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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Poll New Content/Layout OK? Roy Schestowitz 14 21/05/2018 - 5:15pm
Blog entry Mollom Issues Roy Schestowitz 1 21/05/2018 - 5:14pm
Blog entry 5 Best Data Recovery Tools For Linux To Recover Data Or Deleted Partitions Mohd Sohail 1 21/05/2018 - 5:13pm
Story USB Audio Class 3.0 Improvements Coming To Linux 4.18 Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 5:01pm
Story Graphics/GPU: OpenCL, Mesa, X.Org Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 4:59pm
Story Ubuntu 18.10 Aims to Improve Laptop Battery Life Rianne Schestowitz 1 21/05/2018 - 4:50pm
Story Tesla Compliance Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 4:38pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 4:19pm
Story GNOME 3.30 Desktop to Introduce New App for Finding Free Internet Radio Stations Rianne Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 4:08pm
Story Ryzen 7 2700 / Ryzen 7 2700X / Core i7 8700K Linux Gaming Performance With RX Vega 64, GTX 1080 Ti Rianne Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 4:03pm

Security and Bugs

Filed under
Security
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 97 - Automation: Humans are slow and dumb

    Josh and Kurt talk about the security of automation as well as automating security. The only way automation will really work long term is full automation. Humans can't be trusted enough to rely on them to do things right.

  • An introduction to cryptography and public key infrastructure

    Secure communication is quickly becoming the norm for today's web. In July 2018, Google Chrome plans to start showing "not secure" notifications for all sites transmitted over HTTP (instead of HTTPS). Mozilla has a similar plan. While cryptography is becoming more commonplace, it has not become easier to understand. Let's Encrypt designed and built a wonderful solution to provide and periodically renew free security certificates, but if you don't understand the underlying concepts and pitfalls, you're just another member of a large group of cargo cult programmers.

  • Teensafe, A Teen Phone Monitoring App, Leaks Thousands Of Apple ID Passwords

    Teensafe is a monitoring app used by parents for keeping a check on the activities of their children. The app allows parents to access their child’s location, call history, messages, browsing history, and apps downloaded by them without their permission.

  • Teen phone monitoring app leaked thousands of user passwords

    The mobile app, TeenSafe, bills itself as a "secure" monitoring app for iOS and Android, which lets parents view their child's text messages and location, monitor who they're calling and when, access their web browsing history, and find out which apps they have installed.

  • The weirdest bug I’ve found in a compiler: MSVC 2017

    There’s been discussion on cppitertools about the newest MSVC release (15.7) claiming to be fully standards compliant, which led me here.
    The following code fails to compile under MSVC for one reason: the U on lines 4 and 5 is a different name than the T on lines 10 and 11, so the result of the static_assert condition on line 19 is false. (Note that I’m not using std::declval here for simplicity’s sake).

GNU/Linux vs. Unix: What's the difference?

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

If you are a software developer in your 20s or 30s, you've grown up in a world dominated by Linux. It has been a significant player in the data center for decades, and while it's hard to find definitive operating system market share reports, Linux's share of data center operating systems could be as high as 70%, with Windows variants carrying nearly all the remaining percentage. Developers using any major public cloud can expect the target system will run Linux. Evidence that Linux is everywhere has grown in recent years when you add in Android and Linux-based embedded systems in smartphones, TVs, automobiles, and many other devices.

Even so, most software developers, even those who have grown up during this venerable "Linux revolution" have at least heard of Unix. It sounds similar to Linux, and you've probably heard people use these terms interchangeably. Or maybe you've heard Linux called a "Unix-like" operating system.

So, what is this Unix? The caricatures speak of wizard-like "graybeards" sitting behind glowing green screens, writing C code and shell scripts, powered by old-fashioned, drip-brewed coffee. But Unix has a much richer history beyond those bearded C programmers from the 1970s. While articles detailing the history of Unix and "Unix vs. Linux" comparisons abound, this article will offer a high-level background and a list of major differences between these complementary worlds.

Read more

More on Tesla's Compliance

Filed under
GNU
Legal

10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

Filed under
Server
OSS

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups.

If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance.

In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs.

Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot

    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows!

    A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.

  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images

    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now.

    Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward.

    This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Filed under
Hardware

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1.

Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB.

Read more

FOSS FUD From EFF and Black Duck

Filed under
OSS

Posts From MiniDebConf Hamburg 2018

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian is wrong

    So, the MiniDebConf Hamburg 2018 is about to end, it's sunny, no clouds are visible and people seem to be happy.

    And, I have time to write this blog post! So, just as a teaser for now, I'll present to you the content of some slides of our "Reproducible Buster" talk today. Later I will add links to the video and the full slides.

  • Mini DebConf Hamburg

    Since Friday around noon time, I and my 6-year-old son are at the Mini DebConf in Hamburg. Attending together with my son is quite a different experience than plain alone or with also having my wife around. Though he is doing pretty good, it mostly means the day ends for me around 2100 when he needs to go to sleep.

A look at Spice-Up presentation software for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

As a student, presentations are second nature to me. I can’t even count the amount of times I have had to make visual presentations and slides of information over the course of the past couple years.

I’ve always been one to like to change things up, and get bored if I don’t, so rather than always using Google Slides or Microsoft PowerPoint, or even LibreOffice Impress, I’ve opted to use a handy little piece of software called “Spice-Up” on a few occasions.

Read more

DragonFly BSD 5.2.0

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

My experience with DragonFly this week was a lot like my experiences with other members of the BSD family. The system is lightweight, provides lots of useful documentation and gives us a minimal platform from which to build our operating system. The system was stable, fast and provided me with most of the software I wanted. Apart from DragonFly not working with my desktop computer's hardware, I had an overall good experience with the operating system.

I had mixed feelings about H2. At this point the file system seems stable and can be used for most common tasks. However, the advanced features that make the future of H2 look so appealing, are not all in place yet. So it might be best to wait another year before switching over to H2 if you want to make the most of snapshots and other advanced file system options.

DragonFly is typically regarded as a server operating system, and that is where its strengths lie. However, this week I feel it performed well as a desktop platform too. It takes a little while to set up DragonFly as a desktop, but the documentation walks us through most of the process and I was able to do everything I would typically do on Linux desktop distribution.

Read more

Also: Server maker IXsystems sets sail with new TrueNAS flagship

Software: WiFi, GIMP, WordPress

Filed under
Software
  • WiFi hacker- 10 best Android & Desktop WiFi hacking apps free download

    Hacking is no more the specialty of experts and professionals only. With the emergence of user-friendly hacking tools, the art can be easily aced by average users too. A majority of people want to know the best, free WiFi hacker tools to learn to hack on smartphones and desktops.

    Despite the availability of so many hacking tutorials online, let us tell you that hacking is not as easy to learn. It cannot be learned overnight and requires in-depth research and dedication to become a pro at hacking.

  • GIMP 2.10.2 Released

    It’s barely been a month since we released GIMP 2.10.0, and the first bugfix version 2.10.2 is already there! Its main purpose is fixing the various bugs and issues which were to be expected after the 2.10.0 release.

  • GIMP 2.10.2 Released With HEIF Image Format Support

    Just shy of one month since the long-awaited debut of GIMP 2.10, the first stable point release is now available.

    Besides fixing bugs, there is new features too including support for HEIF images for importing and exporting, spherize and recursive transform filters added, improved histogram computation, and more.

  • GIMP 2.10.0 released. How to install it on Fedora or Ubuntu
  • WordPress 4.9.6 Update Helps Websites Prepare for GDPR

    The open-source WordPress content management system project announced its 4.9.6 update on May 17, providing users with privacy enhancements designed to help sites be compliant with the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation.

    GDPR is set to go into effect on May 25, requiring organizations to take steps to protect the privacy of end- user information. To be compliant with GDPR, organizations need to properly disclose how user data is stored and used.

    "It's important to understand that while the GDPR is a European regulation, its requirements apply to all sites and online businesses that collect, store, and process personal data about EU residents no matter where the business is located," WordPress developer Allen Snook wrote in a blog post.

Games: Turmoil, INSOMNIA: The Ark, Survivors of Borridor, Crashlands

Filed under
Gaming

Linux 4.17 RC6

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.17-rc6

    Things continue to be fairly calm. There's a couple of commits in here that
    aren't "trivial few-liners", but most of it really is pretty small. And in
    fact, a quarter of the full patch for the week is tooling - and the bulk of
    that is the testing subdirectory.

    In fact, drivers are in the minority here, because another 30% is arch
    updates (arm, s390, x86), and we even have more lines of filesystem fixes
    than we have driver fixes (admittedly mostly due to a few of the
    more-than-a-few-liner patches being to filesystems: afs and btrfs).

    We do have a few driver fixes (all over - hwmon, usb, sound, acpi, gpu),
    but it's all really small.

    So nothing special to report. Go read the shortlog, pull the changes,
    build, and test. It should all be good and pretty stable by this point.

    Linus

  • Linux 4.17-rc6 Kernel Released As Another "Fairly Calm" Release

    Linux 4.17 is up to its sixth weekly release candidate ahead of the official release expected by mid-June.

KDE Plasma 5.13 Looks Like an Awesome Update

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

The KDE Plasma 5.13 release is shaping up to be something rather special indeed.

Currently in development, KDE Plasma 5.13 serves as the next major release of the leading Qt/Qml desktop environment. The update features a stack of improvements, refinements and some innovative new functionality.

In this post we roundup the best KDE Plasma 5.13 features and changes, plus give you all the details on how to upgrade to Plasma 5.13 in Kubuntu and KDE Neon once it is released on June 12, 2018.

Read more

Also: First week of coding phase, GSoC'18

Introduction To VPS Or Virtual Private Server

Filed under
Development

VPS or Virtual Private Server is a virtual machine that’s hosted somewhere in the world. A VPS provider divides a physical computer into multiple virtual computers and one can buy and access those virtual machines as a service. Each virtual machine runs its own operating system so you can perform […]

Read<br />
more

Raspberry Pi Series Part 4: Ten Raspberry Pi Linux Distributions To Get You Going In 2018

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi informs you everything you need to know about the Raspberry Pi. In this article, we feature Ten Linux distributions for your Raspberry Pi in 2018. If you thought it is only Raspbian we have for Pi, take a look.

Read<br />
more

Linux 4.16.10, 4.14.42, and 4.9.101

Filed under
Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ‘Crush Them’: An Oral History of the Lawsuit That Upended Silicon Valley

    The then-23-year-old giant, which ruled the personal computer market with a despotic zeal, stood accused of using monopoly power to bully collaborators and squelch competitors. Its most famous victim was Netscape, the pioneering web browser, but everyone from Apple to American Airlines felt threatened by late-’90s Microsoft. The company was big enough to be crowned America’s most valuable firm, bold enough to compare attacks on its domain to Pearl Harbor, and, eventually, bad enough to be portrayed as a (semifictionalized) cadre of hypercapitalist murderers in a major motion picture. The “don’t be evil” optics that colored the rise of today’s tech giants (and have recently lost their efficacy) were a direct response to Microsoft’s tyrannical rule.

  • Michał Górny: Empty directories, *into, dodir, keepdir and tmpfiles.d
  • FRAMED Collection, a noir-styled spy adventure where you rearrange comic tiles is now out

    It's actually a compilation of FRAMED and FRAMED 2, games that have been widely praised and previously only available on mobile platforms. It has you moving around slices of an animated comic book, to put the noir-styled spy adventure story together. It actually sounds hilarious, as it's not a basic "this one has to go here" type of game, as it changes what happens based on where you put the tiles creating some amusing sounding failures:

  • Paradox’s grand strategy titles will be getting more content soon

    At their annual convention, Paradox Interactive have announced new expansions for their current grand strategy titles. There’s a little bit of everything for fans of these games.

  • Why OpenShift Is The New OpenStack For Red Hat
  • Help the Debian kernel team to help you

    I gave the first talk this morning at Mini-DebConf Hamburg, titled "Help the kernel team to help you". I briefly described several ways that Debian users and developers can make it easier (or harder) for us to deal with their requests. The slides are up in on my talks page, and video should be available soon.

  • UbuCon Europe 2018: Analysing a dream [English|Spanish]

    The idea of organising the Ubucon in Xixon, Asturies was set two years ago, while participating in the European Ubucon in Essen (germany). The Paris Ubucon took place and in those days we uderstood that there was a group enough of people with the capacities and the will to hold an European Congress for Ubuntu lovers. We had learnt a lot from German and French colleagues thanks to their respective amazing organizations and, at the same time, our handicap was the lack of s consolidated group in Spain.

  • 19-year-old Developer at the Forefront of TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
  • 19-years-old German developer Spearheads TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp

    No doubt that Tron community is preparing for mainnet launch, with different ideas coming in from all roads. As part of its readiness, Tron has unveiled its Opensource Wallet DApp developed by 19-year old German developer, Marius Gill, who has been programming since 13 years old.

    The DApp is an outcome of Project Genesis, which was launched in March 2018 purposely to encourage TRON’s community engagement in bringing in new things into Tron ecosystem. The project provides a bonus pool of 2 billion dollars for active members around the world have lent their hands in implementing ideas for the community.

  • Collabora and GStreamer spring in Sweden

    Earlier this month, a few of us from Collabora, Olivier Crête, Nicolas Dufresne, George Kiagiadakis and I attended the GStreamer Spring Hackfest in Lund, Sweden. Hosted by Axis Communications (who uses GStreamer in their surveillance cameras for many years now), it was a great opportunity for the GStreamer community to touch base and work on open bugs and pet projects.

    [...]

    As for myself, I mainly worked on (or rather started to work on) split-field interlacing support in GStreamer, adding relevant formats and modes in the GStreamer video library. In addition, as a Meson developer (Nirbheek Chauhan) was present, I took the opportunity to discuss with him the last bit of porting build system of Geoclue to Meson, a side project I've been working on. It helped me get it done faster but also helped Nirbheek find some issues in Meson and fix them!

    All in all, my first GStreamer hackfest was an awesome experience (even though I was not feeling well). It was also very nice to hangout and socialize with old and new friends in the GStreamer community after a long time. Many thanks again to Axis for hosting us in their offices! See you at the GStreamer Conference this fall!

  • Reality Redrawn Opens At The Tech

    The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose was filled on Thursday with visitors experiencing new takes on the issue of fake news by artists using mixed reality, card games and even scratch and sniff cards. These installations were the results of Mozilla’ Reality Redrawn challenge. We launched the competition last December to make the power of misinformation and its potential impacts visible and visceral. Winners were announced in February.

  • Tangerine UI problems

    I've been a big fan of Tangerine for a while, it's a bank that doesn't charge fees and does what I need to do. They used to have a great app and website and then it all went a bit wrong.

    It's now a HTML app for Desktop and mobile. This isn't the fault of the tools used, but there's some terrible choices in the app across both.

    [...]

    The overall feel of the app is that its full of spinners, far too cluttered and just to confusing. Hey not everything I've built is perfect, but even I can spot some real problems with this app. I pretty sure Tangerine can do better than this.

    And yes, I'm writing this while drinking a beer I recently bought, as shown on my transaction page.

  • Majority of software plagued by vulnerabilities as open source adoption soars [Ed: More of Black Duck's FUD]
  • SiFive Releases 'Expansion Board' to Build Interest in RISC-V Processor
  • FreeBSD 11.2 Beta 2 Available For Testing, Brings PTI Optimization

    The second beta release of FreeBSD 11.2 is now available for weekend testing.

    FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 is now available with a variety of bug fixes, a fix to restore boot support for the Banana Pi ARM board, a context switch optimization for page table isolation (PTI), DTrace improvements, various build fixes, and a range of other system fixes.

  • Sony Is Working On AMD Ryzen LLVM Compiler Improvements - Possibly For The PlayStation 5

    One of Sony's compiler experts has taken to working on some tuning for the AMD Ryzen "znver1" microarchitecture support within the LLVM compiler stack. This begs the question why Sony is working on Ryzen improvements if not for a future product.

  • Popular YouTuber Says Apple Won't Fix His iMac Pro Damaged While Disassembled

    The damage resulted when they dropped the display while attempting to reattach it to the aluminum chassis. Towards the end of the video, Sebastian also says the iMac Pro requires a new logic board and power supply unit, suggesting there may have been a short circuit that caused damage to internal components as well.

  • Most dangerous new cyber security threats [iophk: "Windows TCO, yet neither Microsoft nor Windows get a mention"]
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More in Tux Machines

Development Leftovers

  • My talk from the RISC-V workshop in Barcelona
  • KDAB at SIGGRAPH 2018
    Yes, folks. This year SIGGRAPH 2018 is in Canada and we’ll be there at the Qt booth, showing off our latest tooling and demos. These days, you’d be surprised where Qt is used under the hood, even by the biggest players in the 3D world!
  • 9 Best Free Python Integrated Development Environments
    Python is a widely used general-purpose, high level programming language. It’s easy to read and learn. It’s frequently used for science, data analysis, and engineering. With a burgeoning scientific community and ecosystem, Python is an excellent environment for students, scientists and organizations that develop technology software. One of the essential tools for a budding Python developer is a good Integrated Development Environment (IDE). An IDE is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to programmers for software development. Many coders learn to code using a text editor. And many professional Python developers prefer to stay with their favourite text editor, in part because a lot of text editors can be used as a development environment by making use of plugins. But many Python developers migrate to an IDE as this type of software application offers, above all else, practicality. They make coding easier, can offer significant time savings with features like autocompletion, and built-in refactoring code, and also reduces context switching. For example, IDEs have semantic knowledge of the programming language which highlights coding problems while typing. Compiling is ‘on the fly’ and debugging is integrated.
  • Want to Debug Latency?
    In the recent decade, our systems got complex. Our average production environments consist of many different services (many microservices, storage systems and more) with different deployment and production-maintenance cycles. In most cases, each service is built and maintained by a different team — sometimes by a different company. Teams don’t have much insight into others’ services. The final glue that puts everything together is often a staging environment or sometimes the production itself! Measuring latency and being able to react to latency issues are getting equally complex as our systems got more complex. This article will help you how to navigate yourself at a latency problem and what you need to put in place to effectively do so.

Devices: AsteroidOS, Das blinkenlight, Android P

  • The open source AsteroidOS is a new alternative to Wear OS
    AsteroidOS is a new Linux-based open source operating system that can be used as a replacement to Wear OS. A small team of developers have been hard at work on the smartwatch platform for the last four years. As the culmination of their efforts, this week the first stable version was made available to the public. It plays nice with a few Wear OS-compatible smartwatches.
  • Das blinkenlights are back thanks to RPi revival of the PDP-11
    The designers left the I2C port of the Raspberry Pi free for hacks, and “it is not very hard to add support for such things in the simh emulator, so the PiDP-11 can use them as I/O”. The SR switches on the PiDP-11's SR switches can be set to boot various operating systems (this part is a work in progress), so instead of RSX-11MPlus users can choose BSD, DOS-11, Unix System 6 or System 7 and the like.
  •  
  • How Android P Will Increase Battery Life

today's howtos

GNU nano 2.9.7 was released

Accumulated changes over the last five releases include: the ability to bind a key to a string (text and/or escape sequences), a default color of bright white on red for error messages, an improvement to the way the Scroll-Up and Scroll-Down commands work, and the new --afterends option to make Ctrl+Right (next word) stop at the end of a word instead of at the beginning. Check it out. Read more