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LoRa access point offers Yocto or Node-RED Linux development options

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Linux

MultiTech has launched a rugged, Linux-driven “MultiConnect Conduit AP” LoRa access point with 8x LoRa uplinks, LTE, and optional mDot and xDot end points.

MultiTech’s MultiConnect Conduit AP supports the increasingly popular, long distance, low-power LoRA RF technology and LoRaWAN Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN) specification. The Linux-powered Conduit AP is designed to be mounted on walls or ceilings to extend LoRaWAN connectivity in IoT networks within “commercial buildings like hotels, convention centers, offices and retail facilities,” says MultiTech.

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Software: Atom-IDE, MPV 0.27, and Sublime Text 3

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Software
  • Introducing Atom-IDE

    GitHub, in collaboration with Facebook, are pleased to announce the launch of Atom-IDE - a set of optional packages to bring IDE-like functionality to Atom.

    The start of this journey includes smarter context-aware auto-completion as well as a host of code navigation features such as an outline view, go to definition, find all references as well as other useful functions such as hover-to-reveal information, errors and warnings (diagnostics) and document formatting.

    Our initial release includes packages for TypeScript, Flow, JavaScript, Java, C# and PHP that utilize the power of language servers to provide deep syntactical analysis of your code and projects. The language server protocol is being adopted by a number of organizations including Microsoft, Eclipse, Sourcegraph, Palantir, Red Hat, Facebook and now GitHub too!

  • Github Announce Atom IDE

    Github has announced Atom IDE, an add-on that transforms the Atom text editor into a full IDE using language servers to provide syntactical analysis of code.

  • MPV 0.27 Released with Minor Fixes, New OpenGL Options

    An updated version of MPV, the popular open-source media player, is available to download.

  • Sublime Text 3 Officially Released, Here’s How To Install It

    Sublime Text 3 has been officially released! I know; it feels like you’ve been using the beta builds for what feels like an eternity — but, at long last, a new stable release of the text editor is now available to download.

Uber, Lyft, and CNCF

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GNU
Linux
OSS
  • Uber and Lyft Bring Open-Source Cloud Projects to CNCF

    In the market for ride sharing services, Uber and Lyft are fierce competitors, the world of open-source however is another story. At the Open Source Summit here on Sept. 13, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced that it had accepted two new projects, Envoy from Lyft and Jaeger from Uber.

  • ​Lyft and Uber travel the same open-source road

    Coke and Pepsi, Gimbels and Macy's, Apple and Microsoft -- these were all great business rivals. Today, we have Lyft and Uber fighting tooth and nail over the new ride-sharing market. While they may be bitter rivals on the highways, the pair can agree on one thing: Open source is the best way to develop software.

    At The Linux Foundation's Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, both companies appeared -- but not at the same time -- to announce they were launching two new cloud-native, open-source software projects with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

  • Ride-hailing firms Lyft and Uber open-source microservices technology

    Ride-hailing companies Lyft Inc. and Uber Technologies Inc. are embracing the open-source software movement.

    The two megastartups have both donated technologies developed in-house to the Cloud Native Computing Federation, which is best known for hosting the Kubernetes container orchestrator project.

Ed Warnicke's Talk About Networking and DevOps

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Server
  • Open-source tech unites networking and DevOps

    In the tech world, innovation and new systems are great, but nothing moves unless the network can handle it. This truth makes networking very important for businesses, because a company can only be as agile as its network. Part of that agility comes from making the network easy to use. Open-source tech is coming to the rescue.

    “The truth is, there’s a lot of work that goes into making the network invisible and ubiquitous for people,” said Ed Warnicke (pictured), distinguished consulting engineer at Cisco Systems Inc. “In particular, one of the challenges that we see arising as the world moves more cloud native, as the microservices get smaller, as the … the shift happens toward serverless, as Kubernetes [container orchestration management] is coming on with containers is that the network is really becoming the runtime, and that runtime has the need to scale and perform like it never has before.”

  • Open Source Summit: It's Time for DevOps and Networking to Talk

    Warnicke delivered a lighting keynote talk titled, Bridging the Divide: Brining Network and DevOps People Together to Build a Unified Cloud Native Future. Warnicke started off his talk by outlining the shift in networking over the last decade from bare metal server needs to virtual machines.

    With Virtual Machines, networking vendors built overlay network topologies and approaches that have enabled virtual networking

Games: HIVE: Altenum Wars, Civilization VI, Banished, Rocket League, Astral Traveler, Hot Lava

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Gaming

Oracle: Liberating Java EE and Joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

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Development
Server
  • Red Hat Gives Thumbs Up to Java EE's Move to Eclipse

    So Java Enterprise Edition has a new home.

    Yesterday Oracle announced it's turning control of the platform over to the nonprofit Eclipse Foundation. On the surface, this makes a lot of sense, as the foundation's namesake project is the most widely used Java IDE. The announcement came just a month after Oracle said it was considering moving control of the platform to an open source foundation.

    All of the details have yet to be ironed-out, but in a blog Oracle's David Delabassee said that Oracle-led Java EE and related GlassFish technologies, including RIs, TCKs, and associated project documentation, will be re-licensed to the foundation, presumably under the Eclipse Public License. In addition, the project will be rebranded with a not yet determined new name.

  • Java EE to Eclipse: A Welcome Move

    In a blog post on the venerable Aquarium blog (started by the Glassfish team at Sun a decade or so ago) Oracle has announced that it has selected the Eclipse Foundation as the new home for Java EE. They will relicense and rename it and invent a new standards process. It looks like the MicroProfile rebellion was successful as this has all been negotiated with Red Hat and IBM as well.

    I don’t see this move as “dumping” Java EE. Moving a project to an open source Foundation is complex and expensive and Oracle should be congratulated on finally committing to this move. Java EE has already been uploaded to GitHub, but that’s not sufficient as the default Github Governance is isolation mediated via pull requests.

    Eclipse is an extremely good choice of host. It has evolved excellent governance that recognises both the primacy of technical contribution and the inevitability of corporate politics and keeps both in balance. It’s ideally suited to the complexities and politics of Java EE, having hosted multiple large projects and survived de-investment by its founder IBM. Under the smart and firm leadership of Mike Milinkovich, Eclipse is the perfect home for Java EE (or whatever Oracle will want us to call it).

  • Oracle opens up enterprise Java and moves it to the Eclipse Foundation
  • Java EE Is Moving to the Eclipse Foundation
  • Tech’s old guard continues to embrace Kubernetes, as Oracle joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Oracle has always been a little more pragmatic about the role of open-source software in the tech industry than a company like Microsoft, which fought the very concept tooth and nail for years. Still, now that both companies have joined the foundation at the heart of one of the most important open-source projects in enterprise tech at the moment, it’s another sign the center of gravity has shifted.

  • ​Oracle joins the Kubernetes movement

    Oracle joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and released Kubernetes on Oracle Linux and its own Kubernetes cloud installer.

NEC Display Solutions Partners with Canonical and Screenly on Ubuntu Core-Based Digital Signage Platform

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Ubuntu

NEC Display Solutions Europe on Sept. 13, announced a collaboration with Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Core and Screenly, the leading digital signage software solution for Raspberry Pi. This is one of several partnerships NEC has made with digital signage software companies leveraging Raspberry Pi as part of their digital signage solution. The joint collaboration facilitates an innovative digital signage solution which uses NEC’s P and V Series 40–55 inch large format displays and modular Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) to deliver high impact visual content in an integrated package for professional AV applications.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software and howtos: QOwnNotes, MPV Player 0.27, Qt 5.10 Alpha and More

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Software
HowTos

New in Linux, Linux Foundation Invites Linux Foes to Give Keynotes

Filed under
Linux
  • BFQ Gets Another Notable Responsiveness Fix

    In addition to the BFQ improvements already staged for Linux 4.14, it looks like another fix will be on the way.

  • F2FS In Linux 4.14 Gets Better Tuning For Android

    Jaegeuk Kim has submitted the F2FS Flash-Friendly File-System updates for the Linux 4.14 kernel merge window.

    For this cycle, F2FS developers have been working on providing a better user experience for F2FS when running on Android devices. One of the notable focuses has been working on the atomic write feature of F2FS and has been testing/developing it in conjunction with the SQLite folks. As part of the F2FS developer work has also been new/improved features for analyzing I/O behavior with this flash-focused file-system.

  • Author Dan Lyons on Tech Startups and the Trouble with the New Economy [Ed: Shame on the Linux Foundation for giving a platform for a SCO attack dog who endlessly attacked GNU/Linux. Makes me wonder if the Linux Foundation will invite the Enderle Group (a one-man 'business' connected to Microsoft) to give a keynote...]

OSS: New FSFE Campaign, Fuchsia OS Magenta Becomes Zircon, Data Science, Mozilla, Oracle, and VCV

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OSS
  • Public Money? Public Code! - Join the FSFE Campaign

    Public institutions spend millions of Euros every year for the development of new software that is specifically tailored to their needs.

    Unfortunately, most of this software is closed source.

    This means that your tax money is being used to pay for software that cannot be modified or even studied. Most public institutions pay to develop programs that they do not or cannot release to the public. When other institutions need to solve similar problems, they have to develop the same software again. And each time the public - including you - has to foot the bill.

  • Google's Fuchsia OS Magenta Becomes Zircon

    For those looking to follow the development of Google's Fuchsia operating system that is written from scratch, it's low-level Magenta core has been renamed to Zircon.

    As a reminder, Fuchsia is a (non-Linux) real-time operating system developed by Google that has been under much public speculation since its code began appearing last year. Fuchsia uses a micro-kernel design with it being called Magenta.

  • How to become a data scientist

    Once upon a time, I wanted to be an evolutionary biologist. To make a long story short, I had a change of heart and dropped out of my PhD program to pursue a career in computer science. I'm now a senior software engineer at Red Hat, where I work on a variety of machine learning and data science projects (you can read more about my journey on my blog). Not long after joining Red Hat, many people—including three different University of Chicago grad students—asked me about transitioning to a career in data science, so I started looking into it.

  • Mozilla Announces 15 New Fellows for Science, Advocacy, and Media

    Today, Mozilla is announcing 15 new Fellows in the realms of science, advocacy, and media.

    Fellows hail from Mexico, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Uganda, the United States, and beyond. They are multimedia artists and policy analysts, security researchers and ethical hackers.

    Over the next several months, Fellows will put their diverse abilities to work making the Internet a healthier place. Among their many projects are initiatives to make biomedical research more open; uncover technical solutions to online harassment; teach privacy and security fundamentals to patrons at public libraries; and curtail mass surveillance within Latin American countries.

  • Oracle prepares to spin off Java EE to Eclipse Foundation

    Oracle is continuing to free up Java Enterprise Edition (EE), Java's enterprise middleware platform, from its once iron-grip. In a blog post, Oracle Software Evangelist David Delabassee said, "After careful review, we have selected the Eclipse Foundation."

    Oracle has recently admitted that "although Java EE is developed in open source with the participation of the Java EE community, often the process is not seen as being agile, flexible, or open enough, particularly when compared to other open-source communities. We'd like to do better."

  • VCV Rack is an open-source virtual modular synth you can download for free
  • VMware Charges Into OpenStack VIM Market
  • Seeking investment, Alaska goes open source with oil & gas data

    Under this program, the state released its first two data sets in 2016.  One set included a 3-D seismic survey from the North Slope that covered a huge chunk of ground near Prudhoe Bay. And the state saw a burst of activity, requests from university researchers, companies, and contractors.

    And even getting the data that is open to the public is still vaguely super-spy-ish. Acting Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources Steve Masterman says they ask people to provide a brand new hard drive, still in the wrapper.

Games: Eat or be eaten in Tooth and Tail, JYDGE, Knightfall, Duck Game, Infectious Madness of Doctor Dekker

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Gaming

GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" is Out

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" Desktop Environment Debuts Officially, Here's What's New

    After six months of hard work, the GNOME Project's development team was proud to announce today, September 13, 2017, the immediate release and general availability of the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

    Dubbed "Manchester," after the city where the annual GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) developer conference took place this year, the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment packs many enhancements for the apps and core components included in the GNOME Stack, along with new features.

    This year, on August 15, the GNOME Project celebrated its 20th anniversary, and we couldn't be happier to be using GNOME as our main desktop environment. The biggest new features of the GNOME 3.26 release are support for emoji, Flatpak improvements, as well as a brand-new Control Center that's now called simply "Settings."

  • GNOME 3.26 Released

    The GNOME Project is excited to announce the release of version 3.26, the latest version of GNOME 3. The new version is the result of six months’ hard work by the GNOME community, and comes packed with improvements and new features. Announcing the release, Matthias Clasen of the GNOME Release Team, said “We are happy and proud to announce GNOME 3.26, the latest major release of GNOME, “Manchester”, just a few weeks after we celebrated the 20th birthday of GNOME at GUADEC. As always, the GNOME community did a great job in delivering exciting features, completing translations, and refining the user experience. Thanks!”

  • GNOME 3.26 Released

    GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" has been officially released.

    Matthias Clasen announced a few minutes ago on the mailing list, "This release brings refinements to the system search, animations for maximizing and unmaximizing windows and support for color Emoji. Improvements to core GNOME applications include a redesigned Settings application, a new display settings panel, Firefox sync in the Web browser, and many more."

  • Introducing GNOME 3.26: “Manchester”

    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3, and is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. In total, the release incorporates 24105 changes, made by approximately 778 contributors.

    3.26 has been named “Manchester” in recognition of this year’s GUADEC organizing team. GUADEC is GNOME’s primary annual conference and is only possible due to the amazing work of local volunteers. This year’s event was held in Manchester, UK, and was a big success. Thank you Team Manchester!

Blender 2.79 Released

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Software
  • Blender 2.79 Released

    These are the release notes for Blender 2.79, released September 12th, 2017.

  • Blender 2.79 Now Available With Much Faster Radeon OpenCL

    Today marks the long-awaited debut of the Blender 2.79 3D modeling software release. Especially for those using OpenCL acceleration, Blender 2.79 is quite an exciting update.

    Exciting us the most about Blender 2.79 is better OpenCL support and much greater performance. The performance improvements in Blender 2.79 aren't limited to OpenCL (or CUDA) but include greater performance on the CPU too thanks to continued AVX optimizations as well as continued multi-threading work. On the CPU side there can be 10~20% speed-ups while for some situations on OpenCL are now as much as 50% faster.

Security: Dlink, Equifax, Bluetooth

Filed under
Security
  • Pwning the Dlink 850L routers and abusing the MyDlink Cloud protocol

    The Dlink 850L is a router overall badly designed with a lot of vulnerabilities.

    Basically, everything was pwned, from the LAN to the WAN. Even the custom MyDlink cloud protocol was abused.

  • House Dems demand answers from Equifax CEO

    All 24 minority members of the committee signed a letter to the Equifax executive, Richard Smith, calling on him to come forward with more information about his handling of the crisis.

  • Chatbot lets you sue Equifax for up to $25,000 without a lawyer

    Even if you want to be part of the class action lawsuit against Equifax, you can still sue Equifax for negligence in small claims court using the DoNotPay bot and demand maximum damages. Maximum damages range between $2,500 in states like Rhode Island and Kentucky to $25,000 in Tennessee.

  • Bluetooth flaws leave billions of devices open to attacks

    Researchers at IoT security firm Armis say they have found eight flaws in the Bluetooth protocol that can be used to attack devices running Android, iOS, Linux and Windows.

  • Bluetooth Vulnerability BlueBorne Impacts Android, iOS, Windows, and Linux Devices

    The BlueBorne attack doesn’t even require the victim to tap or click on any malicious links. If your device has Bluetooth and is on then it is possible for an attacker to take complete control of it from 32 feet away. This even works without the attacker pairing anything to the victim’s device and the target device doesn’t need to be set to discoverable mode either. The team at Armis Labs have identified eight zero-day vulnerabilities so far and believes many more are waiting to be discovered.

Linus Torvalds Lifestyle and Preview of Linux 4.15 Kernel With 'Open' Hardware Support

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Linux
  • ​Linus Torvalds on Linux, life, and bathrobes

    Steve Jobs was never seen without his trademark black mock turtleneck, blue jeans, and New Balance sneakers. It's been said Bill Gates, the world's richest man, dresses like your high-school math teacher. But Linus Torvalds, creator of Linux, likes to be comfortable in his home office, so he spends his workdays in his bathrobe. Life is good when you're the world's most influential developer.

    At The Linux Foundation's Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Foundation, interviewed Torvalds in front of a packed audience. Zemlin asked how Torvalds felt about his fame. Torvalds replied he doesn't really think about it, but "I'm happy I did something meaningful. Everyone wants to do something that matters."

  • RISC-V Eyeing Mainline In Time For The Linux 4.15 Kernel

    RISC-V developers have been preparing their kernel port for the mainline Linux tree while it's looking like for Linux 4.15 that goal may finally be realized.

    RISC-V developers have spent months getting their code into shape so it could be accepted to the mainline Linux kernel for this open-source, royalty-free CPU instruction set architecture. They have missed out on past merge windows, realize it's too late now for Linux 4.14, and are focusing on being ready come Linux 4.15.

Essential open source software for running your small business

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OSS

The easiest way to keep track of your expenses and income is to use GnuCash. It's an accounting package that has a number of useful features for small businesses. There's even an Android app so you can work with your books on the go.

If you don't mind getting your hands dirty at the command line, you'll want to give Ledger a look. Ledger is a double-entry accounting app that also has several graphical frontends.

I can't think of any small business owner who doesn't want to get paid by customers and clients. To do that, you need to send invoices. Sure, you can create invoices in a word processor and print them off or email them as PDFs, but that makes the invoices hard to track. Instead, turn to a dedicated invoicing application.

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IBM’s 'New Gen' LinuxONE

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GNU
Linux
Server
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More in Tux Machines

Firefly COM dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. Read more

Games: Morphite, Mooseman, Arma, and PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller

  • Stylish FPS 'Morphite' released without Linux support, but it's coming
    Sadly, Morphite [Steam] has seen a delay with the Linux version. Thankfully, the developer was quick to respond and it's still coming.
  • The Mooseman, a short side-scrolling adventure just released for Linux
    In the mood for something a little out there? Well, The Mooseman [Steam] a short side-scroller might just hit the spot.
  • Arma 3 1.76 for Linux is planned, work on it to start "soon"
    Bohemia Interactive have announced in their latest "SITREP" that the Linux version of Arma 3 will be updated to the latest version of 1.76, work is set to start on it "soon".
  • Sony's PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller Now Supported in Fedora Linux, GNOME
    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. The patches submitted by the developer to the Bluetooth packages in the latest Fedora Linux release promise to bring improvements to the way PlayStation 3 DualShock controllers are set up in the environment if you're using the GNOME desktop environment. Until now, to set up a DualShock 3 controller, users had to plug it in via USB, then disconnect it, and then press the "P" button on the joypad, which would have popped-up a dialog to confirm the Bluetooth connection. But this method had some quirks though.

Debian Development Reports

  • Free software log (July and August 2017)
    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years. After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125
    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

The GNOME Foundation Backs Librem 5

  • GNOME Foundation partners with Purism to support its efforts to build the Librem 5 smartphone
    The GNOME Foundation has provided their endorsement and support of Purism’s efforts to build the Librem 5, which if successful will be the world’s first free and open smartphone with end-to-end encryption and enhanced user protections. The Librem 5 is a hardware platform the Foundation is interested in advancing as a GNOME/GTK phone device. The GNOME Foundation is committed to partnering with Purism to create hackfests, tools, emulators, and build awareness that surround moving GNOME/GTK onto the Librem 5 phone. As part of the collaboration, if the campaign is successful the GNOME Foundation plans to enhance GNOME shell and general performance of the system with Purism to enable features on the Librem 5.
  • Now GNOME Foundation Wants to Support Purism's Privacy-Focused Linux Smartphone
    GNOME Foundation, the non-profit organization behind the popular GNOME desktop environment designed for Linux-based operating systems, announced on Wednesday that they plan on supporting Purism's Librem 5 smartphone. The announcement comes only a week after KDE unveiled their plans to work with Purism on an implementation of their Plasma Mobile interface into the security- and privacy-focused Librem 5 Linux smartphone, and now GNOME is interested in advancing the Librem 5 hardware platform as a GNOME/GTK+ phone device. "Having a Free/Libre and Open Source software stack on a mobile device is a dream-come-true for so many people, and Purism has the proven team to make this happen. We are very pleased to see Purism and the Librem 5 hardware be built to support GNOME," said Neil McGovern, Executive Director, GNOME Foundation.
  • GNOME Joins The Librem 5 Party, Still Needs To Raise One Million More Dollars
    One week after announcing KDE cooperation on the proposed Librem 5 smartphone with plans to get Plasma Mobile on the device if successful, the GNOME Foundation has sent out their official endorsement of Purism's smartphone dream. Purism had been planning to use GNOME from the start for their GNU/Linux-powered privacy-minded smartphone while as of today they have the official backing of the GNOME Foundation.