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Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Server Planning A New Means For Automated Installations

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Ubuntu

Canonical's server team is working on a new means of carrying out automated installations of Ubuntu Server in time for their 20.04 LTS release.

Traditionally Ubuntu Server has supported automated installations in the same manner of Debian as they had been relying upon the text-based Debian Installer and thus allowed using pre-seeds. But since Ubuntu 18.04 LTS when they rolled out their new text-based installer for Ubuntu Server that isn't based on the long-standing Debian Installer, they lost the pre-seed support.

Rather than trying to support pre-seeds as in the same format as the Debian Installer, they are working on a new approach they hope to have ready by Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS. Their proposed approach is using YAML as the format for specifying the server installation data and makes different assumptions about what to do in the case of missing data and other behavior.

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Also: Robot lifecycle management with Ubuntu

Buying a Linux-ready laptop

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Linux

Recently, I bought and started using a Tuxedo Book BC1507, a Linux laptop computer. Ten years ago, if someone had told me that, by the end of the decade, I could buy top-quality, "penguin-ready" laptops from companies such as System76, Slimbook, and Tuxedo, I probably would have laughed. Well, now I'm laughing, but with joy!

Going beyond designing computers for free/libre open source software (FLOSS), all three companies recently announced they are trying to eliminate proprietary BIOS software by switching to Coreboot.

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Use HackMD to collaborate on open source projects

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OSS

HackMD.io is an open source, collaborative Markdown editor. It allows people to share, comment, and collaborate on documents. As open source software, users can choose between using the online platform or installing it as a local service using the upstream project CodiMD.

HackMD's primary feature is obviously the text editor; it leverages the Markdown language, provides handy tools like inserting checkboxes and horizontal separator lines, and allows users to visualize the Markdown rendering while they're working on a document. But HackMD's real power is in enabling collaboration. Let's have a closer look at those features.

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SBC runs Yocto or Debian on STM32MP1 SoC

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Linux
Debian

i2SOM offers its PanGu SBC based on ST’s dual-core STM32MP1 series SoC. It supports both Yocto and Debian and provides 1GB DRAM, HDMI, Ethernet, LCD, USB OTG, USB Host, TF Card, audio and other interfaces.

i2SOM has unveiled its PanGu SBC based on the STMicroelectronics (ST) STM32MP1 series SoC. The PanGu Board uses the STM32MP157AAA3 version of the SoC series. This version combines a 650MHz Arm dual-core Cortex-A7 core and 209MHz Cortex-M4 coprocessor with an FPU, MPU, and DSP instructions.

The PanGu Board integrates HDMI, 1000Mbps Ethernet, LCD, USB OTG, USB Host, TF Card, audio and other interfaces. The 70 mm × 105.5mm form factor board is designed for applications including industrial systems, the IoT, portable consumer electronics, automotive electronics and others. The PanGu supports Yocto Linux as well as the Jessie version of Debian.

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Indian politicians are missing a huge edutech leap by ignoring Raspberry Pi and Linux

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GNU
Linux

Around a decade ago, an India-based company called Datawind got a nod from the Central government to make and market a low-cost tablet PC called Aakash for students in the country. About half a decade before that — 2004, to be exact — the country launched GSAT-3 aka EDUSAT, its first satellite to be used entirely for the education sector.

Cut to the present, and it is more than two months since Datawind shut down permanently. Meanwhile, EDUSAT was deactivated in 2010, and has since been moved to a part of space that the world refers to as "graveyard orbit."

They were both examples of a political class thinking a little too ahead of time when it came to the technology needed for education. Something similar is now happening at the other end of the spectrum: While the world is agog about the latest iteration of the Raspberry Pi and an increasing number of people is adopting one or the other distro of Linux, most of India seems to be oblivious to both.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Re: [DNG] EvilGnome

    Basically, this doesn't strike me as even a tiny bit interesting. The template of '$EVILCODE does $STUFF to your system if you run it' raises the obvious question of 'What about _not_ running it?' By and large, code doesn't run itself, so failure to answer that 'one interesting question' means the interesting bit got omitted.

  • Web server security – Part 0: How to start

    Many server hardening or server security guides directly start with installing software packages and changing some configuration files. This is fine for experienced server administrators. However, people who try to set up their first server hit on problems and most importantly they very likely forget things that aren’t covered by such guides.

    So, please do not start to set up your first server by blindly following any guide on the internet (including our guides!).

  • “Sudo Mastery, 2nd Edition” open for tech review

    I need all reviews back by 5 August. This gives me time (if everything goes well) to have the book in print for vBSDCon. Assuming they accept my proposal, that is.

Daniel Pocock: Codes of Conduct and Hypocrisy

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OSS
Debian

In 2016, when serious accusations of sexual misconduct were made against a volunteer who participates in multiple online communities, the Debian Account Managers sent him a threat of expulsion and gave him two days to respond.

Yet in 2018, when Chris Lamb decided to indulge in removing members from the Debian keyring, he simply did it spontaneously, using the Debian Account Managers as puppets to do his bidding. Members targetted by these politically-motivated assassinations weren't given the same two day notice period as the person facing allegations of sexual assault.

Two days hardly seems like sufficient time to respond to such allegations, especially for the member who was ambushed the week before Christmas. What if such a message was sent when he was already on vacation and didn't even receive the message until January? Nonetheless, however crude, a two day response period is a process. Chris Lamb threw that process out the window. There is something incredibly arrogant about that, a leader who doesn't need to listen to people before making such a serious decision, it is as if he thinks being Debian Project Leader is equivalent to being God.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 10 tells us that Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations. They were probably thinking about more than a two day response period when they wrote that.

Any organization seeking to have a credible code of conduct seeks to have a clause equivalent to article 10. Yet the recent scandals in Debian and Wikimedia demonstrate what happens in the absence of such clauses. As Lord Denning put it, without any process or hearing, members are faced with the arbitrary authority of the despot.

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Installing five flavours of Linux on my new laptop

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GNU
Linux

I let the Windows setup procedure run on first boot, until I got to the point where it became clear to me that it is now impossible to install Windows without a Microsoft account. Absolutely impossible. Windows 10 has always asked for a Microsoft account during setup, but there was a tiny (nearly invisible) option to use only a local account, which I always did. Well, now that option is gone, and if you dig around long enough you can eventually find an explanation that says if you don't want to use a Microsoft account, well, you have to anyway, but after the installation is complete you can go back into the configuration and change it to use a local account.

So, that was the end of Windows on this new system. I have never had a Microsoft account, and I never will. I booted a Linux Live USB stick, deleted the Windows partition, and set about the task of installing a few of my favorite Linux distributions.

The first thing I had to do was get into the BIOS Setup Utility to disable UEFI Secure Boot. That turns out to be a bit more tricky than you might think, because there is a "POST hotkey delay (sec)" parameter in the BIOS which is initially set to 0, so there is very little time after power-on to press F10 before it starts to boot Windows (or at least tries to). Once into the BIOS Setup, I went to System Configuration / Boot Options / Secure Boot, and changed that to Disabled. While I was in there, I also changed the POST hotkey delay to 5 seconds. Save that (F10) and exit.

[...]

Installation was easy and uneventful; I noticed that Mint has improved their installer on UEFI systems so that it now allows you to choose the EFI Boot Partition, that's nice. Unfortunately it still installed the bootloader to a directory called "ubuntu", which can be inconvenient if you also have Ubuntu installed on the system.

Booting after the installation completed still brought up openSUSE by default, which is actually what I wanted – but if you wanted to boot Mint by default, it would simply require a trip through the BIOS Configuration again. In my case, I just generated a new grub configuration file on openSUSE (grub2-mkconfig), and it added Mint to the Grub boot menu.

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Games: Vagrus, Hive Quest, ATRIUM, GameMode, Elemental War, TerraTech, Higurashi When They Cry Hou, Citadel

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Gaming
  • The dark strategy RPG "Vagrus - The Riven Realms" is doing well, quite an experience to play

    Currently in "Open Access" on Fig, a hybrid Early Access/Crowdfunding model, Vagrus - The Riven Realms seems to be doing well.

    It's only been going for a couple of months but they've already managed to raise $23,071. It's an interesting system, where you back the campaign with your pledge and get immediate access. At various funding points, it unlocks the next part of their development roadmap with the very next milestone very close to being hit.

  • The strange real time strategy adventure "Hive Quest" is now on Kickstarter

    Love insects and other creepy crawlies? Hive Quest might be a game you will enjoy, one that's coming to Linux and it's now crowdfunding on Kickstarter.

    Inspired partially by the classic Black & White from Lionhead Studios, it's not meant to be graphically impressive. In fact, the developer opted to go for a more retro 3D look with it. Gameplay involves you managing a tribe, along with gathering resources like food to keep them going. It's a bit of an odd one, due to the mix of gameplay involved. It blends a strategy game with puzzles, exploration and a little mystery wrapped in an ancient magical theme with insects and spirits.

  • Strategy game "ATRIUM" released recently, it's pretty much the game Carcassonne

    Carcassonne is that you? Well if you want to play something almost the same, ATRIUM just recently released from Black Potion.

    ATRIUM is a tile-based digital board game, where the board gets built as you go. On each turn, a player can place down a tile which you're given two at random each time and a person, with different tiles giving different benefits. Some might turn your people into a powerful character, some might give you extra points and so on. You basically play each turn, until you run out of tiles and the person who has the most territory wins.

  • GameMode – A Tool To Improve Gaming Performance On Linux

    Ask some Linux users why they still sticks with Windows dual boot, probably the answer would be – “Games!”. It was true! Luckily, open source gaming platforms like Steam and Lutris have brought many games to Linux platforms and improved the Linux gaming experience significantly over the years. Today, I stumbled upon yet another Linux gaming-related, open source tool named GameMode, which allows the users to improve gaming performance on Linux.

    GameMode is basically a daemon/lib combo that lets the games optimise Linux system performance on demand. I thought GameMode is a kind of tool that would kill some resource-hungry tools running in the background. But it is different. What it does actually is just instruct the CPU to automatically run in Performance mode when playing games and helps the Linux users to get best possible performance out of their games.

    GameMode improves the gaming performance significantly by requesting a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS while playing the games.

  • Tower Defense game "Elemental War" leaves Early Access today

    Leaving Early Access today after nine months with a fresh update is Elemental War, a Tower Defense game from Clockwork Origins.

    This one is a little unusual, in the way that unlike a lot of Tower Defense games there's no story campaign to play through. Instead it offers multiple game modes for single-player including a standard 60 wave defence mode, a survival mode to go as long as you can and a hero mode where your enemies are given random abilities. On top of that, there's also a level editor and a versus online mode to send waves against other players.

  • Open-world sandbox adventure game "TerraTech" now has a co-op campaign for up to 4 players

    This is awesome. TerraTech is actually a really fun game for those who like to build vehicles and then go exploring and it just got a big update.

    Version 1.3 was released yesterday, building on the work they did in a previous update to give a co-op creative mode it now has a fully online co-op campaign mode. You will be sharing everything from the blocks available to the mission log, so it will require working together.

  • Chapter 7 of Higurashi When They Cry Hou is now out with Linux support

    After waiting a whole year, the seventh chapter of the Higurashi When They Cry Hou is now available with Higurashi When They Cry Hou - Ch.7 Minagoroshi.

    Continuing to support Linux just like all the other chapters, this highly rated series is worth a look for anyone who enjoys a good mystery. This is a kinetic/sound novel, not one if you like to pick lots of options and change the story. It's a linear experience but still worth going through if you like your novels.

  • Looks like Valve are developing another new game, something to do with "Citadel"

    Warm up that cup of speculation, as it appears Valve are working on another game that seems to be going by the name of Citadel.

    Linking into Half-Life, since the Citadel is the HQ from where the Combine govern Earth. Apparently though, this is entirely separate to the unannounced Half-Life VR game with Citadel being a completely different Source 2 project. As always though, do not take this as any form of confirmation.

Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta

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Reviews

Today we are looking at Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta. Feren OS Next is Feren's distro in development, a work in progress, but it is improving a lot and this is a major release for this distro, as it is now called Beta.

It is based on Ubuntu 18.04.2, uses Linux Kernel 4.18 and KDE Plasma 5.16.3. It uses about 700MB of ram when idling.

Since the last point release, its highly customized features have been stabilized, not perfect yet as expected, and new features and graphical art has been added. It is truly becoming a beautiful and unique KDE Plasma distro.

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Original/video: Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta Run Through

Kernel: NVMe and VirtIO-IOMMU

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu/Debian: Comparison of Memory Usages, Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) End of Life and More

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Comparison of Memory Usages of Ubuntu 19.04 and Flavors in 2019

    Continuing my previous Mem. Comparison 2018, here's my 2019 comparison with all editions of Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo". The operating system editions I use here are the eight: Ubuntu Desktop, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Budgie. I installed every one of them on my laptop and (immediately at first login) took screenshot of the System Monitor (or Task Manager) without doing anything else. I present here the screenshots along with each variant's list of processes at the time I took them. And, you can download the ODS file I used to create the chart below. Finally, I hope this comparison helps all of you and next time somebody can make better comparisons.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) End of Life reached on July 18 2019
    This is a follow-up to the End of Life warning sent earlier this month
    to confirm that as of today (July 18, 2019), Ubuntu 18.10 is no longer
    supported.  No more package updates will be accepted to 18.10, and
    it will be archived to old-releases.ubuntu.com in the coming weeks.
    
    
    
    
    The original End of Life warning follows, with upgrade instructions:
    
    
    
    
    Ubuntu announced its 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release almost 9 months
    ago, on October 18, 2018.  As a non-LTS release, 18.10 has a 9-month
    support cycle and, as such, the support period is now nearing its
    end and Ubuntu 18.10 will reach end of life on Thursday, July 18th.
    
    
    
    
    At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include
    information or updated packages for Ubuntu 18.10.
    
    
    
    
    The supported upgrade path from Ubuntu 18.10 is via Ubuntu 19.04.
    Instructions and caveats for the upgrade may be found at:
    
    
    
    
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DiscoUpgrades
    
    
    
    
    Ubuntu 19.04 continues to be actively supported with security updates
    and select high-impact bug fixes.  Announcements of security updates
    for Ubuntu releases are sent to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing
    list, information about which may be found at:
    
    
    
    
    https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-security-announce
    
    
    
    
    Since its launch in October 2004 Ubuntu has become one of the most
    highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users in homes,
    schools, businesses and governments around the world. Ubuntu is Open
    Source software, costs nothing to download, and users are free to
    customise or alter their software in order to meet their needs.
    
    
    
    
    On behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team,
    
    
    
    
    Adam Conrad
    
  • CMake leverages the Snapcraft Summit with Travis CI to build snaps

    CMake is an open-source, cross-platform family of tools designed to build, test and package software. It is used to control the software compilation process and generate native makefiles and workspaces that can be used in any compiler environment. 

    While some users of CMake want to stay up to date with the latest release, others want to be able to stay with a known version and choose when to move forward to newer releases, picking up just the minor bug fixes for the feature release they are tracking. Users may also occasionally need to roll back to an earlier feature release, such as when a bug or a change introduced in a newer CMake version exposes problems within their project.

    Craig Scott, one of the co-maintainers of CMake, sees snaps as an excellent solution to these needs. Snaps’ ability to support separate tracks for each feature release in addition to giving users the choice of following official releases, release candidates or bleeding edge builds are an ideal fit. When he received an invitation to the 2019 Snapcraft Summit, he was keen to work directly with those at the pointy end of developing and supporting the snap system. 

  • Ubuntu's Zsys Client/Daemon For ZFS On Linux Continues Maturing For Eoan

    Looking ahead to Ubuntu 19.10 as the cycle before Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, one of the areas exciting us with the work being done by Canonical is (besides the great upstream GNOME performance work) easily comes down to the work they are pursuing on better ZFS On Linux integration with even aiming to offer ZFS as a file-system option from their desktop installer. A big role in their ZoL play is also the new "Zsys" component they have been developing. 

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

European Events: Apache and GStreamer

Filed under
OSS
  • ApacheCon Europe 2019 Schedule Revealed by The Apache Software Foundation

    If you’ve been following Apache Software Foundation (ASF) announcements for ApacheCon 2019, you must be aware of the conference in Las Vegas (ApacheCon North America) from September 9 to September 12.

    And, recently, they announced their plans for ApacheCon Europe 2019 to be held on 22-24 October 2019 at the iconic Kulturbrauerei in Berlin, Germany. It is going to be one of the major events by ASF this year. In this article, we shall take a look at the details revealed as of yet.

  • GStreamer in Oslo

    Aaron discussed various ways to record RTSP streams when used with playbin and brought up some of his pending merge requests around the closed captioning renderer and Active Format Description (AFD) support, with a discussion about redoing the renderer properly, and in Rust.

    George discussed a major re-work of the gst-omx bufferpool code that he has been doing and then moved his focus on Qt/Android support. He mostly focused on the missing bits, discussing builds and infrastructure issues with Nirbheek and myself, and going through his old patches.

Latest Openwashing: Amazon, RedMonk/Microsoft/GitHub, Linux Foundation Energy, B2B on Red Hat/IBM Site

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OSS

Security, DRM and Privacy

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, firefox, and squid), CentOS (thunderbird and vim), Debian (libonig), SUSE (firefox, glibc, kernel, libxslt, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (libreoffice and thunderbird).

  • EvilGnomes Linux malware record activities & spy on users [Ed: This is something the user actually installs, harming his/her machine. Original post here.]]

    Dubbed EvilGnomes by researchers; the malware was found masquerading as a Gnome shell extension targeting Linux’s desktop users.

  • Mike Driscoll: New Malicious Python Libraries Found Targeting Linux

    They were written by a user named ruri12. These packages were removed by the PyPI team on July 9, 2019. However they were available since November 2017 and had been downloaded fairly regularly.

    See the original article for more details.

    As always, when using a package that you aren’t familiar with, be sure to do your own thorough vetting to be sure you are not installing malware accidentally.

  • Latest Huawei 'Smoking Gun' Still Doesn't Prove Global Blackball Effort's Primary Justification

    We've noted a few times now how the protectionist assault against Huawei hasn't been supported by much in the way of public evidence. As in, despite widespread allegations that Huawei helps China spy on Americans wholesale, nobody has actually been able to provide any hard public evidence proving that claim. That's a bit of a problem when you're talking about a global blackballing effort. Especially when previous investigations as long as 18 months couldn't find evidence of said spying, and many US companies have a history of ginning up security fears simply because they don't want to compete with cheaper Chinese kit.

    That said, a new report (you can find the full thing here) dug through the CVs of many Huawei executives and employees, and found that a small number of "key mid-level technical personnel employed by Huawei have strong backgrounds in work closely associated with intelligence gathering and military activities."

  • No love lost between security specialists and developers

    Unless you've been under a rock, you've noticed hardly a day goes by without another serious security foul-up. While there's plenty of blame to go around for these endless security problems, some of it goes to developers who write bad code.

    That makes sense. But when GitLab, a DevOps company, surveyed over 4,000 developers and operators, they found 68% of the security professionals surveyed believe it's a programmer's job to write secure code, but they also think less than half of developers can spot security holes.

  • GitLab Survey Surfaces Major DevSecOps Challenges Ahead

    A report based on a survey of 4,071 software professionals published this week by GitLab, a provider of a continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD) platform, found that while appreciation of the potential value of DevSecOps best practices is high, the ability to implement those practices is uneven at best.

  • GitLab Survey Reveals Disconnect Between Developer And Security Teams

    In a survey conducted by GitLab, software professionals recognize the need for security to be baked into the development lifecycle, but the survey showed long-standing friction between security and development teams remain. While 69% of developers say they’re expected to write secure code, nearly half of security pros surveyed (49%) said they struggle to get developers to make remediation of vulnerabilities a priority. And 68% of security professionals feel fewer than half of developers are able to spot security vulnerabilities later in the lifecycle.

  • Cook: security things in Linux v5.2

    Over on his blog, Kees Cook runs through the security changes that came in Linux 5.2.

  • Doctorow's novella "Unauthorized Bread" explains why we have to fight DRM today to avoid a grim future

    Salima has a problem: her Boulangism toaster is locked down with software that ensures that it will only toast bread sold to her by the Boulangism company… and as Boulangism has gone out of business, there's no way to buy authorized bread. Thus, Salima can no longer have toast.

    This sneakily familiar scenario sends our resourceful heroine down a rabbit hole into the world of hacking appliances, but it also puts her in danger of losing her home -- and prosecution under the draconian terms of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Her story, told in the novella “Unauthorized Bread,” which opens Cory Doctorow’s recent book Radicalized, guides readers through a process of discovering what Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) is, and how the future can look mightily grim if we don’t join forces to stop DRM now.

    “Unauthorized Bread” takes place in the near future, maybe five or ten years at most, and the steady creep of technology that takes away more than it gives has simply advanced a few degrees. Salima and her friends and neighbors are refugees, and they live precariously in low-income housing equipped with high-tech, networked appliances. These gizmos and gadgets may seem nifty on the surface, but immediately begin to exact an unacceptable price, since they require residents to purchase the expensive approved bread for the toaster, the expensive approved dishes for the dishwasher, and so on. And just as Microsoft can whisk away ebooks that people “own” by closing down its ebook service, the vagaries of the business world cause Boulangism to whisk away Salima’s ability to use her own toaster.

  • New Linux Malware Called EvilGnome Discovered; First Preview of Fedora CoreOS Now Available; Germany Bans Schools from Using Microsoft, Google and Apple; VirtualBox 6.0.10 Released; and Sparky 5.8 Has New Live/Install Media for Download

    Germany has banned its schools from using cloud-based productivity suites from Microsoft, Google, and Apple, because the companies weren't meeting the country's privacy requirements. Naked Security reports, that the statement from the Hessische Beauftragte für Datenschutz und Informationsfreiheit (Hesse Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, or HBDI) said, "The digital sovereignty of state data processing must be guaranteed. With the use of the Windows 10 operating system, a wealth of telemetry data is transmitted to Microsoft, whose content has not been finally clarified despite repeated inquiries to Microsoft. Such data is also transmitted when using Office 365." The HBDI also stressed that "What is true for Microsoft is also true for the Google and Apple cloud solutions. The cloud solutions of these providers have so far not been transparent and comprehensible set out. Therefore, it is also true that for schools, privacy-compliant use is currently not possible."

  • Microsoft, Google and Apple clouds banned in Germany’s schools

    Germany just banned its schools from using cloud-based productivity suites from Microsoft, Google, and Apple. The tech giants aren’t satisfying its privacy requirements with their cloud offerings, it warned.

    The Hessische Beauftragte für Datenschutz und Informationsfreiheit (Hesse Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, or HBDI) made the statement following a review of Microsoft Office 365’s suitability for schools.

  • Microsoft, Google and Apple clouds banned in Germanys schools

    Did you know that Germany just banned its schools from using cloud-based productivity suites from Microsoft, Google, and Apple? The tech giants aren’t satisfying its privacy requirements with their cloud offerings, it warned. What are your thoughts?

    The Hessische Beauftragte für Datenschutz und Informationsfreiheit (Hesse Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, or HBDI) made the statement following a review of Microsoft Office 365’s suitability for schools.

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, Lunduke, Linux Journal, BSD Now and TLLTS

Filed under
Interviews

Fedora, Red Hat Learning Community and Kubernetes

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.2. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, July 22, 2019 through Monday, July 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • Red Hat Learning Community fosters open source tech education and reaches 10k members

    We are pleased to announce that the Red Hat Learning Community has reached more than 10,000 members! Since its launch in September 2018, the community has shown itself to be a valuable hub for those seeking to share knowledge and build their open source skill set.

    When we first started out, this was just an idea. We set out to support, enable, and motivate new and experienced open source learners as they learn how to work with Red Hat technologies, validate their technical skill sets, build careers and pursue Red Hat Certifications. We soft launched the community in July 2018 and invited 400 Red Hat Training instructors, students, curriculum developers and certifications team members to jump-start community discussion boards and earn a founding member badge.

  • skuba Dives into Open Source Waters

    SUSE CaaS Platform 4, our next major release is now in beta. It has major architectural improvements for our customers. In the process of planning and developing it, we took a close look at bootstrapping clusters and managing node membership, and we listened to our customers. One of the things we heard from many of them was that they wanted a way to deploy multiple clusters efficiently, by scripting the bootstrap process or by integrating it into other management tools they use.
    To address this, we committed even more strongly to our upstream participation in Kubernetes development. Instead of building SUSE-specific tools as we had in earlier versions, we contributed the efforts of SUSE engineers to the upstream kubeadm component, helping it bridge the gap between its current state and the abilities we had previously implemented in the Velum web interface. Our bootstrap and node management strategy in version 4 is built on kubeadm.

  • Deprecated APIs Removed In 1.16: Here’s What You Need To Know

    As the Kubernetes API evolves, APIs are periodically reorganized or upgraded. When APIs evolve, the old API is deprecated and eventually removed.

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