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The Performance Impact Of Spectre Mitigation On POWER9

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Over the past year we have looked extensively at the performance impact of Spectre mitigations on x86_64 CPUs but now with having the Raptor Talos II in our labs, here are some benchmarks to see the performance impact of IBM's varying levels of Spectre mitigation for POWER9.

By default, Raptor Computing Systems ships their system in the safest mode of providing full kernel and user-space protection against Spectre Variant Two. But by editing a file from the OpenBMC environment it's possible to control the Spectre protections on their libre hardware. Besides the full/user protection against Spectre there is also kernel-only protection that is more akin to the protection found on x86_64 CPUs. Additionally, there is the ability to completely disable the protection for yielding the greatest performance (or what would be considered standard pre-2018) but leaving your hardware vulnerable to Spectre. More details on controlling the Spectre protections on Talos II hardware can be found via the RaptorCS.com Wiki.

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Linux 4.20-rc2

Filed under
Linux

Fairly normal week, aside from me traveling.

Shortlog appended, but it all looks fine: about half drivers, wih the
rest being the usual architecture updates, tooling, networking, and
some filesystem updates.

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Also: Linux 4.20-rc2 Released With EXT4 Bug Fixes, New NVIDIA Turing USB-C Driver

DXVK 0.92

Filed under
Gaming
  • DXVK 0.92 is out with fixes for LA Noire, Shadow of the Tomb Raider and more

    DXVK, the excellent Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation used together with Wine that forms part of Valve's Steam Play has a fresh brew ready. The progress is amazing as always, that's the twenty-sixth release this year!

  • DXVK 0.92 Released With Fixes For Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Other Games

    DXVK 0.92 is the newly-minuted release and it adds support for bit-accurate clears for 11G11B10 UAVs in order to take care of an error message with the Shadow of the Tomb Raider game. DXVK 0.92 also has build issue fixes in conjunction with select versions of Meson, support for the DMOVC instruction that should help out some situations, rendering fixes for LA Noire, and visual issues have been resolved with Lords of the Fallen and The Surge.

Installing Vundle: The Plugin Manager For Vim

Filed under
Linux

Today, this guide will present a step-by-step guide of how to install and configure Vundle (Vim Bundle) from GitHub, and what issues you may face when installing Vundle. As many of you may know, vim is a console-based text editor that has numerous advanced features. One such feature is that its functionality can be extended and customized using plugins written by other people. Managing these plugins, however, can be rather tedious. Vundle attempts to assist users in managing these plugins for you by providing an interface.

Read<br />
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Ubuntu 19.04 Daily Builds Available to Download

Filed under
Ubuntu

Prep a partition because Ubuntu 19.04 daily builds are now available to download.

A new “Disco Dingo” daily build will be produced each and every day from now until the Ubuntu 19.04 release date in April 2019.

For dedicated Ubuntu developers, testers, and community enthusiasts the arrival of daily builds is the horn blare that declares the development cycle well and truly open.

Furthermore, these images are the only way to sample the upcoming release before a solitary beta release pops out sometime in late March.

Do remember that Ubuntu daily build ISOs are intended for testing and development purposes only. Don’t run these images as the primary OS on mission critical machines — and yes, that includes your brother’s laptop — unless you really know what you’re doing and (more importantly) how you can undo it.

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Publishing Applications via F-Droid

Filed under
Android
HowTos

In 2016 I started working on a set of Python modules for reading and writing bytecode for the Dalvik virtual machine so that I could experiment with creating applications on Android without having to write them in Java. In the time since then, on and off, I have written a few small applications to learn about Android and explore the capabilities of the devices I own. Some of these were examples, demos and tests for the compiler framework, but others were intended to be useful to me. I could have just downloaded applications to perform the tasks I wanted to do, but I wanted minimal applications that I could understand and trust, so I wrote my own simple applications and was happy to install them locally on my phone.

In September I had the need to back up some data from a phone I no longer use, so I wrote a few small applications to dump data to the phone's storage area, allowing me to retrieve it using the adb tool on my desktop computer. I wondered if other people might find applications like these useful and asked on the FSFE's Android mailing list. In the discussion that followed it was suggested that I try to publish my applications via F-Droid.

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7 Best free & Open source Linux Mint & Ubuntu music player

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Ubuntu

Are you looking for a best Ubuntu Music player to listen to your favorite music while working on the Linux operating system, then there are dozens of Linux music payers. You just need to find out the right one for your taste. Although the Ubuntu already comes with the music app to play songs and other audio files, however, you can install additional one to get more features and experience.

To help you with this, we have created this list of top Linux music player those work on both Ubuntu and Linux Mint. If you like any of them then you can also see the installation article of that particular music player on Ubuntu, the link has given with each of them. So, without further delay let’s see the Top & Best free plus open-source Linux Mint and Ubuntu Music player.

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Kernel and Graphics: EXT4, AMDGPU and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • EXT4 Getting Many Fixes In Linux 4.20, Including For Some Really Old Leaks

    Last month I reported on a number of fixes for really old bugs in the EXT4 code with some of the issues dating back to the Linux 2.6 days in the EXT3 file-system code that was carried over to the EXT4 driver. Those fixes are now working their way into the Linux 4.20 stable kernel. 

    Ted Ts'o sent out a fixes pull request today containing 18 patches. Sixteen of those patches are from Vasily Averin who was nailing these really old bugs/leaks. Of them, Ted noted, "A large number of ext4 bug fixes, mostly buffer and memory leaks on error return cleanup paths."

  • AMDGPU DRM-Next Driver Picks Up Support For Vega 20 "A1" Stepping

    Among the work queuing in the AMDGPU DRM-Next branch for what will in turn appear with the next kernel cycle (Linux 4.21) is support for Vega 20 A1 ASICs.

    The current Linux 4.20 cycle appears to have good support for Vega 20 GPUs at least from our tracking without having any access to the GPUs for now, but it looks like the production graphics cards will be on a new "A1" stepping rather than A0 that was used for the bring-up of this first 7nm Vega GPU.

  • Gallium D3D9 "Nine" Support Gets New Patches To Help Fight Lag Without Tearing

    While most Linux gamers these days are mesmerized by DXVK for mapping Direct3D 10/11 to Vulkan for better handling Windows games on Linux, for those with older Direct3D 9 era games there is still the Gallium Nine initiative for D3D9 implemented as a Mesa Gallium state tracker. A new patch series posted this weekend will make that Gallium Nine experience even better.

    Axel Davy who has been the lead developer on the Gallium D3D9 state tracker posted a set of two patches that allow the thread_submit=true option to be used with tearfree_discard=true option.

Wine and Games: Wine-Staging 3.20 and Virtual Reality at Valve

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wine-Staging 3.20 Released, Fixes A Four Year Old Rendering Bug

    Building off Friday's release of Wine 3.20 is now Wine-Staging 3.20 with minor work added into this testing/experimental blend of Wine that tends to particularly suit gamers better than the upstream code-base.

    Wine-Staging 3.20 still contains more than 850 patches on top of upstream Wine, but at least more patches are being deemed stable and trickling into upstream... Just weeks ago that patch count was closer to 900.

  • Reports: Valve making their own VR HMD and apparently a new VR Half-Life

    It appears Valve are truly getting more serious about Virtual Reality as they appear to be making their own headset. On top of that, apparently a new Half-Life VR game is coming.

    Leaked to an imgur album, which contains multiple shots of the new hardware. These includes shots clearly showing a Valve logo:

Sourcegraph: An Open-Source Source Code Search Engine

Filed under
Development

In a recent announcement, a Code Search and Navigation tool named Sourcegraph was declared Open Source. As it makes navigating through Source Code much more convenient, the tool itself going Open Source is definitely a big plus for developers!

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KDE Usability & Productivity, Belated Writeup About Akademy 2018 by Sandro Knauß

Filed under
KDE
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 44

    Week 44 in Usability & Productivity is coming right up! This week was a bit lighter in terms of the number of bullet points, but we got some really great new features, and there’s a lot of cool stuff in progress that I hope to be able to blog about next week!

  • KDE Plasma Now Supports WireGuard, Alt-Tab Switching Improvements

    The WireGuard secure VPN tunnel is not in the mainline kernel yet but the KDE Plasma desktop is the latest project already adding support for it, which can be useful today if making use of WireGuard's DKMS kernel modules.

    KDE Plasma now supports WireGuard VPN tunnels if enabling the NetworkManager WireGuard plug-in. Previously KDE Plasma didn't play well with this plug-in but now it's all been fixed up to deliver a first-rate experience for this open-source VPN tech.

    This week KDE also received some alt+tab switching improvements for screen readers and supporting the use of the keyboard to switch between items. These alt+tab window switching and WireGuard VPN support will be part of the KDE Plasma 5.15 release.

  • Akademy 2018 Vienna

    You have probably read a lot about Akademy 2018 recently, and how great it was.

    For me it was a great experience too and this year I met a lot of KDE people, both old and new. This is always nice.
    I arrived on Thursday so I had one day to set everything up and had a little bit of time to get to know the city.

    On Friday evening I enjoyed the "Welcoming evening", but I was very surprised when Volker told me that I would be on stage the next day, talking about privacy.

    He told me that someone should have informed me several days before. The scheduled speaker, Sebastian, couldn't make it to Akademy.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • NeuroFedora update: week 45
  • After NLL: Moving from borrowed data and the sentinel pattern

    Continuing on with my “After NLL” series, I want to look at another common error that I see and its solution: today’s choice is about moves from borrowed data and the Sentinel Pattern that can be used to enable them.

  • LibreOffice Landing New Custom Widgets Theme, Powered By Cairo

    In an interesting flurry of commits since yesterday, a new custom widgets theme is landing inside this open-source office suite.

    Tomaž Vajngerl and Ashod Nakashian of Collabora has been working on these custom widgets for LibreOffice. The custom widgets are being rendered via Cairo, as an alternative to utilizing the standard GTK or Qt widgets, etc. It appears at least for now much of this custom widget work is intended for use with LibreOffice in its headless mode. At this point the work still appears to be in the very early stages but we'll see where it leads.

  • FDA releases open source code, open source software gets emotional, and more news

    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at two open source companies getting funding, the FDA open sources app code, Barcelona upping its open source investment, and more.

  •  

  • Supply-chain attack on cryptocurrency exchange gate.io

    On November 3, attackers successfully breached StatCounter, a leading web analytics platform. This service is used by many webmasters to gather statistics on their visitors – a service very similar to Google Analytics. To do so, webmasters usually add an external JavaScript tag incorporating a piece of code from StatCounter – www.statcounter[.]com/counter/counter.js – into each webpage. Thus, by compromising the StatCounter platform, attackers can inject JavaScript code in all websites that use StatCounter.

Servers: Red Hat and Kubernetes

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Cloudy weather ahead for IBM and Red Hat?

    The world is buzzing about the software industry’s largest acquisition ever. This “game changing” IBM acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion eclipses Microsoft’s $26.2 billion of LinkedIn, which set the previous record. And it’s the third largest tech acquisition in history behind Dell buying EMC for $64 billion in 2015 and Avago’s buyout of Broadcom for $37 billion the same year.

    Wall Street certainly gets nervous when it sees these lofty price tags. IBM’s stock was down 4.2 percent following the announcement, and there are probably more concerns over a broader IBM selloff around how much IBM is paying for Red Hat.

    This sets the stage for massive expectations on IBM to leverage this asset as a critical turning point in its history. Given that IBM’s Watson AI poster child has failed to create sustainable growth, could this be their best opportunity to right the ship once and for all? Or is this mega merger a complicated clash of cultures and products that will make it hard to realize the full potential?

  • A Slow Motion Strategic Train Wreck With The Color Blue

    IBM's high premium price for the Red Hat buyout places its stamp of approval on Linux cloud services while cheapening its own brand value.

  • Road to ansible-bender 0.2.0

    I’m pleased to announce that ansible-bender is now available in version 0.2.0.

    I would like to share a story with you how I used ansible-bender to release the 0.2.0 version.

  • VMware Buys Kubernetes-based Heptio to Boost Its Multi-Cloud Strategy

Arduino Gets a Command Line Interface

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

When using an Arduino, at least once you’ve made it past blinking LEDs, you might start making use of the serial connection to send and receive information from the microcontroller. Communicating with the board while it’s interacting with its environment is a crucial way to get information in real-time. Usually, that’s as far as it goes, but [Pieter] wanted to take it a step farther than that with his command line interpreter (CLI) for the Arduino.

The CLI allows the user to run Unix-like commands directly on the Arduino. This means control of GPIO and the rest of the features of the microcontroller via command line. The CLI communicates between the microcontroller and the ANSI/VT100 terminal emulator of your choosing on your computer, enabling a wealth of new methods of interacting with an Arduino.

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The "Microsoft Loves Linux" lie

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Paging Linux Users: What Made You Give Up on Windows? [Ed: Microsoft propagandist Bogdan Popa keeps spreading the "Microsoft Loves Linux" lie. That doesn't mean anything good. "Enemies closer" and all...]
  • Microsoft Acquires Obsidian & inXile Entertainment [Ed: The game studios always shut down after Microsoft buys them]

    As what could spell bad news for seeing native Linux game ports of future Pillars and Wasteland titles, among others, Microsoft announced they are acquiring Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment.

    Microsoft is acquiring Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment as part of their effort to deliver "a steady stream of new, exclusive games to our fans." That exclusive reference doesn't bode well if you were fans of inXile or Obsidian games on Linux.

  • Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment have officially joined Microsoft

    Some rather interesting news here, both Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment (source) have now officially joined Microsoft.

    Together, they've made some pretty interesting Linux games such as Pillars of Eternity, Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire, Tyranny, Wasteland 2, Torment: Tides of Numenera, The Bard's Tale IV: Barrows Deep and more to come.

    [...]

    As long as both studios retain a certain amount of freedom, I think we should be okay for future titles. Microsoft loves Linux after all…right? [sarcasm]

    I have to be honest, I'm a little in shock myself at this news.

Programming: py3status, Debian LTS Work, RcppArmadillo and Programmers

Filed under
Development
  • py3status v3.14

    I’m happy to announce this release as it contains some very interesting developments in the project.

  • Holger Levsen: 20181110-lts-201810

    Today while writing this I also noticed that https://lists.debian.org/debian-lts-announce/2018/10/threads.html currently misses DLAs 1532 until DLA 1541, which I have just reported to the #debian-lists IRC channel and as #913426. Update: as that bug was closed quickly, I guess instead we need to focus on #859123 and #859122, so that DLAs are accessable to everyone in future.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.9.200.4.0

    A new RcppArmadillo release, now at 0.9.200.4.0, based on the new Armadillo release 9.200.4 from earlier this week, is now on CRAN, and should get to Debian very soon.

    Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 532 (or 31 more since just the last release!) other packages on CRAN.

  • Just a techie? – Techies, Devs, Boffins and Geeks

    What’s the solution? We could start by giving up on the dream of developers all being equal in ability, who can then be traded as commodities. Developers have different strengths - some are fantastic systems thinkers, some are drawn towards architecture, and others possess a laser focus on delivery. Some are better at communicating, whilst some just want to think deeply about the problem and to ponder every edge case.

    If developers are recognised as individuals and emboldened with trust and freedom, then they will play to their strengths to give an overall multiplying effect. We can embrace individualism rather than chasing it away, by celebrating and raising up the role of the software developer.

    I want my boffins and techies to be seen as surgeons. They know what they’re doing and you’re in safe hands. We’ve got junior doctors in there also to learn, but the junior doesn’t become the senior overnight. When we’ve got top surgeons the results will speak for themselves, and the good news is that the top surgeons aren’t required in such large quantities. This can make everyone happy.

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Mozilla: Firefox, Reps, Encryption and Testday Results

  • Firefox Ups the Ante with Latest Test Pilot Experiment: Price Wise and Email Tabs
    Over the last few years, the Test Pilot team has developed innovative features for Firefox desktop and mobile, collaborating directly with Firefox users to improve the browser – from reminders to return to a tab on your desktop to a simple and secure way to keep track of your passwords. Today, just in time for the holiday shopping season, the Firefox Test Pilot team is introducing Price Wise and Email Tabs — the latest experimental features designed to give users more choice and transparency when shopping online. These game-changing desktop tools are sure to make shopping a breeze with more options to save, share, track and shop. We’ve also made a few updates to the Test Pilot program itself to make it even easier to become a part of the growing Firefox users testing new features.
  • Let Price Wise track prices for you this holiday shopping season
    The online shopping experience is really geared towards purchases that are made immediately. Countless hours have been spent to get you checked out as soon as possible. If you know what you want, and you’re happy with the price, this is great. On the other hand, sometimes you want to take your time, and wait for a deal. For those times, we have our new Test Pilot experiment, Price Wise.
  • Sharing links via email just got easier thanks to Email Tabs
    If your family is anything like ours, the moment the calendar flips to October, you’re getting texts and emails asking for holiday wish lists. Email remains one of the top ways people save and share online, so you likely do what we do: help make everyone’s life easier by diligently copy and pasting the URLs, titles and descriptions into a list. What if Firefox could make that process easier? Thanks to our new Test Pilot experiment Email Tabs, it can.
  • Mozilla Reps Community: Rep of the Month – October 2018
    Please join us in congratulating Tim Maks van den Broek, our Rep of the Month for October 2018! Tim is one of our most active members in the Dutch community. During his 15+ years as a Mozilla Volunteer he has touched many parts of the Project. More recently his focus is on user support and he is active in our Reps Onboarding team.
  • As far as I'm concerned, email signing/encryption is dead
    A while back, I used to communicate a lot with users of my popular open source project. So it made sense to sign emails and let people verify — it’s really me writing. It also gave people a way to encrypt their communication with me. The decision in favor of S/MIME rather than PGP wasn’t because of any technical advantage. The support for S/MIME is simply built into many email clients by default, so the chances that the other side would be able to recognize the signature were higher.
  • Firefox 64 Beta 8 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday November 09th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 64 Beta 8. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: Gabriela, gaby2300. From Bangladesh team: Maruf Rahman, Tanvir Rahman, Md. Raihan Ali, Sajedul Islam, Rizbanul Hasan, Mehedi Hasan, Md. Rahimul Islam, Shah Yashfique Bhuian.

today's howtos

Latest Games for GNU/Linux

  • Little Misfortune is a sweet looking adventure, should hopefully get Linux support
    From the same developer who made Fran Bow (which supports Linux), Little Misfortune is what they're calling an interactive story. With a focus on exploration and the characters, including sweet and dark elements with choices that have consequences. With that in mind, when I spoke to the developer in regards to a Linux build they said "We will try to have it, yes! :)". Not solid, but a very positive response especially since they've supported Linux before.
  • Luna and the Moonling is a sweet puzzle game that's now available on Linux
    Luna and the Moonling from Greyborn Studios is a colourful puzzle game with an aim to put a new spin on block-pushing puzzle gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer. For those who aren't aware, some of the people from Greyborn Studios previously worked on some pretty major titles like System Shock 2, Thief, Skylanders, Red Faction and quite a few more. "From the moment we released in early access last year we’ve had requests from Linux gamers to support the platform," said Michael Ryan, CTO & Technical Director of Greyborn Studios. "We’re big fans of the platform ourselves and were happy to oblige. We really hope Linux users enjoy the game, and welcome them to the Greyborn community," Ryan said.
  • Odd Realm is a sandbox settlement builder inspired by Dwarf Fortress and Rimworld with Linux support
  • Valve gave out more details about Artifact, including some public APIs and pre-order is up
    Artifact, the multi-lane card game from Valve is closing in on release and so Valve have given out a bunch of new details on what to expect. Firstly, it's now up for pre-order on Steam for £15.99/$20 and for that price you will get 10 card packs, 5 event tickets, and two complete starter decks. Considering how much such packs cost for real-life card games, that price is actually quite reasonable I think. Additional packs of cards will be $1.99, each pack has 12 random cards. You will also be able to buy and sell cards on the Steam Market.
  • Zeon 25, a retro-inspired hardcore shoot 'em up is now in Early Access
    The Doom-inspired UI bar along the bottom looked quite amusing, haven't really seen many games do something like that in recent years. Looks like it could be worth a shot, the action looks intense enough to keep me interested for sure. While it's in Early Access, they're hoping to add a co-op mode along with new maps, new enemies, new levels and so on. The full release is currently scheduled for Q1 2019 although that may change depending on how much feedback they get during development.
  • Neuroslicers is a narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS that will have Linux support
    Neuroslicers from developer Dream Harvest seems like a very interesting title. A narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS and it will be coming to Linux.
  • Feral Interactive have put out the system requirements for Total War: WARHAMMER II, due on Linux this month
    Ready your swords and your axe as Total War: WARHAMMER II is heading to Linux this month and Feral Interactive have now put up the system requirements.
  • Here's What You Need to Play Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux and macOS
    UK based video games publisher Feral Interactive revealed today the official system requirements of the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game for Linux and Mac systems. In mid-June, Feral Interactive teased Linux and Mac gamers with the upcoming release of the Total War: WARHAMMER II port for their beloved platforms, the sequel to the critically acclaimed Total War: WARHAMMER video game released more than two years ago. The company said that the Linux and macOS port is coming in November. Well, November is here, and now Feral Interactive has revealed the official system requirements for playing the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game on Linux and macOS-powered computers, saying that the port will be available on these two platforms later this month.
  • Warhammer: Vermintide 2 ‘Back to Ubersreik’ DLC Remasters Three Maps From The First Game
    Warhammer: Vermintide 2, Fatshark’s first person rat-murdering action game, will be getting another DLC next month. The Back to Ubersreik DLC takes players to the setting of the first Vermintide game, and will feature remasters of three maps seen in the original Vermintide.
  • Dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a rather nice Anniversary Update that's worth a look
    After managing to sell a few thousand copies, the dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a great update now available. For those who missed the story, the developer Bearded Giant Games initially failed to really get anywhere with the game. They wrote a post on Gamasutra about it, where they said it had been a "a soul crushing experience". A pretty sobering reading, as game development has become so much harder in the past few years with stores being flooded with new games. Anyway, many months later they managed to hit over 6,000 sales and so this update is a thank you for keeping the developer going.

IBM/Red Hat: Moving, Supercomputing and How IBM and Red Hat Will Impact Your Cloud Strategy

  • Moving house and moving applications are not the same. Or are they?
    As a Solution Architect I see my job as many things, from supporting customers in adopting Red Hat technology, educating organisations about using open source technologies and the benefits it brings, to thinking of ways to solve business challenges using technology and culture change. However, these are all generally in the space of “green field” app development. But what about all the systems keeping the business going today? The challenges businesses face in dealing with these “legacy” systems are complex, multi-faceted, involve many teams, and often businesses face knowledge gaps in how everything works together. In the public sector, where I work, this problem of legacy systems is arguably larger and more challenging, with the need for organisations to share information, outlined by things like Digital Service Standard. But, it’s worked that way for years, so why change it?
  • Red Hat at Supercomputing 2018: Bringing open source innovation from high performance computing to the enterprise
    All supercomputers on the coveted Top500 list run on Linux, a scalable operating system that has matured over the years to run some of the most critical workloads and in many cases has displaced proprietary operating systems in the process. For the past two decades, Red Hat Enterprise Linux has served as the foundation for building software stacks for many supercomputers. We are looking to continue this trend with the next generation of systems that seek to break the exascale threshold. SC18, a leading supercomputing conference, begins today. Red Hat hopes to hold conversations and share our insights on new supercomputers, including Summit and Sierra, nascent architectures, like Arm, and building more open computing environments that can further negate the need for proprietary and monolithic implementations. The updated Top500 list is an excellent example of how open technologies continue to proliferate in high performance computing (HPC) and highlights how the ongoing software optimization work performed on these systems can benefit their performance.
  • New TOP500 List Lead by DOE Supercomputers
    The latest TOP500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers is out, a remarkable ranking that shows five Department of Energy supercomputers in the top 10, with the first two captured by Summit at Oak Ridge and Sierra at Livermore. With the number one and number two systems on the planet, the “Rebel Alliance” vendors of IBM, Mellanox, and NVIDIA stand far and tall above the others.
  • How IBM and Red Hat Will Impact Your Cloud Strategy
    Barring a heavy-handed approach to the recent acquisition, IBM and Red Hat can do some amazing things in the market. IBM is a long way from making physical machines. That part of the business went with Lenovo several years ago. So, what has been their focus ever since? Software and services. And, among those software pieces and services has been the cloud. Until today, you may have heard little about IBM’s cloud presence. Although I can assure you it’s there, it was really struggling to compete with the likes of AWS, Azure, and even GCP. Now, with predictions like those from Gartner stating that by 2020, 90% of organizations will adopt hybrid infrastructure management capabilities and that the market in general could be worth $240 billion or more – this was as good a time as any to really take a dive into the cloud management and delivery ecosystem.
  • Improved support information for RHEL on Azure: sosreport plugin updated [Ed: The author a "Microsoft MVP for Visual Studio" (Red Hat hiring them)]