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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry echo "Hello World" JULinux 20/09/2010 - 7:02pm
Blog entry Virtualization artwales 08/09/2010 - 8:16pm
Blog entry Amnesia: TDD Ready srlinuxx 08/09/2010 - 2:30pm
Blog entry under the weather srlinuxx 3 15/07/2010 - 2:51am
Blog entry X Window System mywebblog 09/07/2010 - 3:56am
Blog entry Cloud computing on Linux can help small business bigbearomaha 06/07/2010 - 2:53am
Blog entry 5 most interesting linux commands linkin47 02/07/2010 - 3:10pm
Blog entry Make your own linux operating system with archlinux linkin47 02/07/2010 - 2:02pm
Blog entry All hail the easy to use! srlinuxx 2 18/06/2010 - 6:09am
Blog entry Big Thank You to Contributors srlinuxx 16/06/2010 - 7:55pm

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Re-thinking Web App Security

    The implications of storing your data locally are quite profound.

  • ASLR^CACHE Attack Defeats Address Space Layout Randomization

    Researchers from VUSec found a way to break ASLR via an MMU sidechannel attack that even works in JavaScript. Does this matter? Yes, it matters. A lot. The discovery of this security flaw along with the practical implementation is really important mainly because of two factors: what it means for ASLR to be broken and how the MMU sidechannel attack works inside the processor.

  • The Biggest Risk with Container Security is Not Containers

    Container security may be a hot topic today, but we’re failing to recognize lessons from the past. As an industry our focus is on the containerization technology itself and how best to secure it, with the underlying logic that if the technology is itself secure, then so too will be the applications hosted.

    Unfortunately, the reality is that few datacenter attacks are focused on compromising the container framework. Yes, such attacks do exist, but the priority for malicious actors is mounting an attack on applications and data; increasingly for monetary reasons. According to SAP, more than 80 percent of all cyberattacks are specifically targeting software applications rather than the network.

4 categories of Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux

There are different Linux distributions. If you just go to Distrowatch site, you will find hundreds of them listed there. Some of them even have my reviews listed. And how many distributions are NOT listed? Some of them either fail to gain registration on Distrowatch, or are in the process of that, like Zorin OS was just few years ago.

However, there are at least four distinctive categories of distributions visible in the Linux world.

Read more

Linux 4.9.10

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.10 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux Kernel 4.9.10 Has ARM, x86 and PowerPC Improvements, Updated Drivers

Linux 4.4.49

Linux Kernel 4.4.49 LTS Is a Small Patch with Some ARM Fixes and Updated Drivers

7 features Linux could borrow from other systems

Filed under
Linux

Linux (or, GNU/Linux, if you prefer) distributions are absolutely amazing—stable, fast, flexible. Your average Linux-based system is a veritable powerhouse of functionality—a tour de force of what computers can accomplish. But from time to time, other operating systems have some pretty great ideas. Here are seven of my personal favorites that Linux distributions might want to consider “borrowing.” Hint, hint. Nudge, nudge.

Read more

Hands-On: Raspberry Pi 7-inch Touch Display and case

Filed under
Linux

While writing about Kali Linux on the Raspberry Pi recently, I started thinking about portability with the Raspberry Pi. Until now, I have used a standard HDMI desktop monitor (24", 1920x1080), which doesn't exactly lend itself to portability. So I started looking for a small, portable display and a convenient case.

The first thing I realized was that there are a lot of different displays available for the Raspberry Pi. I mean really a lot -- so many that it can be pretty intimidating just trying to figure out what the differences, advantages, and disadvantages are.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

A musician's transition from distro to distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I got news about Ubuntu Studio in 2007, and moved to it. As a musician and sound technician, I had used a digital Portastudio to record and mix because I enjoyed turning actual knobs when mixing. I used Ubuntu Studio for mastering in Audacity before I had the chance to upgrade all my studio equipment with a new laptop and sound card in 2010. I did a lot of research to get the best USB sound card and compatible laptop for recording. I was quite sad when I realized that even though it looked good on paper, everything didn't quite work well in reality. I could only get the card work on 16 bit in Linux, but in Windows it would record with 24 bit and 96 KHz. I felt frustrated, I was back to a dual boot life.

Then Ubuntu Studio 12.10 was released and my sound card and laptop finally played nicely together. What a joy! However, much had changed in my life with family and work, and I wouldn't be doing much recording at home for quite some time. Instead I found out I could contribute to open source without being a programmer, which had never occurred to me before. Because I had so much joy and benefit from open source I wanted to give something back. I had participated in the Ubuntu Forums for a while and reached out to the Ubuntu Studio team.

For a few years, I would contribute when I could with the little time I had available between family, work, sleep, and all the other things I wanted to dabble within the 24 hours available each day.

Read more

Also: Organizing your music: Tagging as you rip

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Samsung’s latest Artik module offers quad A9 SoC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Samsung has launched a new, Fedora Linux ready Artik 530 COM and development kit, which unlike the dual -Cortex-A7 Artik 520, moves to a quad-core -A9 SoC.

Read more

Best Windows Like Linux Distributions For New Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

Hey new Linux users, you may be wondering that which Linux distro to choose after seeing so many distros based on Linux. Most of you might be switching from windows to Linux and want those distros which are easy and simple, resemble like windows. So today I will cover those Linux distros whose Desktop Environment is much similar to windows, so let’s start.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Tizen Software

Filed under
Software

GNU and BSD

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • I love Free Software Day 2017

    In the Free Software society we exchange a lot of criticism. We write bug reports, tell others how they can improve the software, ask them for new features, and generally are not shy about criticising others. There is nothing wrong about that. It helps us to constantly improve. But sometimes we forget to show the hardworking people behind the software our appreciation.

  • GCC 7 To Have Better Test Coverage, Unit Testing

    Red Hat developer David Malcolm has shared the work he's been doing on improving the GCC compiler's internal testing to ensure the GNU Compiler Collection is working as anticipated and is generating correct code.

    GCC 7 has many new features while Malcom's focus recently has been improving GCC's own test suite to ensure the quality and correctness of the code being generated.

  • bsdtalk266 - The nodes take over
  • FreeBSD Ended Out 2016 With Work On Using The LLD Linker, ARM64, LXQt Porting

    FreeBSD has issued their latest quarterly report covering Q4'2016, from October to December of development highlights.

Linux Foundation News

Linux and FOSS Events: Oman's SQU and FOSDEM

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Stay with Free Software, City of Munich!

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux
Microsoft

The city of Munich is currently considering a move away from Free Software back to Microsoft products. We consider this to be a mistake and urge the decision makers to reconsider.

For many years now the City of Munich has been using a mix of software by KDE, LibreOffice and Ubuntu, among others. Mayor Dieter Reiter (a self-proclaimed Microsoft-fan who helped Microsoft move offices to Munich) asked Accenture (a Microsoft partner) to produce a report about the situation of the City of Munich's IT infrastructure. That resulted in a 450-page document. This report is now being misused to push for a move away from Free Software. However the main issues listed in the report were identified to be organizational ones and not related to Free Software operating systems and applications.

[...]

The City of Munich has always been a poster child of Free Software in public administrations. It is a showcase of what can be done with Free Software in this setting. The step back by the City of Munich from Free Software would therefore not just be a blow for this particular deployment but also have more far-reaching effects into other similar deployments.

Read more

CloudLinux 7 Gets New Linux Kernel Update to Fix Memory Leak, XFS Issue, More

Filed under
Linux
Security

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi announced today the availability of a new kernel update for CloudLinux 7 operating system series, urging users to update their machines immediately.

CloudLinux 7's kernel packages have been updated to version 3.10.0-427.36.1.lve1.4.37, which has been marked as ready for production and is available from the stable repositories of the operating system.

Today's kernel replaces version 3.10.0-427.18.2.lve1.4.27 that most CloudLinux 7 users might have installed on their machines, and it fixes a memory leak related to LVE Lightweight Virtual Environment) deletion.

Read more

Also (direct): CloudLinux 7 kernel updated

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

  • A Minimal Chrome OS Theme for Tint2
    I used to (and sort-of-still-do, I guess) run a sister site focused on Google Chrome, Chromecast and Chromebooks, i.e. the Chrome ecosystem. As such I am a fan of Chromebooks and Chrome OS, a Linux-based distribution based on Gentoo. The appearance of Chrome OS has waxed and waned in sync with Google’s ambitions and positioning for the OS, going form hyper-minimal to a full desktop clone (with the desktop-y Chrome Apps platform) through to a Material Design inspired Android + Chrome hybrid today.
  • Off-The-Shelf Hacker: Linux for Cheap Hardware, Then and Now
    Most people, don’t realize how prolific Linux has become. With the Embedded Linux Conference just a week away, I’ve been reflecting on how Linux has provided a sort of computing “circle of life” experience for me. It’s powered my computational hardware 20 years ago and continues to do so today.
  • [Video] XPS 13 Review | Linux Action Show 457
  • GParted 0.28.1
    This release of GParted restores the ability to move/resize primary partitions when an extended partition exists. The move/resize regression was introduced in version 0.28.0. This release also includes some minor bug fixes.
  • Antergos Linux : The beauty built on Arch
    Hi guys, welcome to the 16th segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro". Most of us know or heard about Arch Linux, which is one of the most widely used Linux distribution. For some reason, few users find it hard to install and use Arch. But in Linux world, there is almost always some alternative to your desired distribution. In today's segment, we will be introducing an Arch-based distribution which turned it completely on user-friendly side. So, let's get to know about Antergos Linux.

Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos