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Saturday, 22 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux - The beginning of the end Roy Schestowitz 2 22/09/2018 - 8:42am
Story Top Linux Distros for Software Developers Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2018 - 8:31am
Story Security: Updates, NewEgg Breach, "Master Password" and CLIP OS Roy Schestowitz 1 22/09/2018 - 7:47am
Story Source Code From Deutsche Telekom Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2018 - 7:42am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 1 22/09/2018 - 7:38am
Story Debian Patches for Intel's Defects, Canonical to Fix Ubuntu Security Flaws for a Fee Roy Schestowitz 5 22/09/2018 - 7:34am
Story Elementary OS Juno Beta 2 Released Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2018 - 7:24am
Story Security: Windows/NSA Back Doors and Exploits (EternalBlue), Rust Flaw, Roughtime, DDOS Hype and "The Lucy Gang" Roy Schestowitz 2 22/09/2018 - 7:07am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2018 - 6:51am
Story The Linux Kernel Adopts A Code of Conduct Roy Schestowitz 8 22/09/2018 - 6:27am

FOSS Project Spotlight: Nitrux, a Linux Distribution with a Focus on AppImages and Atomic Upgrades

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Nitrux is a Linux distribution with a focus on portable, application formats like AppImages. Nitrux uses KDE Plasma 5 and KDE Applications, and it also uses our in-house software suite Nomad Desktop.

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Outreachy Opens Applications For Open-Source Winter 2018 Internship Program

Filed under
OSS

For eligible students or others with time to participate, the winter 2018 round of the Outreachy program openened this week for applications.

This next round of the Outreachy program runs from December to March and accepted participants receive a $5,500 USD stipend as well as a $500 travel allowance. As is always the case with Outreachy, the program isn't limited to programming tasks but also include documentation, UI/UX work, illustrations, and other areas. These projects are very diverse and range from a coloring book to this year's VKMS work.

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Mesa Can Finally Build With Almost No Compiler Warnings

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Quite a feat for modern open-source projects with large C/C++ code-bases developed over the years, Mesa3D can almost be compiled now without any warnings -- there's just one remaining.

When paired with the latest GCC 8 stable compiler, Mesa paired with some pending patches is down to just one compiler warning left in the build process -- quite an improvement compared to in the past with older versions of GCC and Mesa.

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FOSS FUD, Openwashing, and Entryism

Filed under
OSS

FSF Interns and Debugging with GDB

Filed under
GNU
  • Sonali's Internship work on the Free Software Directory, part 2
  • Internship work on the Free Software Directory, part 2
  • Office Hours #0: Debugging with GDB

    This is a report on the first “office hours”, in which we discussed debugging Rust programs with gdb. I’m very grateful to Ramana Venkata for suggesting the topic, and to Tom Tromey, who joined in. (Tom has been doing a lot of the work of integrating rustc into gdb and lldb lately.)

    This blog post is just going to be a quick summary of the basic workflow of using Rust with gdb on the command line. I’m assuming you are using Linux here, since I think otherwise you would prefer a different debugger. There are probably also nifty graphical tools you can use and maybe even IDE integrations, I’m not sure.

Red Hat: Kevin M. Murai, Microsoft Puff Pieces, Red Hat CEO Optimistic About OpenShift 4.0 as RHEL Lags

Filed under
Red Hat

Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay

    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July.

    These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches.

    I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw).

    [...]

    Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector).

    I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information.

    Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end).

    Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

Filed under
Software

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll.

Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability.

You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Foundation for Sale

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]

    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?”

    Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals.

    In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.

Fedora: Fedora 29 Beta Soon, Fedora Is Looking For Help Testing Their New Silverblue, Fedora at Software Freedom Day

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 29 Beta Will Be Released Next Week

    After slipping last week, the highly anticipated Fedora 29 beta release will set sail next week.

    At Thursday's meeting on the state of the Fedora 29 beta bugs, it was decided that the beta is ready to ship. After five release candidates of the beta, the blocker bugs around installation problems, some GNOME bugs, and other blockers have been resolved.

  • Fedora Is Looking For Help Testing Their New Silverblue

    Fedora is hosting a test day today for testing their new Silverblue spin, formerly known as Fedora Atomic Workstation.

    With the Fedora 29 release due out in about one month it will be their first under the new Silverblue branding. Fedora Silverblue should be pretty much usable today, but by Fedora 30 next spring they are aiming for it to be in great shape.

    Silverblue sets up Fedora to excel at container-based computing, rely upon Flatpaks for desktop applications, support a variety of technologies and workflows via GNOME Software, and other modern approaches to OS development and software deployment.

  • Software Freedom Day – SFD

    Software Freedom Day (SFD) is a Technology Event held annually worldwide to promote and disseminate the benefits of Free Software, its Philosophy and related Technologies.

    On September 15th, I was invited to give a talk about Fedora, this event that took place at the National University of San Luis Gonzaga, Ica.

Q4OS 3.4 Centaurus, testing

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

A significant update to the Q4OS Centaurus testing version is available for download, you can find 64bit iso image at the dedicated Testing releases site. Anybody is invited to try it out and report bugs and glitches.

This release brings quite significant changes and improvements, the most important one is that Q4OS switched to the Calamares installer. That offers nice new installation features, for example fully encrypt target system, easy disk drive partitioning and many others. Another important change is move to the new Trinity 14.0.6 development version. All dependencies from the current stable Q4OS Scorpion has been removed, so the Centaurus now becomes fully independent getting its own repositories and dependencies. Secure boot support has been improved too. The Calamares installer detects, if secure boot is active and adjusts the target system accordingly. If secure boot is switched off in the firmware, no Secure boot stuff is installed.

Q4OS Centaurus 3.4 is based on the current Debian 'Buster' and Trinity desktop 14.0.6 development branches. Q4OS Centaurus will be in development until Debian Buster becomes stable, and will be supported at least five years from the official release date.

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Ubuntu: PlayOnLinux, Foundations Team, Ubuntu Podcast, Kubernetes, Graphics

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • How to install PlayOnLinux in Ubuntu Desktop 18.04

    If you need to install a Windows desktop app on Linux, your best bet is PlayOnLinux.

  • Help needed to improve proposed migration

    Every once in a while, in the Foundations team, we do a coding day. A year ago, Lukasz and I wrote a script, following an idea from Steve Langasek, to provide "hints" and help for the next steps necessary for a package to migrate from -proposed to -release.

    "ubuntu-archive-assistant" was born. I just pushed this to lp:ubuntu-dev-tools, after it being on its own in a separate git tree for a long while. I'd love to get help for feedback, as well as more people contributing fixes, etc. ubuntu-archive-assistant is designed to let you look at a specific package in -proposed and try to tell you what to do next to ensure it migrates from -proposed.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E28 – Twenty-Eight and a Half Wishes - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been playing Two Point Hospital and experimenting with ChromiumOS. We bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback.

  • Ubuntu does Kubernetes

    Canonical also does Kubernetes, but not in a ‘me too!’ kind of way. The Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) is pure upstream Kubernetes tested across the widest range of clouds — from public clouds to private data centres, from bare metal to virtualised infrastructure.

  • Ubuntu 18.10's SDL2 Build Will Ship With Vulkan Support Enabled

    Released almost exactly one year ago to the day was SDL 2.0.6 that brought with it some Vulkan helpers. Finally with the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" release, those Vulkan bits will be enabled.

  • NVIDIA PRIME in Ubuntu 18.04 and 18.10, and a call for testing

    Ubuntu 18.04 marked the transition to a new, more granular, packaging of the NVIDIA drivers, which, unfortunately, combined with a change in logind, and with the previous migration from Lightdm to Gdm3, caused (Intel+NVIDIA) hybrid laptops to stop working the way they used to in Ubuntu 16.xx and older.

More curl bug bounty

Filed under
OSS
Web

The idea is that sponsors donate money to the bounty fund, and we will use that fund to hand out rewards for reported issues. It is a way for the curl project to help compensate researchers for the time and effort they spend helping us improving our security.

Right now the bounty fund is very small as we just started this project, but hopefully we can get a few sponsors interested and soon offer "proper" rewards at decent levels in case serious flaws are detected and reported here.

If you're a company using curl or libcurl and value security, you know what you can do...

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A Time Namespace Has Been Proposed For The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Development
Linux

A set of experimental patches were sent out on Wednesday for implementing a time namespace within the kernel, part of an effort that's been going on for more than a decade around time virtualization.

These 20 patches under a "request for comments" flag allow for per-namespace offsets to the system clocks, including for monotonic and boot-time clocks.

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PostgreSQL 11 Beta 4 Released With JIT Compilation Disabled By Default

Filed under
Server
OSS

The fourth and likely last beta release of PostgreSQL 11 is now available.

One of the headlining features of PostgreSQL 11 was the new LLVM JIT compiler option but as of a few days ago it's been disabled by default due to some performance problems and at this stage seeming to really only help long and complex queries. But for those wanting to try out this just-in-time support can easily enable it with a configuration option in this beta as well as for the final release.

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Linux Graphics: Intel, NVIDIA, Mesa, and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Preparing A Final Batch Of Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 4.20~5.0

    Intel open-source developers have already sent in multiple pull requests of feature work to DRM-Next that in turn will be pulled into the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel merge window and they have one final batch of feature changes on the way.

    The cut-off is quickly approaching for new feature work slated for this next kernel cycle (Linux 4.20, or renamed to Linux 5.0 if Linus Torvalds sticks to his usual versioning preference) and Intel has announced a batch of changes ready for testing ahead of issuing it as a pull request to DRM-Next.

  • NVIDIA Sends Out DRM Display Patches For Tegra's Xavier SoC

    Going back to the beginning of the year NVIDIA developers have been contributing "Tegra194" enablement to the upstream Linux kernel. They've now moved on to contributing T194 support to the Tegra Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver for display support on this SoC that's better known as Xavier.

    The Tegra194 / Xavier is NVIDIA's latest SoC with the eight Carmel ARMv8 cores and Volta-based GPU. The NVIDIA Xavier Developer Kits have begun shipping and now with all of the other necessary hardware enablement bits upstream or on their way to mainline, the latest patches being published are for the display support with the Tegra DRM driver.

  • More Linux Tests & Driver Observations With The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    Here are some additional notes to complement my GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux review from yesterday now that I've had more time with this card and a working Linux driver.

  • Mesa 18.2.1 Is Coming This Week With Dozens Of Fixes

    As the first stable point release to the newly-christened Mesa 18.2, the Mesa 18.2.1 release is going to be a big one.

    The release candidate to Mesa 18.2.1 was issued on Wednesday and has nearly 60 patches over the recent 18.2.0 stable release. This includes Vulkan header updates for v1.1.84 and many RADV / ANV Vulkan driver fixes ranging from CTS issues to hangs to other fixes.

  • Mesa 18.2.1 Released With A Number Of Fixes For The Vulkan Drivers

    Mesa 18.2.1 is out this morning as the first stable point release to the recently introduced Mesa 18.2 series. Mesa 18.2.1 marks the point at which it should be relatively safe for stable-minded users to switch over to this quarterly release stream.

    Given it's the first point release after a very active development cycle, there are a lot of fixes: around five dozen changes are making up today's release coming two weeks after v18.2.0.

  • AMD Adds A Seemingly New Polaris ID To Their Linux Driver

    It looks like another re-branded AMD Polaris graphics card might be on the way given the latest AMDGPU Linux kernel patch.

    Either there's a new AMD Radeon "Polaris" graphics card coming, some new modem for OEMs, or just very tardy maintenance in adding the necessary PCI ID for an existing Polaris graphics card revision... But two years after Polaris RX 400 cards first debuted (and a year and a half since the RX 500 series), there is now a new Polaris PCI ID being added to the AMD Linux graphics driver.

Mir Release 1.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • IoT Graphics: Mir Release 1.0

    The Mir team is pleased to announce the milestone release of Mir 1.0.0. This is the first major release targeted at IoT device makers and enthusiasts looking to build the next-generation of graphical solutions.

  • Mir 1.0 Released For "Next-Generation of Graphical Solutions"

    As we were expecting over the last few days, the long-awaited release of Mir 1.0 is now available. It's certainly a different beast now than when "Mir 1.0" was talked about in the past now that it's focused on providing Wayland support.

Games: Trash Squad, Steam Censorship, Streets of Rogue, Conarium, Citra, RPCS3, Feudal Alloy

Filed under
Gaming
  • 2D shooter with a few RPG elements 'Trash Squad' has been released for Linux

    Time to take out the trash as the 2D shooter with RPG elements Trash Squad [Steam] is now available on Linux. The idea of it actually sounds quite amusing and it looks like it could be reasonably good.

    While it released for Windows back in January this year, only yesterday was Linux support made available. There's no official announcement just yet, but everything seems in place.

  • Valve to begin moderating game forums on Steam next week

    Starting on Tuesday, September 25th Valve will be actively moderating all game forums on Steam unless a developer opts to not have Valve do so.

    So from then onwards if someone reports a post on a Steam forum, let's say for Streets of Rogue, it will then go into a queue for Valve's own moderation team to look over. They will then remove it if it violates their community guidelines.

  • The excellent rogue-lite 'Streets of Rogue' now actually has an ending

    Streets of Rogue, easily one of the top Early Access games going right now actually has an ending and it sounds quite amusing.

  • Lovecraftian horror 'Conarium' now has a Linux version on GOG

    Think you're brave? Lovecraftian horror Conarium from Zoetrope Interactive and Iceberg Interactive can now be picked up for Linux on GOG. Powered by Unreal Engine 4, it first arrived on Linux back in February this year and it only arrived on GOG around 2 days ago.

  • Nintendo 3DS emulator 'Citra' sounds like it's coming along rather nicely

    For those who like to use their PC to emulate other platforms, the Citra [Official Site, GitHub] emulator for the Nintendo 3DS just put out a progress report and it's very promising.

  • PlayStation 3 emulator 'RPCS3' is coming along nicely with some major improvements

    More glorious news for emulation today with the latest RPCS3 [Official Site] (a PlayStation 3 emulator) giving an update on their progress and it's damn fine too.

  • Action RPG 'Feudal Alloy' with fish-controlled medieval robots delayed until next year

    Writing a rather short email to us today, Attu Games have announced their rather interesting Action RPG Feudal Alloy is now going to release next year. To be clear, this isn't a delay in the Linux version, the entire game is delayed.

    No reason was given, literally all that was said was this "Feudal Alloy, a fish-controlled medieval-robots metroidvania, is delayed until January 2019". I'm not fussed personally, when I tested the build they provided us with some time ago I was rather impressed. So taking some extra time to make it as great as they can is fine.

Ubuntu-based elementary OS 5.0 'Juno' Beta 2 Linux distro now available

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Why don’t more desktop computer users use Linux? Well, software compatibility aside, there is fear of change and the unknown. For a user to switch from Windows, it must be a fairly simple affair. For years, just installing a Linux-based operating system was a daunting task. These days, it can be faster and easier than installing Windows 10 -- depending on distro, of course.

For beginners, once installed, their chosen Linux distro should be easy to use with an intuitive desktop environment. I'm a big fan of GNOME, but understandably, not all folks like it -- especially Linux novices. One particular Linux-based desktop operating system has been focusing on accessibility to all -- elementary OS. This distro is polished and aims to be easy to use for both experts and beginners alike. Today, version 5.0 of the OS -- called "Juno" -- reaches Beta 2. Impressively, there have been over 200 fixes implemented since Beta 1.

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