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Tuesday, 15 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Linux Kernel 5.2 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Upgrade to Linux Kernel 5.3

Filed under
Linux

Released in early July 2019, the Linux 5.2 kernel series brought various new features and enhancements, among which we can mention an open-source firmware to support DSP audio devices, support for case-insensitive names in the EXT4 file system, a new file system mount API, better resource monitoring for Android devices, as well as new open-source GPU drivers for ARM Mali devices.

Additionally, Linux kernel 5.2 introduced some performance improvements to the BFQ I/O scheduler, a new CPU bug infrastructure that better protects your computers against the recently disclosed Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) hardware vulnerabilities, and a new device mapper "dust" target for simulating devices with failing sectors and read failures.

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Meet the Villupuram group of engineers educating students about free and open software

Filed under
GNU

A small group of software engineers are changing the face of computer education in Tamil Nadu’s Villupuram, empowering students from working class families by giving them a strong foundation in software programming. The Villupuram GNU/Linux Users Group (GLUG) is a not-for-profit initiative by a group of software professionals and students who believe in software freedom.

Stared in 2013 by a group of six software engineers, the Villupuram chapter of GLUG was formed as part of a global social movement aimed at educating people about free software.

Vijisulochana (Viji), the group’s current representative, tells TNM that the Villupuram GLUG is focused on training interested students so as to make them technically strong.

“Students can always get trained in software training centres, but those centres may not be best equipped to teach them all the latest software developments. We also choose a handful of deserving students based out of Villupuram for whom travelling to Chennai or to other centres in town may not be financially viable. Here, we do it for free,” she says. Their weekly sessions are attended by hundreds of students.

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Plasma 5.17.0

Filed under
KDE

Plasma 5.17 is the version where the desktop anticipates your needs. Night Color, the color-grading system that relaxes your eyes when the sun sets, has landed for X11. Your Plasma desktop also recognizes when you are giving a presentation, and stops messages popping up in the middle of your slideshow. If you are using Wayland, Plasma now comes with fractional scaling, which means that you can adjust the size of all your desktop elements, windows, fonts and panels perfectly to your HiDPI monitor.

The best part? All these improvements do not tax your hardware! Plasma 5.17 is as lightweight and thrifty with resources as ever.

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Debian and Ubuntu Patch Critical Sudo Security Vulnerability, Update Now

Filed under
Security
Debian
Ubuntu

Discovered by Joe Vennix, the security vulnerability (CVE-2019-14287) could be exploited by an attacker to execute arbitrary commands as the root user (system administrator) because sudo incorrectly handled certain user IDs when it was configured to allow users to run commands as an arbitrary user through the ALL keyword in a Runas specification.

"Joe Vennix discovered that sudo, a program designed to provide limited super user privileges to specific users, when configured to allow a user to run commands as an arbitrary user via the ALL keyword in a Runas specification, allows to run commands as root by specifying the user ID- -1 or 4294967295," reads Debian's security advisory.

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State of Calibre in Debian

Filed under
Debian

To counter some recent FUD spread about Calibre in general and Calibre in Debian in particular, here a concise explanation of the current state.

Many might have read my previous post on Calibre as a moratorium, but that was not my intention. Development of Calibre in Debian is continuing, despite the current stall.

Since it seems to be unclear what the current blockers are, there are two orthogonal problems regarding recent Calibre in Debian: One is the update to version 4 and the switch to qtwebengine, one is the purge of Python 2 from Debian.

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How GNOME uses Git

Filed under
GNOME

“What’s your GitLab?” is one of the first questions I was asked on my first day working for the GNOME Foundation—the nonprofit that supports GNOME projects, including the desktop environment, GTK, and GStreamer. The person was referring to my username on GNOME’s GitLab instance. In my time with GNOME, I’ve been asked for my GitLab a lot.

We use GitLab for basically everything. In a typical day, I get several issues and reference bug reports, and I occasionally need to modify a file. I don’t do this in the capacity of being a developer or a sysadmin. I’m involved with the Engagement and Inclusion & Diversity (I&D) teams. I write newsletters for Friends of GNOME and interview contributors to the project. I work on sponsorships for GNOME events. I don’t write code, and I use GitLab every day.

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NordPy: An Open-Source Linux Client for NordVPN

Filed under
Linux
OSS

NordVPN is a personal VPN software with the main focus on protecting user privacy and granting them access to regionally restricted content. It features a strong encryption protocol with a no-log policy and works with north of 5700 servers in at least 60 countries. It is available for Linux, Windows, macOS, AndroidTV, Android, iOS and NAS platforms. It can also be manually set up on WiFi routers.

NordVPN is one of the most recommended VPN services and while it continues to receive positive reviews from customers, developers are beginning to dedicate some time to it and this is how NordPy has come to be.

NordPy is an open-source GUI client for Linux users who like NordVPN and it inherits all the features in the official NordVPN applications. Its feature list includes connection to OpenVPN or NetworkManager-OpenVPN via TCP and UDP, no DNS leak when using OpenVPN,

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Announcing Rustup 1.20.0

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF

The rustup working group is happy to announce the release of rustup version 1.20.0. Rustup is the recommended tool to install Rust, a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

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Also Mozilla: Karl Dubost: This is not a remote work

Software and Games Leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Rudimentary KBibTeX client using Kirigami2

    KBibTeX is a bibliography editor (BibTeX and somewhat BibLaTex) used in conjunction with LaTeX and friends. Based on this code base, a SailfishOS client called ‘BibSearch’ exists which allows to search for bibliographic data in various online sources (IEEE Xplore, Google Scholar, ACM Digital Library, …). BibSearch's code makes use of KBibTeX's C++ code, has its user interface implemented in SailfishOS's Silica QML, and provides just two C++ files on its own to glue together everything.

  • Unoon, a tool to monitor network connections from my system

    I always wanted to have a tool to monitor the network connections from my laptop/desktop. I wanted to have alerts for random processes making network connections, and a way to block those (if I want to).

    Such a tool can provide peace of mind in a few cases. A reverse shell is one the big one, just in case if I manage to open any random malware (read downloads) on my regular Linux system, I want to be notified about the connections it will make. The same goes for trying out any new application. I prefer to use Qubes OS based VMs testing random binaries and applications, and it is also my daily driver. But, the search for a proper tool continued for some time.

    [...]

    A few weeks back, on a Sunday late night, I was demoing the very initial version of the tool to Saptak. While we were talking about the tool, suddenly, an entry popped up in the UI /usr/bin/ssh, to a random host. A little bit of search showed that the IP belongs to an EC2 instance. For the next 40 minutes, we both were trying to debug to find out what happened and if the system was already compromised or not. Luckily I was talking about something else before, and to demo something (we totally forgot that topic), I was running Wireshark on the system. From there, we figured that the IP belongs to github.com. It took some more time to figure out that one of my VS Code extension was updating the git, and was using ssh. This is when I understood that I need to show the real domain names on the UI than random IP addresses.

  • Godlike village sim 'Rise to Ruins' has officially left Early Access with a huge upgrade

    Rise to Ruins (formerly Retro-Pixel Castles) is a great blend of genres, pulling in inspiration from the likes of Black and White, Rimworld, and Dwarf Fortress to make something entirely unique.

    After being in Early Access for nearly five years, this is a huge milestone for Raymond Doerr of SixtyGig Games. It's another title I've followed along closely all these years, after personally purchasing it back in 2015 and it's really delightful to play. The Linux support has been in good shape for a long time too, no noteworthy issues.

  • Stranger Things have entered Rocket League for the Haunted Hallows event

    As a big fan of both Stranger Things (the TV series) and Rocket League, I approve of the little crossover they're currently doing for the new Halloween event the Haunted Hallows.

    Running from now until November 11 at 6PM UTC, the Farmstead Arena has been given a bit of a makeover to be a bit more spooky. Complete with a freaky creature called the Mind Flayer watching over the arena. During the event you can once again earn Candy Corn to redeem for new themed in-game items. I'm quite a big fan of the animated spider decal, looks awesome.

16 Places To Buy A Linux Laptop With Linux Preloaded

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Are you looking for Linux laptops? Do you want a Linux system without having to pay a Microsoft tax? The hardest part of using Linux is to find out the correct hardware. Hardware compatibility and drivers can be a big issue. But where one can find Linux desktops or Laptop for sale? Here are sixteen places to buy a preinstalled Linux Desktop and Laptop.

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The OpenStack Train keeps chugging on

Filed under
OSS

SUSE, formerly a Platinum member of the OpenStack Foundation, may have left the open-source, Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) OpenStack cloud, but the project is going to move forward with the forthcoming 20th release of OpenStack: Train.

That's because while SUSE may no longer find OpenStack profitable, others are finding it works well for them and for their customers. "OpenStack is the market's leading choice of open-source infrastructure for containers, VMs and bare metal in private cloud," said Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation in a statement.

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Events: Akademy, Gnome-shell Hackfest, LibreOffice Conference, .NEXT Copenhagen and GStreamer Conference

Filed under
OSS
  • Akademy 2019 Talks Videos

    We now have the Akademy 2019 videos ready for you to enjoy, see the previous summary of talks on the dot for some inspiration on what to watch. The talk schedule has the full list

    We had keynotes on Developers Italia and the New Guidelines: Let the Open Source Revolution Start! by Leonardo Favario and Towards Qt 6 by Lars Knoll

    We also got updates on KDE Community's goals

  • Gnome-shell Hackfest 2019 – Day 1

    There’s a decent number of attendants from multiple parties (Red Hat, Canonical, Endless, Purism, …). We all brought various items and future plans for discussion, and have a number of merge requests in various states to go through. Some exciting keywords are Graphene, YUV, mixed DPI, Xwayland-on-demand, …

    But that is not all! Our finest designers also got together here, and I overheard they are discussing usability of the lock screen between other topics.

    [...]

    This event wouldn’t have been possible without the Revspace hackerspace people and specially our host Hans de Goede. They kindly provided the venue and necessary material, I am deeply thankful for that.

  • LibreOffice Conference 2019: Meet the Engineering Steering Committee

    Who makes the big technical decisions in the LibreOffice project? In this video from our recent LibreOffice Conference in Spain, the Engineering Steering Committee (ESC) introduces itself and provides an update on the latest updates...

  • Hello from Nutanix .NEXT Copenhagen

    Nutanix is, of course, a fast growing software company that works with many of the same Independent Hardware Vendors (IHVs) as SUSE to deliver solutions in the Hyperconverged Infrastructure (HCI) space. Nutanix pioneered the HCI market and they position themselves as a key element to making it easier than ever before to design, build, and manage datacenter IT. They were originally a single source for turnkey HCI infrastructure, leveraging a close partnership with SuperMicro. They’ve since branched out become more hardware agnostic, supporting a variety of specialized HCI hardware from other vendors, including IBM, Lenovo, Dell, HPE, and Fujitsu.

  • GStreamer Conference 2019: Full Schedule, Talks Abstracts and Speakers Biographies now available

    The GStreamer Conference team is pleased to announce that the full conference schedule including talk abstracts and speaker biographies is now available for this year's lineup of talks and speakers, covering again an exciting range of topics!

    The GStreamer Conference 2019 will take place on 31 October - 1 November 2019 in Lyon, France just after the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE).

Release of PyPy 7.2

Filed under
Development

  • PyPy v7.2 released

    As always, this release is 100% compatible with the previous one and fixed several issues and bugs raised by the growing community of PyPy users. We strongly recommend updating. Many of the fixes are the direct result of end-user bug reports, so please continue reporting issues as they crop up.

  • PyPy 7.2 released

    Version 7.2 of PyPy, an implementation of the Python language, is out.

  • PyPy 7.2 Released With Full 64-bit AArch64 Support, PyPy 3.6 Beyond Beta

    PyPy 7.2 is out today as a big update for this alternative Python implementation that currently provides interpreters for compatibility with Python 2.7 and Python 3.6.

    In cooperation with Arm and Crossbar.io, PyPy developers have been working on complete 64-bit ARM (AArch64) support and this summer they achieved getting the PyPy JIT running on 64-bit ARM. PyPy 7.2 is the first release with this 64-bit ARM support now in good standing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Intel Firmware Binaries Land For AX200/AX201 Bluetooth Linux Support

    With devices beginning to hit store shelves using the new Intel WiFi 6 AX200 series chipsets, the firmware binaries have landed in linux-firmware.git for rounding out support for these latest WiFi/Bluetooth adapters.

    For a few kernel releases now since earlier this year these new Intel wireless chipsets have been supported by the mainline kernel but the firmware hasn't been part of the de facto linux-firmware.git tree that houses the various firmware binaries for different hardware component support under Linux.

  • Improving distfile mirror structure

    The Gentoo distfile mirror network is essential in distributing sources to our users. It offloads upstream download locations, improves throughput and reliability, guarantees distfile persistency.

    The current structure of distfile mirrors dates back to 2002. It might have worked well back when we mirrored around 2500 files but it proved not to scale well. Today, mirrors hold almost 70 000 files, and this number has been causing problems for mirror admins.

  • LibreOffice 6.2.7 packages available for Slackware 14.2

    There was a recent update in my repository of LibreOffice packages, but that libreoffice-6.3.2 was just for slackware-current.

    There’s a recent release in the LibreOffice 6.2 stable series as well (ok… five weeks ago, not that recent…), and so I decided to use my build box’s free weekend to come up with packages for LibreOffice 6.2.7.
    This release has a security improvement over previous versions, in that it will popup a warning to the user if a document tries to run an embedded script (similar to existing warning mechanism for embedded macros).

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Python, Perl and More

  • Uploading Files to AWS S3 with Python and Django

    In the quest to build more interactive websites, we don't only relay information to users but also allow them to upload data of their own. This opens up more opportunities and more ways that our websites can serve the end-users. By allowing users to upload files, we can allow them to share photographs, videos, or music with others or back them up for safekeeping. We can also provide the functionality to manage files and convert them into other formats through websites instead of installing native apps. The rise of social media globally can be attributed to the ability of users to upload their files, mostly in the form of images and videos for other users to see and also as a means of communication. By enabling users to upload files to websites and platforms, means of communication have been enhanced and information can now be spread in very many different formats. In this post, we will explore how Django handles file uploading and how we can tap into and extend this functionality with cloud storage to suit our needs.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #390 (Oct. 15, 2019)
  • The Python range() Function

    Python’s built-in range function is handy when you need to perform an action a specific number of times. As an experienced Pythonista, you’ve most likely used it before. But what does it do?

  • Perl 6 renamed to Raku

    The pull request changing the name of Perl 6 to Raku has been merged. See the full text for more information. "This document describes the steps to be taken to effectuate a rename of 'Perl 6' to 'Raku', as described in issue #81. It does not pretend to be complete in scope or in time. To change a name of a project that has been running for 19+ years will take time, a lot of effort and a lot of cooperation. It will affect people in foreseen and unforeseen ways."

  • Top three mistakes with K-Means Clustering during data analysis

    In this post, we will take a look at a few cases, where KMC algorithm does not perform well or may produce unintuitive results.

  • Agile project management: 10 mistakes to avoid

    Agile project management holds a lot of promise for leaders. Those who have successfully made the switch in their organizations sing agile’s praises, like the ability to rapidly course-correct, release software faster, and create happier teams and customers. But if you’ve been working at it for a while and you still aren’t seeing the promised benefits, you might start to think that agile is more hype than substance, or that it isn’t right for your organization.

Coming up on October 21: First Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.4!

LibreOffice 6.4 is being developed by our worldwide community, and is due to be released in early February 2020 – see the release notes describing the new features here. Of course, we’re still early in the development cycle, so many more features are still to come! In order to find, report and triage bugs, the LibreOffice QA team is organizing the first Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.4 on Monday October 21, 2019. Tests will be performed on the first Alpha version, which will be available on the pre-releases server a few days before the event. Builds will be available for Linux (DEB and RPM), macOS and Windows, and can be installed and run in parallel along with the production version. Mentors will be available from 07:00 UTC to 19:00 UTC for questions or help in the IRC channel #libreoffice-qa and the Telegram QA Channel. Of course, hunting bugs will be possible also on other days, as the builds of this particular Alpha release (LibreOffice 6.4.0 Alpha 1) will be available until mid November. Check the Release Plan. Read more Also: Microsoft Office for free? Try these great alternatives

Canonical/Ubuntu: Design and Web Team, Ubuntu ZFS Support, Weekly Newsletter

  • Design and Web team summary – 11 October 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. This cycle we had two sprints. The first was a web performance workshop run by the amazing Harry Roberts. It was a whirlwind two days where we learned a lot about networking, browsers, font loading and more. We also spent a day working on implementing a lot of the changes. Hopefully our sites will feel a bit faster. More updates will be coming over the next few months. The second sprint was for the Brand and Web team, where we looked at where the Canonical and Ubuntu brands need to evolve. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

  • Ubuntu ZFS support in 19.10: ZFS on root

    This is part 2 of our blog post series on our current and future work around ZFS on root support in ubuntu. If you didn’t yet read the introductory post, I strongly recommend you to do this first! Here we are going to discuss what landed by default ubuntu 19.10.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 600

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 600 for the week of October 6 – 12, 2019.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Linux Headlines, ArcoLinux 19.10.1 Run Through and More

  • 2019-10-15 | Linux Headlines

    A double dose of Python, AWS credits for open source projects, a new kernel development course from the Linux Foundation, and an exciting release for KDE Plasma.

  • A Chat with Allan Jude | Jupiter Extras 22

    Brent sits down for an in-person chat with Allan Jude for a retrospective storytelling of his beginnings in BSD, his long history with podcasting, BSDNow and Jupiter Broadcasting, a beginner's guide to the benefits of FreeBSD, with technical nuggets and nostalgic bits throughout. Allan Jude wears many hats including FreeBSD developer and member of the FreeBSD Core team, ZFS expert, co-founder and VP Engineering at Klara Inc., co-founder and VP Operations at ScaleEngine Inc., host of BSDNow, former host of TechSNAP among many others.

  • Podcast.__init__: Andrew's Adventures In Coderland

    Software development is a unique profession in many ways, and it has given rise to its own subculture due to the unique sets of challenges that face developers. Andrew Smith is an author who is working on a book to share his experiences learning to program, and understand the impact that software is having on our world. In this episode he shares his thoughts on programmer culture, his experiences with Python and other language communities, and how learning to code has changed his views on the world. It was interesting getting an anthropological perspective from a relative newcomer to the world of software. [...] Software development is a unique profession in many ways, and it has given rise to its own subculture due to the unique sets of challenges that face developers. Andrew Smith is an author who is working on a book to share his experiences learning to program, and understand the impact that software is having on our world. In this episode he shares his thoughts on programmer culture, his experiences with Python and other language communities, and how learning to code has changed his views on the world. It was interesting getting an anthropological perspective from a relative newcomer to the world of software.

  • 2019-10-14 | Linux Headlines

    Perl 6 is renamed, AWS goes metal with ARM, OnionShare just got a big upgrade, and Google has a new security dongle.

  • ArcoLinux 19.10.1 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at ArcoLinux 19.10.1. Enjoy!