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Thursday, 21 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Welcome to the Jungle srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 8:24pm
Blog entry Truths srlinuxx 23/06/2011 - 6:30pm
Blog entry weirdness: puppy & wd-40 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:07am
Blog entry BIOS Flash update under linux. gfranken 02/06/2011 - 7:55pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 2011 - Preview Graphics Texstar 9 03/06/2011 - 2:13am
Blog entry Sabayon 7 GNOME 3 review finid 20/10/2011 - 2:33am
Blog entry Pandora FMS 3.2 has been released. geniususer 05/01/2011 - 5:54pm
Blog entry GNOME 2.32.1 desktop updated for PCLinuxOS Texstar 19/11/2010 - 3:22am
Blog entry Gstreamer Conference 2010 Videos and Slides uploaded raseel 16/11/2010 - 4:43am
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos gnome 2010.11 Texstar 13/11/2010 - 2:32am

Mozilla/Firefox: Reducing Your Online Annoyances, This Week in Servo Development and Vista 10 Integration

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Today’s Firefox Aims to Reduce Your Online Annoyances

    Almost a hundred years ago, John Maynard Keyes suggested that the industrial revolution would effectively end work for humans within a couple of generations, and our biggest challenge would be figuring what to do with that time. That definitely hasn’t happened, and we always seem to have lots to do, much of it online. When you’re on the web, you’re trying to get stuff done, and therefore online annoyances are just annoyances. Whether it’s autoplaying videos, page jumps or finding a topic within all your multiple tabs, Firefox can help. Today’s Firefox release minimizes those online inconveniences, and puts you back in control.

  • This Week In Servo 127

    In the past week, we merged 50 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

  • Passwordless Web Authentication Support via Windows Hello

    Firefox 66, being released this week, supports using the Windows Hello feature for Web Authentication on Windows 10, enabling a passwordless experience on the web that is hassle-free and more secure. Firefox has supported Web Authentication for all desktop platforms since version 60, but Windows 10 marks our first platform to support the new FIDO2 “passwordless” capabilities for Web Authentication.

Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: 3D Printers

Filed under
OSS

One interesting thing about the hobbyist 3D printing market is that it was founded on free software and open hardware ideals starting with the RepRap project. The idea behind that project was to design a 3D printer from off-the-shelf parts that could print as many of its own parts as possible (especially more complex, custom parts like gears). Because of this, the first generation of 3D printers were all homemade using Arduinos, stepper motors, 3D-printed gears and hardware you could find in the local hardware store.

As the movement grew, a few individuals started small businesses selling 3D printer kits that collected all the hardware plus the 3D printed parts and electronics for you to assemble at home. Later, these kits turned into fully assembled and supported printers, and after the successful Printrbot kickstarter campaign, the race was on to create cheaper and more user-friendly printers with each iteration. Sites like Thingiverse and YouMagine allowed people to create and share their designs, so even if you didn't have any design skills yourself, you could download and print everyone else's. These sites even provided the hardware diagrams for some of the more popular 3D printers. The Free Software ethos was everywhere you looked.

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Introducing flat-manager

Filed under
Red Hat

A long time ago I wrote a blog post about how to maintain a Flatpak repository.

It is still a nice, mostly up to date, description of how Flatpak repositories work. However, it doesn’t really have a great answer to the issue called syncing updates in the post. In other words, it really is more about how to maintain a repository on one machine.

In practice, at least on a larger scale (like e.g. Flathub) you don’t want to do all the work on a single machine like this. Instead you have an entire build-system where the repository is the last piece.

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Servers: VMware, US Department of Energy, Red Hat/Fedora and SUSE/SAP

Filed under
Server
  • VMware demos hypervisor running on a network card

    VMware has demonstrated Linux running on a network card.

    Speaking at the VMware user group convention in Sydney today, Chris Wolf, chief technology officer, global field and industry demonstrated a VMware’s ESXi hypervisor and a Ubuntu guest VM running on a Mellanox SmartNIC.

  • Aurora Will Be The First Exascale Supercomputer Of America

    The exascale supercomputer has the ability to make use of high-performance computing (HPC) and artificial intelligence (AI) in various areas such as cancer research, climate modeling, and veterans’ health treatments, and more. Aurora will be specially designed to analyze the large amount of data generated by DOE-owned equipment like particle accelerators, telescopes, and other detectors.

  • Intel Xe Graphics Being Part Of The First US Exascale Supercomputer Is Great For Linux

    Announced on Monday was that the US Department of Energy in cooperation with Argonne National Laboratory will see the "Aurora" supercomputer as the first US Exascale SC coming online in 2021 and featuring Intel's highly anticipated Xe Graphics.

    The Intel Xe Graphics are expected to put Aurora over the edge in being the first exascale super computer at least within the United States. Aurora will also feature Optane persistent DIMMs and next-generation Xeon processors. Intel is partnered with Cray on this design for the half a billion USD super computer.

  • Career advice for engineers: Step away from the keyboard

    Over the course of my career, I've had two to three major mindset shifts in how I approach my work. At first, I just focused on engineering—trying to know the most about whatever language or libraries I was using, being very "trivia" focused, and ultimately ignoring the concerns of others in an effort to just write good code. This wasn't to say I didn't try to get along with my coworkers or help them out, but my efforts to improve were all about me; after all, the team and the company do better as I become better. And to be fair, this approach isn't totally unfounded in its merits. As engineers, we must constantly evolve, learn more, and improve because the industry is getting harder with bigger problems that need more technical solutions every day. This approach worked well enough for me for the first half of my career, where I was junior enough to have such selfish (albeit well-meaning) motivations.

    Then I took a job where I worked with more engineers in one office than I had worked with in my entire career to date. This job nearly broke me. I went from being one of the better people in my role to barely scraping by… for nearly two years. I struggled to succeed, I constantly felt outclassed by the people around me, and many days I couldn't figure out why they even hired me (a feeling, it turns out, that some of my co-workers shared). But there was no big epiphany, no single defining moment that turned it around. Just a series of hard, abject failures from which I had two choices—give up or learn and grow. I did my best to do the latter. As I moved back to a smaller startup, I saw firsthand just how important it is to cement a culture, from the ground up, based around these lessons.

    My final mindset shift happened when I transitioned into management after the startup was acquired by a larger company. I didn't choose to be a manager; management chose me, in that I was offered the position. I was also told that, while everyone really believed in me, the ultimate reason they chose me was that they felt it would be less tumultuous to promote someone from within than hiring someone from outside. We had a very aggressive timeframe after the acquisition, and my new company didn't want to risk things by bringing in an outside leader who didn't have the team's trust. I found that this phase reinforced everything I had learned before about being effective in an engineering role—and turned up the dial on how hard I need to apply these lessons every minute of every day.

  • Why you should take the jobs no one else wants

    So often, we describe open organizations as places overflowing with highly engaged people—places where leaders emerge spontaneously to tackle urgent problems, where people opt-in to challenging initiatives they know they can influence and drive, where teams act with initiative and few top-down mandates.

    And it's all true. I see it regularly at Red Hat.

  • OpenShift 4 ISV Operators

    In Red Hat OpenShift 4, the Operator Hub provides access to community and certified operators that facilitate the deployment and configuration of potentially complex applications. In this video, we take a look at creating and scaling a Couchbase cluster using the operator shipped with OpenShift 4.

  • Contribution opportunity! Quick docs!

    Quick docs are meant to be short articles on the official Fedora documentation site that cover commonly used workflows/tools.

    Unlike wiki pages which are generally unreviewed, information on quick-docs follows the PR (peer-review + pull request) process. So the new information that is added there is more trustworthy and should be too, given that quick docs is listed on the official Fedora documentation website.

  • We did it again – Our HA solution is SAP Certified

    One of the main differences is that the new setup is now also supported for clusters with more than two nodes (n>2). We recommend to use an odd number of nodes to guarantee that always a majority of the cluster could proceed after cluster separations.

Qt 5.13.0 Beta1 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

I am happy to announce that Qt 5.13.0 Beta1 is released today. As earlier we release updates as Beta N regularly until we are ready for RC. Current estimation for RC is 7th May 2019, see the schedule from 5.13 wiki.

Beta1 (and later releases) can be installed by using online installer as usual. Commercial users can found online installer from their Qt Account and Opensource users from download.qt.io. We are not planning to blog next Beta releases or RC so please follow mailing lists to get the notification when new ones are available. And of course you can use maintenance tool’s update option to check if there is update already available.

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Also: Qt 5.13 Beta Released

Linux Foundation: The Kodi Foundation and Open Networking Summit

Filed under
Linux
  • Kodi Foundation Joins The Linux Foundation to Help Grow the Open Source Movement

    The Kodi Foundation was proud to announce today that it finally decided to join The Linux Foundation in their attempt to enrich the Open Source software ecosystem.

    As of today, The Kodi Foundation, the makers of the free, open-source, and cross-platform media center software known as Kodi (formerly XBMC), is now an Associate Member of The Linux Foundation in attempt to contribute their code to the Open Source software community and help similar projects evolve.

    "It seemed natural for us to join, given the fact that we are strong believers in the benefits of open-source software. We strongly believe that open-source is the best way to achieve awesome things. That was and still is what moves Kodi forward," stated The Kodi Foundation in a press release.

  • The Kodi Foundation joined the Linux Foundation

    The Kodi Foundation is very proud to announce that it has joined the Linux Foundation as an Associate Member. It seemed natural for us to join, given the fact that we are strong believers in the benefits of open-source software.

    We strongly believe that open-source is the best way to achieve awesome things. That was and still is what moves Kodi forward. Ever since XBMP, where this project started, a small group of like-minded individuals from different backgrounds have worked together to achieve a goal, taking advantage of each other's merits and talents.

  • Community Demos at ONS to Highlight LFN Project Harmonization and More

    A little more than one year since LF Networking (LFN) came together, the project continues to demonstrate strategic growth, with Telstra coming on in November, and the umbrella project representing ~70% of the world’s mobile subscribers. Working side by side with service providers in the technical projects has been critical to ensure that work coming out of LFN is relevant and useful for meeting their requirements. A small sample of these integrations and innovations will be on display once again in the LF Networking Booth at the Open Networking Summit Event, April 3-5 in San Jose, CA.

DragonFlyBSD Looking To Pursue 64-Bit ARM Port With Code Bounty

Filed under
BSD

While NetBSD has more than a half-dozen tier-one supported architectures and dozens more of tier two ports, DragonFlyBSD has been largely centered on x86_64 since their dropping of 32-bit x86 a while ago. Arm has largely remained off their radar but there seems to be some growing interest around seeing DragonFlyBSD on AArch64.

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Games: Two Point Studios, Convoy, Gloomhaven, GOG and End of The Culling

Filed under
Gaming

SiFive Rolls Out RISC-V HiFive1 Rev B Development Platform, $49 USD With FE310-G002 SoC

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

SiFive has announced an upgraded Freedom Everywhere SoC as well as the HiFive1 Revision B developer board using this FE310-G002 SoC.

The HiFive1 Revision B isn't to be confused with their HiFive Unleashed more that retails for $999 USD and is more akin to the traditional Arm developer boards we see that offer video output and other features. The HiFive1 is a mini development board without video output and can be connected to Arduino-compatible accessories and designed for real-time embedded use-cases. But this small embedded development board is available for $49 USD.

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SUSE: More on SUSE Manager, "Independence" Media Blitz and SUSECON 2019

Filed under
SUSE
  • Managing Linux in the Cloud

    SUSE Manager extends the ideals of DevOps to the cloud environment, unlocking a world of rapid deployment and automation.

  • Where next for SUSE?

    Where next for SUSE? The company mentioned its independence no less than 12 times in a recent notice to the press. Flush with investor money, can the business finally steer its own ship to success?

  • SUSECON 2019: These Industry Kingpins Have Something to Say

    I really learned a lot at this event. The access to people who know their stuff is something I did not expect. They are really helpful!

    I loved it. It was interesting and fun. Very good to meet other people and exchange experiences.

16 Best Free Linux Medical Imaging Software

Filed under
Software

Medical imaging is an essential, non-invasive, routine activity performed by radiographers and radiologic technologists. It’s a discipline of the health profession which involves using technology to capture images of the human body.

There are a number of reasons why capturing these images are important to our well-being. First, the images help in the identification and examination of diseases, and physical injuries such as broken bones and ruptured blood vessels, as well as assisting in diagnosing suitable treatments. Medical imaging is also crucial in an educational role.

Imaging capturing devices for medical purposes use the DICOM image format. DICOM is an acronym for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine. It’s the standard open image format used to handle, store, print and transmit information in medical imaging. This article focuses on software that lets you view images generated from DICOM devices.

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Programming: Tools, Demand, Sandboxed API, OpenMP, Radicle, Python and C

Filed under
Development
  • 20 Most Useful Tools for Programmers and Developers

    Programming can be a very hectic task, especially if you are handling a complex project. Sometimes even small projects can give you a hard time. Have you ever found yourself at the verge of giving up in the middle of a project?

    There are different programming tools that can simplify the coding process and improve your levels of productivity. Here are the 20 most helpful tools for programmers.

  • 10 Programming Languages That Are In Demand Among Top Hiring Companies

    Coding continues to be one of the most in-demand skills in the job market. Many professionals are considering getting into the field. Possessing the required skills in coding can open doors to some of the highest-paying jobs. One of the main questions that professionals have before getting started is about finding out which programming language to choose and what steps to take to get into coding. The best way to get started is by first understanding which languages are presently in demand, to make this easy online learning platform Simplilearn says that it has come up with a list of ten programming languages that developers and coding enthusiasts should look out for in 2019 to upskill themselves for a bigger paycheck and to excel at their job roles.

  • Google open-sources project for sandboxing C/C++ libraries on Linux

    Google has open-sourced today a project for sandboxing C and C++ libraries running on Linux systems. The project's name is the Sandboxed API, a tool that Google has been using internally for its data centers for years.

    The Sandboxed API is now available on GitHub, together with the documentation needed to help other programmers sandbox their C and C++ libraries and protect them from malicious user input and exploits.

    For ZDNet users unfamiliar with the term, "sandboxing" refers to running an app or source code inside a "sandbox."

  • What’s new in OpenMP 5.0

    A new version of the OpenMP standard, 5.0, was released in November 2018 and brings several new constructs to the users. OpenMP is an API consisting of compiler directives and library routines for high-level parallelism in C, C++, and Fortran programs. The upcoming version of GCC adds support for some parts of this newest version of the standard.

    This article highlights some of the latest features, changes, and “gotchas” to look for in the OpenMP standard.

  • Radicle – A P2P Stack for Code Collaboration

    Not too long ago I wrote an article about Codeanywhere, a cross-platform cloud IDE that features code collaboration. I recently came across an experimental project that is bound to change collaboration workflow and it goes by the name of Radicle.

    Radicle is a free and open-source P2P stack for code collaboration designed to be offline first, cryptographically secure, and programmable. It is written in a similarly-named programming language which is a deterministic Lisp derivative designed for creating P2P software.

    Radicle aims to transform the code collaboration experience by giving programmers a platform that encourages experimentation as they shape their workflow around specific contexts or projects.

  • Plotting the average directional movement index rating line with python
  • Get only the latest live match from NBA with python
  • Django Authentication — Login, Logout and Password Change/Reset
  • Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 13 - Bitwise Operators (Basics)

7 of the Best Data Recovery Tools for Linux

Filed under
Software

Did your screen just turn black or your laptop freeze without warning? Maybe your hard drive has started chirping. Worse yet, maybe you suddenly can’t save to your home partition.

All these signs of a corrupted or failing drive can cause you to sweat, but there’s no reason to immediately throw away your computer. Keep reading to learn about six Linux tools that can help you retrieve your data and get your digital life back on track.

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Best Command Line Download Accelerators for Linux

Filed under
Software

When working remotely or even locally, you often may need to obtain content from an external source. To get such content, especially when you don’t have any other options, you will want to use command line tools to get the job done.

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Ten Years After Part III - A Storied Conclusion

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Old habits are indeed hard to break, and especially if you don't really understand the reason why those habits have to change. The idea of a software repository just didn't make sense to most of our Reglue kids at first. I cannot count the times when I went to troubleshoot a problem on a Reglue computer to find the desktop riddled with .exe files of failed installations.

What isn't really surprising is that the kids did eventually pick up the whole installation process on their Linux machines, and mostly came to prefer it. But the parents? Not so much. I wish I had recorded some of the calls I got from irate parents or guardians because they couldn't install XYZ software on the computer. It didn't take me long to make sure to make sure that Mom or Dad were present when I explained that part during the orientation. At times, I had to remind those adults that the computer and software was engineered for the benefit of the student, not as a household computer. I mean, get TurboTax on your own machine. It helped some, but still....Adults, right?

[...]

By far the most vocal complaints concerned "needed" software not being available on Linux. We might as well just call out The Terrible Two. Photoshop and Microsoft Office. Now remember, the bulk of my work was done between 2005 and 2009. I never offered any excuses for Photoshop. The Gimp isn't Photoshop, no matter how you twist or turn it and trying to tell someone who uses Photoshop scholastically or professionally that The Gimp can replace Photoshop is a fools errand. Sure it can do a lot of what Photoshop can do but it's those pesky little items that The Gimp lacks that everyone got all bunched up over.

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Linux Distribution Review: elementary os

Filed under
Reviews

In the world of Linux, there are a number of distros for various purposes. Some target the new Linux users, some target advanced users. Some of the distros are also for specific fields, for example, medical, science, and even hacking!
Today, our topic of discussion is elementary OS. For general users, elementary OS is one of the finest distros out there. It aims to be modern, fast and beautiful without sacrificing simplicity and flexibility. You’ll find a ton of similarities with both Windows and MacOS, especially from MacOS. The interface and other tweaks mimic MacOS a lot.

Currently, the latest version of elementary OS is version 5.0, codenamed Juno. It’s a BIG upgrade over the previous version Loki (version 0.4.1).

Let’s check out the current latest elementary OS and what you can expect from it. It’s easy to grab and install in your machine right now! Learn how to install elementary OS.

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How to Change Shell in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

This quick tutorial shows how to check the running shell, available shell in the system and how to change the default shell in Linux.
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today's howtos

RaspEX Project Brings Kodi 18.1 and Linux Kernel 5.0 to Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Based on Debian GNU/Linux and Raspberry Pi's Raspbian operating systems, RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 is now available with the latest Kodi 18.1 "Leia" media center software featuring add-ons for watching Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, and Plex, as well as the lightweight LXDE desktop environment with VLC media player and NetworkManager. RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 is also powered by the latest and greatest Linux 5.0 kernel series, which apparently works very well with the recently launched Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ single-board computer. However, while Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is recommended for RaspEX, you can also install it on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B or the older Raspberry Pi 2 Model B. Read more

Android Leftovers

SparkyLinux Incinerates the Hassle Factor

SparkyLinux gives you an operating system that is out-of-the-box ready for use. It comes with multimedia plugins, selected sets of apps, and its own custom tools to ease different tasks. SparkyLinux is a well-thought-out Linux OS. It has straightforward controls that let you get your work done without distractions. The user interface is friendly, intuitive and efficient. SparkyLinux is a very functional Linux OS. It is a solid choice for use as an all-purpose home edition with all the tools, codecs, plugins and drivers preinstalled. You may not need the USB installation. However, if your computer runs Microsoft Windows or another Linux distro, putting SparkyLinux on a USB stick is much easier than setting up a dual boot on the hard drive or replacing whatever is running on that computer already. Read more