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Sunday, 17 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Mesa, Vega and ETC2 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2019 - 3:13am
Story Bitmain SoC Support Coming To Linux 5.1 - Sophon ARMv8 + RISC-V Chip For Deep Learning Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2019 - 3:11am
Story Debian Developers' Updates and Python Bits Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2019 - 3:07am
Story Tales of colours: GIMP and Latte Dock (KDE) Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2019 - 3:05am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2019 - 3:03am
Story 4 Excellent Command-line FTP clients Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2019 - 2:58am
Story Xfce apps – In the land of Tux, where the shadows lie Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2019 - 2:37am
Story Compiz 0.9.14.0 released Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2019 - 2:35am
Story Updated Debian 9: 9.8 released Rianne Schestowitz 1 17/02/2019 - 2:26am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2019 - 5:56pm

Opening Files with Qt on Android

Filed under
Android
KDE

After addressing Android support in KF5Notifications another fairly generic task that so far required Android specific code is next: opening files. Due to the security isolation of apps and the way the native “file dialog” works on Android this is quite different from other platforms, which makes application code a bit ugly. This can be fixed in Qt though.

Read more

Ubuntu-Centric Full Circle Magazine and Debian on the Raspberryscape

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #121
  • Debian on the Raspberryscape: Great news!

    I already mentioned here having adopted and updated the Raspberry Pi 3 Debian Buster Unofficial Preview image generation project. As you might know, the hardware differences between the three families are quite deep ? The original Raspberry Pi (models A and Cool, as well as the Zero and Zero W, are ARMv6 (which, in Debian-speak, belong to the armel architecture, a.k.a. EABI / Embedded ABI). Raspberry Pi 2 is an ARMv7 (so, we call it armhf or ARM hard-float, as it does support floating point instructions). Finally, the Raspberry Pi 3 is an ARMv8-A (in Debian it corresponds to the ARM64 architecture).

    [...]

    As for the little guy, the Zero that sits atop them, I only have to upload a new version of raspberry3-firmware built also for armel. I will add to it the needed devicetree files. I have to check with the release-team members if it would be possible to rename the package to simply raspberry-firmware (as it's no longer v3-specific).

    Why is this relevant? Well, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular ARM machine ever. It is a board people love playing with. It is the base for many, many, many projects. And now, finally, it can run with straight Debian! And, of course, if you don't trust me providing clean images, you can prepare them by yourself, trusting the same distribution you have come to trust and love over the years.

OSS: SVT-AV1, LibreOffice, FSF and Software Freedom Conservancy

Filed under
OSS
  • SVT-AV1 Already Seeing Nice Performance Improvements Since Open-Sourcing

    It was just a few weeks ago that Intel open-sourced the SVT-AV1 project as a CPU-based AV1 video encoder. In the short time since publishing it, there's already been some significant performance improvements. 

    Since the start of the month, SVT-AV1 has added multi-threaded CDEF search, more AVX optimizations, and other improvements to this fast evolving AV1 encoder. With having updated the test profile against the latest state as of today, here's a quick look at the performance of this Intel open-source AV1 video encoder.

  • Find a LibreOffice community member near you!

    Hundreds of people around the world contribute to each new version of LibreOffice, and we’ve interviewed many of them on this blog. Now we’ve collected them together on a map (thanks to OpenStreetMap), so you can see who’s near you, and find out more!

  • What I learned during my internship with the FSF tech team

    Hello everyone, I am Hrishikesh, and this is my follow-up blog post concluding my experiences and the work I did during my 3.5 month remote internship with the FSF. During my internship, I worked with the tech team to research and propose replacements for their network monitoring infrastructure.

    A few things did not go quite as planned, but a lot of good things that I did not plan happened along the way. For example, I planned to work on GNU LibreJS, but never could find enough time for it. On the other hand, I gained a lot of system administration experience by reading IRC conversations, and by working on my project. I even got to have a brief conversation with RMS!

    My mentors, Ian, Andrew, and Ruben, were extremely helpful and understanding throughout my internship. As someone who previously had not worked with a team, I learned a lot about teamwork. Aside from IRC, we interacted weekly in a conference call via phone, and used the FSF's Etherpad instance for live collaborative editing, to take notes.

    The first two months were mostly spent studying the FSF's existing Nagios- and Munin-based monitoring and alert system, to understand how it works. The tech team provided two VMs for experimenting with Prometheus and Nagios, which I used throughout the internship. During this time, I also spent a lot of time reading about licenses, and other posts about free software published by the FSF.

  • We're Hiring: Techie Bookkeeper

    Software Freedom Conservancy is looking for a new employee to help us with important work that supports our basic operations. Conservancy is a nonprofit charity that promotes and improves free and open source software projects. We are home to almost 50 projects, including Git, Inkscape, Etherpad, phpMyAdmin, and Selenium (to name a few). Conservancy is the home of Outreachy, an award winning diversity intiative, and we also work hard to improve software freedom generally. We are a small but dedicated staff, handling a very large number of financial transactions per year for us and our member projects.

Security: Back Doors Running Amok, Container Runtime Flaw Patched, Cisco Ships Exploit Inside Products

Filed under
Security
  • Here We Go Again: 127 Million Accounts Stolen From 8 More Websites

    Several days ago, a hacker put 617 million accounts from 16 different websites for sale on the dark web. Now, the same hacker is offering 127 million more records from another eight websites.

  • Hacker who stole 620 million records strikes again, stealing 127 million more

    A hacker who stole close to 620 million user records from 16 websites has stolen another 127 million records from eight more websites, TechCrunch has learned.

    The hacker, whose listing was the previously disclosed data for about $20,000 in bitcoin on a dark web marketplace, stole the data last year from several major sites — some that had already been disclosed, like more than 151 million records from MyFitnessPal and 25 million records from Animoto. But several other hacked sites on the marketplace listing didn’t know or hadn’t disclosed yet — such as 500px and Coffee Meets Bagel.

    The Register, which first reported the story, said the data included names, email addresses and scrambled passwords, and in some cases other login and account data — though no financial data was included.

  • Vendors Issue Patches for Linux Container Runtime Flaw Enabling Host Attacks
  • How did the Dirty COW exploit get shipped in software?

    An exploit code for Dirty COW was accidentally shipped by Cisco with product software. Learn how this code ended up in a software release and what this vulnerability can do.

10 Cool Software to Try from CORP Repo in Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Software

In this article, we will share 10 cool software projects to try in Fedora distribution. All the apps or tools covered here can be found in COPR repository. However, before we move any further, let’s briefly explain COPR.

Read more

Mozilla: Extensions in Firefox 66 and Jingle Smash (VR)

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Extensions in Firefox 66

    I want to start by highlighting an important change that has a major, positive impact for Firefox users. Starting in release 66, extensions use IndexedDB as the backend for local storage instead of a JSON file. This results in a significant performance improvement for many extensions, while simultaneously reducing the amount of memory that Firefox uses.

    This change is completely transparent to extension developers – you do not need to do anything to take advantage of this improvement. When users upgrade to Firefox 66, the local storage JSON file is silently migrated to IndexedDB. All extensions using the storage.local() API immediately realize the benefits, especially if they store small changes to large structures, as is true for ad-blockers, the most common and popular type of extension used in Firefox.

    The video below, using Adblock Plus as an example, shows the significant performance improvements that extension users could see.

  • Jingle Smash: Geometry and Textures

    I’m not a designer or artist. In previous demos and games I’ve used GLTFs, which are existing 3D models created by someone else that I downloaded into my game. However, for Jingle Smash I decided to use procedural generation, meaning I combined primitives in interesting ways using code. I also generated all of the textures with code. I don’t know how to draw pretty textures by hand in a painting tool, but 20 years of 2D coding means I can code up a texture pretty easily.

    Jingle Smash has three sets of graphics: the blocks, the balls, and the background imagery. Each set uses its own graphics technique.

Voters Choose Two New Board Members and One Incumbent to openSUSE Board

Filed under
SUSE

Out of 446 eligible voters, 46 more openSUSE Members than last elections, only 231 — 6 fewer than last elections — chose to cast their votes, leaving last spring’s elections holding the record both for most ballots cast and largest percentage of Members who took enough interest in openSUSE to take the time to cast their votes.

Incumbent Christian Boltz aka cboltz garnered the most votes with a total of 141 votes — more than half of those who voted — confirming the Community’s confidence in him. He was followed closely by Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha with 119 votes — also more than half of the active voters — and Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB with 104 votes, almost half.

As incumbent, Christian is already sitting on the Board and will continue his duties for his second two-year term. Marina and Axel are expected to join him and take their seats for their first two-year terms sometime within the next couple of weeks.

Read more

Wayland's Weston 6.0 To Support XDG-Shell Stable, Helping Apps Like MPV Video Player

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

While the current Wayland/Weston release cycle is a bit behind schedule, it has allowed time for another addition to be made to the Weston 6.0 compositor.

Weston 6.0 now has support for the XDG-Shell stable protocol where as previously it only exposed the XDG-Shell v6 unstable protocol. The two versions of the XDG-Shell protocol are quite close so it wasn't much work involved, but newer Wayland-supported apps like the MPV video player are explicitly looking for the stable version of the protocol.

Read more

Also: The Linux Vendor Firmware Service Has Served Up More Than 5 Million Firmware Files

Latte bug fix release v0.8.6

Filed under
KDE

Latte Dock v0.8.6 has been released containing important fixes and improvements!

Read more

Also: The Long Road to Long-Term Goals

What’s New in Linux Mint 19.1 Xfce Edition

Filed under
Reviews

Linux Mint 19.1 XFCE is the latest release of Linux Mint 19.1 that uses lightweight Xfce desktop environment 4.12. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop experience more comfortable.

The Update Manager is able to list mainline kernels and to show their support status. The Software Sources tool was given a new look. Similar to the welcome screen, it’s now using an Xapp sidebar and a headerbar. The Language Settings and the Input Methods are now two separate applications and the user interface for the Input Methods tool was revamped. It uses an icon sidebar and now shows a dedicated page for each supported language.

Based on Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS an powered by Linux Kernel 4.19, Linux Mint 19.1 Xfce edition also include pre-installed applications Thunar File Manager 1.6.15, Mozilla Firefox 65, Archive Manager 3.28, Gnome Disk 3.28, Hexchat 2.14, Thundebird 60, GIMP 2.8, Transmission Torrent Client 2.92, Rythmbox Music Manager 3.4.2, VLC Player 3.0.4, Xfce Dictionary 0.8, Libre Office Suite 6.0.6, Xfce Terminal 0.8, GNOME Fonts 3.28, Synaptic package Manager 0.84.

Read more

GNU/Linux: System76, HP Chromebook and Samsung Tablet

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • System76 refreshes Serval WS Linux laptop with 9th Gen Intel Core CPUs and NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20-Series GPUs

    Nowadays, many consumers put a premium on having a thin and light computer. This is understandable, as no one wants to lug around a big and heavy notebook. With that said, some people only care about raw power -- weight and size be damned. System76's Serval WS is one such laptop -- insanely powerful, but boy howdy, it is a biggun! The 15-inch model weighs 7.5 pounds, while the 17-inch variant tips the scales at 8.6!

    Today, System76 launches a refreshed version of the Linux laptop. It features desktop-class 9th Generation Intel Core processors, which is cool, but arguably more intriguing is the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20-Series GPU options -- 2060, 2070, or 2080. Yeah, this refreshed Serval WS is an absolute beast!

  • HP Chromebook X2 down to $399 for My Best Buy members

    Wow. I just heard from Scott, an About Chromebooks reader, who tipped me off to a $200 savings on the HP Chromebook X2. This is specifically for my Best Buy members as part of an early access President’s Day sale, which is open to all consumers starting Friday. Normally priced at $599.00, the HP Chromebook X2 is down to $399 until midnight tonight, central time.

  • Samsung Announces Galaxy Tab S5e Tablet with Android 9 Pie, Ultra Thin Design

    Samsung announced today the Galaxy Tab S5e tablet with a stylish and versatile design, and components to help you enjoy the best possible content from your favorite streaming services.
    The Galaxy Tab S5e tablet is built for connectivity and entertainment, says Samsung, which means that it comes with support for 4K UHD (Ultra HD) content so you won't have to make any compromise when watching your favorite TV shows and movies. Its 10.5-inch Edge to Edge Super AMOLED display features 16:10 screen ratio and UHD 4K (3840x2160) at 60fps video playback.

Microsoft and IBM Spin/PR

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE
  • Windows 10 Will Finally Offer Easy Access to Linux Files [Ed: No, this is more WSL entrapment. They try to prevent people from using proper GNU/Linux with the actual kernel, either standalone or dual-boot. This is also about surveillance on one's files, keys, keystrokes, everything.]
  • Zowe Makes Mainframe Evergreen [Ed: Swapnil Bhartiya greenwashing and openwashing 2-in-1]

    Zowe also offers a vendor-agnostic experience allowing users to mix and match tooling and technologies. It provides interoperability, through the latest web technologies, products, and solutions from multiple vendors, and it allows developers to use the familiar, industry-standard, open source tools to access mainframe resources and services.

  • The ibmvnic driver with SR-IOV is now supported by SLES 12 and SLES 15 on IBM POWER9 processor-based systems

    The ibmvnic driver enables PowerVM Single Root I/O Virtualizations (SR-IOV) for improved network capabilities including reduced systems processor utilization, decreased network latency, and enforcement of network Quality of Service.

Games: Hollow Knight: Silksong, Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus and Dusk

Filed under
Gaming

New Releases and Video: Archman and ArcoLinux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Mir 1.1.1 Release Candidate

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mir 1.1.1 - release candidate

    I’ve just kicked off the process for a bugfix release of Mir. An initial release-candidate is currently building in ppa:mir-tream/rc.

  • Mir 1.1.1 RC1 Has Fixes For PostmarketOS, Demo Shells Using Wayland

    Mir 1.1 was released back in December as the first post-1.0 feature update while now preparing for release is the Mir 1.1.1 maintenance milestone.

    Canonical's Alan Griffiths has tagged the Mir 1.1.1 release candidate today as the newest bug-fix release. Highlights include:

    - Fixing issues with PostmarketOS support, particularly around its usage of the musl C library rather than Glibc. PostmarketOS is the mobile Linux distribution derived from Alpine Linux that's been having a steady following in recent times and running on the Nexus 5/7, Nokia N9, and other devices.

Programming: Choosing Between Go and Rust, Python, R-tree and R

Filed under
Development
  • The developer’s dilemma: Choosing between Go and Rust

    If you were to make a list of important programming languages that have appeared in the past decade, Go and Rust would almost certainly be featured on it.

    Similarly, if you were to sit down and think about which programming languages are best suited to developing secure, microservices-friendly frameworks or applications today, you might find yourself debating between Go and Rust.

    If you’re struggling to decide whether Go or Rust is a better language for your development needs, keep reading. This post compares Go and Rust, explaining how they are similar, how they’re different, and what each can do for you.

  • pprint.isrecursive: Check if object requires recursive representation
  • Performance benchmark on mdds R-tree

    I must say that I am overall very pleased with the performance of R-tree. I can already envision various use cases where R-tree will be immensely useful. One area I’m particularly interested in is spreadsheet application’s formula dependency tracking mechanism which involves tracing through chained dependency targets to broadcast cell value changes. Since the spreadsheet organizes its data in terms of row and column positions which is 2-dimensional in nature, R-tree can probably be useful for speeding things up in that area.

  • In memory of Monty Hall

    To explore this a bit further and to have a nice exercise with R, a small simulation of games is created.

Software: Pitivi, PackageKit, 23 Electron Applications You Should Know About and More

Filed under
Software
  • Polishing Pitivi's viewer

    In the Pitivi video editor, the viewer is quite important, as it shows the video. Our viewer also shows a discreet frame around a clip selected in the timeline, making it easy to resize and position the video of the clip by dragging. Below is the story of the viewer updates in the past year.

    [...]

    Normally the viewer is used to display the project video at the playhead position, but we also use it to display the start or end margins of a clip when it is being trimmed.

    [...]

    Pitivi benefits from the GStreamer multimedia framework used on most Linux desktops and we contribute back in multiple ways. We could use some more hands on Pitivi. Contributions of any type would be greatly appreciated. Come chat with us. If you're a student, you can join us doing a GSoC internship this summer!

  • PackageKit is dead, long live, well, something else

    It’s probably no surprise to many of you that PackageKit has been in maintenance mode for quite some time. Although started over ten years ago (!) it’s not really had active maintenance since about 2014. Of course, I’ve still been merging PRs and have been slinging tarballs over the wall every few months, but nothing new was happening with the project, and I’ve worked on many other things since.

    I think it’s useful for a little retrospective. PackageKit was conceived as an abstraction layer over about a dozen different package management frameworks. Initially it succeeded, with a lot of front ends UIs being written for the PackageKit API, making the Linux desktop a much nicer place for many years. Over the years, most package managers have withered and died, and for the desktop at least really only two remain, .rpm and .deb. The former being handled by the dnf PackageKit backend, and the latter by aptcc.

  • How to watch for releases of upstream projects

    Do you want to know when a new version of your favorite project is released? Do you want to make your job as packager easier? If so, this article is for you. It introduces you to the world of release-monitoring.org. You’ll see how it can help you catch up with upstream releases.

  • 23 Electron Applications You Should Know About

    Here we present the best Electron applications available for Linux desktops, including Ubuntu, as well as macOS and Windows too.

    We’ve written about a lot of diverse Electron apps over the past few years, ranging from desktop podcast clients to popular IDEs.

    Not everyone appreciates Electron’s cross-platform versatility as much as we do. Heck, I once wrote an opinion piece explaining why Electron apps aren’t evil. Some have issues with the amount of memory Electron apps use up, the CPU cycles they eat up, and the disk size they take up.

    But there are those who don’t mind using the odd Electron app here or there, to plug a gap. So I figured a roundup spotlighting some to the very best Electron applications available for Linux (and other OSes) could still be of interest.

  • 10 Benefits of Publishing Your App in the Snap Store [Video]

    Canonical's Alan Pope lists 10 benefits of publishing apps in the Snap store. His talk was recorded at the FOSDEM Linux conference in Belgium.

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FinalCrypt – An Open Source File Encryption Application

FnalCrypt is a free and open source encryption tool that allows you to encrypt files with a key. It is available for Linux, Windows and macOS. Read more

Fedora's Adoption of Cgroups V2 and Fedora Infrastructure Detective Work

  • Fedora 31 Planning To Use Cgroups V2 By Default
    While the Linux kernel has shipped Cgroups V2 as stable since early 2016, on Fedora and most other Linux distributions it hasn't been enabled by default over the original control groups "Cgroups" implementation. But come Fedora 31 later this year, they are now planning to make it the default. Enabling Cgroups V2 by default will allow systemd and the various Linux container technologies along with libvirt and friends to make use of the new features and improvements over the original Cgroups like offering a unified hierarchy. The new implementation also provides better consistency, purpose-driven flexibility, and other design improvements over the original control groups. It's taken a while for CGroups V2 to become the default due to interface changes compared to V1 and all of the important containers/tooling needing to be adapted to make use of it.
  • Fedora Infrastructure Detective Work: Mirrorlist 503's
    The Fedora Project Mirrorlist system has evolved multiple times in the last 10 years. Originally written by Matt Domsch it underwent an update and rewrite by Adrian Reber, et al a couple of years ago. For many years Fedora used a server layout where the front end web servers would proxy the data over VPN to dedicated mirrorlist servers. While this made sense when systems were a bit slower compared to VPN latency, it had become more troublesome over the last couple of years.

GNU FreeDink 109.6

  • GNU FreeDink 109.6
    This is the first official announcement for the new 109.x line with updated technologies (SDL2, OpenGL), WebAssembly support and many fixes and improvements.
  • GNU's RPG/Adventure Game Updated For SDL2, Defaults To OpenGL Rendering
    Of the many free software projects under the GNU umbrella, there aren't many games. One of the only titles is GNU FreeDink, which is out this weekend with its newest update after several active weeks of development.

Microsoft Now Calls Windows "Linux" (Misleading People)