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Thursday, 27 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 9:18pm
Story An Aerospace Coder Drags a Stodgy Industry Toward Open Source Roy Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 8:34pm
Story Laptop Power, Boot Times With Ubuntu 17.04 Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 7:12pm
Story Open-source EdgeX Foundry seeks to standardize Internet of Things Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 7:09pm
Story Samsung’s Tizen-based Breeze-Free Air Conditioners are just the thing for summer Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 7:06pm
Story Red Hat Rolls Out Version 4.1 of KVM Platform Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 7:04pm
Story GNOME To Do 3.24 release, and it’s shining Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 7:02pm
Story TrueOS STABLE Update: 4/24/17 Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 6:58pm
Story How to track and secure open source in your enterprise Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 6:55pm
Story How I became a webcomic artist in less than a month with open source tools Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2017 - 6:51pm

Black Duck Attacks FOSS Again, for Marketing Purposes, Pretends It's "Research"

Filed under
OSS
Security

Mirantis enters the Kubernetes game and ups its OpenStack play

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Mirantis enters the Kubernetes game and ups its OpenStack play

    The Sunnyvale, Calif. company is doing this by launching a new single integrated distribution of OpenStack and Kubernetes: Mirantis Cloud Platform (MCP) 1.0. This new release also offers a unique build-operate-transfer delivery model.

  • Mirantis launches its new OpenStack and Kubernetes cloud platform

    Mirantis, one of the earliest players in the OpenStack ecosystem, today announced that it will end-of-life Mirantis OpenStack support in September 2019. The Mirantis Cloud Platform, which combines OpenStack with the Kubernetes container platform (or which could even be used to run Kubernetes separately), is going to take its place.

    While Mirantis is obviously not getting out of the OpenStack game, this move clearly shows that there is a growing interest in the Kubernetes container platform and that Mirantis’ customers are now starting to look at this as a way to modernize their software deployment strategies without going to OpenStack. The new platform allows users to deploy multiple Kubernetes clusters side-by-side with OpenStack — or separately.

A group of middle-school girls is learning to program, courtesy of Red Hat

Filed under
Development
Red Hat

If you're walking in the area of Boston's City Hall Plaza today, you might find yourself the subject of unique photo collage tomorrow.

Twenty-five local middle school girl are out roaming the city with digital cameras they built themselves as part of Red Hat Inc.'s (NYSE: RHT) CO.LAB initiative. On Friday, they'll turn the photos into a digital art installation that will be displayed at City Hall and Boston University.

The girls built the cameras on Wednesday out of Raspberry Pi computer kits — small, simple devices that teach the basics of programming. (Click through the gallery above to see the building process.)

Read more

Financial news:

Fedora:

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • 'Benign' worm seeks out vulnerable smart devices

    A "benign" worm is scouring the net seeking out poorly protected smart gadgets.

    CCTV systems, routers, digital video recorders and other internet-of-things (IoT) devices are now believed to be harbouring the Hajime worm.

  • How to manage the computer-security threat

    COMPUTER security is a contradiction in terms. Consider the past year alone: cyberthieves stole $81m from the central bank of Bangladesh; the $4.8bn takeover of Yahoo, an internet firm, by Verizon, a telecoms firm, was nearly derailed by two enormous data breaches; and Russian hackers interfered in the American presidential election.

    Away from the headlines, a black market in computerised extortion, hacking-for-hire and stolen digital goods is booming. The problem is about to get worse. Computers increasingly deal not just with abstract data like credit-card details and databases, but also with the real world of physical objects and vulnerable human bodies. A modern car is a computer on wheels; an aeroplane is a computer with wings. The arrival of the “Internet of Things” will see computers baked into everything from road signs and MRI scanners to prosthetics and insulin pumps. There is little evidence that these gadgets will be any more trustworthy than their desktop counterparts. Hackers have already proved that they can take remote control of connected cars and pacemakers.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Open Source Remote Access Trojan Targets Telegram Users

    Remote access Trojans are mainly used to steal consumer data, either for consumers themselves or the conglomerate keeping this information safe from prying eyes. However, it appears criminals are looking at a different approach for these tools right now. A new open source remote access Trojan can now be used to extract data from the Telegram communication platform.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Fasd – A Commandline Tool That Offers Quick Access to Files and Directories

    Fasd (pronounced as “fast“) is command-line productivity booster, a self-contained POSIX shell script which enables quick and more efficient access to files and directories.

  • What’s new in SSHGuard 2.0

    SSHGuard is an intrusion prevention utility that parses logs and automatically blocks misbehaving IP addresses with the system firewall. It’s less configurable than the better-known Fail2Ban but has a smaller resource footprint and ships with full IPv6 support. The newly released SSHGuard version 2.0 have been made easier to configure for new users. It also gained support for FirewallD, ipset, and ipfilter firewall backends on Linux; as well as Capsicum sandboxing support on *BSD.

    While we’re still waiting for the next release of Fail2Ban with IPv6 support, I took a look around at some of the alternatives and found an interesting option in SSHGuard. I had to address some Linux compatibility issues when getting started with SSHGuard as the development team was mostly focused on FreeBSD. I submitted patches for those issues and got more involved in the development and release of SSHGuard 2.0 in the process.

  • Steghide – An Easy way to Hide Confidential Data Inside Images and Sound Objects in Linux

    As of now, we have wrote few articles about the same topics but the way of method is different, how to hide files and folders in Linux & how to protect files and folders with password to safe the personal documents from others. It help us to send the secret information over the Internet like mail.

    Today we are going to discuss the same topic once again but the method is completely different. I mean, i will show you, how to hide sensitive data inside image and audio files using steghide utility.

  • 3 Emacs extensions for getting organized

    In the colophon to his book, Just a Geek, actor and writer Wil Wheaton wrote that he wanted to use Emacs to write the book but "couldn't find the text editor." Wheaton was joking, of course, but he highlighted an important point about Emacs: it's gone way beyond its roots as a tool for editing text.

    Thanks to its many modes (extensions that change the way the editor behaves), you can use Emacs for just about anything: browsing the web, reading and sending email, publishing blog posts and books, managing databases, learning with flashcards, and much more.

Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Meson considerations

    A number of GNOME modules are switching to meson for 3.26. I myself was an early adopter for this: recipes has had meson build support since the beginning of the year, and after the 1.0 release, I’ve dropped autotools support on the master branch.

    autotools are of course very familiar to most of us, and we know how to get most things done there. But it often isn’t pretty, and using meson feels like a breath of fresh air. Others have been praising meson for its simplicity, ease of use and speed, so I am not going repeat that here.

  • GStreamer 1.12 Is On Approach With New Features, Wayland Zero-Copy Playback

    GStreamer 1.12.0 will soon be released as the latest version of this widely-used, open-source multimedia framework.

    GStreamer 1.12 is bringing waylandsink DMA-BUF importation support so zero-copy multimedia playback will now work under Wayland. GStreamer 1.12 is also bringing Fraunhofer FDK AAC encoder/decoder support, Intel Media SDK support for accelerated video encode/decode on embedded Linux and Windows, OpenCV improvements, CineForm support, and more.

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

Mozilla Thunderbird, Firefox, and Google Blocking Ads?

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
  • Mockups of a new Thunderbird style look quite incredible
  • Mozilla Firefox web browser may no longer be supported on your Linux computer

    Firefox is a wonderful open source web browser. As a result, it comes pre-loaded on many Linux-based operating systems, such as Ubuntu and Fedora. Yeah, some people choose to install Chromium or Chrome instead, but Mozilla's offering remains a staple in the Linux community.

  • Mozilla, Microsoft rebuilding their browsers’ foundations without anyone noticing

    Project Quantum is how Mozilla plans to adapt for this new age. Mozilla is using its safer Rust programming language for parts of Quantum. The company has an experimental rendering engine called Servo that's written in Rust, and pieces of this will make their way into Firefox. The initial focus will be on updating those parts of Gecko that are most amenable to parallel or GPU-based computation, and Firefox 53 contains the first element of this. Firefox 53 will (for most people; it requires Windows 7 with the Platform Update, or better, plus a GPU that isn't blacklisted) create a separate GPU process that's used to perform compositing. The compositor process takes the different elements of the page and the Firefox window and merges them together to create the finished product.

  • Will Google move to block adverts?

    Google's vast wealth and huge influence is built on one thing - advertising - so it might seem bizarre for the search giant to make it less likely that users would see ads.

    But the Wall Street Journal is reporting that Google is planning to introduce ad-blocking in its popular Chrome web browser.

  • Google might roll out their own ad-blocker in Chrome

KDE Applications 17.04 and United KDE theme

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Applications 17.04 Unveiled
  • KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.04.0

    April 20, 2017. KDE Applications 17.04 is here. On the whole, we have worked to make both the applications and the underlying libraries more stable and easier to use. By ironing out wrinkles and listening to your feedback, we have made the KDE Applications suite less prone to glitches and much friendlier.

  • United, a new KDE theme gives you a Unity look and feel

    Yet another tick in the box for my love of how customizable Linux desktops are. United is a new theme for KDE that aims to emulate the Unity look and feel.

    This could be a good option for those Unity fans who want to keep a similar experience, but maybe try something a little different.

DockerCon News

Filed under
Server
OSS

Ubuntu 17.10 Is Named ‘Artful Aardvark’

Filed under
Ubuntu

Still wondering what the Ubuntu 17.10 codename will be? Well, it seems we have our answer.

According to this page on Launchpad, the home of Ubuntu development, Ubuntu 17.10 due in October is nicknamed the “Artful Aardvark”.

The ‘Artful’ repos have also opened, meaning packaging, tooling and development on the next short-term release of Ubuntu can now begin.

Mark Shuttleworth typically announces the new Ubuntu codename in an alliteratively ascribed blog post announcement, but one for the Artful Aardvark is yet to appear.

Read more

Raspberry Pi HAT does 3G/HSPA, and GNSS too

Filed under
Linux

Linkwave’s “Pilot” is a Raspberry Pi HAT add-on with a Sierra Wireless HL 3G/HSPA radio, a SIM slot, as well as a GNNS location chip.

Sierra Wireless announced that Linkwave Technologies has released a $101 3G/HSPA wireless add-on for the Raspberry Pi. The Pilot board incorporates a Sierra Wireless HL module for 3G/HSPA cellular data service, plus a 3V micro-SIM lets you load a 3G card of your choice. The board complies with the Raspberry Pi HAT add-on spec, and can be powered separately or directly from the Raspberry Pi 2, 3, or Zero.

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Wine Releases

Filed under
Software

Compilers: Not Just GNU

Filed under
Development
  • Psychec: A Type Inference Engine For C, The C Language Meets Unification

    Here, at the Compiler's Laboratory of UFMG, we've been trying to understand the meaning of incomplete C code. How well can a parser reason about a source when declarations (or complete headers) are missing? In the C language, challenges appear already during parsing, since, not only syntax, but also semantic information (possibly absent) is required. Yet, the really cool challenges emerge when we want to reconstruct a partial program into a complete one that passes the type-checker.

  • GCC 7 Has Been Branched, GCC 8.0 Now On Master

    The GCC 7 mainline code-base hit the important milestone today of having zero P1 regressions -- issues of the highest priority -- and as such they branched the GCC7 code-base and GCC 7.1 RC1 is then being announced later this week as they prepare for this first stable release of GCC 7.

Future of Ubuntu Server and Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Server Team Begins Planning For 17.10

    Following the successful launch of Ubuntu 17.04, the Ubuntu Server team is beginning to formalize their plans for Ubuntu 17.10.

    Development on Ubuntu 17.10 "AA" has yet to officially begin with Mark Shuttleworth not yet announcing the codename. I've heard a yet to be substantiated comment from a fellow that part of the reason AA isn't yet open for development is they are weighing possible internal development changes, perhaps even making Ubuntu rolling-release-like, but not quite rolling like Arch or Gentoo, following the turnover and other changes going on at Canonical. Anyhow, the server team is moving ahead in trying to plan some of their work for the "AA" cycle.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Is Artful

    According to Launchpad, it looks like we finally have the codename for the successor to the Zesty Zapus.

    Artful Aardvark is registered on Launchpad as the Ubuntu release to be delivered in October 2017. We have yet to see Mark Shuttleworth comment on his blog about it, but there is also now the artful archive.

  • Mir Developers See The Door, No Commits In A Week

System76 System76

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Entering Phase Three

    Phase three moves product design and manufacturing in house. We’re about to build the Model S of computers. Something so brilliant and beautiful that reviewers will have to add an 11 to their scores. Being that we’re System76 and we do things the System76 way, our design principles are polar opposite of the rest of the industry.

  • System76 To Begin Their Own Product Design & Manufacturing

    In looking to make their Linux-powered systems more appealing and original to the masses, System76 will begin their own product design and manufacturing.

    First beginning with desktop computers and laptops further down the road, this system provider of Ubuntu-powered systems will begin their own original product designs.

  • System76 to design and manufacture their desktop PCs in-house
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Best Linux Distros for Gaming in 2017

Gaming in Linux has evolved a lot in the past few years. Now, you have dozens of distros pre-optimized for gaming and gamers. We tested all of them and hand-picked the best. There are a few other articles and lists of this type out there, but they don’t really go into detail and they are pretty outdated. This is an up-to-date list with any info you’d need. Read more