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About Tux Machines

Monday, 22 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The yin and yang of game mods

Filed under
Gaming

To critics of violent games, video game hackers have become the new threat to America's children because they modify the most popular games to include sexual content.

Seeing Through Laptop Lingo

Filed under
Hardware

An amazing thing has happened over the past decade: Laptop computers, once expensive niche products, have become commonplace devices. In selecting a laptop, it's size, durability and adaptability that matter, not muscle.

Baidu.com Ready for Stock Market Debut

Filed under
Web

Baidu.com takes its name from a 900-year-old poem but its ambitions are ultramodern - to become the Chinese-language equivalent of Internet search giant Google Inc. Little known abroad, 5-year-old Baidu.com says it already is the world's sixth most-visited Internet site, thanks to a strong following from China's 100 million-plus Web surfers.

Fifteen arrested in multinational 'phishing' scam

Filed under
Security

Argentine authorities have detained 15 people, including a Spanish national, in connection with a multi-million euro (dollar) online banking fraud, the Spanish interior ministry said.

Canadian high court urges Internet control

Filed under
Web

The Canadian Supreme Court is urging Parliament to pass clearer laws against Internet crime.

Gattica is Here! ... well, in NZ

Filed under
Sci/Tech

An Auckland clinic has been given the go-ahead to begin screening embryos for parents wanting to give birth to babies without genetic disorders.

Connect3D Radeon X800 Linux Review

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

One day several weeks ago, we received an e-mail from a representative from Connect3D. They wanted to send us a new ATI Radeon X800 for us to review under Linux. We couldn't turn them down. So here we have the results.

Internet's Best Friend

Filed under
Web

On the Web you'll find the Infinite Cat Project but no Infinite Dog. My Cat Hates You is big on the Web, but there is no site named My Dog Hates You. Cats are the Web's it-animals. They're everywhere. Why cats and not dogs?

Making online connections more personal

Filed under
Web

The two Chicago residents lived three blocks from each other, but they had no idea. They were on their PCs, at home, when they figured it out. Today they're dating.

Senator Threatens Crackdown on File-Sharing Industry

Filed under
Web

The head of the Senate Commerce Committee warned online file-sharing companies this week that if they do not crack down on piracy and pornography available via their networks, Congress will force them to act.

Ripple effect from Cisco Router Presentation

Filed under
Legal

Cisco/ISS go after websites in IOS spat while Whistle-Blower Faces FBI Probe.

Fedora: Gone Bug Hunting

Filed under
Linux

Are you a Fedora Linux user that wants to contribute to the community but don't know how?

You could start by "Zapping" bugs.

Firefox Builds on Its Success

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox, the popular open-source Web browser, is continuing to gain users even as its management structure evolves and it resets its plans for its next update.

U.S. Screen Actors union approves video game contract

Filed under
Gaming

Members of the Screen Actors' Guild overwhelmingly approved a new contract covering their work in video games, the union's Web site said on Friday.

Merrill sees slowing PC growth ahead

Filed under
Hardware

A new Merrill Lynch report suggests the market for personal computers worldwide will continue to grow in 2006, but growth's likely to be at a slower-than-expected pace as U.S. economic issues and a strong dollar add to normal sector concerns about pricing and product replacement cycles.

Windows Vista Release Pushed Back?

Filed under
Microsoft

Windows Vista won't be available for shipment until the last quarter of 2006, a Microsoft executive let slip in a presentation on Microsoft's campus here this week.

Opera Plugs Three Security Holes

Filed under
Software

Opera Software today released the second upgrade to Opera 8. The new version, Opera 8.02, is available for Windows, Linux and Macintosh and includes security upgrades and smaller bug fixes.

Free Linux Certification Offered at LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

IDG World Expo, today announced that The Linux Professional Institute (LPI), the premier Linux certification organization worldwide, will offer free Linux certification testing at LinuxWorld Conference & Expo(R) in San Francisco.

ECS PF88 Extreme Intel/AMD Hybrid Motherboard

Filed under
Hardware

ECS' PF88 Extreme motherboard was first displayed at Computex this June, and throughout the event, ECS was flooded with questions regarding the workings of the motherboard and the overall concept. Today, hopefully, we'll be able to answer some of the critical questions for you.

Black Duck Gains Access to SourceForge

Filed under
OSS

On Monday, Black Duck Software Inc., a leading provider of software compliance management solutions, and SourceForge.net, one of the world's largest open-source collaborative development sites, will announce that Black Duck will be able to use SourceForge's program repository to make its software compliance program more efficient.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora, CNCF and IBM-Paid Puff Pieces

  • Changing how we work

    As those of you who read the https://communityblog.fedoraproject.org/state-of-the-community-platform-engineering-team/ blog know, we are looking at changing workflows and organization around in the Community Platform Engineering team (of which, I am a member). So, I thought I would share a few thoughts from my perspective and hopefully enlighten the community more on why we are changing things and what that might look like.

  • Kubernetes policy project takes enterprise IT by storm

    An open source compliance as code project has gained a groundswell of popularity over the last six months among enterprise IT pros, who say it simplifies and standardizes Kubernetes policy management. The Open Policy Agent (OPA), an open source compliance as code project founded by former VMware employees, was used at Netflix as early as 2017 and accepted into the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a sandbox project in March 2018. Netflix gave an OPA demonstration at KubeCon in December 2017, and Intuit and Capital One followed at KubeCon in December 2018. After the project advanced to the CNCF's incubating stage in April 2019, and was demonstrated a third time at KubeCon EU in May 2019, it began to generate mainstream buzz. [...] As Kubernetes environments grow to encompass Istio service mesh and Knative event-based orchestration in what Google calls the open cloud stack, the fact that OPA lends itself to Kubernetes policy enforcement but can expand to include those adjacent utilities boosts its appeal.

  • The Who, What, Where, When, and Why for Mainframe Security [Ed: IBM pays Ponemon for puff pieces]

    For most people, security is a bit of a nuisance. No-one likes having to keep updating their password and then needing to remember the new one. And then there’s all the different passwords that need to be remembered for different things. It all just seems like an administrative nightmare. It just makes getting a day’s work done harder. That’s what most users think right up until the moment there’s a breach. And suddenly the mood has changed. Now everyone wants to know exactly what’s happened. They want to know who has done what, where they’ve done it, when it occurred, how they got in, and a million other questions. Your phone is ringing off the hook. Your e-mail is filling up faster than usual. What can you do? Where can you access the information you need? How do you respond to the incident?

Some Interesting Features In VLC and Typical FUD From Bogdan Popa

  • Some Interesting Features In VLC!

    VLC is one of the best video and audio player applications that are open source. We can install this application on various existing operating systems such as Linux, MAC, Windows, and also Android.

  • Critical Flaw in VLC Media Player Discovered by German Cybersecurity Agency [Ed: Will dedicated Microsoft propagandists like Bogdan Popa also write about NSA back doors in Windows or always just focus on smearing FOSS security? There are security bugs found every day, but back doors are an actual conspiracy; yet corporate media sponsored by the conspirators likes to deflect all blame to those who find/exploit these back doors.]

    A critical security flaw in VLC Media Player has recently been discovered by German cybersecurity watchdog CERT-Bund, who warns that a successful attack would allow for remote code execution. The vulnerability exists in VLC Media Player version 3.0.7.1, according to the official CVE-2019-13615, which is the latest stable release of the application.

Review: HexagonOS 1.0

On the whole, Hexagon worked well for me. Hardware support was solid, performance was above average, the included applications worked well, and the settings were easy to adjust. I had very few complaints - just two really: my keyboard layout had to be adjusted and Hexagon did not automatically work well with VirtualBox. However, both of these issues were easily addressed. With that being said, Hexagon appears to bring relatively little, technologically, to the experience over its parent. While running this distribution I sometimes forgot that I was not simply running Xubuntu with a dock installed. The custom utilities Hexagon provides (the software centre and the backup tool) both function, but are quite limited in what they can do for the user and this makes me disinclined to use them over other solutions like Deja Dup and GNOME Software. It's probably too soon to judge what HexagonOS will become. Right now it's just at its 1.0 release, and appears to be a first attempt to take Xubuntu and customize it with a few changes. Hopefully future versions will try more new things, polish the custom applications and distinguish the distribution from its parent. Read more

10 resources every sysadmin should know about

Everybody knows that sysadmins are impossibly busy people. Consequently, it sometimes seems they are superhuman. The sysadmin's dirty secret, the same one shared by many open source users, is that they don't actually do all of the work it looks like they've done. One of the greatest tools in the sysadmin's kit is their ability to reuse work someone else has already done for them. A good sysadmin knows where to turn when there's a big job to be done but nobody available to do it. If you're looking to work smarter, not harder, this is for you: a list of the top 10 resources every sysadmin should know about. Read more