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Wednesday, 25 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Cloud computing on Linux can help small business bigbearomaha 06/07/2010 - 2:53am
Blog entry 5 most interesting linux commands linkin47 02/07/2010 - 3:10pm
Blog entry Make your own linux operating system with archlinux linkin47 02/07/2010 - 2:02pm
Blog entry All hail the easy to use! srlinuxx 2 18/06/2010 - 6:09am
Blog entry Big Thank You to Contributors srlinuxx 16/06/2010 - 7:55pm
Blog entry Linux Failed to Satisfy Old PC Users dangareyes 11/06/2010 - 5:28pm
Blog entry More Iron for your blood... revdjenk 21/05/2010 - 2:45am
Blog entry From Karmic to Lucid: Distribution Update Screenshots eco2geek 05/05/2010 - 5:49am
Blog entry Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released! akramshaikh 29/04/2010 - 7:18pm
Blog entry echo "Hello World" JULinux 20/09/2010 - 7:02pm

Why Linus Torvalds Doesn’t Like Using Debian Or Ubuntu Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Debian
Ubuntu

From the past 25 years, Linus Torvalds is working tirelessly to make Linux a more efficient and user-friendly computing platform. His creation is now available to the open source lovers in the form of many Linux distros that serve a wide variety of users.

Linux and open source software support the idea of choice and it acts as their driving force. However, with time, the internet is filled with tons of Linux distros based on Debian and Ubuntu-like feature

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A Minitel Terminal As A USB Linux Terminal

Filed under
Linux

If you paid a visit to France in the 1980s the chances are you’d have been surprised to see a little brown screen and keyboard sitting next to the telephones wherever you went. At the time, it was another reason apart from the food, wine, and super-fast trains to envy our Gallic cousins. This was Minitel, their take on the cutting-edge of online data services of the day.

Minitel stood apart from similar services of the day in most other countries, because of its business model. Unlike the UK’s Prestel or West Germany’s BTX for which you had to spend significant money on a terminal, the French Minitel terminals were free. Thus in the early 1980s everybody in France was busy using videotext while most of the rest of Europe was still excited by chipping bits of flint into arrow heads. Or at least, that’s how it seemed at the time to those of us who didn’t have Minitel.

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Also: We're giving away an Arduino starter kit!

Made-in-Vietnam open-source software supports IPv6

Filed under
OSS

At first, NukeViet was used to build websites and publish content on internet.

However, since the NukeViet 3.0 version launched in 2010, NukeViet has been developed to serve as a platform for the development of web-based apps.

NukeViet now has many different products, including NukeViet CMS used to operate news websites, NukeViet Portal used to make business information portals, and NukeViet Edu Gate – the information portal solution for education departments, and NukeViet Shop, used to build online sale websites.

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Time to choose: Are you investing in open source or not?

Filed under
OSS

In 1996, the term "open source" didn't exist. Yet 20 years later, open source technology spans countless projects and brings together the collective talent of millions. Take a close look at any open source project or community of developers and you'll find incredible levels of speed, innovation, and agility.

Open source participation varies wildly. Some developers devote their professional lives to open source software projects; others contribute their time and talent as an avocation. While the communities behind the software continue to grow, the technology itself is playing both a foundational role in the most important technology developments of the past 20 years and is also an integral role in the strategies powering many of today's leading organizations.

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Driving cars into the future with Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

To find out more, we interviewed two leaders in this emerging field. Specifically, we wanted to know how Linux and open source software are being used and if they are in fact changing the face of the automotive industry. First, we talk to Alison Chaiken, a software engineer at Peloton Technology and an expert on automotive Linux, cybersecurity, and transparency. She previously worked for Mentor Graphics, Nokia, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Then, we chat with Steven Crumb, executive director of GENIVI, who got started in open source in high-performance computing environments (supercomputers and early cloud computing). He says that though he's not a coder anymore, he loves to help organizations solve real business problems with open source software.

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BeagleBone Green Wireless, a Raspberry Pi 3 Competitor, Ships with Built-in WiFi

Filed under
Linux

SeeedStudio informed Softpedia about the availability of a new single-board computer (SBC) called SeeedStudio BeagleBone Green Wireless, the first BeagleBone board with built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE).

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Raspberry Pi-based signage stack gets Snappy

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The Screenly signage software for the Raspberry Pi is being converted to Ubuntu Snappy Core, enabling OTA updates and transactional rollbacks.

Canonical and Screenly, which makes what it calls “the most popular digital signage solution for the Raspberry Pi,” have announced a partnership to build the Screenly signage stack on Ubuntu Snappy Core. Screenly, which is currently available in commercial (Pro) and free, open source “OSE” versions based on Raspbian Linux, is adopting the lightweight, transaction-oriented Ubuntu Core “to give its customers a stable platform that is secure, robust, simple to use and manage,” says Screenly.

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Here's What the GNOME Control Center App Will Look Like in GNOME 3.22 and Later

Filed under
GNOME

We reported at the beginning of the year that the GNOME developers are working hard on a completely redesigned UI of the GNOME Control Center application, which might land in the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop environment.

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Also: GNOME Calendar App to Let Users Move Events Using Drag and Drop in GNOME 3.22

GNOME Games App to Support Atari 2600 and Atari 7800 Titles in GNOME 3.22

Solus Operating System Now Provides Out-of-the-Box Support for 32-bit Apps

Filed under
OS
Development

The Solus developers are having the time of their lives these days as part of a new, online event called Solus Hackfest 1.2, where the operating system's developers are trying to implement new features to the upcoming Solus 1.2 release.

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F2FS & Btrfs Get Fixes For Linux 4.7 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

The Btrfs and F2FS file-system updates were submitted this weekend for the Linux 4.7 kernel merge window.

The Btrfs pull request from Chris Mason mentions, "Has our merge window series of cleanups and fixes. These target a wide range of issues, but do include some important fixes for qgroups, O_DIRECT, and fsync handling. Jeff Mahoney moved around a few definitions to make them easier for userland to consume. Also whiteout support is included now that issues with overlayfs have been cleared up."

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Also: How Linux Is Built — How Does It Affect Your Daily Lives?

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Python, Go, And Scala — Best Programming Languages You Should Learn To Boost Your Salary
  • crossroad 0.6 released: cross-building GIMP as an example

    Over the years, I have written a tool to cross-compile software under a GNU/Linux OS for other targets: crossroad. Well to this day, the only supported targets are Windows 32/64-bit. I realized I never advertised this tool much which — even though it has been originally built to help me build and hack a specific project (GIMP) — ended up as a generic cross-compilation system for Linux.

  • Django and PostgreSQL composite types

    PostgreSQL has this nifty feature called composite types that you can use to create your own types from the built-in PostgreSQL types. It’s a bit like hstore, only structured, which makes it great for structured data that you might reuse multiple times in a model, like addresses.

    Unfortunately to date, they were pretty much a pain to use in Django. There were some older implementations for versions of Django before 1.7, but they tended to do things like create surprise new objects in the namespace, not be migrateable, and require connection to the DB at any time (i.e. during your build).

  • GHC 8.0.1 is available!
  • GHC 8.0.1 Haskell Compiler Released

    Developers behind the Glasgow Haskell Compiler announced their first "super-major version" of the compiler in six years.

  • GNU Make 4.2 Released

Debian-Based Q4OS 1.4.10 Distro Improves the Bourbon Start Menu, Adds Tweaks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Today, May 23, 2016, the Q4OS development team informs Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of a new stable update for their GNU/Linux operating system, Q4OS 1.4.10 "Orion."

The last update for the Orion branch has been released in the first week of April 2016, based on the Debian GNU/Linux 8.4 "Jessie" operating system, the latest Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), and introducing the "Bourbon" Start Menu, a two-panel, highly customizable Applications menu.

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Manjaro Linux 16.06 "Daniella" RC1 Gets First Update with Latest ZFS on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It did not even hit the stable channel, and the upcoming Manjaro Linux 16.06 "Daniella" operating system has received its first update pack, for the Release Candidate build.

Yes, you're reading it right, Manjaro Linux 16.06 RC1 got its first update pack, which brings the Release Candidate version of the highly anticipated Pamac 4.1 graphical package manager, featuring an updated user interface that promises to fit your needs, as well as fixes for most of the bugs reported by users.

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Linux powered Zumwalt Destroyer delivered to US navy for $3 billion

Filed under
GNU
Linux

World’s first Linux powered Zumwalt destroyer will be seen in action after US navy acquires it for $3 billion

The Navy’s future is looking even brighter with the new Zumwalt Destroyer. The deal made to complete the transaction was a hefty one, as it took a total of $3 billion USD to deliver the destroyer, along with an additional $600 million as a token of appreciation. The Zumwalt Destroyer has been made with stealth and automation in mind.

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Chromebooks are about to take over and Apple and Microsoft should be worried

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chromebooks are about to take over and Apple and Microsoft should be worried

    A few days ago, Google announced that Chromebooks will soon be able to run Android apps from the Google Play app store, finally making them fully capable computers and putting them in a position to put a real dent in Apple and Microsoft's dominance in PCs.

  • When Chromebooks run Android apps, do we still need Android tablets?

    After years of hinting that the lines between Android and Chrome OS were getting thinner and blurrier, Google recently announced that Chromebooks would soon be able to run just about any Android app. The Google Play Store will be available for three Chromebooks with touchscreen displays starting in June, and the list of Chrome OS laptops, desktops, and other devices that will gain access to Android apps is pretty long… and expected to get longer.

  • This portable computer runs on Chromium OS, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Android TV

    Fancy, a portable desktop computer Running Chromium OS, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Android TV and powered by AMD 5350 Quad-Core x86 processor

    Imagine a desktop computer, that too a portable one, being run on both Chromium OS and Linux and allowing to watch you Android TV as well. Dylan Callahan has made that possible by fusing all these three independent features into one computer called Fancy Computer.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME

GNU/Linux Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • PepperMint OS 6
  • Arch Linux and SparkyLinux Offers Linux 4.6 Days after Release

    Linux 4.6 was released on 15th May by Linus Torvalds and the wait to enjoy the update is over. Few distros has adopted the change. According to Arch Linux developer Tobias Powalowski, Linux kernel 4.6 has entered the testing repository in Arch Linux which is on 9th position on popularity whereas Debian-based SparkyLinux has also landed in the operating system’s ‘unstable’ repository. The developers have also provided installation instruction for SparkyLinux which is ready to use, out of the box operating system.

  • 6 Most-Used AUR Helpers For Arch Linux

    Arch Linux is a lightweight, flexible and independently developed general purpose GNU/Linux distribution. And if there is a unique and special distribution of Linux, then it has got to be Arch Linux. Experienced users can build their very own Arch Linux system from the ground up.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/20

    This week we finally could add the long awaited Qt 5.6 to Tumbleweed. It was blocked for a long time as it exposed a bug in, what showed, icewm (the window manager used during installation). This bug though is so deeply nested in the architecture of icewm, that in the end, it was decided to workaround the bug with a ‘fix’ in YaST directly.

  • Rant: The switch from Digital Ocean to Amazon Web Services, and from CentOS to Red Hat

    I’ve been considering moving this blog from Digital Ocean to Amazon Web Services for a while now but finally bit the bullet after a recent DDOS attack on my backend database. This was caused by a misconfiguration on my part, I remembered wrong and thought that I had disabled all remote connections during the mysql_secure_installation process but it actually only restricts remote access to the root account: (Setting local-only access is done with a ‘bind-address=127.0.0.1’ in the my.cnf file by the way). So is that Digital Ocean’s fault? No, absolutely not but it made me paranoid enough to want a firewall on top of my MySQL restrictions to make sure that no other service was allowing outside connections. This could easily be done on the server side but then I’d have to manage firewalls on every instance I stand up and I have plans to.. well I should keep my world domination plans to myself but suffice it to say I wanted a higher level firewall. Digital Ocean offers nothing of the sort, every droplet is wide open unless you change it on the server side. Amazon on the other hand offers security groups, allowing you to create multiple firewall schemes at the network level for different types of servers and manage them with a nice interface.

  • Key Stocks of the Day: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Dell, why u no VPNC

    Those old Fedoras were so nice, BTW. Funnily enough, that VM with 1 CPU and 1.5 GB starts quicker than the host laptop with the benefit of SystemD and its ability to run tasks in parallel. Of course, the handing of WiFi in Fedora 20+ is light years ahead of nm-applet in Fedora 10. There was some less noticeable progress elsewhere as well. But in the same time, the bloat was phenomenal.

  • GNOME Calendar and Drag n’ Drop

    One of the most intuitive ways to interact with an application is reproducing what we do in real life. Applications try to shorten the learning curve by using metaphores of real world objects.

    We all know what GNOME Calendar is: a virtual calendar application. As such, using real-life calendars as a reference for it’s UI is mostly a good thing, except that we’d probably have an annoying time moving events around. In this regard, technology can improve what we do.

  • Running Steam on PS4 Linux

    I'm using ARCH Linux on PS4 running 1.76 fw.

  • AMD FireRays 2.0 – Open Sourcing and Customizing Ray Tracing for Efficient Hardware Platforms Support

    After the success of the first version, FireRays is moving to another major milestone. We are open sourcing the entire library which allows complete integration and contribution from the entire developer community to bring improvements in the rendering world. In fact FireRays 2.0 brings support for Windows, OSX, Linux, AMD, NV, Intel GPUs and CPUs with many back-ends.

  • Should I switch to BTRFS or ZFS on Linux Desktop?

    This is a recap of weird things that could happen with the newer Linux Filesystems. Ubuntu 16.04 and Debian Linux ship both ZFS (OpenZFS) and BTRFS so it's normal to think about it, but like many "new" Linux technologies (e.g Wayland), none agree when it's the right moment to jump on them.

  • Improvements to PulseAudio’s Echo Cancellation

    As we approach the PulseAudio 9.0 release, I thought it would be a good time to talk about one of the things I had a chance to work on, that landed in this cycle.

  • Chromebooks just outsold Macbooks for the first time

    Macbooks may be sleek and sexy, but they’re not moving as fast as the competition any more. They’ve been surpassed by Chromebooks for the first time ever.

  • If you Click on the Red “X”, You’re Getting the Windows 10 Upgrade

    Two Soylentils wrote with a caution about a new strategy in Microsoft's playbook to get people to upgrade to Windows 10.

  • Linux Talk | Giving Back To Linux

Leftovers: Devuan and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Fork Devuan Beta Released

    A team of developers made good on their threats to fork Debian Linux late last year, after the community’s leadership voted to replace sysvinit with systemd, making systemd the default init boot process.

  • A Telegram Snap Package Is Available on Ubuntu 16.04

    Using Ubuntu 16.04 and want to install the official Telegram Linux app?

    Don’t run off to the official website to get the official binary: there’s now a Telegram app snap package available on Ubuntu 16.04.

  • Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition: a tablet that runs like a desktop

    At first, the Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition — often called the Ubuntu tablet — resembles most modern tablets, with a hard plastic case that folds into a stand, limited multi-tasking from an overview screen, and some ability to act like a workstation or laptop. However, even a tentative exploration reveals that the Ubuntu Edition is much more, due mostly to its operating system and the Unity interface, which comes of age at last on this tablet.

  • Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition Review
  • UbuntuBuzz Magazine #11 - Converting PDF
  • UbuntuBuzz Magazine #10 - sK1
  • NoNotifications: Use Do Not Disturb Feature in Ubuntu

    If you are trying to focus on your work and don't want to disable notifications completely then here is a tool called "NoNotifications" for you, which works in Ubuntu Unity. It is just a simple panel indicator which allows you to disable notification temporarily. This tool should be enhanced to offer more features like mobile OS's already have, to completely disable everything Like: tones, alerts, notifications, and so, and schedule a time to activate/deactivate could be a plus for this small application.

  • Temporarily Disable Notifications In Ubuntu (w/ Unity 7) With NoNotifications Indicator

    NoNotifications is a simple indicator for Ubuntu (Unity 7) that allows you to temporarily suppress NotifyOSD notifications. The tool is useful for presentations, when working, and so on, to prevent unwanted notifications from getting in your way or distracting you.

  • Ubuntu’s Got Tablet, Fedora’s Kernel Decision & More…

    Back in the hippie days there was a lot of talk about plastic people, which would be fake people. Back in those days, plastic people were to be avoided, as was plastic anything.

    How times have changed. These days we embrace a plastic world. As example, we replace carefully hand crafted wristwatches made to last a lifetime with electronic rhinestone wearables that will be obsolete in a year or two because they tell us how fast and how seldom we walk.

    You see, by the ’60s definition, plastic didn’t need to be made of plastic to be plastic. You dig?

    [...]

    Swapnil Bhartiya at CIO found BQ’s hardware to be more than up to the task and also thought that nearly all aspects of the Ubuntu Touch with convergence to be beyond super fantastic. Gesture swiping is amazing, Scopes are the best thing since sliced bread, and using convergence to run in full blown desktop mode is “one of it’s greatest features.” The App Store, which he calls the “most exciting part of this Ubuntu tablet,” disappoints him because despite having tons of cool apps he’s never seen offered for phones before, it doesn’t have a few things he likes.

    “After using the tablet for a while,” he opines, “I had to face the harsh reality that as much as wanted to like the tablet, the lack of what I consider essential native apps will prevent me from using it as my primary, or even as a secondary, device.”

    The only apps he mentions that he would like but which are MIA? “[N]one of the streaming services such as Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Prime are available on the device.”

    Maybe he should just buy himself a TV.

    [...]

    In case you missed it, the conference live streamed Corey Doctorow’s Thursday morning keynote address, called “Open, Closed, and Demon Haunted: An Internet of Things That Act Like Inkjet Printers,” along with all other keynotes throughout the event. Included below is a short snippet of the talk that’s available on YouTube. Doctorow’s complete talk is available online, but requires the opening of an account with O’Reilly in order to view it.

  • Cinnamon 3.0 - See What's New

    Cinnamon 3.0 is the latest release of Cinnamon Desktop Environment and it will become as default desktop for upcoming Linux Mint 18 codenamed "sarah".

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Raspberry Pi analog input board has weather station option

RasPi.TV has Kickstartered a $12 “RasPiO Analog Zero” Raspberry Pi add-on board the size of an Raspberry Pi Zero. It offers eight 10-bit analog inputs. The RasPiO Analog Zero has surpassed its Kickstarter goals, and is available through May 31 starting at 8 Pounds ($12). Designed for reading up to eight analog sensors simultaneously on a Raspberry Pi, the add-on board is matched to the size of the 65 x 30mm Raspberry Pi Zero. However, it plugs into any Pi with a 40-pin expansion connector, and can work with older 26-pin Pi models with the help of an adapter. Read more

GhostBSD 10.3 Development Continues, Now with UEFI Support for 64-bit Platforms

Today, May 25, 2016, GhostBSD maintainer Eric Turgeon announced the general availability of the second Alpha release of the upcoming GhostBSD 10.3 operating system. Read more

Samsung still undecided on their Android Wear future

Yesterday the Internet lit up like a Christmas tree with the news that Samsung was no longer going to use Android Wear for any of its Smartwatches, but it seems that might not be quite the case. The report from Fast Company cited some Samsung executives confirming that Samsung was not looking into developing any further Android Wear products. Now, In a statement provided to the Engadget website Samsung states: “We disagree with Fast Company’s interpretation. Samsung has not made any announcement concerning Android Wear and we have not changed our commitment to any of our platforms.” Read more

Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

The Meizu Pro 5 is the latest flagship smartphone to run on Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu is designed to work across all device types – including mobile, tablets, convertibles and desktops – using a common core code. This is similar to Microsoft Windows 10 Mobile. However, unlike Microsoft’s code, Ubuntu is totally open source and has largely been developed and improved by the desktop OS’s millions-strong user base. This means the OS is capable of evolving and changing at a great pace and has update cycles that would make most sysadmins weep. Read more