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Tuesday, 02 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Black Lab SDK 1.8 released Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 7:28pm
Story Did Red Hat’s CTO Walk – Or Was He Pushed? Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 7:24pm
Story Firefox OS Smartphones Change The Mobile Landscape Across India Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 7:20pm
Story Mozilla Marches Ahead with Ads for Firefox Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 3:48pm
Story What happens when a non-coder tries to learn Linux Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 3:40pm
Story Jailhouse 0.1 released Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 3:33pm
Story Ubuntu Launcher 0.5.5 for Android Will Transform Your Phone in Ubuntu – Gallery Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 3:26pm
Story Haiku OS Gains Rudimentary Support For Haswell Graphics Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 3:18pm
Story Enlightenment E19 RC3 Shows Off The New Wayland Compositor Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 3:12pm
Story Linux Foundation's certification sets new benchmark for admins Rianne Schestowitz 29/08/2014 - 10:23am

When Distros Go South

Filed under
Linux

I can easily name five distros that have brought some massive changes to the way we interact with our computers…and not all of them on the good side of my list. A more pertinent question might be, which Linux distros are in it for the long haul?

One of the biggest advantages, and an often-perceived disadvantage, is the overwhelming number of choices in the Linuxsphere. I could give a good argument either way if I were pushed into it, but what it comes down to is stability.

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DRM Graphics Changes For Linux 3.18 Might End Up Being Smaller

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Handling merge requests for the DRM graphics driver updates will be done differently for the Linux 3.18 kernel, which will result in a few less weeks of development time.

David Airlie of Red Hat, the DRM subsystem maintainer, generally has been allowing new Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) code to be introduced to his drm-next tree up to around the time a given kernel release occurs. After that, within days, it could end up landing in the mainline Linux kernel when the merge window opens ahead of the next -rc1 release. David though is deciding to be a more strict about changes late in the cycle in hopes of leading to better tested code and less fallout from driver problems each kernel development cycle.

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Linus Torvalds Releases Linux Kernel 3.17 RC2 to Celebrate the 23rd Anniversary of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

“So I deviated from my normal Sunday schedule partly because there wasn't much there (I blame the KS and LinuxCon), but partly due to sentimental reasons: Aug 25 is the anniversary of the original Linux announcement (‘Hello everybody out there using minix’), so it's just a good day for release announcements.”

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Bored with Distros, China Tries Again, and Recompiling Kernels

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news Fedora Project leader Matthew Miller says folks are bored with Linux distributions. After the Red Flag failure, China is looking to develop another homegrown operating system. Paul Venezia has more on the raging systemd wars and the Linux Tycoon says recompiling the kernel is getting him down. And finally tonight, NetworkWorld has the top 10 things you should know about Red Hat 7.

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Linus Torvalds Releases Linux Kernel 3.17 RC2 to Celebrate the 23rd Anniversary of Linux

Filed under
Linux

“So I deviated from my normal Sunday schedule partly because there wasn't much there (I blame the KS and LinuxCon), but partly due to sentimental reasons: Aug 25 is the anniversary of the original Linux announcement (‘Hello everybody out there using minix’), so it's just a good day for release announcements.”

“Anyway, for being an rc2 it's pretty small, and I can always hope that things stay that way. It's about 60% drivers (drm, networking, hid, sound, PCI), with 15% filesystem updates (cifs, isofs, nfs), 10% architectures (mips, arm, some minor x86 stuff) and the rest is ‘misc’ (kernel, networking, documentation),” wrote Linus in the email announcement.

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$49 TiVo OTA and streaming DVR targets cordcutters

Filed under
Linux

TiVo introduced a Linux-based DVR for “cordcutters” who want to eliminate cable fees by obtaining their TV content from Internet streams and OTA broadcasts.

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Android One set for India debut in September; Micromax, Karbonn ready to launch smartphones

Filed under
Android

"The operating system on the Android One devices will be upgraded to Android L in October," one of the people said. This upgrade will allow users to have better browsing and gaming experience at affordable prices, making the smartphones attractive buys for first-time buyers and those wanting to replace their existing phones.

"Advantages of screen size and Google updates could make a difference to these smartphones offering better performance to what Indian buyers are accustomed to," said PwC India's Mohammad Chowdhury.

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Kali Tools Website Launched, 1.0.9 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Now that we have caught our breath after the Black Hat and DEF CON conferences, we have put aside some time to fix an annoying bug in our 1.0.8 ISO releases related to outdated firmware as well as regenerate fresh new ARM and VMware images (courtesy of Offensive Security) for our new 1.0.9 release.

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Android may have already killed Samsung's Tizen OS

Filed under
Android

In today's Android roundup: A Huawei bigwig thinks that Tizen is already dead. Plus: Lemon Meringue Pie might be the official codename for Android L, and are mobile carriers clogging up Android with bloatware?

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Haiku debates kernel switch (but it's not happening)

Filed under
OS
Linux

A very interesting discussion is taking place in the Haiku mailing list right now. A developer has created a working prototype implementation of the BeOS API layer on top of the Linux kernel, and he is wondering if the project is worth pursuing.

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Zorin OS 9 Core Review: As good as Linux Mint 17!

Filed under
Reviews

Though personally I don’t like Linux operating system resembling Windows (I had really bad experiences with Windows and lost a lot of data in the past at a critical phase in my student life and OS resembling Windows reminds me of the same), but I have seen Zorin OS to be quite popular among the new users, specially those who are converting from Windows to Linux. Even I used Zorin OS for sometime in the past, but once I upgraded Zorin to the next release, it became Ubuntu and all Zorin specific customization are lost. However, the recent Zorin OS release is supported for 5 years (till April 2019) and possibly you don’t need to upgrade it for quite sometime, given the customization I am recommending in this article.

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Linux Performance Tools at LinuxCon North America 2014

Filed under
Linux

This week I spoke at LinuxCon North America 2014 in Chicago, which was also my first LinuxCon. I really enjoyed the conference, and it was a privilege to take part and contribute. I'll be returning to work with some useful ideas from talks and talking with attendees.

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GitHub.io killed the distro star: Why are people so bored with the top Linux makers?

Filed under
OS

Matthew Miller is a little concerned. As the new project leader for the Fedora Linux distribution, he thinks Fedora 20 is great and Fedora 21, when it ships, will be the best release ever. But he worries that to everyone else, Fedora – and Linux distros in general – are getting a little, well … boring.

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Linux AIO Linux Mint DVD Has All Linux Mint 17 Flavors on One Disc

Filed under
Linux

The Linux AIO Team is trying to provide a very simple and obvious service for the users and to gather all the releases for some of the most famous distros and offer them on a single DVD, which might seem like the obvious solution.

As we all know, Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and Debian developers provide separate images for each flavor of their distribution. Linux Mint has quite a few, the Debian project the same, and Ubuntu has so many it's hard to name them all.

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Interesting facts about Linux

Filed under
Linux

There is a never-ending debate on whether or not Linux is an operating system. Technically, the term "Linux" refers to the kernel, a core component of an operating system. Folks who argue that Linux is not an operating system are operating system purists who think that the kernel alone does not make the whole operating system, or free software ideologists who believe that the largest free operating system should be named "GNU/Linux" to give credit where credit is due (i.e., GNU project). On the other hand, some developers and programmers have a view that Linux qualifies as an operating system in a sense that it implements the POSIX standard.

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What does an open design studio look like?

Filed under
OSS

I'm really interested in open source philosophies. I like the camaraderie of the communities and the open collaboration. I like being able to have a direct effect on the development of products that I use. I like the idea of the freedom behind the licensing. I like the idea of supporting the underdog fighting picaresquely against the corporate giants. I like that the whole point of open source is being allowed to see (and modify) the code. In simple terms, with open source as a development model it allows access to a product's plans/blueprints through using a permissive license.

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Linux 3.17 Doesn't Boost Ivy Bridge Performance Numbers

Filed under
Linux

Last week I ran some performance tests that found Sandy Bridge was faster with the Linux 3.17 kernel and these performance gains with the still in-development kernel extended beyond just graphics. Curious, I ran some tests this weekend to see whether Intel Ivy Bridge processors were also running faster with Linux 3.17 compared to Linux 3.16 stable.

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