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Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry PCLinuxOS Enlightenment (E-17) Desktop updated. Texstar 13/11/2010 - 2:29am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos kde 2010.10 Texstar 06/11/2010 - 3:46am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos lxde 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:35pm
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos phoenix xfce 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:32pm
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos zen mini 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:29pm
Blog entry Distribution Release - pclinuxos enlightenment 2010.11 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:22pm
Blog entry All hail the easy to use! srlinuxx 2 18/06/2010 - 6:09am
Blog entry Unity Phone Interface fieldyweb 04/12/2011 - 7:16pm
Blog entry Google's Android Market is better than the Apple App Store fieldyweb 24/11/2011 - 11:44pm
Blog entry My 20 Most Used Android Apps. fieldyweb 24/11/2011 - 11:42pm

BSD and Security Leftovers

Android embraces the Kotlin programming language

Filed under
Android
Development

If you're not a mobile developer working win Android, chances are you haven't heard of Kotlin. If you are an Android programmer, it's the best thing since sliced bread.

While Java has long been Android's main programming language, it's never a good fit. Java was written when "mobile" computing devices were 7-pound laptops. In the meantime, Apple iOS developers had the pleasure of working with mobile-first languages such as Swift. Unlike Swift, which is now open source but started as an in-house Apple product, Kotlin started out as a third-party language.

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NHS mulling Ubuntu switch after Windows XP fail?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Security

NixOS 17.03 "Gorilla"

Filed under
Reviews

NixOS is a viable daily distro for average users who are willing to put a small amount of work into it. Since it is a little strange, knowledge about NixOS may not translate well to other distros. NixOS is very lightweight and usable. I think that it is probably a very good distro for a more advanced user. Like I said, I was able to do everything I wanted on NixOS (except get my NVIDIA drivers working, but I think that's my fault). The Nix package manager is also available for most other distros, so if you want to use the Nix package manager and all the Nix glory associated with it (like isolation of packages) you can. I probably won't keep NixOS on my machine, but I think I will start using the Nix package manager on whatever distro I settle on for this week.

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Emmabuntus 3 1.04 Linux Distro Officially Released, Based on Xubuntu 14.04.1 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Patrick Emmabuntus is pleased to inform us today about the release and immediate availability of the Emmabuntus 3 1.04 update of the educational-oriented GNU/Linux distribution based on Xubuntu and the Xfce desktop environment.

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MATE 1.16.2 Desktop Environment Is Now Available for Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE project leader Martin Wimpress announced today the availability of the MATE 1.16.2 desktop environment in the special PPA (Personal Package Archive) created for users of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

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Building Linux-powered devices, part 1: Making my Linux-only world a reality - Network World

Filed under
Linux

Sometimes, if you want something badly enough, you need to get off your lazy tuchus and make it happen yourself.

For years now, I've been hoping and pining (and often complaining and whining) about how much I want Linux-powered... everything. Not Android. Not ChromeOS. Real Linux. The kind of Linux you have full control over—the sort you'd install on your desktop PC.

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Possible Protections To Take Against WannaCry Ransomware Attack

Filed under
Linux

​Last week Windows users suffered a ransomware attack at a global scale and had their files encrypted. The attackers demanded a payment of $600 worth in bitcoins decrypt all the users' files. This is one of the biggest ransomware attacks recorded and still growing. Read the complete article published yesterday on LinuxAndUbuntu. In this article, we will talk about some of the possible actions one can take against this ransomware.

Read<br />
more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

Plasma 5.10 Beta, Slicker Desktop

Filed under
KDE

Monday, 15 May 2017. Today KDE has made a testing release of our desktop Plasma 5.10 with new features across the suite to give users an experience which lives up to our tagline: simple by default, powerful when needed.

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Here Is What You Need To Know About WannCry Ransomware That's Infecting Windows Systems Globally

Filed under
Linux

​The internet has its good and bad and we have to be extra careful to not fall on the claws of the hackers or attackers. This can happen from buying online, getting your account hacked or getting your files “kidnapped”, on this last one is when your files get encrypted and the attacker wants you to pay him a certain amount to get the files decrypted. In this article, we will talk about this ransomware that until today has infected more than 230,000+ computers in 150 countries and has raised more than $50,000,00.

Read<br />
more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Out-of-Control CIA Continues to be Exposed in WikiLeaks’ Vault 7

    After installing a small file, the operators would then be able to instruct the computer to kill any use of a web browser on a set schedule. For instance, the software could be instructed to shut down Firefox every 25-35 seconds. Similarly, the example included a measure to “lock up” PowerPoint files 10 minutes after they were loaded. It would also allow operators to create a delay when PowerPoint files were attempting to load.

    While the examples they used are simple and relatively harmless, the software could perform virtually any assigned task. Because the data is encrypted with a key stored outside of the machine, the code would be extremely difficult to detect and/or decipher.

    After installing the software, the documentation instructs users to “kick back” and “Relax – After Midnight will take care of the rest.”

    The second piece of software detailed is similar to “AfterMidnight” and is called “Assassin.” That piece of software is a relatively simple way of collecting data remotely and then delivering results to a listening post on a schedule.

    Through screenshots in the documents, it can be seen that the author is named “Justin,” is working from a Dell computer, and desktop shortcuts to an encrypted chat program called ‘Pidgin,’ as well as a folder entitled “drone.”

  • Global ‘Wana’ Ransomware Outbreak Earned Perpetrators $26,000 So Far

    However, I find it depressing to think of the massive financial damage likely wrought by this ransom campaign in exchange for such a comparatively small reward. It’s particularly galling because this attack potentially endangered the lives of many.

  • Ransomware: Microsoft can no longer claim to be 'proactive'

    Microsoft's reaction to the Windows ransomware crisis that occurred on Friday and Saturday has shown one thing: no longer can the company continue to use the business buzzword "proactive" when it talks about itself. It was caught unawares and left looking very old and tired in the way it responded to the situation.

  • Cyber attack: Hackers {sic} in China try to seize control of WannaCry ransomware's 'kill switch'

    “What you can follow is the money,” Mr Raiu said. “You can follow the Bitcoins [although] following the Bitcoins is kind of an art in itself.”

  • [Old] The Software Industry IS the Problem

    The question is how to introduce product liability, because just imposing it would instantly shut down any and all software houses with just a hint of a risk management function on their organizational charts.

  • [Old] Why Not Use Port Knocking?

    The robots currently at work knocking around for your guessable password could easily be repurposed to guess your Unicode password currently known as your port knocking sequence, and quite likely have been already.

Comparison of all Tizen smartphones so far: Samsung Z1 vs Z2 vs Z3 vs Z4

Filed under
Linux

It has been over 2 years since the launch of the first Tizen smartphone– The Samsung Z1. The Z1 was a major attempt by Samsung to prove that Tizen is a capable platform to even run smartphone applications. With the device being launched in the 2nd largest population-India initially the word about Tizen mobile spread instantly. Fast forward to May 2017 and now we have 4 Tizen smartphones released so far- Z1, Z2, Z3 and now the Samsung Z4.

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Linux and FOSS Events: Open Labs Hackerspace, FOSS4G Boston 2017, GSoC 2017 (for Krita), and LaKademy 2017

Filed under
OSS
  • What I discovered in Tirana, Albania

    The past few months have brought many changes for me. I traveled throughout Europe to experience some of the open source conferences and communities across the continent. Along the way, I met incredible people with powerful stories about their own communities. However, there is one community that I knew about before I came to Europe. The Open Labs Hackerspace in Tirana, Albania is a special community that I was fortunate enough to discover and meet. Together, they have helped set in motion the open source way in their own city.

    [...]

    I am privileged and honored to be an official member of this community. However, I am mostly an observer in my role. The passion and interest are at the heart of the hackerspace. The members from Tirana have invested so much of themselves into this community, its mission, and its values. From reading, visiting, and talking with the people involved with Open Labs, you see many of their hearts dedicated to what they’re doing. And when you see someone else who invests their heart into something, it’s challenging to not lend some of your own too.

  • Bringing together the best minds in open source geospatial technology

    FOSS4G Boston 2017 is shaping up to be a very diverse conference. We have a diverse set of keynote speakers including Holly St. Clair, Chief Digital Officer of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Richard Stallman of the Free Software Foundation, and other open source and geospatial leaders. There are also a variety of workshops and presentations this year. Topics will include R, 3D, analytics, artificial intelligence, routing, big data, drones, GeoNode, GeoServer, image processing, QGIS, PostGIS, projections, and much more! To see the full lineup, visit the full list of accepted presentations and workshops.

  • Introduction for GSoC 2017 with Krita

    I’m here again and I will talk about my accepted GSoC proposal, but how every history, I have to start from the start, so sit down, drink a coffee or a hot chocolate(I like) and have fun.

    I’m from Brazil, to be more specific from Salvador, Bahia. I’m an undergraduate student in Analysis and System Development. I’m not like so many other people that code since their 9 years old or something like that. I just wrote my first line of code with 20 years old and now I have 23, but like my mother says, “It’s never late to do something, no matter what” (Yeah, my mother is amazing. By the way, Happy Mother’s Day).

    In first years in the college, I had the opportunity to work in a software house, that works with proprietary software. I didn’t like that experience for so many reasons, but I was holding myself for money (I’m poor). Someday a teacher from my college invite to a course about Qt and C++ and told to us that we can choose what we want to do and presented KDE and Open Source. I quit my job and started to go to the college in my free time. In this time I studied python and read some books about that and I loved it.

  • LaKademy 2017

    I’ve aways been an introspective person and when I was approved to Analysis and Systems Development Course, I thought that I don’t would need to talk with people anymore (while working at least) and I was happy with this xD. Things were going well, until the day that I met the open source concepts and KDE, through my professor, Sandro Andrade (yes, it’s your fault Tongue). It was love at first sight, I liked the idea to share knowledge and help another people or I was just thinking that I could work with my shorts, I hate pants. I will never know the truth xD.

Kernel and Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Kernels 4.10.16, 4.9.28 LTS and 4.4.68 LTS Are Out Now with Many Changes

    Immediately after announcing earlier today the availability of the first point release of the Linux 4.11 kernel series, Greg Kroah-Hartman is informing the community about the launch of new maintenance updates to the Linux 4.10, 4.9 and 4.4 kernels.

  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux 4.12 with First Release Candidate

    Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of the Linux 4.12 kernel series by announcing the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) a day early than expected due to the Mother's Day celebration and last-minute pull requests.

    According to Linus Torvalds, Linux kernel 4.12 RC1 is a pretty large patch that contains numerous additions, including support for AMD's next-generation Radeon RX Vega GPUs, along with a new driver for Intel Atom IPUs (Image Processing Units).

  • Mesa 17.0.6 Released with AMD Polaris 12 GPU Support for Radeon Vulkan Driver

    As expected, the sixth point release to the Mesa 17.0 stable graphics stack was officially unveiled by Andres Gomez, and will soon be available from the software repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution.

    Containing a total of 55 changes, which include both new functionality and fixes for recently discovered bugs, we can say that Mesa 17.0.6 is a hefty maintenance update that all users of the Mesa 17.0 3D Graphics Library series should install, that, of course, if they didn't already upgrade to the newer Mesa 17.1 stable branch.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Elastic twangs in snappy machine learning

    Elastic is of course the company behind the open source Elasticsearch and the Elastic Stack products.

    Into the Elastic 5.4 release then… (as a result of the recent acquisition of data anomaly detection business Prelert) Elastic’s machine learning features will work on any time series data set to automatically apply machine brain intelligence.

  • Open Source On IBM i: Let It Grow

    The evaluation of open source software is nowhere near conclusive when it comes to enterprise grade application development. Decisions remain in the exploratory phases. Roadmaps are incomplete. Most are without clear routes to a destination. Some are without destinations. However, it would be wrong to assume roads are not being built.

    There is no way that the future of application development – on IBM i or anywhere else – can handle everything that is coming down the pike without open source. That’s not a mandate to jump on a band wagon. It’s an awareness wake-up call. The IBM i community should not be napping.

  • LFNW 2017!

    LinuxFest NorthWest was a fantastic time for me, our Ubuntu booth had Valorie (Kubuntu), Simon (Kubuntu/Lubuntu) and over at the Jupiter Broadcasting we had the awesome Martin Wimpress (Ubuntu Mate). One top question was “what about that Unity news” which we gave a clear answer about Unity development ending and the move to GNOME. Since we were also burning DVD’s and dding usb drives we would recommend that users try out GNOME Shell if GNOME was there preferred Desktop.

  • US District Court Rules GNU GPL is an Enforceable Contract

    https://www.xda-developers.com/us-district-court-rules-gnu-gpl-is-an-enforceable-contract/

New Neptune Linux Plasma 5 ISO Snapshot Lands with KDE Applications 17.04, More

Filed under
KDE

Neptune Linux developer Leszek Lesner proudly announced this weekend the availability of a new ISO snapshot for the Neptune Plasma 5 edition of the Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution.

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Also: It's Now Possible to Access Your Google Drive Account on KDE Plasma 5 Desktops

KDE Frameworks 5.34.0 Released for KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Users with 83 Changes

KDE Frameworks 5.34 Released

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.34.0

Linux Kernel 4.11 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed, Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.5

Filed under
Linux

Dominique Leuenberger reports this weekend on the latest updates that landed in the software repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, which were brought by a total of six snapshots released in the last two weeks.

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The Alpha Litebook

Filed under
Reviews

elementary OS Despite desktop Linux becoming more popular over the years and the GNU/Linux family of operating systems gaining more mainstream support from software and hardware creators, there still are not a lot of big name hardware companies selling Linux computers. Even those which do, such as Dell, tend to tuck their Linux options into a back corner, shinning the spotlight on their computers that ship with Windows pre-installed.

This has left the Linux hardware market relatively open for smaller players. Many smaller shops have appeared over the years, specializing in selling computers with Linux pre-installed. One of the most recent arrivals in the Linux market is the Alpha Litebook. The Litebook, which was launched in early 2017, is a $249-$269 USD notebook computer which ships with elementary OS. elementary is based on Ubuntu and the distribution uses the Pantheon desktop environment by default.

Happy with the price-to-specifications ratio featured by the Litebook and curious to see how the device would perform, I ordered one of the laptops at the start of March. This review of the Alpha Litebook will consist of four sections: acquiring the Litebook and dealing with Alpha's customer support; the hardware of the Litebook; my thoughts on elementary OS as a default distribution; and the process of installing another Linux distribution on the Litebook.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE

OSS Leftovers