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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story Bodhi 3.1.1 Released, Fedora 21 EOL, Mint 17.3 Betas Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 2:21am
Story MagicStick and More Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 2:07am
Story Why I chose Wordpress for my college football blog Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2015 - 7:22pm
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-8 Update Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2015 - 7:06pm
Story Solus 1.0 Operating System to Launch Before Christmas Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2015 - 7:00pm
Story Editable version UK’s ODF guidance Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2015 - 6:56pm
Story Bulgaria to start open source repository Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2015 - 6:54pm
Story ZigBee home automation design kits use RPi-based gateway Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2015 - 6:52pm
Story Storm in a teacup: Wileyfox does Android cheapie, British style Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2015 - 6:45pm
Story Ubuntu Desktop with Unity 8 to Handle Background Apps and File Access Differently Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2015 - 11:10am

Sharjah school dumps high-cost software for open-source applications

Filed under
OSS

itp.net: Education provider Scholars International Academy (SIA) has opted for open-source software and thin client systems, in a bid to save parents the cost of proprietary software.

KDE e.V. Quarterly Report 2007Q3/Q4 Now Available

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE e.V. Quarterly Report is now available for Q3 and Q4 2007, covering July to September, and October to December 2007. This document includes reports of the board and the working groups.

Survey: Open source is entering the enterprise mainstream

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com.au: Open-source applications are gaining more approval in enterprises, particularly in the areas of operating systems, infrastructure applications, and development tools

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #93

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 93 for the weeks May 25th - May 31st, 2008 is now available. In this issue we cover: new Ubuntu Membership approval process, new Ubuntu Members, new LoCo approval process, LinuxTag 2008, Launchpad 1.2.5, Launchpod episode #3, Forum Tutorial of the week, Ubuntu UK Podcast #6, Full Circle Magazine #13, Team Reports, and much, much more!

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • how to enable Linux after installing windows

  • The decline of Gentoo
  • Slides from php|tek 2008
  • Ultra-portable Ubuntu Laptop
  • Fedora Source RPM

When Snort is not enough

Filed under
Software

techtarget.com: As an independent security consultant I offered a course to customers called Network Security Operations, which covered network-centric intrusion detection, response and forensics. Learn how to support Snort with complementary tools and techniques when necessary.

few interviews

Filed under
Interviews
  • An Interview with Anurag Bhandari, the Founder of Granular Linux

  • An interview with jacobmp92
  • Anno Scholte: Open Source for Open Systems

firefox fastest growing browser in may

Filed under
Moz/FF

weblogs.mozillazine.org/asa: Firefox, now with 18.41% of the global browser market according to Net Applications, was the fastest growing browser in May.

It’s Spring

Filed under
MDV

srikrishnadas.wordpress: Yes, it is spring now. No, I don’t mean the season but the new distribution on my lappie. I spent my night yesterday installing and configuring mandriva spring. It took almost 5 hours.

Yes, I'm Free, Said The Open Source Software Idea

Filed under
OSS

informativepost.com: In the beginning was... hacker culture and free Internet software. They existed as outsiders. They were really known by few. But some knew of them and an idea started to grow... it was first only in one person's mind, then two, then it spread to the hacker culture and further into the business world.

Mandriva 2008 Spring vs. Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ... and how neither one wins

Filed under
Linux

cool-stuff-or-not.blogspot: Mandriva launched the new 2008 Spring version (or 2008.1) around April 9th 2008 and just 2 weeks later around April 24th Ubuntu 8.04 LTS was out clogging the internet pipes in a download frenzy Smile Needless to say - I have tested both final versions on a number of computers.

What can KDE 4.1 do for you ?

Filed under
KDE

ereslibre.es: We, the KDE team, have done a huge effort of making KDE 4.1 series a really usable desktop, and I really think we are going in a good path. KDE is stabilizing in general terms, and kdelibs goodies are starting to be used widely by almost all applications.

Firefox 3: A Safari User’s Review

Filed under
Moz/FF

macapper.com: Officially released in November 2004, Firefox has grown to become the second biggest browser, with a market share of nearly 18%, all platforms combined (Internet Explorer has 75%, to web developers’ great regret). Today, it seems that version 3 of Firefox is just around the corner.

Ulteo Virtual Desktop: Running GNU/Linux in Windows

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: 2008 is shaping up to be the year that GNU/Linux hit the Windows desktop. Already the year has seen the first working version of the KDE Windows project, Wubi, which installs Ubuntu to an existing Windows filesystem, and LiveUSB Creator, a wizard for installing the Fedora distribution to a flashdrive from within Windows.

Litrix 8.5 | Brazilian Desktop GNU/Linux Distribution for Home Users

Filed under
Linux

saleem-khan.blogspot: Litrix 8.5 - International edition was released on Tuesday, 20 May 2008 and is available for download as a single Live DVD of 1.2 GB from the Litrix Linux Home Page. I never had a chance to try the previous versions partly because the English language support was not available by default and partly because it is based on the "scary" Gentoo Linux which looks threatening to home users because of its manual configuration.

Myah OS 3.0 Mouse Pro Released

Filed under
Linux

The long awaited Myah OS 3.0 is here. 3.0 has been in development since 2006 right after the release of version 2.3. Being completely development from the source up has been quite an undertaking. The initial release is the flagship of the Myah OS range dubbed Mouse Pro. This name is due to the fact that it's built around the XFCE 4.4 desktop, and comes with a complete development environment.

4.1 times more Prettyness

Filed under
KDE

Ladies and gentlemen, let me introduce you the brand new shiny Plasma theme that will be used for KDE 4.1. Here you can see the new applet and krunner backgrounds, the new panel, our brand-new carbon fiber clock and some items that once upon a time weren't themed at all, like the pager and the taskbar.

Small PCs big news as economy slows

Filed under
Hardware

reuters.com: Smaller, low-cost PCs are likely to be at the top of the shopping list for technology buyers gathering in Taipei this week for the world's second largest computer fair, as an economic slowdown in the United States forces consumers to cut back on spending.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • UBUNTU Studio Revisited

  • SaxenOS 2008 beta 2 Final Report
  • Going Ubuntu
  • Fedora 9
  • OpenOffice.org 3.0 Beta and Extensions Show Strong Momentum (PR)
  • The Palm Size Linux Server
  • Cute Lil’ Classmate
  • Is this the cheapest Linux laptop on the planet?
  • The latest in Novell Linux certifications
  • “make” is annoying
  • Get Used to the Command Line in Linux, Part 3

How To Back Up Your Files With Areca On Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

Areca is a personal file backup software developed in Java. It allows you to select files or directories to back up, filter, encrypt and compress their content, and store them on your backup location. Areca supports incremental backups and generates backup reports, which can be stored on your disk or sent by email. This guide explains how to install and use it on a Fedora 9 desktop (GNOME).

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.