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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 6:20am
Story Calamares Release and Adoption Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 6:14am
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 5:59am
Story Wine 2.0 RC6 released Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 5:57am
Story Your Computer's Clipboard is a Security Problem - Fix it in Linux With xsel and cron relativ7 21/01/2017 - 4:40am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 1:10am
Story UNIX or OSS in the Back End Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 1:09am
Story Desktop environments, Cinnamon, and GNOME Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 1:07am
Story Linux on Servers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 1:06am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2017 - 1:03am

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC

Filed under
Development

PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • PulseAudio 10 Coming Soon, Using Memfd Shared Memory By Default

    It's been a half year since the debut of PulseAudio 9.0 while the release of PulseAudio 10 is coming soon.

    PulseAudio 9.99.1 development release was tagged earlier this month, then usually after x.99.2 marks the official release, so it won't be much longer now before seeing PulseAudio 10.0 begin to appear in Linux distributions.

  • Experimenting With Virtual GPU Support On Linux 4.10 + Libvirt

    With the Linux 4.10 kernel having initial but limited Intel Graphics Virtualization Tech support, you can begin playing with the experimental virtual GPU support using the upstream kernel and libvirt.

Licensing FUD and Licensing Advice

Filed under
Legal
  • On the Law and Your Open Source License [Ed: Black Duck is just a parasite selling proprietary software by bashing FOSS]

    "Looking back five or ten years, companies managing open source risk were squarely focused on license risk associated with complying with open source licenses," notes a report from Black Duck Software. Fast-forward to today, and the rules and processes surrounding open source licensing are more complex than ever.

  • Explaining the source code requirement in AGPLv3

    This condition was intended to apply mainly to what would now be considered SaaS deployments, although the reach of "interacting remotely through a computer network" should perhaps be read to cover situations going beyond conventional SaaS. The objective was to close a perceived loophole in the ordinary GPL in environments where users make use of functionality provided as a web service, but no distribution of the code providing the functionality occurs. Hence, Section 13 provides an additional source code disclosure requirement beyond the object code distribution triggered requirement contained in GPLv2 Section 3 and GPLv3 and AGPLv3 Section 6.

KDE Support For Flatpak Portals Progressing

Filed under
KDE

While GNOME / Red Hat developers have been leading the Flatpak app sandboxing initiative, KDE developers are making progress too with embracing Flatpak as a more convenient and secure way of securely packaging Linux desktop apps.

The latest on the KDE + Flatpak front is that Jan Grulich has been getting a KDE implementation of Flatpak's "Portals" working. Portals are the APIs offered to the sanboxed apps for essentially escaping the sandbox for certain operations.

Read more

Original: KDE Flatpak portals introduction

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Graphics: Nouveau, NVIDIA and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Red Hat's OpenShift Container Platform openly shifts storage into the hands of devs

Filed under
Red Hat

Enterprise Linux biz Red Hat has revised its OpenShift Container Platform to include support for dynamic storage provisioning in local and remote applications.

The software is an on-premises platform-as-a-service product that allows organizations to run applications using Kubernetes orchestration and Docker containers.

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Mozilla rebrands with clever new logo and open source design principles

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

Mozilla is a very important organization for the open web. While Firefox's share of usage has not been lighting the world on fire lately, Mozilla is much more than just a web browser developer. It often fights for the rights of web users. Since it is a not-for-profit organization, you can be fairly confident that its intentions are pure.

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Open Source Serverless Computing Frameworks, and Why They Matter

Filed under
OSS

Serverless computing is fast becoming one of the hottest trends in the channel since the cloud. What is the open source ecosystem doing to keep pace with the serverless trend, and why does it matter? Here's a look.

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Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 900

Filed under
Linux

Dell charges $1650 for a similar XPS 13 albeit with the next generation of Intel chip. The current model of Yoga is the 910, and that laptop costs $1300. However, I didn’t even consider it because they screwed the pooch on the keyboard. Lots of reviews start with the color and feel of the materials on the outside, but I’m going to start on the keyboard layout.

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5 of the Best Places to Find DEBs Packages for Debian-Based Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Debian-based Linux distributions have one thing going for them: superior software selection for users. When it comes to making software for Linux, all the big companies target this type of Linux distribution first. Often some developers don’t even bother to make packages for other types of Linux distributions and only make DEB packages.

However, just because many developers target these types of Linux distros doesn’t mean that its users never have problems finding software. Most Debian and Ubuntu users will find themselves hunting down DEB packages on the Internet.

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Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Munzali Garba

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I became interested in Linux when I started coding and learned of this entirely free, open source, and powerful system that a lot of computer tech pros used (and which also powered most of the servers on the Internet). Then I looked into it, found Ubuntu was the most popular distro …and so the glorious journey began.

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Who Contributes to the Linux Kernel?

Filed under
Linux

The Linux kernel is an enormous open source project that has been in development for more than 25 years. While many people tend to think of open source projects as being developed by passionate volunteers, the Linux kernel is mostly developed by people who are paid by their employers to contribute. According to The Linux Foundation, since 2005, “some 14,000 individual developers from over 1,300 different companies have contributed to the kernel.”

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“Unboxing” the Android Things Developer Preview

Filed under
Android

Android Things is Google’s answer to creating an environment for IoT devices. Take a slimmed down Android build, add some sensor-specific APIs, and provide it on a number of powerful pre-integrated micro-boards and you have a ready-made platform for building a host of upcoming IoT devices. Android Things can take advantage of many existing Android libraries, toolkits, and APIs, making it easier and quicker for developers to turn ideas into product. What’s not to like?

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Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian is a puzzle: difficult

    I myself recently had to use the Ubuntu installer in a laptop, and it didn’t seem that different to the Debian one: same steps and choices, like in every other OS installation.

  • Canonical: 2017 Will See a Mir 1.0 Release, Plans to Implement Vulkan Support

    Canonical, the company founded by Mark Shuttleworth to promote the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system everywhere around the world, has recently published the 'year in review' for their Mir display server technology.

    As most of you are aware, Canonical develops its own display server for Ubuntu, called Mir, which, in some ways, is similar to the X.Org Server and Wayland technologies.

    While Ubuntu on the desktop still uses X.Org Server's components, Mir is currently heavily tested for the Unity 8 user interface that Canonical plans on implementing by default for future releases of Ubuntu Linux, for desktops.

Security News

Filed under
Security

  • Security advisories for Tuesday
  • FOI: NHS Trusts are ransomware pin cushions [Ed: Windows]

    The FOI requests found that 87 per cent of attacks came via a networked NHS device and that 80 per cent were down to phished staffers. However, only a small proportion of the 100 or so Trusts responded to this part of the requests.

    "These results are far from surprising. Public sector organisations make a soft target for fraudsters because budget and resource shortages frequently leave hospitals short-changed when it comes to security basics like regular software patching," said Tony Rowan, Chief Security Consultant at SentinelOne.

    "The results highlight the fact that old school AV technology is powerless to halt virulent, mutating forms of malware like ransomware and a new more dynamic approach to endpoint protection is needed.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.