Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 07 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry echo "Hello World" JULinux 20/09/2010 - 7:02pm
Blog entry Virtualization artwales 08/09/2010 - 8:16pm
Blog entry Amnesia: TDD Ready srlinuxx 08/09/2010 - 2:30pm
Blog entry under the weather srlinuxx 3 15/07/2010 - 2:51am
Blog entry X Window System mywebblog 09/07/2010 - 3:56am
Blog entry Cloud computing on Linux can help small business bigbearomaha 06/07/2010 - 2:53am
Blog entry 5 most interesting linux commands linkin47 02/07/2010 - 3:10pm
Blog entry Make your own linux operating system with archlinux linkin47 02/07/2010 - 2:02pm
Blog entry All hail the easy to use! srlinuxx 2 18/06/2010 - 6:09am
Blog entry Big Thank You to Contributors srlinuxx 16/06/2010 - 7:55pm

Best Features Of Linux Mint 18.1 ‘Serena’

Filed under
Linux

If you’re fed up with Windows 10 and its hiccups, or you can’t afford the new MacBook Pro with fancy TouchBar, somewhere there’s a solid Linux system waiting for you. Linux Mint is often regarded as one of the best Linux desktop operating systems. Over the years, Mint has established itself as a competent Windows 10 replacement and its impressive releases continue to affirm this notion.

Earlier this year in June, we witnessed the release of Linux Mint 18 Sarah. Now, the second point release of Linux Mint 18, i.e., Mint 18.1 Serena, is just around the corner. It’s slated to arrive later this December.

Read more

Linux Kernel 4.4.36 LTS Introduces Minor PA-RISC Changes, Wireless Improvements

Filed under
Linux

After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.8.12, renowned kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman informed us about the availability of the thirty-sixth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.36

Linux Kernel 4.8.12 Released, Brings PA-RISC, PowerPC, and x86 Improvements

Filed under
Linux

A few moments ago, Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the twelfth maintenance update of the Linux 4.8 kernel series, as well as the availability of Linux kernel 4.4.36 LTS.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.8.12

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • KDevelop 5.0.3 Open-Source IDE Improves GitHub Handling Authentication, More

    The development behind the open-source and cross-platform KDevelop IDE (Integrated Development Environment) was proud to announce on the first day of December the availability of the third point release for KDevelop 5.0 stable series.

    KDevelop 5.0.3 arrives one and a half months after the second maintenance update, but it's a small bugfix release that attempts to patch a total of nine issues reported by users since then. However, it's a recommended update for all users.

    "We are happy to announce the release of KDevelop 5.0.3, the third bugfix and stabilization release for KDevelop 5.0. An upgrade to 5.0.3 is strongly recommended to all users of 5.0.0, 5.0.1 or 5.0.2," reads the release announcement.

  • PHP 7.1.0

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0.

  • PHP 7.1 Makes Its Debut

    This first major update to last year's huge PHP 7.0 release builds several new features on top. Introduced by PHP 7.1 is nullable types, a void return type, a iterable pseudo-type, class constant visibility modifiers, support for catching multiple exception types, and many other language enhancements plus more performance optimizations and other work.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/48

    After releasing daily snapshots without interruption for 17 days, Tumbleweed did slow down a bit during the last week. As already mentioned in my last review, 1124 had been canceled due to an issue with sddm installing strange branding configurations. And later on, we ‘broke’ our own staging setup and needed to bootstrap a few of them, making the throughput much lower than you were used to. So, we ended up with 3 snapshots since my last review: 1125, 1128 and 1129.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 28

    November is over, Santa Claus elves start to stress and the YaST team brings you one of the last reports of 2016. Let’s see what’s new in YaSTland.

Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Sues Cloud Provider, Mint Beta, Devuan Tour

    Ubuntu parent-company, Canonical, today posted that they've been in a dispute with "a European cloud provider" over their use of their own homespun version of Ubuntu on their cloud servers. Their implementation disables even the most basic of security features and Canonical is worried something bad could happen and it'd reflect badly back on them. The post read, "The home-grown images of this provider disable fundamental security mechanisms and modify the system in ways that are unsupportable. They are likely to behave unpredictably on update in weirdly creative and mysterious ways." They said they've spent months trying to get the unnamed provider to use the standard Ubuntu as delivered to other commercial operations to no avail. Canonical feels they have no choice but to "take legal steps to remove these images." They're sure Red Hat and Microsoft wouldn't be treated like this.

  • Taking a stand against unofficial Ubuntu images

    Ubuntu is amazing on the cloud because we work with cloud providers to ensure crisp, consistent and secure images which you can auto-update safely. On every major cloud—AWS, Azure, Google, Rackspace, SoftLayer and many more—you can be confident that ‘Ubuntu’ is Ubuntu, with the same commitment to quality that you can expect when you install it yourself, and we can guarantee that to you because we require that clouds offer only certified Ubuntu images.

  • Canonical Takes Stand Against Unofficial Ubuntu Images, Reportedly Risky & Insecure

    Mark Shuttleworth has written a new blog post where he's outlining a dispute Canonical is having with a European cloud provider over a breach of contract and "publishing insecure, broken images of Ubuntu" for its cloud customers.

    With these Ubuntu Cloud unofficial images reportedly being buggy, users are complaining to Canonical/Ubuntu, assuming it's an upstream issue. Having enough of that, they are now preparing for legal steps to remove the unofficial Ubuntu images from the particular cloud provider.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” MATE – BETA Release
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” Cinnamon – BETA Release

Linux Devices

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware
  • Jolla Experiments With A Sailfish OS Watch

    Jolla engineers have spent the past few weeks porting Sailfish OS to an Android smartwatch as they feel their Linux-based OS is particularly suited for small screens.

    Jolla isn't announcing a Sailfish Watch product, but rather looking at it as part of their licensing strategy to offer their OS to smartwatch manufacturers. Joona Petrell shared that they had technical and design inspiration help off the Asteroid Smartwatch OS and their libHybris layer allowed them to quickly bring-up Sailfish and their UI on the Android smartwatch.

  • Amazon extends AWS IoT with offline processing
  • The Great Raspberry PiTop Giveaway
  • Using a fully free OS for devices in the home

    There are more and more devices around the home (and in many small offices) running a GNU/Linux-based firmware. Consider routers, entry-level NAS appliances, smart phones and home entertainment boxes.

  • Samsung have Invested $10 Million in Svace, Security Solution to Analyze Tizen Apps

    As part of its security measures, Samsung are using the SVACE technology (Security Vulnerabilities and Critical Errors Detector) to detect potential vulnerabilities and errors that might exist in source code of applications created for the Tizen Operating System (OS). This technology was developed by ISP RAS (Institute for System Programming of the Russian Academy of Sciences), who are based in Moscow, Russia.

  • Trouble at Cyanogen [Ed: it chose to be a Microsoft proxy and look what happened; the usual!]

Linux Foundation and Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • 10 Great Moments from Linux Foundation 2016 Events
  • 10 Great Moments from Linux Foundation 2016 Events
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.36 LTS Introduces Minor PA-RISC Changes, Wireless Improvements

    After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.8.12, renowned kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman informed us about the availability of the thirty-sixth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

    The Linux 4.4 LTS branch is currently used in various long-term supported operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Linux Mint 18 "Sarah," as well as the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" release, and in rock-solid and widely-used server-oriented GNU/Linux distributions like Alpine Linux. Linux kernel 4.4.36 LTS is here to change a total of 32 files, with 236 insertions and only 94 deletions.

  • Linux Kernel 4.8.12 Released, Brings PA-RISC, PowerPC, and x86 Improvements

    A few moments ago, Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the twelfth maintenance update of the Linux 4.8 kernel series, as well as the availability of Linux kernel 4.4.36 LTS.

  • Developers' Planned Changes Still Coming To Mesa 13.1 / Mesa 17.0

    Earlier this week I wrote about a release schedule coming out for Mesa 13.1 that culminates with this next big Mesa update being out in February. Some Mesa developers have now shared the work they still hope to see in this next release.

  • Gallium3D Drivers Prepped For EGL_ANDROID_native_fence_sync

    Rob Clark has landed his code for supporting EGL_ANDROID_native_fence_sync in Mesa and his Freedreno Gallium3D driver is the first in-tree Mesa/Gallium3D driver to support the native fence FD support, even beating out the Intel driver.

  • Intel Publishes Renderbuffer Decompression Patches

    A set of 27 patches published this week for GBM and the Intel Mesa driver provide for significant bandwidth savings.

    Intel's Ben Widawsky published the set of patches enabling renderbuffer decompression for the i965 driver plus the necessary GBM modifications. With these patches there is the potential for massive bandwidth savings. Results shared by Widawsky on a Skylake GT4 GPU show the compression dropping the read bandwidth from 603 MiB/s to 259 MiB/s and the write bandwidth dropping from 615 MiB/s to 337 MiB/s, when using a modified version of kmscube for testing.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Mozilla Patches Zero-Day Flaw in Firefox

    Mozilla moves quickly to fix vulnerability that was being actively exploited in attacks against Tor Browser, which is based on Firefox.

    Late afternoon on November 30, Mozilla rushed out an emergency update for its open-source Firefox web browser, fixing a zero-day vulnerability that was being actively exploited by attackers. The vulnerability was used in attacks against the Tor web browser which is based on Firefox.

  • Thursday's security advisories
  • 'Fatal' flaws found in medical implant software

    Security flaws found in 10 different types of medical implants could have "fatal" consequences, warn researchers.

    The flaws were found in the radio-based communications used to update implants, including pacemakers, and read data from them.

    By exploiting the flaws, the researchers were able to adjust settings and even switch off gadgets.

    The attacks were also able to steal confidential data about patients and their health history.

    A software patch has been created to help thwart any real-world attacks.

    The flaws were found by an international team of security researchers based at the University of Leuven in Belgium and the University of Birmingham.

  • Lenovo: If you value your server, block Microsoft's November security update

    Lenovo server admins should disable Windows Update and apply a UEFI fix to avoid Microsoft’s November security patches freezing their systems.

    The world’s third-largest server-maker advised the step after revealing that 19 configurations of its x M5 and M6 rack, as well as its x6 systems are susceptible.

  • Symantec and VMware patches, Linux encryption bug: Security news IT leaders need to know
  • UK homes lose internet access after cyber-attack

    More than 100,000 people in the UK have had their internet access cut after a string of service providers were hit by what is believed to be a coordinated cyber-attack, taking the number affected in Europe up to about a million.

    TalkTalk, one of Britain’s biggest service providers, the Post Office and the Hull-based KCom were all affected by the malware known as the Mirai worm, which is spread via compromised computers.

    The Post Office said 100,000 customers had experienced problems since the attack began on Sunday and KCom put its figure at about 10,000 customers since Saturday. TalkTalk confirmed that it had also been affected but declined to give a precise number of customers involved.

  • New Mirai Worm Knocks 900K Germans Offline

    More than 900,000 customers of German ISP Deutsche Telekom (DT) were knocked offline this week after their Internet routers got infected by a new variant of a computer worm known as Mirai. The malware wriggled inside the routers via a newly discovered vulnerability in a feature that allows ISPs to remotely upgrade the firmware on the devices. But the new Mirai malware turns that feature off once it infests a device, complicating DT’s cleanup and restoration efforts.

Ubuntu Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Trisquel GNU/Linux 8 Alpha Is Now Available to Download

    Trisquel GNU/Linux 8.0 alpha is now available for download and testing. Based on Ubuntu 16.04, Trisquel 8.0 also ships with the MATE 1.12 desktop.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Beta released

    Well,Just months back Linux Mint 18 got it's release,now it is the time to have the next point release of Linux Mint 18.Just few hours ago Linux Mint team has announced the availability of Linux Mint 18.1 Beta.
    As Linux Mint users , who have already moved to Linux Mint 18, might be loving it for the newly introduced themes,look & feel and features(of course,they didn't go like updating only pre-installed packages Tongue ).So,in this time, coming from rainy to winter season,they have made a good list of new improvements,features and support.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Beta Is Out with Cinnamon 3.2 & MATE 1.16, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

    A few moments ago, Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena."

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • November Bug Squash Month: GJS

    During November I finally took the leap and offered to become a maintainer of GJS. My employer Endless has been sponsoring work on bugs 742249 and 751252, porting GJS’s Javascript engine from SpiderMonkey 24 to SpiderMonkey 31. But aside from that I had been getting interested in contributing more to it, and outside of work I did a bunch of maintenance work modernizing the Autotools scripts and getting it to compile without warnings. From there it was a small step to officially volunteering.

  • Core Apps Hackfest afterthoughts

    During last weekend, I was very happy to attend the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. This is effectively the first hackfest I’ve ever been! Thanks Carlos for organizing that, thanks Kinvolk folks for hosting the event, and Collabora for sponsoring the dinner.

    This event was a great chance to meet the maintainers in person and talk directly to the designers about doubts we have. Since Carlos already wrote down the list of tasks we worked on, I’m not going to repeat it. So here, I’ll report what I was able to work on.

  • Contribute to Polari with this one simple trick!

    I’ve been rather quiet recently working on new features for Builder. But we managed to just release Builder 3.22.3 which is full of bug fixes and a really new important feature. You can now meaningfully target flatpak when building your application. Matthew Leeds has done this outstanding work and it is really going to simplify how you contribute to GNOME applications going forward.

    I’m really happy with the quality of this feature because it has shown me where our LibIDE design has done well, and where it has not. Of course, we will address that for 3.24 to help make some of the UI less confusing.

Debian News

Filed under
Debian
  • My Debian Activities in November 2016

    This month I marked 377 packages for accept and rejected 36 packages. I also sent 13 emails to maintainers asking questions.

  • Debian LTS report for November 2016

    Noevember 2016 was my third month as a Debian LTS team member. I was allocated 11 hours and had 1,75 hours left from October. This makes a total of 12,75 hours. In November I spent all 12,75 hours (and even a bit more) preparing security updates for spip, memcached and monit.

  • Free software activities in November 2016

    Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, most software is distributed pre-compiled to end users.

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to permit verification that no flaws have been introduced — either maliciously or accidentally — during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Ubuntu still isn't free software

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth just blogged about their stance against unofficial Ubuntu images. The assertion is that a cloud hoster is providing unofficial and modified Ubuntu images, and that these images are meaningfully different from upstream Ubuntu in terms of their functionality and security. Users are attempting to make use of these images, are finding that they don't work properly and are assuming that Ubuntu is a shoddy product. This is an entirely legitimate concern, and if Canonical are acting to reduce user confusion then they should be commended for that.

The appropriate means to handle this kind of issue is trademark law. If someone claims that something is Ubuntu when it isn't, that's probably an infringement of the trademark and it's entirely reasonable for the trademark owner to take action to protect the value associated with their trademark. But Canonical's IP policy goes much further than that - it can be interpreted as meaning[1] that you can't distribute works based on Ubuntu without paying Canonical for the privilege, even if you call it something other than Ubuntu.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

FFmpeg 3.2.2 "Hypatia" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Released with 30 Fixes

Today, December 6, 2016, the development team behind the powerful, open-source, free, and cross-platform FFmpeg multimedia framework released a new maintenance update in the FFmpeg 3.2 "Hypatia" series. Read more

Ubuntu-Based BackBox Linux 4.7 Is Out with Kernel 4.4 LTS, Updated Hacking Tools

On December 6, 2016, the developers behind the Ubuntu-based, hacking-oriented BlackBox Linux operating system proudly announced the release of BackBox Linux 4.7. Read more

Doyodo RetroEngine Sigma is a Linux-powered classic video game emulation console

The Nintendo NES Classic is quite an amazing console. True, it is not as powerful as modern game systems like Xbox One and PlayStation 4, but it comes pre-loaded with many classic NES titles. Unfortunately, its strength is also its weakness -- those pre-loaded titles are the only games you can play. You cannot load other games, so you are stuck with what you got. Read more

LibreOffice 5.3 Beta 2 to Land Soon as Third Bug Hunting Event Is Held This Week

Today, December 6, 2016, The Document Foundation, through Italo Vignoli, was proud to announce the upcoming third bug hunting session for the LibreOffice 5.3 open-source office suite. Read more