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Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Printer Woes gfranken 5 19/01/2011 - 2:19am
Blog entry storming srlinuxx 2 27/04/2011 - 6:05am
Blog entry Downtime srlinuxx 1 21/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Blog entry Gnome3 is a YES revdjenk 08/04/2011 - 12:27pm
Blog entry Mageia 1 Alpha2 -- A Status Report gfranken 27/03/2011 - 3:59am
Blog entry Looking for help to bring a new app to the world bigbearomaha 09/03/2011 - 1:35pm
Blog entry motherboard srlinuxx 2 06/03/2011 - 6:32pm
Blog entry More Hardware troubles srlinuxx 03/03/2011 - 9:19pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS on the BBC Texstar 1 03/03/2011 - 9:51pm
Blog entry Mandriva Linux 2011TP (Tech Preview) - Quick Look gfranken 08/02/2011 - 6:46pm

GTK+ 3.21.4 GUI Toolkit Fixes Clipboard Handling on Wayland, Adds New APIs

Filed under
Development
GNOME

As part of the GNOME 3.21.4 desktop environment release, the development team behind the popular and widely-used GTK+ GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit have released development version 3.21.4.

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Puppy Linux Cousin Toutou Linux 6.3.2 "SlaXen" Alpha Released for Public Testing

Filed under
Linux

Toutou, one of the fastest and most comprehensive minimalist GNU/Linux distributions, is again in development, it looks like we're now able to test drive the 6.3.2 Alpha release of the upcoming Toutou Linux SlaXen series.

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Linux 4.6.5

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.6.5 kernel.

All users of the 4.6 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.6.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.6.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

thanks,

greg k-h

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Also: Linux 4.4.16

Linux 3.14.74

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • The Linux Deepin File Manager Is a Thing of Beauty

    China-based Linux distro Deepin has shown off its all-new desktop file manager. And to say it's pretty is an understatement.

  • GRadio Lets You Find, Listen to Radio Stations from the Ubuntu Desktop

    Love to listen to the radio? My ol’ pal Lolly did. But let’s say you want to listen to the radio on Ubuntu. How do you do it? Well, the Ubuntu Software centre should always be the first dial you try, but you’ll need to sift through a load of static to find a decent app.

  • Reprotest 0.2 released, with virtualization support

    reprotest 0.2 is available in PyPi and should hit Debian soon. I have tested null (no container, build on the host system), schroot, and qemu, but it's likely that chroot, Linux containers (lxc/lxd), and quite possibly ssh are also working. I haven't tested the autopkgtest code on a non-Debian system, but again, it probably works. At this point, reprotest is not quite a replacement for the prebuilder script because I haven't implemented all the variations yet, but it offers better virtualization because it supports qemu, and it can build non-Debian software because it doesn't rely on pbuilder.

  • Calibre 2.63.0 eBook Converter and Viewer Adds Unicode 9.0 Support, Bugfixes

    Kovid Goyal has released yet another maintenance update for his popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform Calibre ebook library management software, version 2.63.0.

    Calibre 2.63.0 arrives two weeks after the release of the previous maintenance update, Calibre 2.62.0, which introduced support for the new Kindle Oasis ebook reader from Amazon, as well as reading and writing of EPUB 3 metadata.

    Unfortunately, there aren't many interesting features added in the Calibre 2.63.0 release, except for the implementation of Unicode 9.0 support in the regex engine of the Edit Book feature that lets users edit books that contain characters encoded with the recently released Unicode 9.0 standard.

  • Mozilla Delivers Improved User Experience in Firefox for iOS

    When we rolled out Firefox for iOS late last year, we got a tremendous response and millions of downloads. Lots of Firefox users were ecstatic they could use the browser they love on the iPhone or iPad they had chosen. Today, we’re thrilled to release some big improvements to Firefox for iOS. These improvements will give users more speed, flexibility and choice, three things we care deeply about.

  • LibreOffice 5.2 Is Being Released Next Wednesday

    One week from today will mark the release of LibreOffice 5.2 as the open-source office suite's latest major update.

    LibreOffice 5.2 features a new (optional) single toolbar mode, bookmark improvements. new Calc spreadsheet functions (including forecasting functions), support for signature descriptions, support for OOXML signature import/export, and a wealth of other updates. There are also GTK3 user-interface improvements, OpenGL rendering improvements, multi-threaded 3D rendering, faster rendering, and more.

  • Blackmagic Design Finally Introduces Fusion 8 For Linux
  • Why Microsoft’s revival of Skype for Linux is a big deal [Ed: This article is nonsense right from the headline. Web client is not Linux support. And it's spyware (centralised too).]

Microsoft and Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • gnome-boxes: Coder’s log

    So another two weeks have passed and it’s time to sum things up and reflect a little on the struggles and accomplishments that have marked this time period, which was quite a bumpy ride compared to the others, but definitely more exciting.

  • GNOME Keysign 0.6

    It’s been a while since I reported on GNOME Keysign. The last few releases have been exciting, because they introduced nice features which I have been waiting long for getting around to implement them.

  • Testing for Usability

    I recently came across a copy of Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works (book, 2005) by Goto and Cotler. The book includes a chapter on "Testing for Usability" which is brief but informative. The authors comment that many websites are redesigned because customers want to add new feature or want to drive more traffic to the website. But they rarely ask the important questions: "How easy is it to use our website?" "How easily can visitors get to the information they want and need?" and "How easily does the website 'lead' visitors to do what you want them to do?" (That last question is interesting for certain markets, for example.)

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Newest Tumbleweed snapshot updates KDE Applications

    The latest openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has updated KDE Applications in the repositories to version 16.04.3.

    Snapshot 20160724 had a considerably large amount of package updates for Tumbleweed KDE users, but other updates in the snapshot included updates to kiwi-config-openSUSE, Libzypp to version 16.1.3, yast2-installation to version 3.1.202 and Kernel-firmware to 2016071

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 22

    openSUSE Conference’16, Hackweek 14 and the various SUSE internal workshops are over. So it’s time for the YaST team to go back to usual three-weeks-long development sprints… and with new sprints come new public reports!

    With Leap 42.2 in Alpha phase and SLE12-SP2 in Beta phase our focus is on bugs fixing, so we don’t have as much fancy stuff to show in this report. Still, here you are some bits you could find interesting.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Google's Open Source Spatial Audio Tool Joins its Virtual Reality Offering

    The digital photography and digital audio arenas have been going through a renaissance for some time now, with 360-degree photo tools arriving that provide panoramic and immersive views of locations and SurroundSound-like audio experiences. On the photography and virtual reality front, Google recently announced that it open sourced VR View, a tool that lets developers tembed 360-degree photo and video content into sites and native apps. The images can be viewed on Cardboard viewers or through a single-lens viewer.

    Now, Google has announced that it has open sourced Omnitone, a software tlibrary hat developers can use to integrate spatial audio with websites. The software is available now on GitHub under an Apache license.

    Google has posted two videos featuring the spatial audio dynamics that you can achieve with Omnitone. The videos depict musicians that you can listen in on from various spatial angles.

  • Apache Software Foundation Serves Up Mesos Version 1.0

    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), which incubates more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, has announced the availability of Apache Mesos v1.0. In case you missed it, Mesos and related efforts from companies such as Mesosphere have already made a mighty impact on clustering, data center resource management and emerging data center operating systems.

  • Why you should avoid vanity metrics and measure what matters

    In February 2011 we were "dinged" for what was clearly a slowdown in registrations. Something was very wrong, they said. The ship was clearly on fire, they said, and the community manager was at the helm. Not surprisingly, my LinkedIn activity picked up quite a bit that month. So what happened? Funny story—it turns out, in February we enabled a CAPTCHA on our registration form and started blocking spammers rather effectively, drastically depressing the new registration count. A few months later, after the analyst report, spammers figured out a way to get around the CAPTCHA, and things returned to "normal".

  • Koding open-sources its cloud IDE, integrates it into GitLab

    Koding, a startup with technology for operating a cloud-based integrated development environment (IDE) for collaborative programming across devices, is announcing today that it’s open-sourcing its core technology and making it a part of GitLab, the open-source source-code repository service.

    With the push of a green button on GitLab repository pages, developers will be able to run any software on GitLab, with all the necessary dependencies already in place. “It almost feels like a part of GitLab,” Koding cofounder and CEO Devrim Yasar told VentureBeat in an interview.

  • Astronaut Achieves 14 Consecutive Months of VistA Features and Fixes

    One of the most prolific VistA developers on Earth Astronaut, LLC has just completed its 14th consecutive month of releasing new VistA features that are clinically tested and in production.

  • OpenBSD 6.0 pre-orders up

    In addition, one of the six release songs has been released early. There will be another compilation CD titled "The songs 5.2 - 6.0" alongside the release.

  • Photos: School-minded Faculty Brewing Co. will be Vancouver's first open source brewery

    "We want people to criticize and comment on them," Lozano explained. "People will be able to submit recipes that we can later brew and post online too, and then we can create open source recipes."

  • RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 6
  • RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 7
  • RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 8
  • Which Programming Language Is Most Important To You In 2016?

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Ubuntu OTA-12

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu OTA 12, Latest Update to Ubuntu Phone, Rolling Out Now

    Ubuntu OTA-12, the latest update for Ubuntu Phone and Tablet, has begun roll out. We show you what's new.

  • Ubuntu OTA-12 Bringing More Features & Improvements To Mobile Ubuntu

    Ubuntu OTA-12 is being released today by Canonical as the latest over-the-air update for Ubuntu tablet/phone users.

    Ubuntu OTA-12 is bringing wireless display support to supported devices, fingerprint unlock for the Meizu PRO 5 device, color emojis for the on-screen keyboard, improvements to the built-in web browser, and through the command-line it's possible to install traditional Ubuntu apps as part of the converged experience. The OTA-12 update does bundle in Libertine.

32-bit Arduino Leonardo clone maker offers “ChipKIT Lenny” preview

Filed under
Linux
OSS

“chipKIT Lenny” is a PIC32-based Arduino Leonardo clone with more RAM and flash, and a multifunction microUSB port. Sneak preview boards are now available.

Majenko Technologies has built an Arduino Leonardo compatible board supported by the open source chipKIT project, which like all chipKIT boards features a MIPS-based Microchip PIC32 microcontroller unit instead of an ATmega32u4. (See farther below for more on chipKIT.) The chipKIT Lenny was teased by the chipKIT project in late June, and is now being released by Majenko in a preview version priced at 19 UK Pounds (currently about $25).

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Cyanogen OS vs Android: what’s the difference?

Filed under
OS
Android

It may have started as Google’s obligatory answer to the iPhone, but Android has grown into a much-beloved operating system that’s currently used by over 107 million people in the U.S. alone and almost one-and-a-half billion worldwide. Much of what makes Android special also distinguishes it from competitors: its power, versatility, and customizability.

But this isn’t a love ode to Google’s popular software. Instead, we’re going to discuss some of the key differences between Google’s Android and Cyanogen OS, a modified, third-party version of Android that brings added features and gives users additional control over their devices. So let’s jump right in.

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AMD and FOSS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Introducing a New Line of Graphics Cards for “The Art of the Impossible”
  • Free Radeon

    Remember the bad old days when GNU/Linux systems struggled without proper drivers for video-cards? Well, they’re gone with AMD. They’ve produced a very powerful line of powerful graphics cards designed for demanding professionals including those using GNU/Linux.

  • AMD Open Sources Professional GPU-Optimized Photorealistic Renderer

    AMD today announced that its powerful physically-based rendering engine is becoming open source, giving developers access to the source code.

    nables creators to bring ideas to life through high-performance applications and workflows enhanced by photorealistic rendering. Alongside Radeon ProRender, developers also have access to Radeon Rays on GPUOpen.com, a high-efficiency, high-performance, heterogeneous ray tracing intersection library for GPU, CPU or APU on virtually any platform. GPUOpen is an AMD initiative designed to assist developers in creating ground-breaking games, professional graphics applications and GPU computing applications with superior performance and lifelike experiences, using no-cost open development tools and software.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Learn from the Experts at The Linux Foundation’s Europe Events
    The Linux Foundation has released session details for three major conferences coming up this fall: MesosCon Europe, Embedded Linux Conference / OpenIoT Summit Europe, and LinuxCon + ContainerCon Europe. MesosCon Europe, which will take place August 31-September 1 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, is an annual conference organized by the Apache Mesos community, bringing together users and developers for two days of sessions about Mesos and related technologies. This year, the MesosCon program will include workshops to get started with Mesos, keynote speakers from industry leaders, and sessions led by adopters and contributors.
  • The Firebird Project's Firebird Relational Database
    Firebird distills its identity into the phrase "True universal open-source database" and boasts not only of being "free like free beer" but also, fittingly, of being "free like a bird". The latter permits anyone to build a custom version of the Firebird, as long as the modifications are made available for others to use and build upon.
  • Report: Austria can benefit from Big Data solutions
    Big Data solutions can contribute significantly to Austrian public administrations, a working group concludes in a report published in June. Benefits include improved quality of life, finding optimal business locations, and offering better guidance to citizens. The report by the Big Data working group aims to help public administration when considering Big Data solutions, providing legal, economic and technical context.
  • Report: over half of Spain’s regions now use SaaS
    In 2014, 59% of Spain’s regional governments used Software as a Service, according to the 2015 eGovernment report published on 30 June by PAe, Spain’s eGovernment portal. Next most-used cloud computing service is Infrastructure as a Service (40%), and third is Platform as a Service (20%). The usage of cloud computing is just one of the attributes of and indicators for eGovernment services that are aggregated in the report. The document shows the use of document management systems and support of electronic signatures. The text looks at interoperability, open data portals and eParticipation, lists region’s maturity levels of eGovernment services, from the availability to download forms online to the fully electronic management of applications.
  • Software Freedom in Kosovo, Waiting for Xfce Mint & More…
    It’s not FOSS, but I reckon the biggest story in tech this week, ignoring claims of Russia hacking for Trump, is the sale of Yahoo to Verizon for $4.8 billion. Considering that traffic watcher Alexa says the site is the fifth most visited address on the web, that seems like something of a bargain to me. Add to that Yahoo’s prime Silicon Valley real estate and the price seems to be in the “it fell of the truck” category. The sale puts Verizon in control of both America Online and Yahoo, so I suspect we’ll be seeing Verizon trying to compete with Google and Bing for a share of the search advertising market. [...] We’ve also heard from Software Freedom Kosova, which tells us it’s issued this year’s call for speakers, which will be open through September 15. This will be the seventh year for the Kosovo event, which aims to “promote free/libre open source software, free culture and open knowledge” — all laudable goals in my estimation. Potential speakers should know “the topic must be related to free software and hardware, open knowledge and culture.” Mike DuPont, the SFK member who made us aware of the event, told FOSS Force, “There might be travel expenses for qualified speakers.” The event will take place October 21-23.
  • Cloud, open source and DevOps: Technology at the GLA
    David Munn, head of IT at the Greater London Authority, explains what technology his organisation has adopted in order to help individuals keep innovating
  • Our attitude towards wealth played a crucial role in Brexit. We need a rethink
    Money was a key factor in the outcome of the EU referendum. We will now have to learn to collaborate and to share [...] Does money matter? Does wealth make us rich any more? These might seem like odd questions for a physicist to try to answer, but Britain’s referendum decision is a reminder that everything is connected and that if we wish to understand the fundamental nature of the universe, we’d be very foolish to ignore the role that wealth does and doesn’t play in our society.
  • France’s Insee and Drees publish microsimulation model to increase transparency
    Insee (Institut national de la statistique), the French public agency for statistics, and Drees (Direction des études du Ministère des Affaires sociales et de la santé), which is in charge of surveys at the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, has published the source code of the microsimulation algorithmic model called Ines.
  • Plant Sciences pushing open-source berry model
    Several of those opportunities appear to lie in the development of so-called ‘open market’ breeding. Historically, Plant Sciences’ berry varieties have made it into the commercial arena under limited licensing arrangements, with individuals or groups of grower-shippers paying a premium to use them. While Nelson is eager to point out that this model continues to perform well, his company have decided to structure its business in Europe in such a way that it offers varieties to the “largest audience possible” at the most competitive price. “Given the price pressures that producers, marketers and retailers are under, we sense that such an approach is needed to remain most viable going forward and bring new varieties forward to the broadest market,” he explained.
  • Drug discovery test leads to malaria drug prospects at UW
  • Worldwide Open-Source Project Discovers Promising Disease-Fighting Compounds
  • Open-source drug discovery a success
  • The Global Open Data Index to be updated
    Open Knowledge International, a not-for-profit organisation that promotes openness and transparency, has decided to update the survey for its Global Open Data Index. This index measures Open Data publication in 122 countries.
  • This Startup Created the Ultimate Open-Source Prototyping Product
    The world has become a technologically focused place. Unless you’ve set up shop in a cabin in the woods, your life is likely filled with gadgets, wearables, devices, and doodads that control everything from your TV to your laptop. And with all this technology, it’s no wonder tech jobs have become so prevalent in the market. Fortunately, there are a number of ways to learn skills and prototyping projects that will impress even the most critical interviewer. And one startup has built the perfect product to do just that. Created by a group of students from the India Institute of Technology, evive is an open-source prototyping module that can make creating projects easier than ever. It has a power module, plug and play hardware interface, user interface, data acquisition module, shield stack space and more. It’s even IoT ready so it can connect to more devices than you can count. Plus, it works across multiple platforms like LabVIEW, MATLAB, Scratch, Eclipse, ROS, Python, Arduino IDE and many more.
  • Friday's security updates
  • Pwnie Express Open Sources Tools to Lock Down IoT/Android Security
    Pwnie Express isn't a name that everyone is familiar with, but in the security arena the company has a good reputation for its wired and wireless threat detection technologies. Now, the Boston-based firm has announced plans to open source key tools that it has used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software. Blue Hydra is a Bluetooth utility that can detect Bluetooth devices, and also work as a sniffer to query devices it detects for threats. Meanwhile, the Android Open Pwn Project (AOPP), is an Android ROM built for security testers. It's based on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) and community-developed ROMS -- one of which is CyanogenMod. It lets developers on the Android front sniff out threats on mobile platforms.

Openwashing

Sailfish OS 2.0.2

  • Sailfish OS 2.0.2 In Early Access With Variety Of Improvements
    Jolla announced today that their Sailfish OS 2.0.2 "Aurajoki" mobile operating system release is available as early access. Sailfish OS 2.0.2 makes it easier to take screenshots via the volume buttons, a variety of new keyboard layouts, a new layout on the media app, a new Sailfish OS logo, simplified backups, browser improvements, support for flash when recording videos, the cloud services now supports the VK service, dual SIM support on capable devices, Dropbox and OneDrive integration in the photo gallery, and a wide variety of other fixes and improvements.
  • [Early Access] Sailfish OS 2.0.2 Aurajoki
    This update contains of many bug fixes and new added features such as taking screenshot by holding down volume buttons for 0.5 seconds, added keyboard layouts for Indian languages Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Punjabi, Tamil and Bengali, new layout on Media app’s front page, new Sailfish OS logo and many more.