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Friday, 14 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Internet Explorer Usage Continues To Fall

Filed under
Moz/FF

Use of Internet Explorer is continuing to decline at the expense of Mozilla's Firefox, making the imminent launch of IE7 even more vital for Microsoft.

For Opera, smaller really is better

Filed under
Interviews

Wium Lie, who works out of the company's home base in Norway, recently visited San Francisco, where he caught up with CNET News.com editors to discuss the state of browser technology.

Linux for the supernewbie

Filed under
HowTos

This is the first of a four part series that will, if you decide you WANT TO, and only if you want to, introduce you to Linux, and by they end, you might just find yourself with Linux installed on your computer beside windows.

HOW-TO: Adobe Photoshop CS2 on Ubuntu - 10 steps!

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HowTos

This HOW-TO covers up the whole process of installing Adobe Photoshop CS2 on a Ubuntu box in a few simple steps. This method has been tested only on Ubuntu, but it should work on any other linux flavor.

Torvalds takes bite of Mac mini

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Mac

Linus Torvalds has picked up one of Apple's new Intel-based Mac minis to play with, but the Linux creator still prefers Apple's old PowerPC architecture for his primary desktop machine.

The Perfect Setup - CentOS 4.4 (32-bit)

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HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up a CentOS 4.4 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.). This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of CentOS 4.4, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: The Penguin Plunge

Filed under
Linux

Enterprise Unix Roundup recently spoke with Amy Niersbach, platform architect, business and information services, for the city of Chicago. She outlined how and why the decision was made to migrate two of the city's systems to Red Hat Linux.

A first look at the Linux friendly Google Docs & Spreadsheets project

Filed under
Google

All netizens would by now be aware of Google re-launching its online Spreadsheet and Writely Document products as an integrated product at docs.google.com. This is a first look at what is in store for people who intend to use this Google product.

KDE 3.5.5 Released

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.5.5, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes.

Interview: Gael Duval

Filed under
Interviews

A few weeks ago, Gael Duval lifted the veil of secrecy surrounding his new project a little bit by 'leaking' some screenshots and information. Obviously, a lot of questions remained, and hence we contacted Gael Duval in order to ask him some basic questions about Ulteo.

Quicktips - How to make your fonts so smooth you’ll cry

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HowTos

Here’s a great tip picked up from Zenwhen over at the Ubuntu Forums for making your fonts super-smooth. There’s a huge amount of difference here, so much so that even my bad 80’s Metal font looks nice. Note that this was done with Gnome in Ubuntu 6.06, but should work with KDE as well.

Full Tip.

SLAX v5.1.8 LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

SLAX, our favorite mini LiveCD at Phoronix, has reached version 5.1.8. Like usual, they have their various SLAX editions such as KillBill, Server, Popcorn, and Frodo. SLAX Standard v5.1.8 features KDE 3.5.4, recompiled with some Slackware 11.0 fixes, better handling of booting from USB devices, and added slaxsave.zip to the SLAX CD.

Complete Story

Mandriva readies for global installfest

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva, makers of the popular Linux distribution, are to hold a global Linux installfest later this month.

Automatic/Dynamic configuration of hostnames for rolling out labs

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I was given the task of rolling out a number of PCs running Linux for a student lab. The roll out isn't complete yet, but I thought that this trick was so nice for lab based environments that I'd use it to try my hand at a debian-administration article.

Moore's law is alive and kicking

Filed under
Hardware

LAST YEAR was the 30th anniversary of Moore's Law, Intel founder Gordon Moore's prediction that the number of transistors on a chip would double about every two years. A lot of learned researchers have since explained why Moore's Law was ending. And yet, it hasn't.

Baby steps with The GIMP

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HowTos

Have you been planning on getting around to learning how to use the GIMP someday? Well now that the GIMP has had its tenth anniversary, it’s about time to start. In this article, I will walk you step by step through the process of making a web banner using the GIMP. Hopefully this kickstart will encourage you to do more playing on your own.

Mandriva 2007: Why is this distribution still around?

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

Naming distribution versions after a calendar year sounds familiar to me. I'm thinking of Windows 95, of course. And my experience with French distribution Mandriva 2007 brought me back to those frustrating times I used to have with Microsoft's decade-old offering.

Beefing up DokuWiki with plugins

Filed under
HowTos

Desktop applications such as Firefox, Thunderbird, and the GIMP are not the only ones that can use extensions and plugins for added functionality -- some Web-based programs can too. DokuWiki, for example, is a great wiki system by itself, but since it can accept plugins, you can easily add some nifty features to it.

Agreement Gives All Libyan Kids Laptops

Filed under
Hardware

The government of Libya reached an agreement with an American nonprofit group to provide inexpensive laptop computers to all of its 1.2 million schoolchildren, The New York Times reported in Wednesday's editions.

OSDL links battling Linux factions

Filed under
Linux

The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) has released version 1.0 of its Project Portland application to link rival Linux technologies.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Metropolisim, Monster Prom, Kingdom Two Crowns and Lots More

  • Metropolisim aims to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever, will have Linux support
    Metropolisim from developer Halfway Decent Games is releasing next year, with a pretty bold aim to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever.
  • Monster Prom, the dating sim that won me over is now available on GOG
    Visual novels and dating sims aren't something I'm usually into, however Monster Prom is actually funny and worth playing and it's now available on GOG. I know we have a number of GOG fans here, so hopefully this will be interesting for you. As always, we try to treat all stores equally with release info.
  • Kingdom Two Crowns will be coming to Linux after all with the Quality of Life update
    Kingdom Two Crowns, the third in the Kingdom series released recently for Windows and Mac. It looked like we weren't getting it, but it's now confirmed to be coming. In their new roadmap post on Reddit and Steam, under the "QoL #01 Update" (Quality of Life Update) they noted that they will add "Add SteamOS (Linux) Support". This update is due out sometime early next year. This is really nice news, it's good to know they didn't give up on supporting Linux after all.
  • Steam Link for the Raspberry Pi is now officially available
    After a rather short beta period, the Steam Link application for the Raspberry Pi is now officially out.
  • Valve in it for the 'long haul' with Artifact, first update out and a progression system due soon
    Artifact, the big new card game from Valve isn't doing so well but Valve won't be giving up any time soon. The first major update is out, with a progression system due soon. At release, it had around sixty thousand people playing and that very quickly dropped down hard. Harder than I expected, a lot worse than Valve probably thought it would too.
  • Bearded Giant Games open their own store with a 'Linux First Initiative'
    Bearded Giant Games, developer of Ebony Spire Heresy have announced their new online store along with a 'Linux First Initiative'. I know what you're thinking already "not another store", but fear not. For now, it's mainly going to be a place for them to sell their games directly. Speaking about it in a blog post, they mentioned how they hate having to check over multiple forums, channels, emails and so on to stay up to date and they wish "to spend more time giving love to my projects instead of updating 4 different distribution channels, translating pages, writing different press releases and making separate builds"—can't argue against that.
  • The Forgotten Sanctum, the final DLC for Pillars of Eternity II is out along with a patch
    Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire expansions come to a close with the release of The Forgotten Sanctum along with a major update now out.
  • Pre-order Meeple Station for instant beta access, what the developers say is like Rimworld in space
    Meeple Station, the space station building sim that the developers say is like Rimworld in space can now be pre-ordered with instant beta access. While we don't like the idea of pre-orders, getting access to the beta right away is a decent way to do it. Sadly, their Kickstarter campaign actually failed which I didn't notice. Making sure that wasn't the end of it, the developer Vox Games decided to go the Early Access route. They weren't left out in the cold of space though, as they also recently announced that Indie DB will be publishing their game. Under the label of Modularity, this will be the first title published by Indie DB.
  • Heroes of Newerth drops support for Linux and Mac
    Heroes of Newerth, the MOBA originally from S2 Games which is now handled by Frostburn Studios has dropped Linux and Mac support. [...] I'll be honest here, I couldn't care less about it personally. The last time i tried it, it was the single most toxic experience I've ever had in an online game. I've played a lot of online games and even so it was still at a level I had not seen before. I tried to go back to it a few times, never with a happy ending. Still, sad for any remaining Linux (and Mac) fans of the game. Looking over some statistics, it's not popular with viewers either. Around 180 on Twitch compared with nearly 100K for League of Legends and over 50K for Dota 2.
  • Unity 2018.3 With HDR Render Pipeline Preview, Updated PhysX & More
    Unity Tech is ending out the year with their Unity 2018.3 game engine update that brings a number of new features and improvements to its many supported platforms.

Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.0-rc2 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - Bug fixes only, we are in code freeze.
  • Just when you think you can stop drinking, Wine 4.0 has another release candidate available
    Just before the weekend hits you in the face like a bad hangover when you realise it's Monday already, there's another bottle of Wine ready for you. Of course, we're not talking about the tasty liquid! Put down the glass, it's the other kind of Wine. The one used to run your fancy Windows programs and games on Linux. Doing their usual thing, developer Alexandre Julliard announced that the Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2 is officially out the door today. While this release is nothing spectacular it is an important one, the more bugs they're able to tick off the list the better the 4.0 release will be for more people to use it.

Android Leftovers

A Look At The Clear Linux Performance Over The Course Of 2018

With the end of the year quickly approaching, it's time for our annual look at how the Linux performance has evolved over the past year from graphics drivers to distributions. This year was a particularly volatile year for Linux performance due to Spectre and Meltdown mitigations, some of which have at least partially recovered thanks to continued optimizations landing in subsequent kernel releases. But on the plus side, new releases of Python, PHP, GCC 8, and other new software releases have helped out the performance. For kicking off our year-end benchmark comparisons, first up is a look at how Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux distribution evolved this year. For getting a look at the performance, on four different systems (two Xeon boxes, a Core i5, and Core i7 systems), the performance was compared from Clear Linux at the end of 2017 to the current rolling-release state as of this week. Read more