Usage Still Being Debated

While debating new CPU requirements for Fedora 32 potentially taking it all the way to AVX2 CPUs as a new base requirement, before that Fedora 31 still needs to get finished up and there is some late feature work happening for this current cycle. At Monday's Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) meeting, upgraded the Go programming language stack to Golang 1.13 was approved for Fedora 31. Meanwhile defaulting to DNF's "best" mode for Fedora 31 was rejected in not being fond of the different behavior by default and contingent upon what tool a user is using for upgrades. Read more Also: Fedora CoreOS Preview Released

An /e/ Summer update: smartphones for sale, applications, PWAs & next steps

Eighteen months later, most of what was described in that early vision has been built. We have produced an unGoogled mobile OS (currently supported on 80 different smartphone models) and /e/ associated online services — email address, online storage, calendar & notes — are up and running. All accessed through a single personal /e/ identity and password (read a comprehensive description here). Recently, we have introduced the /e/ app repository providing access to 60,000 free Android apps that can be installed directly from the /e/OS. Read more