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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
linpc srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:57am
ondiskgoblinx srlinuxx 04/09/2007 - 9:36pm
linuxextremedesktop srlinuxx 20/08/2007 - 2:13am
ondisk-mint srlinuxx 11/08/2007 - 3:58pm
adadheader srlinuxx 27/04/2007 - 1:18am
pclos srlinuxx 27/04/2007 - 4:39am
adadcontent srlinuxx 29/04/2007 - 8:54pm
salesad srlinuxx 01/05/2007 - 5:38pm
easyS srlinuxx 03/05/2007 - 7:03pm
ondisk-pclos-header srlinuxx 24/05/2007 - 3:25pm

Graphics: Open-Source AMD Linux Driver Stack, Mesa 18.3.0 RC, ROCm 1.9.2 and Firefox on Wayland

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The Open-Source AMD Linux Driver Stack Hitting Problems With The Radeon RX 590

    While the Radeon RX 590 that launched this week is just yet another Polaris refresh, it turns out the open-source AMD Linux graphics driver stack isn't yet playing well with retail RX 590 graphics cards. This is quite a surprise considering the PCI ID was picked up months ago and the mature Polaris Linux driver support for quite a while now, but could be like the rough Raven Ridge Linux experience where the production cards with the shipping vBIOS isn't what the developers encountered during their pre-production driver enablement.

    [...]

    Long story short, it looks like at least one initialization issue is blocking the Radeon RX 590 Linux support. Hopefully the workaround ends up being trivial enough that it can be quickly back-ported to existing stable Linux kernel series. Once the Radeon RX 590 is running well on Linux, I'll be through with a ton of benchmarks that I have already been working on this week with other graphics cards using the newest Linux driver stacks. This situation is sadly reminiscent of the Raven Ridge launch earlier this year where the open-source driver team was working on support for months in advance, but the production hardware/BIOS ended up varying a lot from their hardware bring-up that is was very shaky support at launch. The Raven Ridge support improved a lot on Linux since launch, but even to this day some hardware still seems to be problematic both of hardware in my labs as well as reports by users. Hopefully it won't take nearly as long for the RX 590 support to be in shape.

  • mesa 18.3.0-rc3

    The third release candidate for Mesa 18.3.0 is now available.

  • Mesa 18.3-RC3 Released With RADV Fixes, Drops Zen L3 Thread Pinning

    Mesa release manager Emil Velikov has announced the latest weekly release candidate of the upcoming Mesa 18.3.

    Mesa 18.3 has a number of Meson build system updates, several RADV driver corrections, a few NIR updates, fixes video API support for Raven 2 APUs, and back-ports the change to drop the AMD Zen L3 thread pinning functionality.

  • Radeon ROCm 1.9.2 Released - Brings SDMA/RDMA Support For Vega 20, HIP/HCC Improvements

    While we know ROCm 2.0 is coming out before year's end and that will have many improvements like complete OpenCL 2.0 support, ROCm 1.9.2 is out today as the latest stable release for this Radeon Open Compute stack.

    ROCm 1.9.2 brings some notable changes for just being a point release ahead of the big ROCm 2.0 milestone. Vega 20 remains one of the big areas for AMD's driver/software developers for what will begin shipping next year as the Radeon Instinct MI50 / MI60 accelerators.

  • Mozilla Now Ships Firefox Nightly Builds With Wayland Enabled

    After what feels like an eternity in waiting years for Mozilla to ship their Firefox web-browser with native Wayland support enabled, their latest Firefox Nightly builds have achieved this milestone.

    There have been Wayland patches for Firefox going back years but the Wayland support hasn't been enabled in the official Firefox binaries up until now. Starting yesterday, the Mozilla.org Firefox Nightly packages have Wayland support built-in and when launching Firefox if GDK_BACKEND=wayland is set, should now work with native Wayland rather than XWayland.

OSS: Delver, Lock-in, Dries Buytaert, Openstack and Mycroft

Filed under
OSS
  • Delver devs release their tech publicly under open source license

    As an added bonus, it's always nice when developers open source their tech to share with others.

    The source release doesn't contain or cover the game data from Delver, and the game data remains subject to original copyright and applicable law.

    It's also worth mentioning that the source code release is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2.0, meaning the software can continue to be shared, edited, and distributed for free, and can be used for commercial use as well.

  • How open source makes lock-in worse (and better) [Ed: Troll Mac Asay at it again]

    For open source companies desperate to figure out a business model that scales with the adoption of their ostensibly free software, Amazon's recent troubles getting off Oracle's database could be instructive. One way to look at Amazon's struggles is through the lens of "proprietary software creates lock-in," but this isn't actually helpful. Why? Because open source creates similar lock-in, and that's something open source entrepreneurs might want to consider.

  • At Acquia Engage, CTO talks of open source WCM, Red Hat buy

    Dries Buytaert: No, [because] 18 to 19 years ago, mobile didn't exist. Google was a private company. I remember AT&T launching text messaging a month or so before. Social media didn't exist. I think less than 10% of the world had internet.

    I started Drupal; it was very much an experimental platform for me, just to have some fun. I was fascinated with the web, and I didn't have any grand plans. Obviously, that changed over time. I made it open source, [and] it started growing, slowly.

    Drupal started to grow, so I started my plans for Drupal and [followed] my conviction of us being onto something. We made a bet-the-farm bet on cloud [in about 2008], and that turned out to be the right bet, because we pioneered a new business model for open source, delivering [it] in the cloud. And a lot of companies are doing that now -- Elastic Path, MongoDB -- and I'm very proud of that.

  • Openstack moves one step closer to the edge

    The second Openstack Summit of the year drew to a close in Berlin yesterday, and it will be the last of its name as it rebrands as the Open Infrastructure Summit in 2019, a move that seems largely in line with the evolution of the open source cloud platform as it shifts further into edge and builds out a series of related pilot projects with Openstack as the core proposition.

    Many of the keynotes this time around showed the progress that the community had made in building out the pilot projects announced at the Vancouver Summit earlier this year. One in particular, the first release of StarlingX, might well help cement the open infrastructure platform in edge.

    StarlingX is branded as an open source edge platform, with telecom and IoT use cases in mind. According to the Foundation it "leverages components of Ceph, Openstack and Kubernetes and complements them with new services including configuration and fault management", in particular to address technology challenges around high availability and ultra-low latency compute.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Mycroft

    Companies are looking to provide better experiences with their customers, which has given rise to the popularity of chatbots. Yet assistants that use voice tend to be only associated with tech giants like Apple, Amazon, and Google. Mycroft is an open-source voice assistant that is aiming to make voice assistants more attainable for everyone.

    “We believe the future of AI should be open, not a cryptic black box only few understand and have control over. Building this new technology together, collaborating, sharing ideas and building on top of each other – that’s how we see it,” Mycroft’s website states.

GitHub alternative strives to be all open source, only open source

Filed under
Development

A new software service for hosting and managing open source projects, Sr.ht, aims to be an entirely open source alternative to existing services like GitHub, GitLab, and Bitbucket, recreating many of their features.

Created by Drew DeVault and written in a mixture of Python and Go, Sr.ht is now available for public alpha testing by developers. Users can create an account with the hosted version provided by DeVault, or set up the exact same code on cloud or on-prem hardware.

Read more

Security: SMS, Patches, Android, Spam and 'Smart' Things

Filed under
Security
  • A leaky database of SMS text messages exposed password resets and two-factor codes

    A security lapse has exposed a massive database containing tens of millions of text messages, including password reset links, two-factor codes, shipping notifications and more.

    The exposed server belongs to Voxox (formerly Telcentris), a San Diego, Calif.-based communications company. The server wasn’t protected with a password, allowing anyone who knew where to look to peek in and snoop on a near-real-time stream of text messages.

    For Sébastien Kaul, a Berlin-based security researcher, it didn’t take long to find.

    Although Kaul found the exposed server on Shodan, a search engine for publicly available devices and databases, it was also attached to to one of Voxox’s own subdomains. Worse, the database — running on Amazon’s Elasticsearch — was configured with a Kibana front-end, making the data within easily readable, browsable and searchable for names, cell numbers and the contents of the text messages themselves.

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Google: Android Pie Updates Will Be A Lot Faster With Project Treble
  • Frustrating spammers
  • Tracking and snooping on a million kids

    With a couple of watches paired to different testing phones, I had a play with various authorisation and Insecure Direct Object Reference, IDOR, attacks.

    The only check the API appears to perform is matching the UID with the session_token, so simply changing the family_id in the get_watch_data_latest action, shown ibelow, allows an attacker to return the watch location and device_id associated with that family.

Programming: Java EE, Rust, JavaScript, RcppGetconf and More

Filed under
Development
  • Free Online Java EE Development Course From Red Hat Available Now

    The Red Hat Training team is pleased to announce the release of Fundamentals of Java EE Development. This free training is hosted by our partner edX. edX is an open online course provider that now hosts three Red Hat courses, including Fundamentals of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fundamentals of Containers, Kubernetes, and Red Hat OpenShift.

    Enterprise Java (Java EE is now known as Jakarta EE) is one of the most in-demand and marketable programming platforms. With Fundamentals of Java EE Development, students learn the foundational skills needed to develop modern applications. Serving as an introduction to enterprise Java development using Red Hat Developer Studio and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform, this course builds on students’ Java SE skills to teach the basic concepts behind more advanced topics such as microservices and cloud-native applications.

  • New Rust Course - Building Reuseable Code with Rust

    This course is about the Rust programming language, but it’s not those general introductory course on basic Rust syntax. This course focus on the code reuse aspect of the Rust language. So we won’t be touch every language feature, but we’ll help you understand how a selected set of features will help you achieve code reuse.

    [...]

    snippet is not enough. What comes next naturally is to define a clear interface, or internal API between the modules (in a general sense, not the Rust mod). This is when traits comes in handy. Traits help you define and enforce interfaces. We’ll also discuss the performance impact on static dispatch vs. dynamic dispatch by using generics and trait object.

    Finally we talk about more advanced (i.e. you shouldn’t use it unless necessary) tool like macros, which will help do crazier things by tapping directly into the compiler. You can write function-like macros that can help you reuse code that needs lower level access. You can also create custom derive with macros.

  • What is the MEAN stack? JavaScript web applications

    Most anyone who has developed web applications knows the acronym LAMP, which is used to describe web stacks made with Linux, Apache (web server), MySQL (database server), and PHP, Perl, or Python (programming language).

    Another web-stack acronym has come to prominence in the last few years: MEAN—signifying a stack that uses MongoDB (database server), Express (server-side JavaScript framework), Angular (client-side JavaScript framework), and Node.js (JavaScript runtime).

  • RcppGetconf 0.0.3

    Changes are minor. We avoid an error on a long-dead operating system cherished in one particular corner of the CRAN world. In doing so some files were updated so that dynamically loaded routines are now registered too.

  • The performance impact of zeroing raw memory

    When you create a new variable (in C, C++ and other languages) or allocate a block of memory the value is undefined. That is, whatever bit pattern happened to be in the raw memory location at the time. This is faster than initialising all memory (which languages such as Java do) but it is also unsafe and can lead to bugs, such as use-after-free issues.

    There have been several attempts to change this behaviour and require that compilers would initialize all memory to a known value, usually zero. This is always rejected with a statement like "that would cause a performance degradation fo unknown size" and the issue is dropped. This is not very scientific so let's see if we could get at least some sort of a measurement for this.

More Benchmarks Of The Performance Pullback In Linux 4.20

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Last night I published some benchmarks after finding Linux 4.20 is regressing in several workloads compared to Linux 4.18/4.19 and at least was affecting Intel Core i9 "HEDT" boxes. Here are more affected workloads regressing on Linux 4.20 and it's not just limited to high-end hardware.

This morning I decided to check in on my automated bi-daily kernel benchmarks on LinuxBenchmarking.com. It's all automated and thus don't necessarily have the time to look at the data too often (even though PTS' LinuxBenchmarking.com does also provide email notifications when auto-detecting possible regressions), but in looking back at the archived data it too captured a significant performance pullback on multiple systems on Linux 4.20.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish - Reasonable-ish

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

We mentioned consistency, remember? Well, in this regard, Ubuntu MATE is consistent. Lots of tiny visual bugs, average battery life, an occasional crash or three, and network connectivity issues. These were my top complaints with Beaver and they remain so with Cuttlefish. Ubuntu MATE 18.10 is more or less identical to its LTS predecessor. The changes aren't really big, with some extra hardware problems - the phone side is a big, big disappointment, but you get better overall theming and a more streamlined package manager.

I would like to see this project succeed, but the energy investment from going hobby to pro is exponential, and it can't be done easily. But this is exactly what Ubuntu MATE needs. A super-strong QA process, and more focus on getting things tightly integrated. Power management is another issue. In the end, you should stay with the LTS edition of course, but hopefully, the problems we see here will be resolved in the next version. This reminds me of the situation Xfce was in two years ago. Gaining momentum, becoming better, and then ... we'll see.

Because, speaking of energy, there does seem to be a limited, finite amount of it, and the mojo pendulum seems to have swung away from Xfce to MATE. There are a lot of excellent and unique new ideas in this project, but the glue (gluons in nuclear physics, if you will) isn't strong enough. Grade, about 7/10. I really want to see everything working like clockwork. Having a modern, majestic Gnome 2 reincarnate would be super fun. Take care, Borgians.

Read more

Canonical: Mastering the upgrading of OpenStack

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Names Carahsoft 2018 Public Sector Distribution Partner of the Year; Natalie Gregory Quoted

    Red Hat has selected Carahsoft Technology as a recipient of the Public Sector Distribution Partner of the Year award for the fifth year in a row.

    Carahsoft said Thursday the award recognizes its efforts to drive net revenue and support for Red Hat’s public sector partner program.

  • Why IBM's purchase of Red Hat makes their future mostly cloudy

    IBM's purchase of Red Hat is getting mixed reviews and the implications for the IT world remain to be seen. I talked with James Sanders about the acquisition and reaction to the news. The following is an edited transcript of our interview.

  • First beta of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 now available with security updates, new features

    As the dust settles from the announcement of IBM's pending acquisition of Red Hat, work continues undaunted in delivering new products. This week sees the first beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8, Red Hat's venerable enterprise distribution, which also serves as the basis for CentOS and Oracle Linux. For reference, RHEL is based on Fedora, which just celebrated the release of Fedora 29.

    In terms of security, the biggest changes in RHEL 8 are support for OpenSSL 1.1.1 and TLS 1.3, which a press release notes "[enable] server applications on the platform to use the latest standards for cryptographic protection of customer data." Likewise, the new release includes "System-wide Cryptographic Policies" allowing for cryptographic configuration using a unified interface, rather than needing to work with specific applications.

  • Fedora lifecycle: Problems, solutions, and a proposal

    I’ve been talking with a number of Fedora leaders, principals, and team members about the issue of Fedora lifecycle. Lifecycle here means the way we manage, schedule, and populate Fedora releases. I started the Lifecycle objective and proposed it as a lead to the Fedora Council to house what I hope will be improvements to Fedora lifecycle.

    One of the most important goals is to diversify the community ownership of our releases. This involves a fairly extensive set of changes in Fedora. It will need effort from a number of teams that work on release processes and services. For that reason, I’m proposing we pause the release cycle after the release of Fedora 30.

    I posted this morning to the devel list to start gathering feedback and input from a wider group on the ideas around the ideas in the writeup. The most important feedback comes from those who are involved in those processes and services. But constructive feedback is welcome from any part of Fedora. Please take the time to read the whole document and understand the goals and benefits for Fedora.

  • FPgM report: 2018-46
  • Fedora 29 : PyQt5 with Qt5 Designer tool.
  • Bodhi 3.11.0 released

Raspbian 2018-11-13 Brings Hardware-Accelerated VLC Media Player

Filed under
Debian

After releasing the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ yesterday, the Raspberry Pi Foundation today announced Raspbian 2018-11-13 as the latest update to their Debian-based Linux distribution for these low-cost ARM SBCs.

Most notable with the Raspbian November 2018 update is shipping VLC as its default media player application. The VLC build in Raspbian comes with working hardware acceleration using Broadcom's VideoCore engine for H.264 / MPEG-2 / VC-1 video formats. But the MPEG-2 and VC-1 support requires purchasing the codec licenses.

Read more

Containers and Kubernetes News

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Ruby in Containers

    Software changes environments from a development machine to a UAT (user acceptance testing) server environment or even from a test environment to production. It is required that the software runs consistently and reliably in these environments in the process.

    There was a time when deploying software was an event, a ceremony because of the difficulty that was required to keep this consistency. Teams spent a lot of time making the destination environments run the software as the source environment. They thereafter prayed that the gods kept the software running perfectly in production as in development.

    With containers, deployments are more frequent because we package our applications with their libraries as a unit making them portable thereby helping us maintain consistency and reliability when moving software between environments. For developers, this is improved productivity, portability and ease of scaling.

    Because of this portability, containers have become the universal language of the cloud allowing us to move software from one cloud to another without much trouble.

    In this article, I will discuss two major concepts to note while working with containers in Ruby. I will discuss how to create small container images and how to test them.

  • Kubernetes co-founder on the container revolution and the future of VMs

    Containers have exploded in popularity in recent years. To help with the deploying, scaling, and managing of containerized applications, Brendan Burns co-founded Kubernetes - a production-grade container orchestration system. In this episode, Brendan shares how he and his co-founders came up with the idea, how they got started, and what containers mean for the future of Virtual Machines.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: BlueK8s

    Kubernetes (aka K8s) is now the de facto container orchestration framework. Like other popular open-source technologies, Kubernetes has amassed a considerable ecosystem of complementary tools to address everything from storage to security. And although it was first created for running stateless applications, more and more organizations are interested in using Kubernetes for stateful applications.

    However, while Kubernetes has advanced significantly in many areas during the past couple years, there still are considerable gaps when it comes to running complex stateful applications. It remains challenging to deploy and manage distributed stateful applications consisting of a multitude of co-operating services (such as for use cases with large-scale analytics and machine learning) with Kubernetes.

  • How to choose the right storage solution for your containers

    We talk to many shops that are adopting, or have adopted, DevOps practices. For many companies, staying ahead of disruption means not only delivering new applications but also optimizing (or changing!) current processes and systems. They are moving to team-based cultures, working in smaller increments, and automating their environments to try to increase the velocity for software development and deployment.

    Having a common storage underpinning that is "self-service" for developers to provision and manage storage for their applications means teams have less friction in developing and shipping applications.

Microsoft's Vista 10 Disaster Returns, Privacy Violations, and Moving to GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • If at first or second you don't succeed, you may be Microsoft: Hold off installing re-released Windows Oct Update

    The 1809 build of Windows 10 and Windows Server is fast becoming infamous. Microsoft pulled it shortly after release when it started deleting people's files, and stumbling in other ways. Redmond reissued the software on Tuesday, and today it's clear you shouldn't rush into deploying it, if installing it at all, in its present state.

  • Microsoft Just Crammed Ads Into Windows 10 Mail. When Will They Stop? [Ed: With Vista 10 the users are the product. The spies from Microsoft spy on them (sometimes illegally, but these people are above the law) and their real clients are advertisers.]

    Whether it’s pre-installing Candy Crush Saga, showing full-screen ads on your lock screen, or displaying banner ads in File Explorer, Microsoft has been shoehorning ads into every inch of Windows 10. The Mail app is getting them next.

    Update: Microsoft’s head of communications, Frank Shaw, just backpedaled on Twitter. He said “this is an experimental feature that was never intended to be tested broadly and is being turned off.” As Mehedi Hassan notes over at Thurrott, this is a strange claim because Microsoft has a detailed support page explaining these advertisements.

  • Microsoft menaced with GDPR mega-fines in Europe for 'large scale and covert' gathering of people's info via Office

    Microsoft broke Euro privacy rules by carrying out the "large scale and covert" gathering of private data through its Office apps.

    That's according to a report out this month [PDF] that was commissioned by the Dutch government into how information handled by 300,000 of its workers was processed by Microsoft's Office ProPlus suite. This software is installed on PCs and connects to Office 365 servers.

    The dossier's authors found that the Windows goliath was collecting telemetry and other content from its Office applications, including email titles and sentences where translation or spellchecker was used, and secretly storing the data on systems in the United States. That's a no-no.

    Those actions break Europe's new GDPR privacy safeguards, it is claimed, and may put Microsoft on the hook for potentially tens of millions of dollars in fines. The Dutch authorities are working with the corporation to fix the situation, and are using the threat of a fine as a stick to make it happen.

  • How old were you when you first started using Linux?

    Whether you switched from another operating system, or are one of the lucky few who knew no OS before it, all of us were beginners at some point.

    How old were you when you started using Linux? Do you remember that time clearly, or is it so far in the past that it's but a faint memory?

    Regardless of the answer, let us know when it was, and maybe, a bit about what that experience has meant to you.

Games: Serious Sam Fusion, Surviving Mars: Space Race, Total War: WARHAMMER II

Filed under
Gaming
  • Serious Sam Fusion has the first update in some time

    Serious Sam Fusion, the game hub that allows you to play Serious Sam HD: The First Encounter, Serious Sam HD: The Second Encounter, Serious Sam 3: BFE along with the VR version finally has an update. It's still in beta, but not classed as "Early Access" on Steam.

    If you pickup any of those games, it automatically gives you Fusion which is especially good for Linux gamers since some of their titles weren't officially available on Linux but are with Fusion. The Fusion hub also brings Vulkan support, so that's awesome.

  • Surviving Mars: Space Race expansion and Gagarin free update have released, working well on Linux

    Haemimont Games along with Paradox Interactive have released the Surviving Mars: Space Race expansion today and it's great.

  • Total War: WARHAMMER II will release for Linux on November 20th

    Feral Interactive have announced that Total War: WARHAMMER II for Linux is officially releasing on November 20th. Originally developed by Creative Assembly in partnership with Games Workshop and published by SEGA for Windows, this is the follow-up game to the original which was released for Linux in November of 2016.

  • Total War: WARHAMMER II Launching For Linux Next Week

    Feral Interactive has just announced that Total War: WARHAMMER II will be released for Linux (and macOS) next week.

    On 20 November they will be releasing this latest native Linux game port following the Windows release a year ago. We've known it was slated for November and now it looks like they have the release all squared away for debut next Tuesday.

Plata Is A New Gtk Theme Based On The Latest Material Design Refresh

Filed under
GNOME

Plata is a new Gtk+ theme based on the latest Material Design refresh. The theme comes in 3 variants, regular (mixed), Lumiere (light) and Noir (dark), each with regular and compact versions.

The theme, which mixes black, indigo and grey with bits of red and purple, supports Gtk+ 3.20.x, 3.22.x and 3.24.x, as well as Gtk+ 2, and a multitude of desktop environments like Gnome Shell (and Flashback), Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate, LXDE, and Budgie Desktop.

Patheon (elementary OS), Unity 7 and "Gnome Shell customized by Canonical" (the Ubuntu session) are not officially supported by Plata theme. I've used Plata in Ubuntu 18.10 with Gnome Shell and I didn't notice any issues other than the theme GDM theme not being used, but this is only after about an hour of usage.

Read more

GNOME 3.31.2 released

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.31.2 is now available. This is the second unstable development release leading to 3.32 stable series. Apologies that it's slightly late: there were some technical snafus.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.31.2, you can use the official BuildStream project snapshot. Thanks to BuildStream's build sandbox, it should build reliably for you regardless of the dependencies on your host system...

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.31.2 Desktop Released

Bisected: The Unfortunate Reason Linux 4.20 Is Running Slower

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

After running a lot of tests and then bisecting the Linux 4.20 kernel merge window, the reason for the significant slowdowns in the Linux 4.20 kernel for many real-world workloads is now known...

This latest Linux 4.20 testing endeavor started out with seeing the Intel Core i9 performance pulling back in many synthetic and real-world tests. This ranged from Rodinia scientific OpenMP tests taking 30% longer to Java-based DaCapo tests taking up to ~50% more time to complete to code compilation tests taking measurably longer to lower PostgreSQL database server performance to longer Blender3D rendering times. That happened with a Core i9 7960X and Core i9 7980XE test systems while the AMD Threadripper 2990WX performance was unaffected by the Linux 4.20 upgrade.

Read more

5 Easy Tips for Linux Web Browser Security

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

If you use your Linux desktop and never open a web browser, you are a special kind of user. For most of us, however, a web browser has become one of the most-used digital tools on the planet. We work, we play, we get news, we interact, we bank… the number of things we do via a web browser far exceeds what we do in local applications. Because of that, we need to be cognizant of how we work with web browsers, and do so with a nod to security. Why? Because there will always be nefarious sites and people, attempting to steal information. Considering the sensitive nature of the information we send through our web browsers, it should be obvious why security is of utmost importance.

So, what is a user to do? In this article, I’ll offer a few basic tips, for users of all sorts, to help decrease the chances that your data will end up in the hands of the wrong people. I will be demonstrating on the Firefox web browser, but many of these tips cross the application threshold and can be applied to any flavor of web browser.

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More in Tux Machines

FreeBSD 12.0-RC1 Released, Fixes Ryzen 2 Temperature Reporting

Arguably most user-facing with this week's FreeBSD 12.0-RC1 release is updating the amdsmn/amdtemp drivers for attaching to Ryzen 2 host bridges. Additionally, the amdtemp driver has been fixed for correctly reporting the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX core temperature. The 2990WX temperature reporting is the same fix Linux initially needed to for a 27 degree offset to report the correct temperature. It's just taken FreeBSD longer to add Ryzen 2 / Threadripper 2 temperature bits even though they had beat the Linux kernel crew with the initial Zen CPU temperature reporting last year. Read more Also: MeetBSD 2018: Michael W Lucas Why BSD?

GPU/Graphics: DRM/KMS and CUDA

  • Google's Pixel 3 Is Using The MSM DRM Driver, More Android Phones Moving To DRM/KMS Code
    It turns out Google's recently announced Pixel 3 smartphone is making use of the MSM Direct Rendering Manager driver associated with the Freedreno open-source Qualcomm graphics project. Google is also getting more Android vendors moving over to using DRM/KMS drivers to power their graphics/display. Alistair Strachan of Google presented at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference and the growing adoption of Direct Rendering Manager / Kernel Mode-Setting drivers by Android devices.
  • Red Hat Developers Working Towards A Vendor-Neutral Compute Stack To Take On NVIDIA's CUDA
    At this week's Linux Plumbers Conference, David Airlie began talking about the possibility of a vendor-neutral compute stack across Intel, Radeon, and NVIDIA GPU platforms that could potentially take on NVIDIA's CUDA dominance. There has been the work on open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) SPIR-V compute support all year and that's ongoing with not yet having reached mainline Mesa. That effort has been largely worked on by Karol Herbst and Rob Clark, both open-source GPU driver developers at Red Hat. There has also been other compute-motivated open-source driver/infrastructure work out of Red Hat like Jerome Glisse's ongoing kernel work around Heterogeneous Memory Management (HMM). There's also been the Radeon RADV driver that Red Hat's David Airlie co-founded and continues contributing significantly to its advancement. And then there has been other graphics/compute contributions too with Red Hat remaining one of the largest upstream contributors to the ecosystem.

Endless OS Switching To The BFQ I/O Scheduler For More Responsive Linux Desktop

While Con Kolivas' kernel patch series decided to do away with BFQ support, the GNOME-aligned Endless OS Linux distribution has decided to do the opposite in move from CFQ as the default I/O scheduler over to BFQ. Endless OS has decided to switch to the BFQ (Budget Fair Queuing) I/O scheduler since it prioritizes interactive workloads and should make for a better experience for its users particularly when applications may be upgrading in the background. During heavy background I/O, Endless found that their launch time of LibreOffice went from taking 16 seconds with CFQ to just three seconds when using BFQ. Other tests were also positive for improving the interactivity/responsiveness of the system particularly during heavy background I/O. Read more

Goa to train teachers in new open-source software apps for cyber security

After working with Google India for wider adoption of internet safety in schools two years ago, Goa education agencies will implement another project to train computer, information and communication technology school and higher secondary teachers in new open-source software applications for cyber security integration. The State Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education and Goa State Council Educational Research and Training (GSCERT) have decided to begin the second programme with over 650 computer teachers from December 4 to 18, Mr. Ajay Jadhav, Board of Study member and coordinator of the first project with Google, said on Friday. The cyber security training syllabus has been worked out and 18 resource persons are ready for the project. Read more