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Wednesday, 18 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry echo "Hello World" JULinux 20/09/2010 - 7:02pm
Blog entry Virtualization artwales 08/09/2010 - 8:16pm
Blog entry Amnesia: TDD Ready srlinuxx 08/09/2010 - 2:30pm
Blog entry under the weather srlinuxx 3 15/07/2010 - 2:51am
Blog entry X Window System mywebblog 09/07/2010 - 3:56am
Blog entry Cloud computing on Linux can help small business bigbearomaha 06/07/2010 - 2:53am
Blog entry 5 most interesting linux commands linkin47 02/07/2010 - 3:10pm
Blog entry Make your own linux operating system with archlinux linkin47 02/07/2010 - 2:02pm
Blog entry All hail the easy to use! srlinuxx 2 18/06/2010 - 6:09am
Blog entry Big Thank You to Contributors srlinuxx 16/06/2010 - 7:55pm

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Rust severely disappoints me

    I wanted to like Rust. I really did. I’ve been investigating it for months, from the outside, as a C replacement with stronger correctness guarantees that we could use for NTPsec.

    I finally cleared my queue enough that I could spend a week learning Rust. I was evaluating it in contrast with Go, which I learned in order to evaluate as a C replacement a couple of weeks back.

  • Oviedo university studies to increase open source

    The University of Oviedo in Asturias, one of Spain’s autonomous communities, is studying ways to increase its use of free and open source software, reports La Nueva España, a newspaper. Using free and open source software will help to avoid the use of unlicensed software, the university management is quoted as saying in December.

    The university is also looking into using free software solutions to reduce academic plagiarism.

    The newspaper notes how Asturia’s one and only university is at the bottom end of the annual ranking of universities that use free software (Ranking de Universidades en Software Libre, RuSL.

  • There's A New Port Of RISC-V For GCC

    For those following the progress of the RISC-V open-source and royalty-free processor ISA, a new port of the GNU Compiler Collection for this architecture is now available.

    Palmer Dabbelt of UC Berkeley previously mentioned a few months ago their GCC RISC-V code was held up due to university lawyers due to upstream GCC contributions requiring copyright assignment to the Free Software Foundation, which upset the university. But it seems they're past that now as Palmer announced this week the new RISC-V port for GCC.

Security Leftovers (Back Doors in WhatsApp/Facebook and Microsoft Windows)

Filed under
Security
  • The eight security backdoors that helped kill faith in security

    With the news of WhatsApp's backdoor granting Facebook and government agencies access to user messages, fears over users' privacy issues are sure to be at an all-time high for WhatsApp's 1 billion users.

    Backdoors in computing equipment are the stuff of legend. A decade ago a security expert informed me with absolute certainty that a prominent non-US networking company had designed them into its products for years as a matter of course as if nobody much cared about this fact. Long before the average citizen had heard the letters NSA, it struck me at the time as extraordinary suggestion. It was almost as if the deliberate compromise of an important piece of network equipment was a harmless novelty.

  • Reported “backdoor” in WhatsApp is in fact a feature, defenders say

    The Guardian roiled security professionals everywhere on Friday when it published an article claiming a backdoor in Facebook's WhatsApp messaging service allows attackers to intercept and read encrypted messages. It's not a backdoor—at least as that term is defined by most security experts. Most would probably agree it's not even a vulnerability. Rather, it's a limitation in what cryptography can do in an app that caters to more than 1 billion users.

    At issue is the way WhatsApp behaves when an end user's encryption key changes. By default, the app will use the new key to encrypt messages without ever informing the sender of the change. By enabling a security setting, users can configure WhatsApp to notify the sender that a recently transmitted message used a new key.

    Critics of Friday's Guardian post, and most encryption practitioners, argue such behavior is common in encryption apps and often a necessary requirement. Among other things, it lets existing WhatsApp users who buy a new phone continue an ongoing conversation thread.

  • Security flaw leaves WhatsApp messages susceptible to man-in-the-middle attacks

    FLAWS in the way that WhatsApp deals with encryption keys leaves users wide open to man-in-the-middle attacks, enabling third-parties to tap their communications.

    The flaw has been described as a "security back door" by The Guardian and privacy campaigners (not unlike the back doors that governments of various stripes have been trying to mandate on all internet communications by law), but more sobre voices have described it as a minor bug and criticised The Guardian for going OTT.

    Nor is it new. Vulnerabilities in key handling were first discovered by German computer scientist Tobias Boelter in April 2016.

    The security flaw relates to situations where encryption keys are dropped and have to be re-issued and re-sent. In certain circumstances, a third-party could exploit the bug to persuade the app to resend messages because the authenticity of re-issued keys is not verified in WhatsApp by default.

  • There's No Security Backdoor in WhatsApp, Despite Reports

    This morning, the Guardian published a story with an alarming headline: “WhatsApp backdoor allows snooping on encrypted messages.” If true, this would have massive implications for the security and privacy of WhatsApp’s one-billion-plus users. Fortunately, there’s no backdoor in WhatsApp, and according to Alec Muffett, an experienced security researcher who spoke to Gizmodo, the Guardian’s story is “major league fuckwittage.”

  • WhatsApp vulnerability allows snooping on encrypted messages

    A security vulnerability that can be used to allow Facebook and others to intercept and read encrypted messages has been found within its WhatsApp messaging service.

    Facebook claims that no one can intercept WhatsApp messages, not even the company and its staff, ensuring privacy for its billion-plus users. But new research shows that the company could in fact read messages due to the way WhatsApp has implemented its end-to-end encryption protocol.

  • Hacker group Shadow Brokers retires, dumps more code as parting gift

    The Shadow Brokers claimed to have held even more valuable cyber tools in reserve and offered to sell them to the highest bidder in an unorthodox public auction. On Thursday, they said their sales effort had been unsuccessful and were therefore ceasing operations. “So long, farewell peoples. The Shadow Brokers is going dark, making exit,” the group said according to a screenshot of the webpage posted Thursday on the news website CyberScoop.

  • Suspected NSA tool hackers dump more cyberweapons in farewell

    The hacking group that stole cyberweapons suspected to be from the U.S. National Security Agency is signing off -- but not before releasing another arsenal of tools that appear designed to spy on Windows systems.

  • Shadow Brokers announce retirement, leak NSA Windows Hacking tools as parting gift
  • The Shadow Brokers Leaves the Stage with a Gift of So-Called NSA-Sourced Hacking Tools
  • Shadow Brokers group bids adieu, dumps hacking tools before going silent
  • 'It Always Being About Bitcoins': Shadow Brokers Retire
  • Hacking Group 'ShadowBrokers' Release NSA Exploits, Then Go Dark

Microsoft Windows Runs Under Windows

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Linux Arrives On Windows 10

    Sr. Product Manager SUSE Linux Enterprise SUSE, Hannes Kühnemund, has written a blog post and described how to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP2 on Windows 10. Now, by running simple commands, the users can install SUSE Linux distributions in Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). The company has also prepared a detailed blog post and described the whole procedure. For those who don’t know, by default, Microsoft enabled Ubuntu within WSL.

  • OpenSUSE comes to Windows 10. Plus, can you trust WhatsApp?

    This is the first in a weekey series I'm calling ‘weekly roundup’ in which I will highlight some of the hottest stories of the week from the world of Linux and open source. This week, I want to call your attention to some excciting Windows 10/openSUSE news and alert you to a backdoor vulnerability in WhatsApp that allows messages to be intercepted.

Blob-less Raspberry Pi Linux Is A Step Closer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi single board computer has been an astounding success since its launch nearly five years ago, to the extent that as of last autumn it had sold ten million units with no sign of sales abating. It has delivered an extremely affordable and pretty powerful computer into the hands of hobbyists, youngsters, hackers, engineers and thousands of other groups, and its open-source Raspbian operating system has brought a useful Linux environment to places we might once have thought impossible.

The previous paragraph, we have to admit, is almost true. The Pi has sold a lot, it’s really useful and lots of people use it, but is Raspbian open-source? Not strictly. Because the Broadcom silicon that powers the Pi has a significant amount of proprietary tech that the chipmaker has been unwilling to let us peer too closely at, each and every Raspberry Pi operating system has shipped with a precompiled binary blob containing the proprietary Broadcom code, and of course that’s the bit that isn’t open source. It hasn’t been a problem for most Pi users as it’s understood to be part of the trade-off that enabled the board’s creators to bring it to us at an affordable price back in 2012, but for open-source purists it’s been something of a thorn in the side of the little board from Cambridge.

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FESCo Approves More Feature Changes For Fedora 26

Filed under
Red Hat

The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) approved more features for Fedora 26 at Friday's meeting.

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Tired of Windows? Switching to Linux Will Be Easy If You Know This

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Linux sounds intimidating, but it’s essentially just another operating system. When you buy a pre-built PC, it arrives with an operating system pre-installed, usually Windows or Mac. But Linux distros such as Ubuntu are just as capable as Windows.

The process of installing Linux is rather simple. But actually using Linux is a bit different. There are many incentives for migrating from Windows to Linux. For instance, Linux variants often use less RAM or offer a lightweight environment.

Overall, there’s simply more choice. If you’re tired of Windows, switching to Linux will be pretty easy if you know these things.

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New User Distros, Powered By Linux, No Opera for You

Filed under
-s

There are many companies who use or offer Linux and today Linux and Ubuntu rounded up 10 of the biggest. Elsewhere, Jack Wallen offered his suggestions for which distros might suite particular users of certain other operating systems. From Windows 7 to Mac, he found an Ubuntu-derivative for each. Yep, "there's a distribution for everyone," as long as it's Ubuntu. OMG!Ubuntu! reported today that Opera won't be providing new conceptual browser to Linux users, because they claim it's being developed "just for fun." Remember who else once said that? In other news, Canonical today plugged Dell's new Ubuntu laptops, Ubuntu Budgie announced a wallpaper contest, and MakeUseOf made use of Linux versus Windows today to illustrate how easy it can be to switch.

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What Is Conky And How To Configure Conky On Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
Linux

Conky is a free system monitor tool for the X window system on Linux. It is able to monitor many system variables including CPU status, swap space, temperatures, disk storage, processes, network interfaces, battery status and a host of others and then display the information on your desktop. It can also display other things like time, calendars weather and the like. All these are available via themes with which Conky works.

Read<br />
more

Debian vs. Ubuntu Standoff – Comparing the Top Linux Solutions

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

Debian and Ubuntu both have fan bases that continue to advocate the superiority of their selected solution, but what is really different between them? In this article we will take a look at how both Debian and Ubuntu have been maintaining a steady position since the early days and how even to this day they are regarded as top solutions that provide some of the most trustworthy, efficient services.

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Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Friday
  • New Windows backdoor targets intelligence gathering

    New versions of the MM Core Windows backdoor are being used to provide a channel into victims' machines for the purpose of intelligence gathering, according to Carl Leonard, principal security analyst at Forcepoint Security Labs.

    The new versions were found by members of the Forcepoint investigations team.

    MM Core, which is also known as BaneChant, is a file-less advanced persistent threat which is executed in memory by a downloaded component. It was first reported in 2013 with the version 2.0-LNK and used the tag BaneChant in the network request sent to its command-and-control centre.

    A second version, 2.1-LNK, found shortly thereafter, had the network tag StrangeLove.

    Forcepoint researchers Nicholas Griffin and Roland Dela Paz, whose write-up on MM Core was provided to iTWire, said the two new versions they had found were 2.2-LNK (network tag BigBoss) and 2.3-LNK (SillyGoose).

  • Implementing Medical Device Cybersecurity: A Two-Stage Process

    Connectivity is ubiquitous – it’s moved beyond an overhyped buzzword and become part of life. Offering ever-advancing levels of access, control, and convenience, widespread connectivity also increases the risk of unauthorised interference in our everyday lives.

    In what many experts believe was a world first, manufacturer Johnson & Johnson recently issued a warning to patients on a cyber-vulnerability in one of its medical devices. The company announced that an insulin pump it supplies had a potential connectivity vulnerability. The wireless communication link the device used contained a potential exploit that could have been used by an unauthorised third party to alter the insulin dosage delivered to the patient.

  • Dockerfile security tuneup

    I recently watched 2 great talks on container security by Justin Cormack from Docker at Devoxx Belgium and Adrian Mouat from Container Solutions at GOTO Stockholm. We were following many of the suggestions but there was still room for improvement. So we decided it was good time to do a security tuneup of our dockerfiles.

  • FTC Sues D-Link For Pretending To Give A Damn About Hardware Security

    If you've been paying attention, you've probably noticed that the so-called Internet of Things isn't particularly secure. Hardware vendors were so excited to market a universe of new internet-connected devices, they treated things like privacy, security, and end-user control as afterthoughts. As a result, we've now got smart TVs, smart tea kettles, WiFi-connected barbies and all manner of other devices that are not only leaking private customer data, but are being quickly hacked, rolled into botnets, and used in historically unprecedented new, larger DDoS attacks.

    This isn't a problem exclusive to new companies breaking into the IoT space. Long-standing hardware vendors that have consistently paid lip service to security are fueling the problem. Asus, you'll recall, was dinged by the FTC last year for marketing its routers as incredibly secure, yet shipping them with easily-guessed default username/login credentials and cloud-based functionality that was easily exploitable.

    The FTC is back again, this time suing D-Link for routers and video cameras that the company claimed were "easy to secure" and delivered "advanced network security," yet were about as secure as a kitten-guarded pillow fort. Like Asus, D-Link's hardware also frequently ships with easily-guessed default login credentials. This frequently allows "hackers" (that term is generous since it takes just a few keystrokes) to peruse an ocean of unsecured cameras via search engines like Shodan, allowing them to spy on families and businesses in real time.

Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • SteamVR support for Linux looks like it's getting close

    Thanks to a Twitter tip we have word that it looks as if SteamVR support for Linux might finally be close.

  • Valve May Be Moving Closer With Their VR Linux Support

    It looks like Valve may be moving closer to debut their Linux VR support, which they demonstrated at the 2016 Dev Days and we've known they've been working on further -- including improvements to AMDGPU/RadeonSI/RADV.

  • Early Access survival game 'Rust' gains Vulkan support in a pre-release

    When they do manage to get it fixed up enough to run on Linux, I will give it a go and note some thoughts on it.

  • Rust Game Now Supports Vulkan Renderer

    Not to be confused with Rustlang, the game called Rust now has a Vulkan renderer enabled.

    For those unfamiliar with this early-access game on Steam, as self-described on its product page, "The only aim in Rust is to survive. To do this you will need to overcome struggles such as hunger, thirst and cold. Build a fire. Build a shelter. Kill animals for meat. Protect yourself from other players, and kill them for meat. Create alliances with other players and form a town. Whatever it takes to survive."

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Driver Lands, Premiering With Mesa 17.0

    In time for this weekend's feature freeze of Mesa 17.0, the Etnaviv Gallium3D driver has landed in Mesa Git after years of work on this reverse-engineered, open-source driver stack.

  • Intel ANV Vulkan Driver Lands Last Minute HiZ Improvements

    Some more exciting last minute work landing in Mesa Git before this weekend's Mesa 17.0 branching are the potentially performance-improving HiZ work within the Intel Vulkan driver.

  • Google releases 'Draco' 3D graphics open source compression library on GitHub

    Google is a significant contributor to the open source community. This is notable, as the company is wildly successful and its products are used by many. It incorporates open source code in its offerings, and then contributes back too. The search giant's visibility lends credibility to open source ideology.

    Today, Google announces yet another open source project. Called "Draco," it is a compression library designed for 3D graphics. The project can dramatically reduce the size of 3D graphic files without significant visual impact to the person viewing.

  • Introducing Draco: compression for 3D graphics

    3D graphics are a fundamental part of many applications, including gaming, design and data visualization. As graphics processors and creation tools continue to improve, larger and more complex 3D models will become commonplace and help fuel new applications in immersive virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). Because of this increased model complexity, storage and bandwidth requirements are forced to keep pace with the explosion of 3D data.

  • Google Announces "Draco" For 3D Graphics Compression

    Google's Chrome Media team has developed Draco as an open-source compression library designed for 3D graphics.

  • Fedora 25 Switching Over To Using GLVND For Mesa, Happier NVIDIA Driver Installation

    A Mesa update coming down the pipe for Fedora 25 Linux users will see GLVND support enabled by default.

    GLVND, of course, being the OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch library. This is the NVIDIA-led effort that was also supported by upstream Mesa/X.Org developers for in effect a "new OpenGL Linux ABI" for allowing multiple Linux OpenGL drivers to happily co-exist on the same system. This makes things much easier than having different drivers overwriting the libGL files, complications with driver installation/uninstall, etc. It was long overdue but finally was seeing upstream support in 2016.

  • Wayland 1.13 Planned For Release Next Month

    Wayland 1.13 has been in development since September while the plans today were firmed up for releasing it in February.

  • Tegra/Nouveau Render-Only Gallium3D Support
  • Building Mesa from source, a guide

    If you are using Mesa (FOSS OpenGL/Vulkan drivers on Linux), you can be in situation when it introduces some new features upstream, but it didn't make it into your distribution yet and it can take quite a long time for that to happen. Certain games can become playable with that change, or it can be a performance optimization that speeds up already working games, or may be you simply want to test the newest Mesa itself - either way, you might be interested in running the latest development version of Mesa for various reasons. At the same time you don't want to mess up your system with an unstable graphics stack.

Linux Kernel News and Linux Foundation Projects

  • Laptop Mode Tools 1.71

    I am pleased to announce the 1.71 release of Laptop Mode Tools. This release includes some new modules, some bug fixes, and there are some efficiency improvements too. Many thanks to our users; most changes in this release are contributions from our users.

  • Laptop-Mode-Tools 1.71 Adds VGA Switcheroo Support, Kbd-Backlight

    For those using Laptop-Mode-Tools to conserve power consumption when running on battery or using it to be more power efficient on your desktop or server, a new version is now available.

    Laptop Mode Tools 1.71 adds new modules for vgaswitcheroo and kbd-backlight. This package update also revives the Bluetooth module, has some wireless/WiFi changes, AC/battery determination improvements, fixes, and other smaller improvements.

  • Amdocs Joins Forces with Linux Foundation to Accelerate OpenECOMP Adoption in Open Source
  • Amdocs Joins Forces with Linux Foundation to Accelerate OpenECOMP Adoption in Open Source

    Amdocs to contribute key modules to OpenECOMP to help accelerate the industry uptake of common SDN and NFV standards and faster service delivery architectures

    ST. LOUIS, Jan. 13, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Amdocs (NASDAQ:DOX), the leading provider of digital customer experience solutions, today announced that it will partner with the Linux Foundation to accelerate the global adoption of the open source Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) platform. Hosted by the Linux Foundation, this new project will make ECOMP open source available to service providers and cloud developers in 2017.

  • Amdocs Will Contribute Modules to OpenECOMP
  • Amdocs Aids Linux Foundation in Open Source ECOMP
  • Blockchain will secure global derivatives trading

    Starting next year, one of the major providers of financial-markets infrastructure will begin using blockchain, the cryptographic software underlying bitcoin and other digital currencies, to help settle post-trade transactions in credit derivatives. It’s the first use of the breakthrough technology to undergird the global financial system.

    The Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation, in a release this week, said it would “re-platform” its existing Trade Information Warehouse, which automates record keeping and payment management for about 98 percent of all credit derivative transactions globally — or about $11 trillion a year.

  • Why IBM CEO Ginni Rometty Believes in Blockchain

    Close attention has been paid in the wake of Donald Trump’s historic victory in the US presidential election to bitcoin, which rose on safe-haven demand in reaction to Trump’s victory and uncertainty in global markets also related to Brexit’s looming impact.

Many IT Pros Ask for Linux and More Server News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Many IT Pros Ask for Linux and Cloud Training

    A significant share of technology professionals said they encounter barriers in getting necessary, regular training on Linux and cloud systems, according to a recent survey from the Linux Academy. Very few reported that their IT department has such an advanced grasp of these topics that it requires little training. Many, in fact, would like to get up to speed on Linux, DevOps and the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud. However, time constraints, budget limitations and inadequate employer support are keeping these workers from getting the training they need. It doesn't help that, thanks to the shortage of available talent, it's taking two months or longer to fill open job vacancies that demand Linux or cloud skills. "The advancement of [open source and cloud] technologies is clearly outpacing the pool of professionals who are able to service and manage them," said Anthony James, founder of the Linux Academy. "By the time professionals receive the training they need, the technologies have progressed, making their training obsolete. This underscores not only the need for access to timely and affordable training, but also for companies to further invest in their employees' skills." Nearly 890 IT professionals took part in the research.

  • New framework uses Kubernetes to deliver serverless app architecture

    A new framework built atop Kubernetes is the latest project to offer serverless or AWS Lambda-style application architecture on your own hardware or in a Kubernetes-as-a-service offering.

    The Fission framework keeps the details about Docker and Kubernetes away from developers, allowing them to concentrate on the software rather than the infrastructure. It's another example of Kubernetes becoming a foundational technology.

  • A Story of a Microservice: Lessons from the Trenches

    A lot has been written about microservices over the years, but we feel that not many of these articles have presented real-life and long-term experiences of building and maintaining microservices. In this blog post we aim to address this shortcoming.

    Microservices are loosely coupled, independently deployable applications that are focused on fulfilling a single cohesive responsibility. The microservices mindset encourages continuous deployment cycles, promotes choosing the right tool for each job, and helps to build a highly fault-tolerant architecture that can be evolved and scaled on a fine-grained level. Implementing a microservice architecture requires a substantial investment in an automated deployment infrastructure.

Ashley Williams on npm

Filed under
Software
  • State of the Union: npm

    Ashley Williams kicked off her colorful "paint by number" keynote at Node.js Interactive by explaining that npm is actually a for-profit company. Npm makes money by selling its enterprise services and, apart from the amounts required to run the everyday operations of a regular company, its revenue is invested in running the npm registry.

  • KEYNOTE: State of the Union: npm by Ashley Williams, npm

    In this keynote, Ashley Williams, Developer Community and Content Manager, discusses how npm works as a service and shares some of the remarkable numbers associated with the registry.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • VidCutter is an Open-Source Video Trimmer app

    I’m pretty capture happy with my Nexus 5X because a) the camera is decent and Cool live with 6 very comical cats…

    Sometimes I take videos but only want to use a specific part of it, be it to turn into an animated gif or quickly share it with folks online.

    This is where video trimming apps come in handy.

  • The elusive Palm OS 5.5 Garnet emulator for Windows/Linux

    From top left to bottom right, you're looking at Palm OS 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 5.3 (a Palm Zire ROM), 5.4.9 (the last released version of Palm OS available on real devices), and Palm OS 6.1.0 Cobalt (the last version of Palm OS; no 6.x device has ever been released). This is a pretty complete collection, and while it doesn't contain every released version of Palm OS, it covers the most important ones, and provides a great overview of the development of the operating system.

  • Opera Won’t Be Bringing New Browser ‘Neon’ to Linux

    Opera Software debuted an all-new concept browser called Opera Neon yesterday.

    Neon is fast, blingy, and a little bit gimmicky, but does some neat new stuff that has gotten a lot of people quite excited.

    Sadly, Neon wasn’t made available to download on Linux.

    And now we find out that it won’t be.

  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.15 released with support for autostart and more
  • Rogue Wave Software's TotalView for HPC and CodeDynamics

    New versions of not just one but two dynamic analysis tools from Rogue Wave Software were unveiled recently to pleased developers everywhere. Upgraded TotalView for HPC and CodeDynamics, versions 2016.07, improve the diagnosis and correction of bugs, memory issues and crashes at execution.

More OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Pantek, Metisentry merge to build on open source IT expertise

    Two local IT services firm that specialize in open source technologies have merged.

  • Hedge fund firm Man AHL says open sourcing software helps attract best developer talent

    A commonly held view of hedge funds is of secretive organisations that jealously guard the tools that make them money. Contrary to this is the trend among certain firms to open source their software and invite collaboration from the developer community.

    Firms that have blazed a trail in the open sourcing of this sort of technology are the likes of AQR, which kick-started the Pandas libraries project, and Man AHL, which has open-sourced its Arctic data storage system.

    Arctic powers Man AHL's vast financial market data store and is built on top of the open-source no-SQL database MongoDB. The Arctic codebase was made available on GitHub back in 2015.

  • Software Company Anahata Announces Management Restructuring
  • Software Company Anahata Appoints Ambarish Mohan as the Head of Open Source
  • Apache Beam Graduates to Help Define Streaming Data Processing

    Open-source effort originally developed from code contributed by Google moves from the Apache incubator to become a Top Level Project

    The open-source Apache Beam project hit a major milestone on Jan.10, graduating from the Apache Incubator and officially becoming a Top Level Project. Beam is a technology that provides a unified programming model for streaming as well as batch data processing.

    The Apache Incubator is an entry point for new projects into the Apache Software Foundation (ASF), with graduation marking a level of maturity and adherence to established policies and processes.

    "Graduation is an exciting milestone for Apache Beam," Davor Bonaci, Vice President of Apache Beam, said in a statement. "Becoming a top-level project is a recognition of the amazing growth of the Apache Beam community, both in terms of size and diversity."

  • Yahoo Open Sources Tool for Continuous Delivery at Scale

    For the past year, we've taken note of the many open source projects focused on Big Data and infrastructure technology hat have been contributed to the community. Some of these are real difference makers--strong enough for new startup companies to align around them with business models focused on them. While the Apache Software Foundation has has announced many of these, some of the bigger tech companies are contributing as well.

    Yahoo recently open sourced a distributed “publish and subscribe” messaging system dubbed Pulsar that’s capable of scaling while protecting low latencies. Yahoo uses Pulsar to drive several of its own in-house applications. And now, Yahoo is open sourcing Screwdriver.cd, an adaption of its Continuous Delivery build system for dynamic infrastructure.

  • Mozilla and Market Researchers Herald Big IoT Future

    Early last year, Mozilla announced that the Internet of Things (IoT) will be the next big opportunity for its open source software platform. "The Internet of Things is changing the world around us, with new use cases, experiences and technologies emerging every day," wrote officials in a post. "As we continue to experiment in this space, we wanted to take a moment to share more details around our approach, process and current projects we’re testing."

    We've heard similar predictions from several companies, and now two recent studies are confirming that the Internet of Things (IoT) is poised for huge growth.

    Studies from International Data Corporation (IDC), and one from the U.S. Department of Commerce (DoC), confirm that worldwide IoT spending is set to skyrocket.

  • The State of Open Source Licensing [Ed: Stop relying on Black Duck for information; was created as anti-GPL company.]

    Copyleft licenses, for example, of which the GPL is the most notable variant, are committed to the freedom of the source code. Code governed by a copyleft license asks for reciprocity from consumers; if changes to the code base are made and distributed (we’ll come back to that word), they must be released and shared under the original terms. Permissive licenses, on the other hand, are built around freedom for the developer: permissively licensed assets impose few if any restrictions on downstream users, and require no such reciprocity. Both communities are strongly committed to freedom; the difference lies in what, precisely, is kept free.

  • Renault Is Planning To Release Its Hardware As An Open-Source Automotive Platform

    Auto maker Renault is developing an open-source platform based on the Twizy that is a compact and lightweight electric vehicle with the bodywork parts removed. The POM will be made available to start-ups, independent laboratories, private customers and researchers, enabling third parties to copy and modify existing software in order to create a customizable electric vehicle. Renault has partnered with B2B company OSVehicle to develop and sell this open-source platform to the community. Bringing together entrepreneurs, developers, designers, and engineers, they will make it easier for them to build, share, distribute and modify the hardware designs of electric vehicles.

More Raspberry Pi, Linux Pressure, Plasma 5.9

Filed under
-s

Jonathan Riddell announced the latest KDE Plasma today to "kick off 2017 in style." While announcing Plasma 5.9 Beta, Riddell assured users that 5.8 LTS would continue to receive bug fixes. Weird thing to say for a developmental release. Relatedly, neon 20170112 was uploaded but not announced. In other news, Mint 18.1 took another one on the chin today at The Reg mainly for it's old base and Update Manager. Jamie Watson tested other distributions on his Raspberry Pis, this time Fedora, Manjaro, and Ubuntu MATE and Robin "Roblimo" Miller said Windows users should be grateful to Linux. That followed a similar themed story from the other day where a developer claims Valve Linux choice forced Microsoft to beef up Windows gaming support. It was another interesting day in the land of The Penguin.

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Security News

  • Security advisories for Tuesday
  • FOI: NHS Trusts are ransomware pin cushions [Ed: Windows]
    The FOI requests found that 87 per cent of attacks came via a networked NHS device and that 80 per cent were down to phished staffers. However, only a small proportion of the 100 or so Trusts responded to this part of the requests. "These results are far from surprising. Public sector organisations make a soft target for fraudsters because budget and resource shortages frequently leave hospitals short-changed when it comes to security basics like regular software patching," said Tony Rowan, Chief Security Consultant at SentinelOne. "The results highlight the fact that old school AV technology is powerless to halt virulent, mutating forms of malware like ransomware and a new more dynamic approach to endpoint protection is needed.

10 reasons to use Cinnamon as your Linux desktop environment

Recently I installed Fedora 25, and found that the current version of KDE Plasma was unstable for me; it crashed several times a day before I decided to try to try something different. After installing a number of alternative desktops and trying them all for a couple hours each, I finally settled on using Cinnamon until Plasma is patched and stable. Here's what I found. Read more

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