Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 19 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry working quake 1 srlinuxx 25/11/2010 - 1:50am
Blog entry unreal gold install srlinuxx 24/11/2010 - 3:10am
Blog entry new quake 2 install srlinuxx 23/11/2010 - 7:41am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 64-bit Texstar 19/11/2010 - 4:01pm
Blog entry GNOME 2.32.1 desktop updated for PCLinuxOS Texstar 19/11/2010 - 3:22am
Blog entry Gstreamer Conference 2010 Videos and Slides uploaded raseel 16/11/2010 - 4:43am
Blog entry Virtualization artwales 08/09/2010 - 8:16pm
Blog entry Fred srlinuxx 5 22/07/2011 - 3:51pm
Blog entry Lastpass. fieldyweb 11/12/2011 - 7:41pm
Blog entry Listening to your music, the Third way.. AudioGalaxy vs Subsonic fieldyweb 27/11/2011 - 3:59pm

10 Linux Commands For Network Diagnostics

Filed under
Linux

It is difficult to find a Linux computer that is not connected to the network, be it server or workstation. From time to time it becomes necessary to diagnose faults, intermittence or slowness in the network. In this article, we will review some of the Linux commands most used for network diagnostics.

Read<br />
more

Variscite unveils its first i.MX8X module

Filed under
Android
Linux

Variscite’s “VAR-SOM-MX8X” COM runs Linux or Android on NXP’s up to quad -A35 core i.MX8X SoC with up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, plus WiFi/BT, dual GbE controllers, and -40 to 85°C support.

Variscite has launched its first i.MX8X-based computer-on-module. The 67.6 x 51.6mm VAR-SOM-MX8X runs Yocto Project based Linux or Android on NXP’s dual- or quad-core Cortex-A35 based, 1.2GHz i.MX8X. The up to -40 to 85°C tolerant module is aimed at industrial automation and control, defense, medical, telematics, building control, failover displays/HMI, and robotics applications. The only other i.MX8X module we’ve seen is Phytec’s Linux-compatible, 55 x 40mm phyCORE-i.MX 8X module.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • freenode #live 2018 - Doc Searls and Simon Phipps - In Conversation
  • How to edit themes in Linux Mint Cinnamon - Tutorial
  • KDE Bugsquad – Okular Bug Day on November 17th, 2018

    Thank you to everyone who participated last Bug Day! We had a turnout of about six people, who worked through about half of the existing REPORTED (unconfirmed) Konsole bugs. Lots of good discussion occurred on #kde-bugs as well, thank you for joining the channel and being part of the team!

    We will be holding a Bug Day on November 17th, 2018, focusing on Okular. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!

  • Omarine 5.3 released! (Nov 14 2018)

    This release updates dbus and glib together with all dependencies and related packages. Some of them are rebuilt, the rest are upgraded. Glib 2.58.1 can be considered a development threshold because many dependent packages must be caught it up. Below is a list of some typically upgraded packages:

  • Achievement unlocked! I spoke at PythonBrasil[14]

    PythonBrasil is the national Python community conference that happens every year, usually in October, in Brazil.

    I attended PythonBrasil for the first time in 2016, the year we had started PyLadies Porto Alegre. Back then, we were a very small group and I was the only one to go. It was definitely one of the best experiences I ever had, which, of course, set a very high standard for every single tech event I attended afterwards.

    Because of the great time I had there, I wanted to bring more and more women from PyLadies Porto Alegre to experience PythonBrasil in the next editions. So, during the PyLadies Porto Alegre 1st birthday party, I encouraged the other women to submit activities to try and to go to the conference that would happen in Belo Horizonte.

  • Browser Based Open Source Image Optimization Tool Squoosh Comes To Google Lab’s Latest Release

    Open source, browser-based image optimization tool Squoosh is Google’s new Chrome Lab release. This new web tool is meant to make web developers work a lot simpler to optimize web pages. Images loading in a website is usually the reason for them to take so long to load and Squoosh helps web developers shrink the image so that it consumes lesser data. Squoosh can downsize, compress, and reformat images. Its purpose is to make web developers’ work less tedious and hence quicker. Google chrome labs made this tool available offline and said it would be handy to have this tool work offline. Squoosh also supports editing image codecs that are not normally available in the browser.

  • VS Code Live Share plugin [Ed: When GNU/Linux sites help Microsoft]
  • Microsoft Releases Open-Source HLSL to GLSL Shader Cross-Compiler [Ed: As above, except this is just openwashing of proprietary DX]
  • Upgrading OpenBSD 6.3 to 6.4 on Vultr
  • iGNUit has a new homepage address
  • gxmessage has a new homepage
  • It Looks Like The Raptor Blackbird Open-Source Motherboard Will Sell For Just Under $900

    Many have been curious to learn more about the Blackbird from Raptor Computing Systems as a lower-cost POWER9, open-source hardware alternative to their higher-end Talos II hardware that we've been recently benchmarking. The possible price has been revealed. 

    Overnight, Raptor Computing Systems tweeted a straw poll looking to gauge the interest level in "Would you pre-order a Raptor Computing Systems Blackbird system or board this year at a mainboard cost of $875?"

  • C++20 Making Progress On Modules, Memory Model Updates

    This past week was an ISO C++ committee meeting in San Diego, which happened to be their largest meeting ever, and they managed to accomplish a lot in drafting more planned changes around the C++20 language update.

Security: Updates, Pwn2Own Tokyo and Spyware

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (powerdns and powerdns-recursor), Debian (ceph and spamassassin), Fedora (feh, flatpak, and xen), Red Hat (kernel, kernel-rt, openstack-cinder, python-cryptography, and Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.2.5), and Ubuntu (python2.7, python3.4, python3.5).

  • iPhone X, Samsung Galaxy S9, Xiaomi Mi 6 Hacked At Pwn2Own Tokyo [Ed: All so-called 'phones' nowadays have a back door at the baseband OS, so cracking them and remotely controlling them is trivial, securing them a non-starter.]
  • It’s Amateur Hour in the World of Spyware and Victims Will Pay the Price

    We’re living in the golden age of spyware and government hacking, with companies rushing to join a blossoming billion dollar market. The weakest among us—activists or journalists—will suffer the consequences if we don’t regulate it appropriately.

Top 20 Best Tizen Apps for October 2018

Filed under
Linux

This is the monthly rundown of the most downloaded apps from the Tizen Store for your Tizen mobile. This time its October 2018. WhatsApp still has the number #1 spot and it doesn’t look like it will be leaving that anytime soon. There are a few new entry games like Counter Terror: Pursuit, Sweet candy fever, Monster simulator trigger city, and also utilities like Transparent screen.

Read more

Stable kernels 4.19.2, 4.18.19, 4.14.81, and 4.9.137

Filed under
Linux

Trying DragonFlyBSD & FreeBSD On The Intel Core i9 9900K With ASUS PRIME Z390-A

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Since last month's Intel Core i9 9900K launch for this eight core / sixteen thread processor we have explored its performance for Linux gaming, how the performance and power efficiency go from the Intel 990X to 9900K, the Spectre mitigation costs, and the Intel Coffeelake Refresh performance across various Linux distributions. For those curious about using the new Intel CPUs and Z390 motherboards with one of the BSD operating systems, I spent a few days over the weekend trying out FreeBSD and DragonFlyBSD releases with the i9-9900K and ASUS PRIME Z390-A motherboard combination.

Read more

Meet TASBot, a Linux-Powered Robot Playing Video Games for Charity

Filed under
Linux

Can a Linux-powered robot play video games faster than you? Only if he takes a hint from piano rolls...and doesn't desync.

Let me begin with a brief history of tool-assisted speedruns. It was 2003. Less than half the developed world had internet access of any kind, and YouTube hadn't been created yet. Smartphones were rare and nascent. Pentium III processors still were commonplace, and memory was measured in megabytes. It was out of this primordial ooze that an interesting video file circulated around the web—an 18MB .wmv labeled only as a "super mario bross3 time attack video" [sic]. What followed was an absolutely insane 11-minute completion of the game by someone named Morimoto replete with close calls, no deaths and Mario destroying Bowser after apparently effortlessly obtaining 99 lives. The only other context was a link to a page written in Japanese, and the rough encoding that Windows Media Video format was known for in that era made it difficult for casual viewers to observe that it was an emulator recording rather than the output of a real Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) console.

Read more

Mozilla: Rust and Privacy

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • This Week in Rust 260

    This week's crate is cargo-nono, a cargo subcommand to check a crate's dependencies for no-std compatibility. Thanks to Hobofan for the suggestion!

  • Your Privacy Focused Holiday Shopping Guide

    The lyrics to “Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town” detail an omniscient Saint Nicholas. But in 2018 — in an era of always-listening products and apps — the lyrics might as well be detailing the latest connected device.

    This holiday season, Mozilla is helping consumers identify which connected products are secure and trustworthy — and which aren’t. The goal: help consumers shop for gifts based on how well they protect the privacy and security of their friends and family, in addition to traditional factors like a product’s price and performance.

KDE and GNOME: NVIDIA, Krita/Atelier and GSoC Mentors Summit 2018

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • NVIDIA Working On An EGLStreams Back-End For KDE On Wayland

    With no recent activity on the NVIDIA-led Unix device memory allocation work that all developer communities could get behind to supersede GBM and EGLStreams for use by Wayland compositors, NVIDIA is working on an EGLStreams back-end for KDE's KWin compositor.

    Similar to the work done on an EGLStreams back-end for GNOME and other EGLStreams work by the smaller Wayland compositors, a NVIDIA engineer is now officially working on an EGLStreams back-end for KWin so that the NVIDIA proprietary driver would play well with KDE on Wayland. Up to now KWin has only supported the Mesa GBM interfaces. KDE developers have said they wouldn't invest in developing an EGLStreams back-end, but that they wouldn't be opposed if say NVIDIA would contribute and maintain the code -- that's what is happening now.

  • Shop update! Digital Atelier and a new USB-Card

    And we’ve also created a new USB-card, with the newest stable version of Krita for all OSes. Includes Comics with Krita, Muses, Secrets of Krita and Animate with Krita tutorial packs.

  • GSoC Mentors Summit 2018

    I represented GNOME, sadly alone because the other selected mentor didn’t get the US visa in time. This was my first trip out of India and I couldn’t plan it properly1, so I went there for just the two conference days.

Graphics: Screen Tearing, Wayland Alpha Compositing Protocol, AMDGPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • What Is Screen Tearing and How to Get Rid of It on Linux

    Unfortunately for Linux fans, screen tearing is, and has been, a persistent annoyance that doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. There are a couple of factors enabling the longevity of the screen tearing issue.

    First, and probably most obviously, is the dated, broken, and bloated X server. Even with the progress of Wayland, X is here to stay for the immediate future. Next is the strange and inconsistent graphics driver picture. One of the biggest offenders in causing screen tearing is also the most popular GPU manufacturer on Linux, NVIDIA. Throw in different desktop environments with their own display settings and compositors, and you have a real mess.

    These methods will hopefully eliminate screen tearing in most situations, but it’s impossible to provide a one-size-fits-all solution, thanks to the amount of variables involved. Try what applies to your system, and keep in mind that there might be new factors involved.

  • Collabora Revives Work On Alpha Compositing Protocol For Wayland

    Collabora's Scott Anderson has revived work on the alpha compositing protocol for Wayland, which is based upon the work done by Google on this functionality for Chromium on Wayland.

    The Wayland Alpha Compositing Protocol is intended to control the alpha compositing and blending of surface contents within a Wayland environment. This experimental protocol allows for advanced blending and alpha operations on Wayland surfaces (wl_surface) and Google's work on it dates back at least two years.

  • Radeon Linux Driver Preparing Adaptive Backlight Management (ABM)

    The "AMDGPU" Radeon Linux kernel graphics driver is preparing support for "Adaptive Backlight Management" as a backlight power-savings feature for laptops.

    Adaptive Backlight Management reduces the backlight level in an effort to save power but increases the pixel contrast and luminance to improve image quality and readability under the lower light condition.

Meet TiDB: An open source NewSQL database

Filed under
Server
OSS

As businesses adopt cloud-native architectures, conversations will naturally lead to what we can do to make the database horizontally scalable. The answer will likely be to take a closer look at TiDB.

TiDB is an open source NewSQL database released under the Apache 2.0 License. Because it speaks the MySQL protocol, your existing applications will be able to connect to it using any MySQL connector, and most SQL functionality remains identical (joins, subqueries, transactions, etc.).

Step under the covers, however, and there are differences. If your architecture is based on MySQL with Read Replicas, you'll see things work a little bit differently with TiDB. In this post, I'll go through the top five key differences I've found between TiDB and MySQL.

Read more

GNOME Mutter Brings More Fixes, Shell 3.31.2 Has Some Performance Work

Filed under
GNOME

New development releases of GNOME Shell and Mutter are out today in the 3.31 development series along with new 3.30 stable point releases that back-port more fixes for these important pieces to the GNOME desktop.

Mutter 3.31.2 brings a number of fixes including better handling for non-UTF8 encodings, memory leak fixes from the 3.30 series, a possible crash when restarting the window manager, initial Meson build system support, a crash fix for monitor hot-plugging, and other fixes rounding this out as a practical update.

Read more

Is your startup built on open source? 9 tips for getting started

Filed under
OSS

When I started Gluu in 2009, I had no idea how difficult it would be to start an open source software company. Using the open source development methodology seemed like a good idea, especially for infrastructure software based on protocols defined by open standards. By nature, entrepreneurs are optimistic—we underestimate the difficulty of starting a business. However, Gluu was my fourth business, so I thought I knew what I was in for. But I was in for a surprise!

Every business is unique. One of the challenges of serial entrepreneurship is that a truth that was core to the success of a previous business may be incorrect in your next business. Building a business around open source forced me to change my plan. How to find the right team members, how to price our offering, how to market our product—all of these aspects of starting a business (and more) were impacted by the open source mission and required an adjustment from my previous experience.

A few years ago, we started to question whether Gluu was pursuing the right business model. The business was growing, but not as fast as we would have liked.

Read more

Also: Cisco partners using open source gain 10% sales advantage over rivals

An Everyday Linux User Review Of Elementary OS 5.0 Juno

Filed under
Reviews

Elementary OS is currently riding high in the Distrowatch rankings and it has been a while since my last review so I thought it was high time I took another look.

The tag line at the top of the Elementary OS website reads as “The fast, open and privacy respecting replacement for Windows and macOS”.

In this review I am going to examine this claim in depth as well as other claims such as “Apps you need, without the ones you don’t”. The website states that the applications have been carefully considered to cater for your everyday needs so you can spend more time using your computer and less time cleaning up bloatware.

Without further ado lets separate the fact from the fiction and explore Elementary OS with a virtual magnifying glass befitting a well known sleuth. After all it is “Elementary” my dear Watson. (Sorry, couldn’t resist).

Read more

Zeal – An Offline Documentation Browser For Software Developers And Linux Admins

Filed under
Software

Recent past i was traveling to my hometown very often for my personal work and i was facing difficulties to write article on 2DayGeek due to unavailable of internet as i don’t have proper internet facility because we are staying in remote area.

I was thinking what is the alternate solution to fulfill this.

I did small google search for offline documentation tool and got the awesome tool called “Zeal”.

Yes, it’s true. It’s awesome tool and supports 194 application documents.

I’m very much comfortable to work with zeal documentation as i’m getting whatever i want it.

Also, we can use this if you want to save some bandwidth when you are running with bandwidth shortage. Also it won’t show any ads, it’s clean and easy to use.

Read more

Shotcut Video Editor Adds VA-API Encoding Support For Linux, Other Improvements

Filed under
Software

Shotcut, a free and open source video editor, was updated to version 18.11.13 yesterday. The new release includes VA-API encoding support on Linux, as well as a new option to use hardware encoder in the export screen, among other improvements.

Shotcut is a free video editor for Linux, macOS and Windows. It includes a wide range of functions, from editing features like trimming, cutting, copying and pasting, to video effects or audio features like peak meter, loudness, waveform, volume control, audio filters, and so on.

There's much more that Shotcut can do, including edit 4K videos, capture audio, it supports network streaming, and so on. See its features page for a in-depth list.

The application, which uses Qt5 and makes use of the MLT Multimedia Framework, supports a wide range of formats thanks to FFmpeg, and it features an intuitive interface with multiple dockable panels.

The latest Shotcut 18.11.13 adds VA-API encoding support for Linux (H.264/AVC and H.265/HEVC codecs).

Read more

Also in software:

  • Rclone – Sync Files Directories from Different Cloud Storage

    Rclone is a command line program written in Go language, used to sync files and directories from different cloud storage providers such as: Amazon Drive, Amazon S3, Backblaze B2, Box, Ceph, DigitalOcean Spaces, Dropbox, FTP, Google Cloud Storage, Google Drive, etc.

    As you see, it supports multiple platforms, which makes it a useful tool to sync your data between servers or to a private storage.

  • Odio – A Beautiful Open Source Radio Streaming App

    Odio is a new, free, beautiful, and open source software for streaming radio stations. It has an intuitive UI that resembles that of Spotify with a search field that sits in the top navigation bar for accessibility.

    The main app window is the Home tab which lists radio station suggestions as “Featured“. You can filter the listed radio stations by “Top Click” and “Highest Voted“.

    Apart from using the search field, you can search for radio stations by countries, languages, and tags.

linux-4.19-ck1, MuQSS version 0.180 for linux-4.19

Filed under
Linux

Announcing a new -ck release, 4.19-ck1 with the latest version of the Multiple Queue Skiplist Scheduler, version 0.180. These are patches designed to improve system responsiveness and interactivity with specific emphasis on the desktop, but configurable for any workload.

Read more

Also: MuQSS Scheduler Updated, Linux 4.19-ck1 Drops BFQ I/O Scheduler

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel: EROFS, Heterogeneous Memory Management, Getting Involved, 4.20-rc3, and DRM ('Secure Output Protocol')

  • There Is Finally A User-Space Utility To Make EROFS Linux File-Systems
    Back when Huawei introduced the EROFS Linux file-system earlier this year, there wasn't any open-source user-space utility for actually making EROFS file-systems. Even when EROFS was merged into the mainline tree, the user-space utility was still non-existent but now that issue has been rectified.
  • The State Of Heterogeneous Memory Management At The End Of 2018
    Heterogeneous Memory Management is the effort going on for more than four years that was finally merged to the mainline Linux kernel last year but is still working on adding additional features and improvements. HMM is what allows for allowing the mirroring of process address spaces, system memory to be transparently used by any device process, and other functionality for GPU computing as well as other device/driver purposes. Jerome Glisse at Red Hat who has spearheaded Heterogeneous Memory Management from the start presented at last week's Linux Plumbers Conference on this unified memory solution.
  • An attempt to create a local Kernel community
    Now I am close to complete one year of Linux Kernel, and one question still bugs me: why does it have to be so hard for someone in a similar condition to become part of this world? I realized that I had great support from many people (especially from my sweet and calm wife) and I also pushed myself very hard. Now, I feel that it is time to start giving back something to society; as a result, I began to promote some small events about free software in the university and the city I live. However, my main project related to this started around two months ago with six undergraduate students at the University of Sao Paulo, IME [3]. My plan is simple: train all of these six students to contribute to the Linux Kernel with the intention to help them to create a local group of Kernel developers. I am excited about this project! I noticed that within a few weeks of mentoring the students they already learned lots of things, and in a few days, they will send out their contributions to the Kernel. I want to write a new post about that in December 2018, reporting the results of this new tiny project and the summary of this one year of Linux Kernel. See you soon :)
  • Feral Interactive Announces Total War: WARHAMMER II to Be Released for Linux Tomorrow, Uber Joined The Linux Foundation, Security Bug Discovered in Instagram, Fedora Taking Submissions for Supplemental Wallpapers and Kernel 4.20-rc3 Is Out
    Linux kernel 4.20-rc3 is out. Linus says the only unusual thing was his travel and that the changes "are pretty tiny".
  • Wayland Secure Output Protocol Proposed For Upstream - HDCP-Like Behavior
    Collabora developer Scott Anderson sent out a "request for comments" patch series that would add a Secure Output Protocol to the Wayland space. The Secure Output Protocol is for allowing a Wayland client to tell the compositor to only display if it's going to a "secure" output, such as for HDCP-like (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) configurations, but there is no mandate at the protocol level about what is the definition of secure -- if anything. This does not impose any DRM per se by Wayland but is mostly intended for set-top-boxes and other closed systems where a Wayland client can reasonably trust the compositor. The Wayland Secure Output Protocol is based upon the work done by Google on their Chromium Wayland code.

more of today's howtos

Best Linux Desktop Environments: Strong and Stable

A desktop environment is a collection of disparate components that integrate together. They bundle these components to provide a common graphical user interface with elements such as icons, toolbars, wallpapers, and desktop widgets. Additionally, most desktop environments include a set of integrated applications and utilities. Desktop environments (now abbreviated as DE) provide their own window manager, system software that controls the placement and appearance of windows within a windowing system. They also provide a file manager which organizes, lists, and locates files and directories. Other aspects include a background provider, a panel to provide a menu and display information, as well as a setting/configuration manager to customize the environment. Ultimately, a DE is a piece of software. While they are more complicated than most other types of software, they are installed in the same way. Read more

KDE neon upgrade - From 16.04 to 18.04

I am quite happy with the KDE neon upgrade, going from the 16.04 to the 18.04 base. I think it's good on several levels, including improved hardware support and even slightly better performance. Plus there were no crashes or regressions of any kind, always a bonus. This means that neon users now have a fresh span of time to enjoy their non-distro distro, even though it's not really committing to any hard dates, so the LTS is also only sort of LTS in that sense. It's quite metaphysical. On a slightly more serious note, this upgrade was a good, positive experience. I semi-accidentally tried to ruin it, but the system recovered remarkably, the post-upgrade results are all sweet, and you have a beautiful, fast Plasma desktop, replete with applications and dope looks and whatnot. I'm happy, and we shall bottle that emotion for when the need arises, and in the Linux world it does happen often, I shall have an elixir of rejuvenation to sip upon. KDE neon, a surprisingly refined non-distro distro. Read more