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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story In Search of a Linux iTunes Replacement Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:34pm
Story Servers News Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:33pm
Story PHP, JavaSctipt and More Languages Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:32pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:31pm
Story This New Android Is Like the Swiss Army Knife of Phones Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:29pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:27pm
Story Chrome 52 Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 4:09pm
Story FOSS in Networking Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 3:45pm
Story Graduates: How to Get Your Dream Open Source Job Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 2:53pm
Story GNU/Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 2:02pm

Prometheus unbound: Open source cloud monitoring

Filed under
OSS

Prometheus 1.0 is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation's effort to assemble a product portfolio for a container-based, open source cloud

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A Linux Kernel Wizard’s Adventures in Embedded Hardware

Filed under
Linux

Sometimes the best tutorials come not from experts, but from proficient newcomers who are up to date on the latest entry-level technologies and can remember what it’s like to be a newbie. It also helps if, like Grant Likely, the teacher is a major figure in embedded Linux who understands how hardware is ignited by software.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft blocks Linux installations

    Microsoft has closed a backdoor left open in Windows RT even though the OS is pretty much dead in the water as Vole can’t be bothered with it any more.

    This vulnerability in ARM-powered locked down Windows devices was left by Redmond programmers during the development process. Exploiting this flaw, a hacker could boot operating systems of his/her choice, including Android or GNU/Linux.

  • “Windows 10 Is A Failure” — According To Microsoft’s Own Metric [Ed: in spite of very dirty if not illegal tricks]

    Microsoft has accepted that Windows 10 has failed to perform as expected. The software giant hoped that by mid-2018, Windows 10 will be running on 1 billion devices. Now, this number seems far-fetched due the constantly shrinking PC market and poor performance of Windows 10 Mobile.

  • KDEPIM ready to be more broadly tested

    As was posted a couple of weeks ago, the latest version of KDE has been uploaded to unstable.

    All packages are now uploaded and built and we believe this version is ready to be more broadly tested.

  • Builder Happenings

    Over the last couple of weeks I’ve started implementing Run support for Builder. This is somewhat tricky business since we care about complicated manners. Everything from autotools support to profiler/debugger integration to flatpak and jhbuild runtime support. Each of these complicates and contorts the problem in various directions.

    Discovering the “target binary” in your project via autotools is no easy task. We have a few clever tricks but more are needed. One thing we don’t support yet is discovering bin_SCRIPTS. So launching targets like python or gjs applications is not ready yet. Once we discover .desktop files that should start working. Pretty much any other build system would be easier to implement this.

Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • New guidelines for Fedora Ambassadors and Design

    This week, some Ambassadors, CommOps, and Design Team members collaborated on improving and redefining the guidelines for how to request artwork and other art assets. As the advocates and representatives of Fedora across the globe, the Ambassadors often need many tools and resources for demonstrating Fedora. Examples of this might be fliers, banners, tablecloths, stickers, badges, and more. Until recently, the process for requesting artwork assets was not well-defined and somewhat unclear. This can cause problems when Ambassadors need something designed for an event. Sometimes it can draw out the request or end up in an accident, such as purple DVD media covers!

  • GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Documentation and upgrades

    This week and the last were busy, but I’ve made some more progress towards creating the last, idempotent product for managing WordPress installations in Fedora’s Infrastructure for GSoC 2016. The past two weeks had me mostly working on writing the standard operating procedure / documentation for my final product as well as diving more into handling upgrades with WordPress. My primary playbook for installing WordPress is mostly complete, pending one last annoyance.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS

3 open source data visualization tools for Hadoop

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OSS

Looking for ways to draw meaningful conclusions from big data?

In his lightning talk at Great Wide Open 2016, Rommel Garcia gives us quick takeaways for three open source tools that help Hadoop users do just that:

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KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • About my GSoC project

    My mentor gave me a task (it was one of the first ones) to refactor QMap structure, which was holding archive entries metadata, into an Archive::Entry class, which would use QProperty system. Such refactoring would bring more extensibility and allow to pass and manipulate data in more convenient ways. And of course QProperty is a big step forward for possible future using QtQuick and other nice modern Qt stuff. Today I’m finished with it. That was a huge amount of work in order to complete that task. It was not hard itself, but rather routine, because this structure was used by large part of code. Though after that I faced a tough challenge to fix all the bugs I’ve done with that refactoring. Now I’m happy I can proceed to other important things.

  • Accelerating Vector Tile Creation

    Late summer brings a couple of interesting dates for the Marble community: On the Desktop we’ll release Marble 2.0 and around the same time our Android app Marble Maps will have its first stable release. Later on in September it’s time to celebrate the 10th birthday of the Marble project!

    The common theme to the upcoming release is the introduction of the Vector OSM map: A beautifully styled map based on data from the OpenStreetMap project that spans the entire world from globe to street zoom level. In order to make this possible we’re working very hard behind the scenes to optimize both the tile data and the rendering in Marble to give you a smooth experience.

  • 17th FISL, KDE Brazil and cake!

    In this last week happened in a cold city called Porto Alegre, in Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil, the 17 edition of FISL, the Free Software International Forum.

    Well… KDE has always participated in this forum, and the organization gave to us all day in a room, so the KDE Community could make a lot of talks.

Linux Lite 3.0

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Reviews

Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Linux Lite 3.0 is a lightweight distribution with the Xfce 4.12 desktop. In addition to being lightweight, it is also aimed at providing a familiar user experience for users transitioning from Microsoft Windows. In the wide array of Ubuntu derived distributions, Linux Lite has a lot of competition, so what sets Linux Lite apart from the other options? I downloaded the 955MB 64-bit install media to find out and below I share my experience with this very nice, polished distribution.

Booting and installing the distribution is a very familiar experience for anyone who has used Ubuntu or any distribution based on Ubuntu. The standard Ubiquity installer walks the user through the install experience providing guidance and making the experience pretty straight forward. In this regard, Linux Lite 3.0 is almost identical to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

Because Linux Lite 3.0 is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, it features version 4.4 of the Linux kernel and supports a wide variety of hardware out of the box using open source drivers. If the user needs proprietary drivers, all the drivers that are available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS can be installed. Unfortunately users who need to use the proprietary ATI Catalyst drivers will run into problems because Linux Lite 3.0, just like Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, does not support the Catalyst drivers. One other hardware related issue to note is that the Linux Lite documentation recommends switching the computer's BIOS to Legacy mode instead of using UEFI mode and Secure Boot. The documentation states that "Linux Lite does not support or advocate the use of Secure Boot" and it notes that the distribution can be made to work with UEFI booting, but "The solution requires intermediate knowledge of Linux" and provides a link to a YouTube video which provides instructions.

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Security News

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Security
  • Ubuntu user forums hack leaks millions of user details [Ed: Canonical continued using proprietary software that had already been breached, now gives GNU/Linux a bad name again. Many journalists out there cannot tell the difference between operating system and forums software, never mind proprietary and Free software. How many so-called "technology" journalists still say "commercial" software instead of proprietary software, as if FOSS is non-commercial?]

    Attacker took advantage of unpatched software.

    Canonical, the parent company of popular Linux distribution Ubuntu, has disclosed that its user web forums have suffered a major data breach.

    Over the weekend, Canonical said that it had come across claims that a third party had a copy of the Ubuntu Forums database.

    The company was able to verify that a breach had taken place, with a database containing details of two million Ubuntu Forums users being leaked.

  • As Open Source Code Spreads, So Do Components with Security Flaws[Ef: Catalin Cimpanu's headline would have us believe that proprietary software has no "Security Flaws", only FOSS]

    The company that provides hosting services for the Maven Central Repository says that one in sixteen downloads is for a Java component that contains a known security flaw.

  • OpenSSH has user enumeration bug

    A bug in OpenSSH allows an attacker to check whether user names are valid on a 'net-facing server - because the Blowfish algorithm runs faster than SHA256/SHA512.

    The bug hasn't been fixed yet, but in his post to Full Disclosure, Verint developer Eddie Harari says OpenSSH developer Darren Tucker knows about the issue and is working to address it.

    If you send a user ID to an OpenSSH server with a long (but wrong) password – 10 kilobytes is what Harari mentions in his post – then the server will respond quickly for fake users, but slower for real users.

Intel's SGX tiptoes towards Linux

Filed under
Linux

Intel has fulfilled a promise made in April to open-source a Linux driver for its SGX technology.

SGX – Software Guard Extensions – first landed in 2013, and gives programmers lock up code and data inside containers enforced by the CPU. The idea is to create an environment to assure people clouding their enterprise systems that not even admins in the data centre can spy on what's going on.

Back in April, Chipzilla promised an SGX SDK for Linux, and a few weeks ago – with so little fuss we overlooked it – it made good over at GitHub.

The current implementation is very Alpha-looking, with just one distribution anointed to run SGX – Ubuntu 14.04-LTS 64bits. The hardware requirement is a Skylake system configured with SGX enabled.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Wayland's Weston Now Working On Libweston-Desktop

    Wayland developers continue working on Libweston, which is aiming to make more of the Weston reference compositor reusable by other Wayland compositors. This library offers much of the boilerplate code around the Wayland protocols to allow more sharing by compositors and making it more straight-forward to get things up and running. The latest component is Libweston-desktop.

  • 6 Excellent Open Source Google Drive Clients

    Google Drive, formerly Google Docs, is a file storage and synchronization service created by Google. They are a multinational technology company specializing in Internet-related services and products that include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software.

    Google Drive allows users to store files in the cloud, share files, and edit documents, spreadsheets, and presentations with collaborators. Google Drive includes Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides, an office suite that permits collaborative editing of documents, spreadsheets, presentations, drawings, forms, and more. Google Drive lets you open and edit files from any device. Users get 15GB of free storage. This includes Google Drive, Google Photos, and Gmail. More storage can be purchased. Drive uses Google’s highly-secure, custom-built data centers.

  • FreeType 2.7 Bringing DirectWrite/ClearType-Like Rendering -- Much Better Looking Fonts On Linux

    FreeType 2.7.0 will be shipping with the v40 TrueType instructions interpreter enabled by default. This interpreter is going to "finally brings DirectWrite/ClearType-like rendering to the screen, or 'subpixel hinting' as some FreeType code calls it."

  • Solus 1.2.1 Releases Tomorrow

    We’re really excited to be releasing our last “traditional” release, Solus 1.2.1, tomorrow. We opted to delay by a day just to ensure we don’t push ourselves too hard after the recent Hackfest, as well as being able to take the time to do additional QA.

  • GIMP and LibreOffice on Ubuntu Phone

    GIMP and LibreOffice on Ubuntu Phone - meizu MX4 ubuntu edition

  • Facebook Announces Open-Source Swift SDK Beta for iOS [Ed: Proprietary software company helps another proprietary software company with openwashing]

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Microsoft’s Windows RT security patch also stops you from loading Linux

    It was big news when Microsoft announced it was working on a version of Windows that would run on tablets with ARM-based processors… but by the time Windows RT actually launched it was a lot less exciting. Devices like the Microsoft Surface and Surface 2 couldn’t run desktop Windows apps and weren’t significantly cheaper than Intel Atom-powered tablets running the full version of Windows, and they didn’t even get better battery life.

  • The sad state of Linux download security

    Installation images for many of the most popular Linux distributions are difficult or impossible to obtain securely via download.

  • Why we use the Linux kernel's TCP stack

    Let's start with a broader question - what is the point of running an operating system at all? If you planned on running a single application, having to use a kernel consisting of multiple million lines of code may sound like a burden.

    But in fact most of us decide to run some kind of OS and we do that for two reasons. Firstly, the OS layer adds hardware independence and easy to use APIs. With these we can focus on writing the code for any machine - not only the specialized hardware we have at the moment. Secondly, the OS adds a time sharing layer. This allows us to run more than one application at a time. Whether it's a second HTTP server or just a bash session, this ability to share resources between multiple processes is critical. All of the resources exposed by the kernel can be shared between multiple processes!

    [...]

    Having said that, at CloudFlare we do use kernel bypass. We are in the second group - we care about performance. More specifically we suffer from IRQ storms. The Linux networking stack has a limit on how many packets per second it can handle. When the limit is reached all CPUs become busy just receiving packets. In that case either the packets are dropped or the applications are starved of CPU. While we don't have to deal with IRQ storms during our normal operation, this does happen when we are the target of an L3 (layer 3 OSI) DDoS attack. This is a type of attack where the target is flooded with arbitrary packets not belonging to valid connections - typically spoofed packets.

Debian News

Filed under
Debian

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Nautilus Development

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • GSoC 2016: The adventure begins

    Hello! I am Razvan, a technology & open-source enthusiast and I am working on what is probably the most interesting project for me so far, Nautilus. So far, this has been the highlight of my experience – lots of interesting things learned while coding and a great interaction with the community. This is mainly thanks to Carlos, captain of Nautilus, who always finds the time to help me and other contributors whenever we get stuck. On top of this, the funny chats with him and people from the GNOME community make contributing so much more enjoyable! Up until now I’ve been titled King of the Trash™, I’ve learned about some file system magic from Christian Hergert, and I’ve also been threatened by a katana-wielding GNOME samurai. Awesome, right?

  • Extraction support in Nautilus

    As a result, the output will always have the name of the source archive, making it easy to find after an extraction. Also, the maximum number of conflicts an extraction can have is just one, the output itself. Hurray, no more need to go through a thousand dialogs!

  • Improved File Extraction Coming To GNOME's Nautilus

    As part of Google Summer of Code, improved extraction support for compressed files is being worked on for the Nautilus file manager.

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