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Tuesday, 12 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry storming srlinuxx 2 27/04/2011 - 6:05am
Blog entry Downtime srlinuxx 1 21/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Blog entry Gnome3 is a YES revdjenk 08/04/2011 - 12:27pm
Blog entry Mageia 1 Alpha2 -- A Status Report gfranken 27/03/2011 - 3:59am
Blog entry Welcome to the Jungle srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 8:24pm
Blog entry Woohoo, we're back srlinuxx 7 13/12/2010 - 1:19pm
Blog entry December 2010 Issue of The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine Released Texstar 03/12/2010 - 4:36pm
Blog entry Malware Warning (resolved) srlinuxx 3 24/10/2010 - 10:51am
Blog entry Upgrade Ubuntu to latest version – using shell dhavalthakar 13/10/2010 - 3:06am
Blog entry How to install libreoffice in Ubuntu using PPA gg234 07/10/2010 - 6:27am

Security: Uber and Windows Debacles

Filed under
Security

Software: Camicri Cube, Calamares, Liferea, Deepin Picker

Filed under
Software
  • Camicri Cube – Installing Packages On Offline Ubuntu Systems

    We already have given a workaround to Install Softwares offline in Ubuntu. As far as I tested, it was one of the easiest way for installing packages on offline Ubuntu systems. However, there is a limitation in that method. You can only download and install the software for the same Ubuntu version. In other words, If you download a package in Ubuntu 14.04, and try to install it on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, It will not work. So, the online and offline should be the same version and architecture. Also, that method is meant for the systems that have slow Internet connection. Your offline system still need Internet connection to install Synaptic package manager if it not installed already. So that is not a viable solution to install packages on an offline system. Don’t be disappointed! There is an another way to install packages in an offline Ubuntu system. Meet Camicri Cube, a portable package manager to download applications on any internet connected computers (Ubuntu Linux or Windows), and install them back on your offline computer. Sounds great? Yes!

  • More Calamares Releases

    Another month passed, just like that. I spent last week holed up with some KDE people in the hills, watching the snow come down. While they did impressive things to the KDE codebase, I hacked on Calamares. Since my last post on the topic, I’ve been running a roughly every-other-week release schedule for the Calamares 3.1-stable branch. We’ve just reached 3.1.10. The reason for these stable releases is small bugfixes, minor polishing, and occasional non-interfering features.

    Each release is announced on the Calamares site, and can be found on the Calamares GitHub page.

    Calamares isn’t a KDE project, and aims to support whatever Linux distro wants to use it, and to configure the stuff that is needed for that distro. But when feature requests show up for KDE integration, there’s no special reason for me to reject them — as long as things can remain modular, the SKIP_MODULES mechanism in Calamares can avoid unwanted KDE Frameworks dependencies.

  • Is Liferea Feed Reader Still the Best RSS App on Ubuntu?

    The feed reader, which has been around since 2003, regularly features in lists of the best open-source feed reader apps for Linux.

    In fact, Liferea is often the recommended choice for anyone looking to read RSS feeds on the Linux desktop. It’s reliable, highly configurable, and “just works”. It also wide support for different feed formats (including RSS, Atom and OMPL).

    As Liferea recently picked up its first major update in a year I decided it was time to check in on the app to see if, in an era of visually-rich online feed reader services like Feedly and NewsBlur, Liferea can still compete.

  • Deepin Picker – A Color Picker App for Deepin Users (Designers)

    The idea of a color picker might be foreign (and maybe unuseful ) to some people but this post is for designers and developers who are on the Linux platform since they are the ones who usually need to differentiate colors by using Hex codes, CMYK, or RGB values.

    As Deepin OS users probably already know, they need not search far and wide for such a utility because the Deepin Tech has got them covered.

    Deepin Picker is an open-source fast screen color picking tool developed by Deepin Technology for Deepin OS. With it, you can hover and click to pick color codes in the form of RGB, RGBA, CMYK, HEX, and HSV which are automatically saved to your clipboard.

today's howtos

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HowTos

Fedora 27 Gnome - Downhill and down

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 27 is another in a long string of passionless, apathetic, badly stitched autumn releases that just make the Linux desktop look ever sadder and less relevant than ever before. Tons of hardware problems, crashes, bleak and useless UI, fonts and color problems, broken Samba. On the upside, media and smartphone support is good, performance is reasonable for an ancient box, and Nvidia drivers setup was elegant.

But remember, this is 2017. You need tons of extra, unofficial software just to make the desktop usable, there are so many inconsistencies it drives me mad, and if you just compare across the board, there's literally NOTHING in common with any which distro. For me, Fedora 24/25 was the highlight of this system, a brief glimmer of hope. If you feel the need, go ahead, but I'd say skip, wait, cry. Grade 2/10. On to the next tribulation.

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Open source baseboard extends Linux-ready MAX 10 FPGA module

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Aries launched a $33 “SpiderBase” carrier with a large prototyping area for its recent “MX10” COM, which can run NIOS II softcore Linux on a MAX 10 FPGA.

In March, when we reported on the i.MX6 UL based M6UL computer-on-module from Aries Embedded, we also briefly noted that an MX10 computer-on-module was on the way. Since then, Aries has shipped the MX10, and has now launched SpiderBase (AKA Spiderboard Baseboard) for the module.

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Mesa 17.3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 17.3.0

    The release consists of approximately 2700 commits from over 120 developers.

  • Mesa 17.3 Brings Intel i965, RadeonSI, and Nouveau Drivers Closer to OpenGL 4.6

    Collabora's Emil Velikov is pleased to announce today the general availability of the final Mesa 17.3 graphics stack release for GNU/Linux distributions.

    Mesa or Mesa 3D Graphics Library is an open-source graphics stack, a collection of open-source graphics drivers to bring support for the latest OpenGL and Vulkan technologies to Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia graphics cards on Linux-based operating systems.

  • Mesa 17.3 Officially Released: Nearly OpenGL 4.6, Better Vulkan Support

    Delays pushed back the Mesa 17.3 release from November, but this quarterly update to the Mesa 3D graphics stack is now available for users.

    Mesa 17.3 is another significant update this year for the open-source graphics drivers. Mesa 17.3 offers nearly complete OpenGL 4.6 support for RadeonSI / Intel / Nouveau NVC0 drivers with the notable exception of the SPIR-V ingestion support yet not being complete. Mesa 17.3 also contains significant improvements to the Radeon RADV and Intel ANV Vulkan drivers with new extension support, performance optimizations, and all important fixes.

  • Mesa 17.3.0 release to further advance open source graphics drivers

    Mesa 17.3.0 is the latest version of the open source graphics drivers and it has officially released today.

    While this is a major new version, as always, new versions can cause a bit of breakage due to so much changing. The Mesa developers recommend waiting for the first point release 17.3.1 if you're after a stable and reliable experience.

Qt Creator 4.5 Open-Source IDE Improves Android and CMake Support

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KDE

Available for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows platforms, the Qt Creator 4.5 release comes three months after the previous version to add a new UI tool that lets you manage Android SDK packages, as well as to offer better information about various issues with the installed Android SDK, including warnings about missing components or the minimum version of requirements.

"Since Android SDK tools version 25.3.0, there is no UI tool available to manage the Android SDK packages. Because of that, we have added such UI to Qt Creator," Eike Ziller wrote in the release announcement. "Unfortunately, the command line tool for managing SDKs that is provided with the SDK cannot update packages on Windows, and fails with JDK 9, so this applies to Qt Creator as well."

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Qt 5.10 Released with Qt 3D Studio Graphical Editor, Numerous Improvements

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KDE

Coming six months after the long-term supported Qt 5.9 series, Qt 5.10 is a short-lived branch that introduces new stuff and a bunch of improvements. The biggest new feature of the Qt 5.10 release being the introduction of Qt 3D Studio, a graphical editor that lets you create 3D graphical user interfaces (GUIs).

"Qt 3D Studio consists of both a runtime component that is run in your application and a graphical design tool to design and create the UI. While the tool is a standalone application, the runtime can easily be integrated with the rest of Qt," said Lars Knoll. "Qt 3D Studio will work with both Qt 5.9 and 5.10."

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ReactOS Now Natively Supports More Filesystems Than all Windows OSes Combined

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OS

First introduced in the ReactOS 0.4.5 release, the support for styles created for Microsoft's Windows XP operating system received further enhancements in ReactOS 0.4.7 to reduce visual glitches for several apps, as well as to better handle transparency and messaging.

ReactOS 0.4.7 also implements support for Shell extension and allows users to enable the Quick Launch shell extension manually if they want an early taste of this feature. Furthermore, the devs managed to bring the ReactOS painting process closer to the one of the Microsoft Windows OS.

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Debian 10 "Buster" Will Ensure Automatic Installation of Security Upgrades

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Debian

The Debian Installer Buster Alpha 2 release comes with a few important changes, such as the addition of the unattended-upgrades package by default through the pkgsel component to ensure the automatic installation of security upgrades, as well as the addition of the installation images for the mips64el architecture.

Another important change in this second alpha release of the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer is that the Linux 4.13 kernel series is now supported for new installations, though you should know it reached end of life last month, so we believe the third alpha of Debian Installer will support Linux kernel 4.14 LTS.

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GeckoLinux Brings Flexibility and Choice to openSUSE

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Linux
SUSE

If you’re looking for an excuse to venture back into the realm of openSUSE, GeckoLinux might be a good reason. It’s slightly better looking, lighter weight, and with similar performance. It’s not perfect and, chances are, it won’t steal you away from your distribution of choice, but GeckoLinux is a solid entry in the realm of Linux desktops.

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Sessions And Cookies – How Does User-Login Work?

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Security

Facebook, Gmail, Twitter we all use these websites every day. One common thing among them is that they all require you to log in to do stuff. You cannot tweet on twitter, comment on Facebook or email on Gmail unless you are authenticated and logged in to the service.

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more

OnionShare – Share Files Anonymously

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Security

In this Digital World, we share our media, documents, important files via the Internet using different cloud storage like Dropbox, Mega, Google Drive and many more. But every cloud storage comes with two major problems, one is the Size and the other Security.

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more

Manjaro Linux - One Of The Finest Linux Distros

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Linux

​Manjaro is suitable for new users as well as experienced. The fact that Manjaro is based on Arch, being a rolling distro that is quite stable, ships with awesome tools and packs a good selection of software out of the box makes Manjaro a fantastic distro. Let us take a look at this excellent Linux distro.

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more

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • PHP version 7.0.27RC1 and 7.1.13RC1
  • The junior programmer’s guide to asking for help

    Asking for help is a skill, and a skill you can learn. Once you’ve mastered this skill you will be able ask questions at the right time, and in the right way.

  • Cliff Lynch's Stewardship in the "Age of Algorithms"

    I agree that society is facing a crisis in its ability to remember the past. Cliff has provided a must-read overview of the context in which the crisis has developed, and some pointers to pragmatic if unsatisfactory ways to address it. What I would like to see is a even broader view, describing this crisis as one among many caused by the way increasing returns to scale are squeezing out the redundancy essential to a resilient civilization.

  • Stewardship in the "Age of Algorithms"

    This paper explores pragmatic approaches that might be employed to document the behavior of large, complex socio-technical systems (often today shorthanded as “algorithms”) that centrally involve some mixture of personalization, opaque rules, and machine learning components. Thinking rooted in traditional archival methodology — focusing on the preservation of physical and digital objects, and perhaps the accompanying preservation of their environments to permit subsequent interpretation or performance of the objects — has been a total failure for many reasons, and we must address this problem. The approaches presented here are clearly imperfect, unproven, labor-intensive, and sensitive to the often hidden factors that the target systems use for decision-making (including personalization of results, where relevant); but they are a place to begin, and their limitations are at least outlined. Numerous research questions must be explored before we can fully understand the strengths and limitations of what is proposed here. But it represents a way forward. This is essentially the first paper I am aware of which tries to effectively make progress on the stewardship challenges facing our society in the so-called “Age of Algorithms;” the paper concludes with some discussion of the failure to address these challenges to date, and the implications for the roles of archivists as opposed to other players in the broader enterprise of stewardship — that is, the capture of a record of the present and the transmission of this record, and the records bequeathed by the past, into the future. It may well be that we see the emergence of a new group of creators of documentation, perhaps predominantly social scientists and humanists, taking the front lines in dealing with the “Age of Algorithms,” with their materials then destined for our memory organizations to be cared for into the future.

  • Testing OpenStack using tempest: all is packaged, try it yourself

    tl;dr: this post explains how the new openstack-tempest-ci-live-booter package configures a machine to PXE boot a Debian Live system running on KVM in order to run functional testing of OpenStack. It may be of interest to you if you want to learn how to PXE boot a KVM virtual machine running Debian Live, even if you aren’t interested in OpenStack.

Security: AMD and Intel 'Back Doors', Quantum Computing and SELinux

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Security

How to use Fossdroid to get open source Android apps

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Android
OSS
HowTos

Fossdroid is an alternate web interface for the F‑Droid repository of open source apps for the Android operating system. Unlike the official F‑Droid website, Fossdroid's design is based on the Google Play Store, which gives users who have never used an external app repository a familiar interface to search, browse, and install Android apps. Users who use a lot of F‑Droid apps should install the F‑Droid app, which can install apps and keep them automatically updated, but Fossdroid provides a nice way to explore what the F‑Droid repository offers. Here's how to use the Fossdroid website to find, download, and install apps.

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Peppermint 8 Respin Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Team Peppermint are pleased to announce the latest iteration of our operating system Peppermint 8 Respin which still comes in 32bit and 64bit versions with the 64bit version having full UEFI and Secureboot support. Whilst a respin is generally a minor release intended as an ISO update, the Peppermint 8 Respin does contain some significant changes.

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Also: “Fast And Light” Peppermint 8 Respin Released — Download This Linux Distro Here

Servers: US Army, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Kata

  • Army Tapping Open-Source, Cloud as Big Data Platform

    The Army is forging ahead with deployment of its Big Data Platform (BDP), a move that underscores the Department of Defense’s (DoD) plans for using open-source software, commercial technologies, and cloud services to get a grip on the data it collects from a wide range of sources.

    The Army recently announced its intention to award Enlighten IT Consulting a sole-source contract to implement the BDP, which officially became a program of record a year ago. Enlighten, which already had worked on the platform, is also working on the Defense Information System Agency’s (DISA) overarching Big Data Platform, most recently under a $40 million contract to continue development.

  • Kubernetes Ecosystem Grows as Cloud Native Computing Foundation Expands

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) was first launched by the Linux Foundation in July 2015, with a single project at the time: Kubernetes. At the CloudNativeCon/Kubecon North America Event in Austin, Texas, there are now 14 projects and an expanding membership base.

    The pace of growth for the CNCF has not been uniform, though, with much of the growth happening over the course of 2017, as Kubernetes and demand for cloud-native technologies has grown.

  • Kata Containers Project launches to secure container infrastructure

    At KubeCon in Austin, Texas, the OpenStack Foundation announced a new-open source project, Kata Containers. This new container project unites Intel Clear Containers with Hyper's runV. The aim? To unite the security advantages of virtual machines (VMs) with the speed and manageability of container technologies.

    It does this by provides container isolation and security without the overhead of running them in a Virtual Machine (VM). Usually. Containers are run in VMs for security, but that removes some of the advantages of using containers with their small resources footprint. The purpose of runV was to make VMs run like containers. In Kata, this approach is combined with Intel's Clear Containers, which uses Intel built-in chip Virtual Technology (VT), to launch containers in lightweight virtual machines (VMs). With Kata, those containers are launched in runV.

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Linux Foundation News

  • Juniper Networks Reinforces Longstanding Commitment to Open Source by Moving OpenContrail's Codebase to the Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), an industry leader in automated, scalable and secure networks, today further bolstered its support for open standards during its annual NXTWORK user conference, by announcing its intent to move the codebase for OpenContrail™, an open-source network virtualization platform for the cloud, to the Linux Foundation. Juniper first released its Juniper® Contrail® products as open sourced in 2013 and built a vibrant user and developer community around this project. Earlier this year, Juniper expanded the project's governance, creating an even more open, community-led effort to strengthen the project for its next growth phase. Adding OpenContrail's codebase to the Linux Foundation's networking projects will further its objective to grow the use of open source platforms in cloud ecosystems.
  • Hyperledger Hub Supports Open Source Blockchain Development
    Hyperledger is a global blockchain collaboration hub created and hosted by nonprofit The Linux Foundation. Its members are leaders in finance, banking, the Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and technology. Now two years in, Hyperledger compares closely to the Ethereum Enterprise Alliance. Hyperledger is a hub for communities of software developers building blockchain frameworks and platforms. These developers, on the other hand, are a mix of individuals and teams from organizations around the world.
  • Linux Foundation Continues to Emphasize Diversity and Inclusiveness at Events
    This has been a pivotal year for Linux Foundation events. Our largest gatherings, which include Open Source Summit, Embedded Linux Conference, KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Open Networking Summit, and Cloud Foundry Summit, attracted a combined 25,000 people from 4,500 different organizations globally. Attendance was up 25 percent over 2016. Linux Foundation events are often the only time that developers, maintainers, and other pros who contribute to Linux and other critical open source projects — like AGL, Kubernetes and Hyperledger to name a few — get together in person. Face-to-face meetings are crucial because they speed collaboration, engagement and innovation, improving the sustainability of projects over time.  

today's leftovers

  • Personal Backups with Duplicati on Linux
  • Flatpak'ed Epiphany Browser Becomes More Useful
    Epiphany 3.27.3 was released this morning as the newest release of GNOME's web browser in the road to the GNOME 3.28 stable desktop debut next March.
  • BlackArch 2017.12.11
    Today we released new BlackArch Linux ISOs. For details see the ChangeLog below. Here's the ChangeLog: update blackarch-installer to version 0.6.2 (most important change) included kernel 4.14.4 updated lot's of blackarch tools and packages updated all blackarch tools and packages updated all system packages bugfix release! (see blackarch-installer)
  • Latest Linux Distribution Releases (The Always Up-to-date List)
  • Mining cryptocurrency with Raspberry Pi and Storj
    I'm always looking for ways to map hot technologies to fun, educational classroom use. One of the most interesting, and potentially disruptive, technologies over the past few years is cryptocurrencies. In the early days, one could profitably mine some of the most popular cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, using a home PC. But as cryptocurrency mining has become more popular, thanks in part to dedicated mining hardware, the algorithms governing it have boosted computational complexity, making home PC mining often impractical, unprofitable, and environmentally unwise.
  • Huawei Collaborated with the Developers of Phoenix OS for the Mate 10’s Easy Projection Feature
    Though the company has virtually no presence in the United States, Huawei is a top 3 smartphone manufacturer in the world. Its subsidiary, Honor, aims to penetrate the Indian market with budget smartphones. Elsewhere, Huawei recently launched the Huawei Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro in several markets around the world, and rumors have it the device will launch in the United States as well. Apart from the AI features powered by the company’s HiSilicon Kirin 970 SoC, one of the company’s most publicized features is Easy Projection. While not as powerful as Samsung DeX, it brings a desktop OS-like experience without needing to purchase an expensive accessory. Huawei is pushing the feature on its flagship devices, though there’s something about Easy Projection that hasn’t really been mentioned in the press yet. Behind Huawei’s Easy Projection feature is a relatively unheard of player—Beijing Chaozhuo Technology, developers of Phoenix OS.
  • Namaste ! (on the road to Swatantra 2017)
    I’ll have the pleasure to give a talk about GCompris, and another one about Synfig studio. It’s been a long time since I didn’t talk about the latter, but since Konstantin Dmitriev and the Morevna team were not available, I’ll do my best to represent Synfig there.
  • #PeruRumboGSoC2018 – Session 4
    We celebrated yesterday another session of the local challenge 2017-2 “PeruRumboGSoC2018”. It was held at the Centro Cultural Pedro Paulet of FIEE UNI. GTK on C was explained during the fisrt two hours of the morning based on the window* exercises from my repo to handle some widgets such as windows, label and buttons.
  • Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS
    Chrome 63 began rolling out to Android and desktop browsers last week with the usual security fixes and new developer features. On the latter platform, this update introduces Material Design to the Bookmark Manager. Several versions ago, Google began updating various aspects of the browser with Material Design, including History, Downloads, and Settings. Like the Flags page for enabling experiments and in-development features, which Google also revamped in version 63, the Bookmark Manager (Menu > Bookmarks > Bookmark Manager) adopts the standard Materials UI elements. This includes an app bar that houses a large search bar. It adopts the same dark blue theme and includes various Material animations and flourishes.
  • ExpressVPN Unveils Industry’s First Suite of Open-Source Tools to Test for Privacy and Security Leaks
  • New format in GIMP: HGT
    Lately a recurrent contributor to the GIMP project (Massimo Valentini) contributed a patch to support HGT files. From this initial commit, since I found this data quite cool, I improved the support a bit (auto-detection of the variants and special-casing in particular, as well as making an API for scripts). So what is HGT? That’s topography data basically just containing elevation in meters of various landscape (HGT stands for “height“), gathered by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) run by various space agencies (NASA, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, German and Italian space agencies…).
  • What You Need To Know About The Intel Management Engine
    Over the last decade, Intel has been including a tiny little microcontroller inside their CPUs. This microcontroller is connected to everything, and can shuttle data between your hard drive and your network adapter. It’s always on, even when the rest of your computer is off, and with the right software, you can wake it up over a network connection. Parts of this spy chip were included in the silicon at the behest of the NSA. In short, if you were designing a piece of hardware to spy on everyone using an Intel-branded computer, you would come up with something like the Intel Managment Engine. Last week, researchers [Mark Ermolov] and [Maxim Goryachy] presented an exploit at BlackHat Europe allowing for arbitrary code execution on the Intel ME platform. This is only a local attack, one that requires physical access to a machine. The cat is out of the bag, though, and this is the exploit we’ve all been expecting. This is the exploit that forces Intel and OEMs to consider the security implications of the Intel Management Engine. What does this actually mean?

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