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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME 3.22 "Karlsruhe" Desktop Environment Gets Its First Public Beta Release Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:53pm
Story Open Source Software for Business: 12 Leading Apps Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:51pm
Story Wine 1.8.4 Released Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:49pm
Story Gentoo Linux live DVD "Choice Edition" Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:42pm
Story Latest Slackware Version Doesn't Cut Newbies any Slack Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:41pm
Story MariaDB Under Fire for Proprietary Curve Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:32pm
Story Linux at 25 Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:28pm
Story GitLab Features Expansion Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:15pm
Story Ministry of ICT and NITA Uganda Urge on Adoption of Open Source Software Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 10:12pm
Story Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Now in Feature Freeze, First Beta to Land August 25 Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2016 - 9:41pm

Desktop News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • The aristocratic desktop (part 1)

    Still, there was some issues. And I discovered that some very basic concepts are harder to understand than I thought. Double-click, a window, a folder, the desktop, the taskbar, the trayicon. I also discovered that some users were using a computer for ten years without even understanding the minimize function for a window ! The only way to switch between a web page and a word processor was to close one and then opening the other. It was seen as normal !

  • Windows 10 needs proper privacy portal, says EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has called on Microsoft to offer a “single unified screen” on which Windows 10 users can control how Windows 10 deals with their personal information and monitors their use of the OS.

    The organisation has listed the long list of nasty nagware tactics Microsoft used to get people running Windows 10, labelling some “questionable tactics to cause users to download a piece of software that many didn’t want.”

    It's not keen on the nagware bundled alongside patches, suggesting that tactic reduced trust in patches and therefore potentially exposed users who don't act promptly when important fixes arrive.

    It also rails against the telemetry Windows 10 collects and is especially harsh on Microsoft's insistence that if business users send it less data, Windows Update will be less effective and PCs will be less secure.

    The Foundation says “this is a false choice that is entirely of Microsoft’s own creation.”

    “There’s no good reason why the types of data Microsoft collects at each telemetry level couldn’t be adjusted so that even at the lowest level of telemetry collection, users could still benefit from Windows Update and secure their machines from vulnerabilities, without having to send back things like app usage data or unique Ids like an IMEI number.”

  • Microsoft wants to pay you to use its Windows 10 browser Edge [Ed: CNET's editor in chief called it "Bribery" last time Microsoft did such things. How to starve a lesser wealthy competitor, drive it out of the market...]

    Microsoft has a new browser. It launched with Windows 10 and it’s called Edge. The company says it’s faster, more battery efficient and all-round better than Chrome or Firefox. You can even draw on websites with a stylus. Trouble is, not very many people are using it. So now Microsoft’s trying to bribe you to switch.

    The newly rebranded Microsoft Rewards – formerly Bing Rewards, which paid people for using Bing as their search engine (another product Microsoft says is better than a Google product but that very few people actually use) – will now pay you for using Edge, shopping at the Microsoft store, or using Bing.

    Users of Edge who sign up to Microsoft Rewards, which is currently US-only, are then awarded points simply for using the browser. Microsoft actively monitors whether you’re using Edge for up to 30 hours a month. It tracks mouse movements and other signs that you’re not trying to game the system, and you must also have Bing set as your default search engine.

“Teensy” Arduino clone grows, with more I/O, USB, and faster CPU

Filed under
Hardware

PJRC is Kickstartering two new models of its “Teensy” Arduino compatible, featuring a faster 180MHz Cortex-M4, more memory, more pins, and a second USB.

In the world of Arduino compatibles, you can choose from bare-bones clones or value-added innovators that develop new software as well as hardware, and occasionally risk some compatibility in order to advance the capabilities of the entire Arduino platform. In the latter category is Teensy, a DIY breadboard-oriented Arduino project from Portland, Oregon based PJRC, led by Teensy inventor Paul Stoffregen, known for its superior USB-based keyboard/mouse, LED array, and audio support. The eight-year old company has now upgraded the Teensy board with a much faster MCU, more RAM and flash, many more I/O pins, and additional USB and CAN ports, making it one of the fastest Arduino clones around.

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Arch Linux Take Your Linux Knowledge To Next Level [Review]

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This review will be a bit unconventional, probably because Arch Linux itself is a bit unconventional. Rather than having continued, numbered releases like most distros, Arch Linux follows the rolling-release model, meaning that you install Arch once and it updates forever (or at least, until you break something). There is no “Arch Linux 16.04 LTS”, there is simply Arch Linux. The philosophy of Arch, known as The Arch Way, focuses on simplicity and user centrality, rather than user friendliness.

Read<br />
more

kdenlive 16.08.0 released

Filed under
KDE

Kdenlive 16.08.0 marks a milestone in the project’s history bringing it a step closer to becoming a full-fledged professional tool. The highlights of this release are:

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Beyond Linux: 7 Open-Source Projects the Linux Foundation Is Leading

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Linux Foundation got its start in 2007 as a home for the development of Linux and its creator Linus Torvalds. In the last decade, the mission of the foundation has expanded beyond the confines of the Linux kernel. Although the Linux kernel still remains central, the foundation's model of enabling open, collaborative software development has proven valuable to multiple groups. That's where the Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects effort comes in, enabling groups of developers to bring software projects under the Linux Foundation umbrella. By being part of the foundation, software projects benefit from its infrastructure and expertise at helping to shepherd and grow open-source software development efforts in a vendor-neutral approach. A 2014 slideshow on eWEEK looked at 10 projects beyond Linux that the foundation now manages. So far in 2016, the Linux Foundation has announced at least seven new efforts that are now collaborative projects. eWEEK takes a look at some of the efforts the foundation is leading beyond just Linux.

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New BlackArch Linux ISO Lands with Over 1,500 Penetration Testing, Hacking Tools

Filed under
Linux

The skilful team of developers and security professional behind the BlackArch Linux operating system have announced today, August 19, 2016, the general availability of a new ISO image.

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Linux Foundation Conquers the World, or at Least Becomes Quite Influential in SDN & NFV

Filed under
Linux

Open source projects are new to networking, but they’ve been cropping up all over the place in the last couple of years. And many of them are gravitating toward the Linux Foundation.

Some of them were originally independent groups. The Open Network Operating System (ONOS) for example, was founded by On.lab. But in October, it became part of the Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation was already hosting the OpenDaylight Project, which some considered a rival to ONOS. But the two groups seem to be happily coexisting under the same host.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Wine 1.9.17 Improves Joystick Support, Gun Metal and Multiple DirectX9 Games

Filed under
Software

Today, August 19, 2016, the Wine development team announced the release of Wine 1.9.17, a new milestone towards the next major stable branch of the open-source software that lets Linux users run Windows apps and games, Wine 2.0.

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Also: Wine 1.9.17 Released, Direct3D CSMT & D3D11 Still Lacking

Open source uproar as MariaDB goes commercial

Filed under
OSS

MariaDB Corp. has announced that release 2.0 of its MaxScale database proxy software is henceforth no longer open source. The organization has made it source-available under a proprietary license that promises each release will eventually become open source once it's out of date.

MaxScale is at the pinnacle of MariaDB Corp.'s monetization strategy -- it's the key to deploying MariaDB databases at scale. The thinking seems to be that making it mandatory to pay for a license will extract top dollar from deep-pocketed corporations that might otherwise try to use it free of charge. This seems odd for a company built on MariaDB, which was originally created to liberate MySQL from the clutches of Oracle.

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2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Ahmed Alkabary: A Recent Graduate and Aspiring SysAdmin

Filed under
Interviews

For me, I don’t just appreciate the Linux operating system but I also feel like it has become my life. Whenever I’m on a Linux based computer I feel like I’m at home. You can say it is a passion that has taken many years of cultivating to become integrated in my life the way it is today.

In 2011 I was eager to purchase a brand new computer, but to my dismay the shop had only one computer that met my requirements. Although unbeknownst to me the computer had a specific operating system that I was unfamiliar with. The operating system was pre-installed with Linux, specifically openSuse. I was so hesitant to purchase the computer but proceeded anyway. I hoped to change the operating system once I got home, but I was unsure of what came over me to keep Linux. But to this day I feel I have yet to make a decision that would have a greater impact on my life then the day I decided to keep Linux.

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Alfonso Savio: How Do You Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat

Alfonso Savio is a man of many talents. Alfonso works for the National Cancer Institute of Naples and started using Linux in 2004 with Fedora Core 3. He’s a systems integrator, systems and network administrator, project and database manager, and software developer. However, his official title is ICT Manager of the Clinical Trials Unit.

Alfonso’s team analyzes data from clinical trials to advance scientific research in the fight against cancer. The team comprises physicians and data managers. He is the sole person in his department using Linux for his primary desktop. Hence, he’s an open source trailblazer.

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Benchmarks: 2 BSDs vs. 7 Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

The operating systems tested for this comparison included CentOS Linux 7, Clear Linux 9710, DragonFlyBSD 4.6.0, Fedora 24, FreeBSD 11.0-Beta 4, Manjaro 16.06.1, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, and a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 16.10. For those wondering about OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, I'll have tests of that Clang-compiled distribution later in the week. This BSD/Linux OS comparison grew out of curiosity sake when first seeking to test how well DragonFlyBSD 4.6 and FreeBSD 11 are performing.

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More Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Windows 10's upgrade model temporarily wipes $1.6B from Microsoft's books

    the distribution and maintenance of Windows 10 put a $1.6 billion temporary dent in its revenue, the company said Thursday.

    In a filing covering the March quarter, Microsoft pointed to the revenue deferral of Windows 10 -- a relatively new way of accounting for the Redmond, Wash. company -- as a reason for the 6% year-over-year decline in revenue.

    "Revenue decreased $1.2 billion or 6%, primarily due to the impact of a net revenue deferral related to Windows 10 of $1.6 billion and an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately $838 million or 4%," Microsoft's 10-Q filing with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) stated.

    The $1.6 billion in Windows 10 revenue during the March quarter didn't actually vanish: It was instead deferred and will hit the bottom line over the next two to four years.

  • Netrunner Desktop version becomes Maui 1

    Maui will continue as the full desktop version of the previously Kubuntu based Netrunner line:

    What basically equals Netrunner+1 is simply released under the new name “Maui 1″.

    Being based on KDE neon, Maui also marks the transition to an LTS base, where some parts are receiving regular updates during its lifecycle (so called “partially rolling”).

  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST development sprint 23

    As you may know, it’s possible to install (open)SUSE in an automatic, even completely unattended, basis using AutoYaST. AutoYaST can be configured to display custom configuration dialogs to the user and wait for the reply a certain amount of time before automatically selecting the default options. Until now, the only way for the user to stop that countdown was to start editing some of the fields in the dialog.

    We got a bug report because that functionality was not working exactly as expected in some cases so, in addition to fixing the problem, we decided to revamp the user interface a little bit to improve usability. Now there are more user interactions that are taken into account to stop the counter, specially we added a new “stop” button displaying the remaining seconds. You can see an example of the result below.

  • Fedora 25 Alpha status is NO-GO
  • FOSS wave: Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

    Furthering the efforts of some work around building a strong, tight-knit FOSS community around Fedora, I approached a few people from Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. I figured out the scope to talk about Fedora and Fedora quality assurance (QA). The target audience was bringing more college students from Bhopal into open source and Fedora.

  • The top 10 IoT application areas – based on real IoT projects

    As part of a larger effort to track the IoT ecosystem, we set out, mining hundreds of homepages, and managed to assemble and verify 640 actual enterprise IoT projects (Note: We did not include any consumer IoT projects such as wearable devices or hobby projects).

  • This tiny $5 computer is giving the Raspberry Pi a run for its money

    When it comes simple homebrew computers, the Raspberry Pi has been king of the mountain for a long time. The ruler might have some new competition, however, if the wild Kickstarter success of Onion’s Omega2 is any indication.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Making documentation easy with Read the Docs

    In the Doc Dish column, we often have focused on writing documentation, but that's not the whole story. For what shall it profit a writer if they write the whole document and have no readers? Once documentation is written, it must get in front of the user so to be read. For anything beyond simple readme files, this can be a challenge; often documentation writers need design, hosting infrastructure, search tools, and so on. One project aims to make that a little easier.

    Read the Docs is an open source (MIT-licensed) project that started during the 2010 Django Dash. The goal of the project is to improve the quantity and quality of documentation by reducing barriers. Although Read the Docs can't write your documentation for you, it does handle automatically building from your source code management system. Docs are rendered as HTML and PDF and full-text search is included.

  • Rhythmbox 3.4 Released With New Web Remote Plugin

    A new version of Rhythmbox, the oft-overlooked desktop music app preinstalled on Ubuntu, is now available to download.

  • Confessions of a command line geek: why I don't use GNOME but everyone else should

    Despite what tablet- and phone-loving pundits say, the laptop is here to stay. When a user wants to watch a movie on a train, they reach for the tablet first. But if they want to do actual, real work, they still prefer the laptop.

    Meanwhile, software freedom should always be for everyone, not just technical users and software developers. The GNOME project was one of the first in this history of Free Software to realize this, and seek to create a free software desktop that truly allowed everyone to enjoy the software freedom that those of us had already happily found with Bash and Emacs (or vi Smile years before.

    This keynote will discuss why GNOME remains best poised to deliver software freedom to everyone, how GNOME continues to be the best welcome-mat for those who want software freedom, and why GNOME remains absolutely essential to the advancement of software freedom for decades to come.

  • GUADEC/2

    Once again, GUADEC has come and gone.

    Once again, it was impeccably organized by so many wonderful volunteers.

    Once again, I feel my batteries recharged.

    Once again, I’ve had so many productive conversations.

    Once again, I’ve had many chances to laugh.

Linux Foundation News

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

GNOME News

  • The future is here
    Nautilus from master, updated everyday, parallel installable, in less than 3 minutes. I cannot believe this is possible. Note that due to be sandboxed with no permission handling there are things that are not working, like opening with an application. For someone not aware of the whole platform and the Linux desktop, it’s difficult to see how many implications this bring to us and the changes that will allow in the upcoming months. This truly changes the game for GNOME (and any other desktop) as a project and platform, including 3rd party developers and companies using Linux desktops or that want to support it.
  • GUADEC’16 report
    I got a chance to attend GUADEC’16 which happened in Karlsruhe, Germany from 11 – 17 August. I stayed for the whole duration including Workshop Day, core days and the later BOF days which were very learning. I’m grateful to my mentor David Woodhouse who guided me all the time. I thank GNOME community for giving me the chance to speak at intern lightning talk and i tried my best to present my project in front of those great people. I hope to get a chance someday again to speak up. We have finished our GSoC project so i am free now to wander around to find some more places and tasks in GNOME’s huge shelter. My experience of attending GUADEC was awesome, despite being a less speaker i was very comfortable to talk and interact to people in the community. I made some new friends in the community and i came to know a lot more about it. I loved attending social events after the long day of great and motivating talks. I am thankful to the GUADEC organizers, i didn’t feel any problem for a second staying 6,000 kms away from home.
  • GUADEC 2016
    I came back from Karlsruhe last week, where GUADEC 2016 took place. It was a wonderful event. Even though it was only my second GUADEC, I felt at home in this community, meeting with old and new friends.
  • Summer Talks, PurpleEgg
    The topics were different but related: The Flock talk talked about how to make things better for a developer using Fedora Workstation as their development workstation, while the GUADEC talk was about the work we are doing to move Fedora to a model where the OS is immutable and separate from applications. A shared idea of the two talks is that your workstation is not your development environment environment. Installing development tools, language runtimes, and header files as part of your base operating system implies that every project you are developing wants the same development environment, and that simply is not the case.

Fedora News

  • UDP Failures and RNGs
  • F24-20160823 updated Live isos
    New Kernel means new set of updated lives. I am happy to release the F24-20160823 updated lives isos.
  • Curse you, Jon Masters! Why do you always have to be right!
    Long story short, Fedora 24 came out and I'm given the taste of the same medicine: the video on the ASUS is completely busted. I was able to limp along for now by using the old kernel 4.4.6-301.fc23, but come on, this is clearly a massive regression. Think anyone is there to bisect and find the culprit? Of course not. I have to do it it myself. So, how did F24 ship? Well... I didn't test beta versions, so I don't have much ground to complain.
  • Communication Anti-Patterns
  • Autocloud: What's new?
    Autocloud was released during the Fedora 23 cycle as a part of the Two Week Atomic Process. Previously, it used to listen to fedmsg for successful Koji builds. Whenever, there is a new message the AutocloudConsumer queues these message for processing. The Autocloud job service then listens to the queue, downloads the images and runs the tests using Tunir. A more detailed post about it’s release can be read here. During the Fedora 24 cycle things changed. There was a change on how the Fedora composes are built. Thanks to adamw for writing a detailed blogpost on what, why and how things changed.