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Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The State of Plasma Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:01pm
Story Wine 2.2 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 9:45pm
Story Development News:/Trools Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 6:04pm
Story Linus Torvalds at Open Source Leadership Summit Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 6:02pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:58pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:57pm
Story Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS Out Now for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 with MATE 1.16.1 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 4:06pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 4:05pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 3:13pm

Why Munich should stick with Linux

Filed under
Linux

Once more, the drums are beating for Munich to turn its back on Linux and return to Windows. Oh please! Get a grip!

A Munich administrative and personnel committee recommended an immediate start to the creation of a uniform, Windows 10-based client architecture that can be deployed across the council by the end of 2020.

Read more

OpenWrt-driven LoRa gateways feature indoor and outdoor models

Filed under
Linux

Dragino’s LoRa Gateways run OpenWrt on an Atheros AR9331 — and Arduino on an ATMega328P — and bridge LoRA wireless with IP using WiFi, Ethernet, or 3G/4G.

Shenzhen based Dragino Technology has launched a weatherproof Outdoor OLG01 LoRa Gateway to go along with its two indoor LG01-P and LG01-S LoRa Gateway models for LoRa wireless IoT applications. Here, we’ll cover all three models, as well as a relatively new Lora IoT Kit, which combines the LG01-P with LoRa and GPS shields, a pair of Arduino Uno boards, and sensors (see farther below).

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • VC Investor Martin Casado on the Future of Software-Defined Networking

    Software-defined networking’s biggest accomplishment last year was achieving market traction and validation, says Martin Casado, a general partner at the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. But there are still many challenges ahead for the industry at large and the organizations that aim to drive SDN forward.

  • What is the best Linux distro for beginners?

    Abundance of choice is one of the biggest challenges faced by all Linux users, particularly those dipping their toe in the water for the first time. Choosing your first Linux distro can be incredibly daunting, especially when you don't even know what you're looking for.

    In Linux's early days, choosing a distro was simple: you went with the one you had heard about, or the one that someone you knew had experience with, or the one with some degree of documentation. Naturally, then, you were limited in choice to the likes of RedHat, Debian, or Slackware.

  • DEFT “Zero” Linux 2017.1 Lightweight Hacker Distro Available For Download
  • No, OpenSUSE and SUSE Downloads Haven’t Been Hacked

    Some inconsequential remnants of SUSE’s old relationship with Novell remain, however; both the domain names and the IP addresses used by SUSE/openSUSE are still listed as being owned by Novell. If I were SUSE, I think I’d take care of that and have both transferred to my name. There’s no need to remind people of a history that’s better left forgotten.

    All indications are that the defacer of the openSUSE News site, which operates as a subdomain of openSUSE.org, leveraged a widely reported vulnerability in WordPress that has recently been responsible for more than 2 million WordPress sites being hacked. The vulnerability was fixed in late January with the WordPress 4.7.2 update.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, January 2017

    In January, about 159 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

Microsoft-Friendly Media Prematurely Announces Death of GNU/Linux (Old Tactics) to Market Vista 10

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Automotive Grade Linux Continues Rapid Growth

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative open source project developing a Linux-based, open platform for the connected car, today announced that six new members have joined Automotive Grade Linux and The Linux Foundation. DrimAES joins AGL at the Silver level while ARM, Elektrobit, RealVNC, Telenav and Tuxera join AGL at the Bronze level.

  • Why Microsoft Won’t Use the Linux Kernel for Windows

    There are a number of reasons why Microsoft won’t use the Linux kernel for Windows. For one there is a huge difference in the technical aspects of the Linux Kernel and the NT kernel.

    Another reason would be the issues of licensing involved if Microsoft has to switch over to using the Linux kernel for windows. Thirdly, there are things done on Windows that can’t be done on any other operating system.

  • Linux Enhanced BPF (eBPF) Tracing Tools

    This page shows examples of performance analysis tools using enhancements to BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter) which were added to the Linux 4.x series kernels, allowing BPF to do much more than just filtering packets. These enhancements allow custom analysis programs to be executed on Linux dynamic tracing, static tracing, and profiling events.

  • Mesa 17.0.0 Released

    It’s been a busy few week for Mesa related news, and today is no exception as Mesa 17.0 is now officially available. Mesa 17.0.0 is the first release with the new year-based versioning system (it would’ve been Mesa 13.1.0 otherwise).

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Phones: Fake News, Tizen, and Android Lawsuit

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • Of iPhones and Fake News - We have rare opportunity to discover bastard lying deceptive journalists and writers in tech

    The past week had a rare ‘perfect test’ for any tech reader, to evaluate most tech writers they follow. It was a test of journalistic integrity (and of competence, and possibly of deliberate intent to deceive you, the reader).

    This is the test. Did your writer report about iPhone latest Quarter sales data, vs Samsung’s Galaxy series of smartphones, correctly and honestly, or did your writer try to mislead you. Were you actually a victim of ‘Fake News’ (as many US voters were when voting for Donald Trump). This is really a simple test and it will tell you categorically, is you preferred tech writer honest and fair, or is the writer biased and peddling fake news at you.

  • Smartphone Game: PaperFlick in Tizen Store for Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3

    PaperFlick is a game much like Paper Toss, which is a game that is already on the Android and IOS platforms. This game is just like it but you can’t change what you throw into the bin, but I hope in future updates that the developer will add that feature. Basically, what you have is a paper ball and you have to throw it in the bin, but it isn’t that easy. In paperflick, the fan will blow the ball in a different direction and away from the bin so you don’t get any points. You need to throw the paper ball at the right angle to get it in the bin.

  • Oracle Files Its Opening Brief As It Tries (Again) To Overturn Google's Fair Use Win On Java APIs

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • ToaruOS 1.0 Open Source OS Released After 6+ Years Of Development

    Hobbyist operating systems are seen as one of the more advanced projects taken up by the computer enthusiasts. While some developers use some existing kernel and other resources, others design everything from the scratch. ToaruOS is also one such hobby operating system/kernel, which is mostly written from the scratch.

  • Fund Open Source Software Research to Enhance ICT for Development (ICT4D) and ICT for Dollars (ICT4$)

    I owe part of my IT education to the Open Source community. I enhanced my programming skills using Open Source programming languages; I garnered a better understanding of operating systems through my study and research of the Linux kernel; I understood the inner workings of software by having access to their code; and in college, I used learning materials from computer science classes made available by MIT Open Courseware. But this article is not about how I benefited from open source software. I only mentioned my experience with Open Source Software (OSS) to stress the plethora of opportunities that it provides and the impact it can have on our ICT sector, and the country as a whole. Hence, the subsequent paragraphs provide insights into the positive impact that Open Source Software can have on a developing country like Liberia. The article is also a call to both the public and private sectors to invest in Open Source Software or OSS in order to enhance Information and Communications Technology for Development (ICT4D) and Information and Communications Technology for Dollars (ICT4$).

  • 15 Open Source Artificial Intelligence Tools

    One of the hottest areas in technology right now is the Artificial Intelligence (AI). Big like IBM, Google, Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon investing lots money in the R&D to take the AI to next level. Even companies like Samsung last year take over a start-up to roll out it’s of AI assistant Bixby. Given the level of interest, here are some for tools for Building the next generation of AI algorithms.

  • What’s moving and shaking in the open-source community?

    Open source software has its roots in the very birth of software and computing itself. The field was first pioneered by scientists, researchers and academics with information and knowledge being freely and widely shared. Over the years open-source has matured and behind this maturity is a community of developers, collaborating and sharing to make better innovations faster. Successful open source projects like Linux, Apache, PostgreSQL and many others are growing super-linearly. As 2017 gathers steam, the open-source community is also rapidly developing. This year, as businesses focus on rightsizing their resources, containers will become more common as they give businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets or resources, which makes the move into micro-services much easier.

  • 9 relevant topics for community leaders today

    In 2009, Jono Bacon brought the first Community Leadership Summit to the free and open source world. Five years later, Donna Benjamin hosted an off-shoot event, CLSx at linux.conf.au in Perth. 2017 marks the third year for CLSxAU at LCA.

    This year the event hosted nearly 30 attendees, each participating in one or more of nine discussion sessions.

  • Free as in puppy: The hidden costs of free software [Ed: This repeats Sun and Microsoft FUD against FOSS; Proprietary software has these costs too, and MORE]

    The following sections represent common areas for software costs to sneak in. This is by no means a comprehensive list.

  • What happens when we just assume positive intent?

    I never make New Year's resolutions. I've never understood the concept, never felt motivated to change with the calendar, and always been cynical of the effectiveness of "resolving" to change.

    Instead, I like to continually examine my habits and think about how I can improve on a more frequent basis. That said, 2016 has been an interesting year, and the beginning of 2017 I think is a good opportunity to think about how to be intentional about my behavior in all aspects of my life.

    So here's my 2017 open organization resolution: When it comes to leading in an open organization, I want to be more intentional about understanding and considering my own motivations and the motivations of others, and encouraging my colleagues to do the same.

  • DevOps Poetry Slam: 5 poems on the art of DevOps
  • A getting started guide for contributors, Designate's future, and more OpenStack news
  • Yahoo open-sources TensorFlowOnSpark for deep learning with big data

    Yahoo is announcing today that it’s open-sourcing TensorFlowOnSpark, a piece of software it has created to make the Google-initiated TensorFlow open-source framework for deep learning compatible with its data sets that sit inside Spark clusters, which some organizations maintain for processing lots of different kinds of data. The code is available now under an Apache 2.0 license on GitHub.

  • ‘Think WordPress’ Documentary Trailer

    Open source activism takes many forms, including the creation of documentaries that celebrate and explain open source solutions. Two bold women in France, Deborah Donnier and Emilie Lebrun are working on a 50-minute documentary in French that celebrates and explains WordPress.

  • Study of German weather data made easy with Rdwd

    Rdwd, an open source software solutions developed at at the Institute of Earth and Environmental Science at Potsdam University (Germany) is making it easy to study records made public by the German weather service (DWD, Deutsche Wetterdienst).

  • Government finally launches digital transformation strategy

    The long-awaited strategy for the Government Digital Service was finally launched today, more than a year since it was promised, providing an outline of how it intends to reach the ambitious goal of using its £450 million budget to save £3.5 billion by the end of 2020.

    Minister for the Cabinet Office Ben Gummer MP announced the proposals at the annual conference of public sector think tank Reform.

  • Ambra, the PLOS Journal Publishing Platform, is Open Again

    As part of our commitment to Open Science, PLOS is pleased to announce that Ambra™, the engine behind PLOS journals, is once again open source. Head over to ambraproject.org to read more and get started.

  • PHP vs. Node.js: An epic battle for developer mind share

    It’s a classic Hollywood plot: the battle between two old friends who went separate ways. Often the friction begins when one pal sparks an interest in what had always been the other pal’s unspoken domain. In the programming language version of this movie, it’s the introduction of Node.js that turns the buddy flick into a grudge match: PHP and JavaScript, two partners who once ruled the internet together but now duke it out for the mind share of developers.

    In the old days, the partnership was simple. JavaScript handled little details on the browser, while PHP managed all the server-side tasks between port 80 and MySQL. It was a happy union that continues to support many crucial parts of the internet. Between WordPress, Drupal, and Facebook, people can hardly go a minute on the web without running into PHP.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Recent WordPress vulnerability used to deface 1.5 million pages

    Up to 20 attackers or groups of attackers are defacing WordPress websites that haven't yet applied a recent patch for a critical vulnerability.

    The vulnerability, located in the platform's REST API, allows unauthenticated attackers to modify the content of any post or page within a WordPress site. The flaw was fixed in WordPress 4.7.2, released on Jan. 26, but the WordPress team did not publicly disclose the vulnerability's existence until a week later, to allow enough time for a large number of users to deploy the update.

  • Simple Server Hardening

    These days, it's more important than ever to tighten up the security on your servers, yet if you were to look at several official hardening guides, they read as though they were written for Red Hat from 2005. That's because they were written for Red Hat in 2005 and updated here and there through the years. I came across one of these guides when I was referring to some official hardening benchmarks for a PCI audit and realized if others new to Linux server administration were to run across the same guide, they likely would be overwhelmed with all of the obscure steps. Worse though, they likely would spend hours performing obscure sysctl tweaks and end up with a computer that was no more protected against a modern attack. Instead, they could have spent a few minutes performing a few simple hardening steps and ended up with a more secure computer at the end. So in this article, I describe a few hardening steps that provide the most bang for the buck. These tips should take only a few minutes, yet for that effort, you should get a much more secure system at the end.

  • Sophos: IoT Malware Growing More Sophisticated
  • Linux IoT, Android and MacOS expected in 2017, SophosLabs
  • Hackers using Linux flaws to attack IoT devices
  • Linux Security Fundamentals: Estimating the Cost of a Cyber Attack

NVIDIA 378.13 Linux Driver Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA's Unix driver team is celebrating Valentine's Day by releasing their first stable driver in the 378 driver series for Linux.

Last month brought the NVIDIA 378.09 beta driver with multi-threaded GLSL shader compilation support, new Vulkan extension, Quadro M1000/M2000 support, and other changes while today's 378.13 release buttons up those beta changes.

Read more

Also: NVIDIA Updates Legacy Drivers With X.Org Server 1.19 Support

Qt 5.5.1-2 for Wind River® VxWorks® Real-Time Operating System Released

Filed under
KDE

The Qt 5.5.1-2 release for VxWorks Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) release supports the new VxWorks 7 release SR 0480 (September 2016) on ARM-v7 with updates in the Qt Base, Qt Declarative and Qt Quick Controls modules. For full list of changes, please see the change log.

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Four major advantages to using open source software in the enterprise

Filed under
OSS

With WordPress, Firefox and Linux now the virtual infrastructure for many millions of Internet users globally, and the likes of Apache and database management system MySQL widely embraced by corporations, open source (OS) software has long since passed a tipping-point moment. Yet despite growing familiarity with what OS means -- and usage even by the EU and the US government -- doubts among many businesses about the quality and reliability of OS software persist.

Such concerns tend to cluster around three perceptions. The first is that because many OS products were built by the wider developer community -- projects and foundations without the resources of a software giant with a history of producing proprietary programs -- they cannot then be truly enterprise grade; indeed, they must be of inferior quality and reliability.

That, in turn, feeds a second perception that because an OS product is usually free, or low-cost, to use, then the organization or team behind it will inherently lacks the economic basis to offer the sort of 24/7 "real time" customer support enterprises expect, especially during the implementation process and its aftermath. In particular, they fear that the project or team in question may vanish into the shadows a couple of years down the line, leaving them at the mercy of bugs and hackers.

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Award for Latvian Archives’ use of open source

Filed under
OSS

The Latvian National Archives have won the “Most Open Organisation” award for their extensive use of free and open source software for their online audiovisual archive. The system combines (Red Hat) Linux servers, the Apache web server, and content management system Drupal to offer access to Latvian documentaries, newsreels, cartoons and feature films from 1910 to the present day.

Read more

10 Best Linux Terminals For Ubuntu And Fedora

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

One of the most important applications for Linux users is the terminal emulator. It allows every user to get access to the shell. Bash is the most common shell for Linux and UNIX distributions, it’s powerful and very necessary for newbies and advanced users. So, in this article, you are going to know the great alternatives that you have to use an excellent terminal emulator.

Read<br />
more

13 weird and wonderful niche Linux distros of 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Fed up with the bog-standard Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and so on? Looking for a distro that reflects your individuality? In this roundup we've discovered no less than 13 of the best, oddest and most useful distributions that Linux has to offer.

They include one distro which is the official, sanctioned OS of North Korea, no less, along with a Satanic Edition of Ubuntu (yes, you read that correctly), and also a distro which is so light it will run on a PC from the mid-80s.

Read more

Also: Linux: The best distros for gaming?

[Older] 5 of the most popular Linux gaming distros

FOSS Databases in the News

Filed under
OSS
  • Postmortem of database outage of January 31

    This incident caused the GitLab.com service to be unavailable for many hours. We also lost some production data that we were eventually unable to recover. Specifically, we lost modifications to database data such as projects, comments, user accounts, issues and snippets, that took place between 17:20 and 00:00 UTC on January 31. Our best estimate is that it affected roughly 5,000 projects, 5,000 comments and 700 new user accounts. Code repositories or wikis hosted on GitLab.com were unavailable during the outage, but were not affected by the data loss. GitLab Enterprise customers, GitHost customers, and self-hosted GitLab CE users were not affected by the outage, or the data loss.

  • SQLite Release 3.17.0 On 2017-02-13
  • SQLite 3.17 Released With More Performance Improvements

    SQLite 3.17.0 was released today as the newest version of this widely-used embedded database library.

    With many recent releases we've seen a focus on performance improvements and with SQLite 3.17 it is no different. SQLite 3.17 features approximately 25% better performance when using the R-Tree extension, which was achieved by using more compiler built-ins and other optimizations. SQLite 3.17 also features more general performance improvements and uses around 6.5% less CPU cycles.

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More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

GNU/Linux Desktop

  • Austrian Schools
    Here it is 2017 and Austrian schools are using GNU/Linux and folks are still having problems with That Other OS in schools. I was in a similar situation back in 2000 when I first installed GNU/Linux in my classroom. TOOS didn’t work for me then and it still doesn’t work for schools today. Any time you have a monopolist telling you what you can and can’t do in your classroom, you’re going to have problems, especially if that monopolist isn’t particularly supportive of your objectives. In my case, M$ was celebrating its monopoly and didn’t even care if the software crashed hourly. I later discovered there were all kinds of evil consequences of the EULA from Hell, like limiting the size of networks without a server running their software and fat licensing fees.
  • How to build the fastest Linux PC possible on a budget
    There’s nothing more satisfying than watching a system boot up almost instantaneously when the power switch is hit. Long gone are the days of going to make yourself a brew while those spinning platters buzz and the display kicks into life, lazily dragging you into the GUI you call home. But surely that luxury of speed is reserved for those who are willing to drop £1,000+ on a new system? Fortunately, this is not the case anymore. With advancements in technology over the last six years, and Intel’s aggressive push to keep reinvigorating its chipsets each and every generation, we’re starting to see more and more affordable budget, speed-oriented components finally making it to market. The SSD has succeeded the hard drive with sub 10-second boot times and lightning quick file transfers. However, three years on and we’ve seen both the rise and fall of the SATA III bus. This was a standard that was supposed to last us until 2020, but now lies completely saturated, with only the ever enduring HDD still making good use of the connectivity.
  • How to communicate from a Linux shell: Email, instant messaging
    I get a lot of questions on how to perform various tasks from a Linux shell/terminal. In the interest of making a simple cheat sheet—something I can point people to that will help them get rolling with terminal powers—what follows are my recommendations for how to perform various types of communication from your shell. I’m talking about the normal sort of communication most people perform via a web browser (or a handful of graphical applications) nowadays: Email, instant messaging, that sort of thing. Except, you know, running them entirely in a terminal—which you can run just about anywhere: in an SSH session on a remote server, on a handheld device, or even on your Android phone/tablet.
  • 5 signs that you are a Linux geek
    Linux users are a passionate bunch, and some are downright proud of their of their geekiness. But if you’re not sure about your status, a writer at MakeUseOf has a list of 5 signs that show you are a Linux geek.

Security News

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Kaspersky: No whiff of Linux in our OS because we need new start to secure IoT [Ed: Kaspersky repeats the same anti-Linux rhetoric he used years ago to market itself, anti-Linux Liam Tung recycles]
    Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of Kaspersky Lab, says its new KasperskyOS for securing industrial IoT devices does not contain "even the slightest smell of Linux", differentiating it from many other IoT products that have the open-source OS at the core.
  • Reproducible Builds: week 95 in Stretch cycle
  • EU privacy watchdogs say Windows 10 settings still raise concerns
    European Union data protection watchdogs said on Monday they were still concerned about the privacy settings of Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system despite the U.S. company announcing changes to the installation process. The watchdogs, a group made up of the EU's 28 authorities responsible for enforcing data protection law, wrote to Microsoft last year expressing concerns about the default installation settings of Windows 10 and users' apparent lack of control over the company's processing of their data. The group - referred to as the Article 29 Working Party -asked for more explanation of Microsoft's processing of personal data for various purposes, including advertising.

Android Leftovers