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Wednesday, 26 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What Drew Me to Solus? Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 2:56pm
Story Elementary OS 0.4 LOKI is one of the best distro based on Ubuntu & better too Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 2:00pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 12:04pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 10:58am
Story Blockchain and FOSS Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 10:57am
Story Tizen News Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 10:56am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 10:54am
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 10:53am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 10:15am
Story The basics of open source quality assurance Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2016 - 8:40am

Nasdaq Selects Drupal 8

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Dries Buytaert announced today that Nasdaq Corporate Solutions has selected Drupal 8 and will work with Acquia to create its Investor Relations Website Platform. In the words of Angela Byron, a.k.a "Webchick", "This is a big freakin' deal."

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Direct: Nasdaq using Drupal 8 for new Investor Relations websites

Android Leftovers

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat brings enterprise mobile apps to its containers platform

    Linux major Red Hat has unveiled its Red Hat Mobile Application Platform, a containerized offering designed to run in any public or private cloud or on-premise infrastructure that supports its Enterprise Linux. When used alongside Red Hat’s existing SaaS (software-as-a-service) mobile app platform, enterprises gain a wider set of deployment options to integrate, manage, and scale their mobile app initiatives to meet their business objectives, said the company.

  • Red Hat flaunts new curriculum offering

    The solution provides higher education institutions with the support to offer exams and courses centred around Red Hat technology.

    “Red Hat Academy goes beyond just implementing the software,” said Mustapha Hill, Channel Ecosystem Leader, MENA, Red Hat. “With this initiative, we actually advise universities on how they can implement software training into their curriculum. We do this because we want graduates to eventually be able to gain employment in the market based on their knowledge of Red Hat technology.

  • Fedora kernel scripting

    When I joined the Fedora kernel team about 1.5 years ago, I was the first brand new person in a long time. My teammates had most of the infrastructure instructions for the kernel in their brains. Part of my new hire tasks were documenting the steps for working with the Fedora kernel. These days, I can do most of the day to day tasks in my sleep. The tasks are still somewhat manual though which leaves room for error. I've decided to correct this by scripting some of the more manual parts.

  • Going to FUDCon: Phnom Penh Edition

    A little over a year ago, FUDCon APAC happened in Pune. I know because I lost a lot of nights sleep over it. The event also marked a turning point in my life because it coincided with my decision to move on from Red Hat and accept an offer with Linaro, a decision that I can say now was among the best I have taken in my life despite the very difficult choice I had to make to leave arguably the best team one could ever work with. FUDCon also brought me in touch with many volunteers from across Asia and it was interesting to see the kinds of challenges they faced when talking about Fedora and Open Source in general. That was also when I got to know Nisa and Somvannda from Cambodia better, especially when I had the chance to go over to Phnom Penh for APAC budget discussions. They had wanted to do a FUDCon in Phnom Penh in 2015 and we simply put out a better bid then.

  • Tommorow FOSSASIA meets PyLadies Pune

    Tomorrow we have a special PyLadies meetup at the local Red Hat office. Hong Phuc Dang from FOSSASIA is coming down for a discussion with the PyLadies team here. She will be taking about various projects FOSSASIA is working on, including codeheat. In the second half I will be taking a workshop on creating command line shell using Python.

  • Deploy containers with Atomic Host, Ansible, and Cockpit
  • How to Install Atom in Fedora

    A text editor is an important tool for developers, since they spend a lot of time using one. This article is about Atom, a cool modern editor.

    Atom is a free and open source text editor developed in 2015 by Github. Its developer calls it “the hackable text-editor for the 21st century.” It offers vast language support, and easy customization. It also works as an integrated development environment, or IDE. It comes with some built-in packages, but you can install other packages too. Most of these are freely licensed and maintained by community. Of course, it’s also free of cost.

  • debugging koji build failures

    From time to time builds fail in koji (The Fedora build system), and it’s good to know how to figure out where to look for the reason. Koji has a central hub that manages jobs and a bunch of builders that actually do the builds. When someone initiates a build you are talking to the hub and either uploading a src.rpm (for a scratch build) or telling it to use a particular git hash/repo for an official Fedora build. For official builds, koji will first generate a job to build the src.rpm from git and the packages lookaside cache with the source. This job will run on some builder thats ready and has capacity for it. Once the src.rpm is generated (or if you are providing it for a scratch build), the hub will generate build tasks for all the arches that are set in the target tag you are building to. Each one of those will go out to a builder of the right arch type that is enabled and has capacity, etc. If any of these fail, the entire build fails.

Security News

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  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • Security bug lifetime

    In several of my recent presentations, I’ve discussed the lifetime of security flaws in the Linux kernel. Jon Corbet did an analysis in 2010, and found that security bugs appeared to have roughly a 5 year lifetime. As in, the flaw gets introduced in a Linux release, and then goes unnoticed by upstream developers until another release 5 years later, on average. I updated this research for 2011 through 2016, and used the Ubuntu Security Team’s CVE Tracker to assist in the process. The Ubuntu kernel team already does the hard work of trying to identify when flaws were introduced in the kernel, so I didn’t have to re-do this for the 557 kernel CVEs since 2011.

  • Reproducible Builds: week 77 in Stretch cycle

    After discussions with HW42, Steven Chamberlain, Vagrant Cascadian, Daniel Shahaf, Christopher Berg, Daniel Kahn Gillmor and others, Ximin Luo has started writing up more concrete and detailed design plans for setting SOURCE_ROOT_DIR for reproducible debugging symbols, buildinfo security semantics and buildinfo security infrastructure.

  • Veracode security report finds open source components behind many security vulnerabilities [Ed: not a nice firm]

Linux Kernel News

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  • Linux kernel bugs: we add them in and then take years to get them out

    Kees Cook is a Google techie and security researcher whose interests include the Linux Kernel Self Protection Project.

    The idea of “self-protection” doesn’t mean giving up on trying to create secure code in the first place, of course.

    It may sound like an irony, but I’m happy to accept that writing secure code requires that you simultaneously write code that is predicated on insecurity.

  • storaged - next evolution step of udisks2

    What do you think about the above goals? Do you think GNU/Linux distributions should and will adopt storaged as a replacement for *udisks2"? Would you like your favorite distribution to do so? Or do you see a really bumpy road ahead? Please tell us what you think in the comments and if you know about somebody who should read this post and participate in the broader discussion, don't forget to let them know and send them the link!

  • Ten Years of KVM

    We recently celebrated 25 years of Linux on the 25th anniversary of the famous email Linus sent to announce the start of the Linux project. Going by the same yardstick, today marks the 10th anniversary of the KVM project — Avi Kivity first announced the project on the 19th Oct, 2006 by this posting on LKML...

Bosch and Red Hat join initiative to develop cloud-based IoT platform components

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Red Hat

The Eclipse Foundation open source community is collaborating with Bosch Software Innovations, Red Hat and Eurotech to develop interoperable IoT components that can be deployed to a Cloud platform. We are constantly reminded that IoT is all about the ecosystem, but such extensive industry networks are only as valuable as their ability to work together and interoperate without unnecessary complications.

This latest collaboration will be part of the existing Eclipse IoT Working Group, a community of 26 open source IoT projects hosted by the Eclipse Foundation, though still a separate project. An ecosystem within an ecosystem then. This is getting very confusing.

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Red Hat and Ericsson sign open source deal

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Red Hat

Red Hat is well known as probably the most successful company built entirely on open-source software. Building a business on top of open source is a hard thing, especially so back in the early days of open source when no one had any real idea how the economics of a product that was free would translate into commercial success.

But succeed it did, and Red Hat has created a huge business built entirely on offering services on top of open-source products.

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Ericsson, Red Hat Partner on Open Source

Red Hat and Ericsson Announce Broad Alliance to Enable Pervasive Adoption of Open Source Solutions

Who killed Cyanogen?

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Analysis Does European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager's team pay close attention to the tech news? If not, perhaps they should.

Last week there was barely a murmur after Cyanogen Inc scaled back its ambitions. “Throwing in the towel” may be harsh – but the Android software company said it would henceforth be trying to interest phone makers in useful bits and bobs of code, rather than a platform alternative to Google, a customisable firmware.

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Canonical Ltd.'s Ubuntu Core

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Canonical Ltd.'s "Snappy" Ubuntu Core, a stripped-down version of Ubuntu designed for autonomous machines, devices and other internet-connected digital things, has gained significant traction in the chipset/semiconductor market recently.

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Live kernel patches for Ubuntu

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Kernel live patching enables runtime correction of critical security
issues in your kernel without rebooting. It’s the best way to ensure
that machines are safe at the kernel level, while guaranteeing uptime,
especially for container hosts where a single machine may be running
thousands of different workloads.

We’re very pleased to announce that this new enterprise, commercial
service from Canonical will also be available free of charge to the
Ubuntu community.

The Canonical Livepatch Service is an authenticated, encrypted, signed
stream of livepatch kernel modules for Ubuntu servers, virtual
machines and desktops.

Read more

Also: Hotfix Your Ubuntu Kernels with the Canonical Livepatch Service!

Apache on Ubuntu Linux For Beginners: Part 2

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You must set up your Apache web server to use SSL, so that your site URL is https:// and not http://. Sure, there are exceptions, such as test servers and lone LAN servers that only you and your cat use.

But any Internet-accessible web server absolutely needs SSL; there is no downside to encrypting your server traffic, and it's pretty easy to set up. For LAN servers it may not be as essential; think about who uses it, and how easy it is to sniff LAN traffic.

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Linux Foundation Certified Engineer: Karthikeyan Ramaswamy

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Linux was part of my academics. I was introduced to Linux at the Anna University Bioinformatics Lab by my Professor Gautam Pennathur. After that introduction, I became truly interested in Linux and open source when I was doing my final year project with Professor Nagasuma Chandra in the bioinformatics department, Indian Institute of Science. It was an incredible journey with the different flavors of Linux as well as the scripting and programming languages. After learning about the history of Linux and open source software movement, I become an Individual supporter of The Linux Foundation and an Annual Associate Member of the Free Software Foundation.

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A Doctor Learns How to Code Through Open Source

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Judy Gichoya is a medical doctor from Kenya who became a software developer after joining the open source medical records project, OpenMRS. The open source project creates medical informatics software that helps health professionals collect and present data to improve patient care in developing countries.

After seeing how effective the open medical records system was at increasing efficiency and lowering costs for clinics in impoverished areas of Africa, she began hacking on the software herself to help improve it. Then she set up her own implementation in the slums outside Nairobi, and has done the same for dozens of clinics since.

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Announcing the Release of Fedora 25 Beta

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Red Hat

The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Fedora 25 Beta, the next big step on our journey to the exciting Fedora 25 release in November.

Download the prerelease from our Get Fedora site:

Get Fedora 25 Beta Workstation
Get Fedora 25 Beta Server

Looking for Cloud edition? Check out the section on Fedora Atomic below. Or, check out one of our popular variants:

Get Fedora 25 Beta Spins
Get Fedora 25 Beta Labs
Get Fedora 25 Beta ARM

Read more

today's leftovers

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  • Linux-Based Photographic Workflow on Android with Termux

    The title is a bit of a mouthful, but the basic idea is pretty simple; Instead of schlepping around a Linux machine, you can transform an Android device into a lightweight Linux-based platform for organizing, processing, and backing up photos and RAW files when you are on the move. The key ingredient of this solution is the Termux, a small open source app that combines a terminal emulator and a lightweight Linux environment. The app comes with its own software repository that has all the tools you need to set up a simplified photographic workflow. The Linux Photography book explains exactly how to can go about it, but here are a few pointers to get started.

  • NVIDIA Announces The GeForce GTX 1050 Series

    NVIDIA this morning is expanding the Pascal family with the announcement of the GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti lower-cost graphics cards.

  • GStreamer Conference 2016 Videos, Vulkan Support Was Among The Talks

    The annual GStreamer Conference took place last week in Berlin alongside the Linux Foundation's Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The videos from this multimedia open-source conference are now available.

    The folks from Ubicast have once again done a nice job recording all of the presentations from this GStreamer event. Conference talks ranged from the "stage of the union" to the state of VA-API with GStreamer, GStreamer Video Editing, dynamic pipelines, Vulkan, and more.

    When it comes to Vulkan support in GStreamer, there is work underway on vulkansink and vulkanupload elements, basic Vulkan support modeled on GStreamer's libgstgl API, and more, but much more work is needed before it will be at the level of OpenGL support.

  • Solus 1.2.1 Released With Budgie Desktop Updates, Ships RADV Driver

    Version 1.2.1 of the promising Solus Linux distribution is now available and also premieres a MATE edition ISO to complement its original Budgie desktop.

  • Bill Belichick rants against NFL tablets: 'I'm done'

    After the image of the New England Patriots coach slamming a Microsoft Surface tablet on the sideline in a Week 4 game against the Buffalo Bills went viral, Belichick explained Tuesday why he is fed up with the product.

News About Servers

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  • Demand compels container management vendor Rancher to create partner program
  • Rancher Labs Expands Container-Management Reach With New Partner Program
  • Rancher Labs Introduces Global Partner Network
  • Rancher Labs Launches Partner Program Around Open Source Container Management
  • WTF is a container?

    You can’t go to a developer conference today and not hear about software containers: Docker, Kubernetes, Mesos and a bunch of other names with a nautical ring to them. Microsoft, Google, Amazon and everybody else seems to have jumped on this bandwagon in the last year or so, but why is everybody so excited about this stuff?

    To understand why containers are such a big deal, let’s think about physical containers for a moment. The modern shipping industry only works as well as it does because we have standardized on a small set of shipping container sizes. Before the advent of this standard, shipping anything in bulk was a complicated, laborious process. Imagine what a hassle it would be to move some open pallet with smartphones off a ship and onto a truck, for example. Instead of ships that specialize in bringing smartphones from Asia, we can just put them all into containers and know that those will fit on every container ship.

  • Solving Enterprise Monitoring Issues with Prometheus

    Chicago-based ShuttleCloud helps developers import user contacts and email data into their applications through standard API requests. As the venture-backed startup began to acquire more customers, they needed a way to scale system monitoring to meet the terms of their service-level agreements (SLAs). They turned to Prometheus, the open source systems monitoring and alerting toolkit originally built at SoundCloud, which is now a project at the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation.

    In advance of Prometheus Day, to be held Nov. 8-9 in Seattle, we talked to Ignacio Carretero, a ShuttleCloud software engineer, about why they chose Prometheus as their monitoring tool and what advice they would give to other small businesses seeking a similar solution.

  • VMware Embraces Kubernetes in Container Push

    VMware is the latest IT vendor to support Kubernetes, the open-source container management system that Google developed.
    VMware announced on Oct. 18 at its VMworld 2016 Europe event that it is now supporting the Kubernetes container management system on the VMware Photon platform.

    Kubernetes is an open-source project that was developed by Google and today benefits from the contributions of a diverse community, including Red Hat and CoreOS. The Kubernetes project became part of the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) in July 2015. The Kubernetes 1.4 release debuted on Sept. 26 with added security features.

    "We have now built a Kubernetes-as-a-service capability into Photon Platform," Jared Rosoff, chief technologist for cloud native apps at VMware, told eWEEK.

  • CoreOS Expands Kubernetes Control With Redspread Acquisition

    The purchase of container management vendor Redspread is the container startup's second acquisition.
    CoreOS on Oct. 17 announced the acquisition of privately held container management vendor Redspread. Financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed.

    Redspread got its start in the Y Combinator cyber accelerator for technology startups and was officially launched in March. Coincidentally, CoreOS was also originally part of Y Combinator, graduating in 2013. To date, CoreOS has raised $48 million in funding to help fuel its container efforts. The acquisition of Redspread is the second acquisition by CoreOS and comes more than two years after CoreOS' acquisition of in 2014.

Software and Games

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  • Indicator Diskman Makes It Easy to Manage Drives & Partitions on Ubuntu

    Indicator Diskman Indicator Diskman is a small panel-based indicator applet that lets you view and manage mounted drives, volumes, partitions, and disc images.

  • Synapse or Alfred — What’s Your Favourite App Launcher for Linux?

    Sometimes there are apps that I want to write about but I’m uncertain of why I want to write about them. Case in point today is Synapse, a smart application launcher (and then some), a one-time mainstay on many a Linux desktop.

  • VirtualBox 5.1.8 Out Now, Oracle Adds Linux Kernel 4.8 Support in VirtualBox 5.0

    A few minutes ago, Oracle announced the availability of two new maintenance updates for its popular, open-source and cross-platform VirtualBox virtualization software, versions 5.1.8 and 5.0.28.

    The VirtualBox 5.1.8 point release is the most advanced Oracle VM VirtualBox version you can get right now, and it promises a month's worth of bug fixes and improvements to further stabilize the application for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

  • Wine Staging 1.9.21 Lets You Run Steam Web Browser in Windows 7 Mode on Linux

    Today, October 18, 2016, the Wine Staging development team announced the availability for download of a new version of their Wine Staging open-source alternative to the popular Wine software.

    Based on the recently released Wine 1.9.21 development build, Wine Staging 1.9.21 promises a bunch of goodies for those interested in running the latest Windows games and applications on their GNU/Linux operating system, among which we can mention improvements to the Vulkan wrapper.

  • The 'SMACH Z' gaming handheld is back on Kickstarter, no longer using SteamOS but their own Linux version

    The 'SMACH Z' [Kickstarter] is a promising device and I'm quite excited to see how this all turns out, the promise of taking my Steam library easily on the go sounds fun.

    They are no longer using SteamOS, but their own Linux-based "SMACH Z OS", although it will still be a mostly normal Linux distribution since it will run Linux games and Steam.

    What bugs me, is that they "recommend" their Linux OS, but all their benchmarks in the video and noted on the Kickstarter were done on Windows. That tells me a lot about their confidence in showing how it will run games if people don't use Windows. As sad as that is, we know most games run a bit slower on Linux right now, so it's not really surprising. The real issue here, is that Windows support is a stretch-goal, meaning all of the benchmark/performance information is useless unless they hit that goal.

Leftovers: KDE

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  • Global Menu Support Is Coming Back to KDE Plasma 5
  • KDE Plasma Looking At Global Menu, Wayland & Mobile For 2017

    KDE Plasma developers talked this week about their plans for the new development cycle and what they want the desktop to look like moving into 2017 and further ahead into 2018.

  • KDE Plasma 5 Desktop to Become a Solid and Reliable Workhorse That Stands Out

    On October 18, 2016, long time KDE software developer Sebastian Kügler published an in-depth story about what's coming to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment in the next couple of years.

    It appears that KDE’s Plasma team had their traditional kickoff meeting on Monday, October 17, to discuss the upcoming features of the next KDE Plasma 5 release, which will be versioned 5.9 and whose release schedule has been already published, as reported earlier right here on this space.

    However, the Plasma team also discussed new ways to improve the quality of the popular desktop environment, as well as make it faster, more stable and reliable than existing versions. Their aim is to bring KDE Plasma to an unprecedented level of quality that will blow the competition away.

    "Our general direction points towards professional use-cases. We want Plasma to be a solid tool, a reliable work-horse that gets out of the way, allowing to get the job done quickly and elegantly. We want it to be faster and of better quality than the competition," said Sebastian Kügler in the blog announcement.

  • Twenty and counting: KDE marks another milestone

    Twenty years ago, a German software developer named Matthias Ettrich kicked off a project to provide Linux users with all the desktop functionality that Windows users had at the time.

    The detailed email inviting participation was sent by Ettrich on 14 October 1996. He outlined his ideas and goals and attracted plenty of interest. The K Desktop Environment project was on its way.

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More in Tux Machines

New Cortex-M chips add ARMv8 and TrustZone

ARM launched its first Cortex-M MCUs with ARMv8-M and TrustZone security: the tiny, low-power Cortex-M23 and faster Cortex-M33. At the ARM TechCon show in Santa Clara, ARM unveiled two new Cortex-M microprocessors that will likely emerge as major Internet of Things workhorses over the coming decade, supplanting most existing Cortex-M designs. The Cortex-M23 and Cortex-M33 are also the first Cortex-M processors with ARMv8-M technology, enabling ARM TrustZone security, among other benefits. The TrustZone support is enabled via a new IoT-oriented CoreLink SIE-200 network-on-chip, which adds IP blocks on top of the AMBA 5 AHB5 interface. ARM also announced a TrustZone CryptoCell-312 technology for creating secure SoCs based on ARMv8-M. Read more

OpenStack in the Headlines

  • From OpenStack Summit, Red Hat Reports That the Deployment Era is Here
    As noted here yesterday, OpenStack is here to stay in enterprises. A new study by 451 Research analysts shows that about 72 percent of OpenStack-based clouds are between 1,000 and 10,000 cores and three fourths choose OpenStack to increase operational efficiency and app deployment speed. Meanwhile, in conjunction with OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Red Hat is out with very notable results from its polling of its OpenStack user base. Its study found that production deployments increased hugely in the last year, according to a survey of 150 information technology decision makers and professionals carried out by Red Hat.
  • You can run the same programs on 16 different OpenStack clouds
    Cloud companies like to talk about about how you can avoid vendor lock-in. And OpenStack just showed how to make it happen. Sixteen different vendors did a live demo at OpenStack Summit showing that you could run the same software stack on 16 separate OpenStack platforms.
  • ​Where OpenStack cloud is today and where it's going tomorrow
    The future looks bright for OpenStack -- according to 451 Research, OpenStack is growing rapidly to become a $5-billion-a-year cloud business. But obstacles still remain.
  • ​Mirantis OpenStack: The good news and the bad news
    Mirantis recently signed a major deal with NTT, but the company is also laying off some of its employees.
  • The World Runs on OpenStack
    The OpenStack Summit keynotes got underway the morning of October 25, with Mark Collier, Chief Operating Officer of the OpenStack Foundation, declaring that the world runs on OpenStack.
  • Study: OpenStack is Marching Forward in Enterprises
    How fast is the OpenStack global cloud services market growing? Research and Markets analysts came out with a new report recently that forecasts the global OpenStack cloud market to grow at a CAGR of 30.49% during the period 2016-2020. Many enterprises now have large scale OpenStack deployments, and in conjunction with this week's OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, new study results are shedding light on exactly how entrenched this open cloud platform is in enteprises. The bottom line is: OpenStack is here to stay in enterprises. OpenStack deployments are getting bigger. Users are diversifying across industries. Enterprises report using the open source cloud software to support workloads that are critical to their businesses. These are among the findings in a recent study by 451 Research regarding OpenStack adoption among enterprise private cloud users. About 72 percent of OpenStack-based clouds are between 1,000 and 10,000 cores and three fourths choose OpenStack to increase operational efficiency and app deployment speed. The study was commissioned by the OpenStack Foundation. Here are some of the companies discussing their OpenStack deployments in Barcelona: Banco Santander, BBVA, CERN, China Mobile, Comcast, Constant Contact, Crowdstar, Deutsche Telekom, Folksam, Sky UK, Snapdeal, Swisscom, Telefonica, Verizon, Volkswagen, and Walmart. You can find some of the specific deployment stories from the companies at the OpenStack User Stories page.

Alpine Linux 3.4.5 released

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.4.5 of its Alpine Linux operating system. This is a bugfix release of the v3.4 musl based branch, based on linux-4.4.27 kernels and it contains important security fixes for the kernel and for musl libc. Read more

Linux Graphics