Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 29 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 10:28am
Story Benchmarking Linux 3.16 File-Systems On An SSD Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 6:39am
Story Jolla unveils Sailfish Launcher for Android Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 5:17am
Story PCLinuxOS Magazine: July 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 4:22am
Story Google L’s ‘HeadsUp’ already (unofficially) available on Google Play Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 12:37am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 11:28pm
Story FreeBSD 9.3 RC2 Released with Numerous Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:19pm
Story Robolinux 7.5.4 Wants to Be the Ultimate Windows Replacement Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:26pm
Story Hacking LibreOffice in Paris Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 8:21pm
Story HTC Roadmap Leaked with Android 4.4.4 and Android L Plan for One M8/One M7/One Mini 2/One E8 Rianne Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 4:57pm

Denial of service attacks outlawed

Filed under
Security

A UK law has been passed that makes it an offence to launch denial of service attacks, which experts had previously called "a legal grey area."

Report from the Ubuntu Developer Summit

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers and other interested parties from all over the world have swarmed to Google's offices in Mountain View this week for the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) to plan out the next release of Ubuntu.

The Open-Source Impact

Filed under
OSS

Is open-source software making an impact in small and medium-sized enterprises? That depends on whom you ask. Open-source developers and service providers will sing the praises of software that is not only free but also frees you from many long-established commercial restraints.

Customizing Your Ubuntu Linux Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux expert Marcel Gagne shows how to customize your Ubuntu Linux system to make it truly yours — change your background, your colors, your fonts, and anything else you need to create a desktop as individual as you are.

Developing with Apache Derby – Hitting the Trifecta

This article reviews how to modify an SQL query to group related rows together to provide summary statistics database information and introduces the concept of a view, which can be used to simplify database application development by creating a virtual table that represents the results of an SQL query. Also learn about database indexes, which you can use to locate specific table rows. After you've mastered these advanced database concepts, you'll be well positioned to begin developing Java database applications with Apache Derby.

SFLC’s Bradley M. Kuhn on Novell-Microsoft

Filed under
SUSE

A careful examination of Microsoft’s Patent Pledge for Non-Compensated Developers reveals that it has little value. The patent covenant only applies to software that you develop at home and keep for yourself; the promises don’t extend to others when you distribute. You cannot pass the rights to your downstream recipients, even to the maintainers of larger projects on which your contribution is built.

Running ASP.NET Applications in Debian and Ubuntu using XSP and Mono

Filed under
HowTos

Mono is an open-source project providing the necessary software to develop and run .NET client and server applications on Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, Windows, and Unix. Monodevelop is probably the best IDE for developing .NET applications on Linux. In order to install and use it for development, you will also need the Mono .NET runtime environment installed.

Ubuntu Edgy 6.10 Clean Install Impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

After my success upgrading from Ubuntu 6.06 to Edgy 6.10 I decided to reformat my hard drive and try doing a clean install. The whole install process went very smoothly and was an improvement over the Ubuntu 6.06 install.

Blogging made easy with Drivel

Filed under
Software

Most bloggers use a browser to log in and post new entries. The Drivel Journal Editor is designed for those who consider using a browser too tedious when making new blog entries. Designed for GNOME, Drivel can work with Blogger, LiveJournal, MovableType, WordPress, and other popular journaling tools. Despite an elegant yet simple interface, Drivel packs in some very useful features, such as an integrated spellcheker, HTML syntax highlighting, and the ability to edit and update past entries.

Jono Bacon: UDS nearly done

Filed under
Ubuntu

Well, the UDS finishes up tomorrow, and lots has been going on. The spec about unifying resources with Launchpad was very productive, and there was some discussion of it being rolled out for planets and user maps.

Weakly Debian Nudes #4

Filed under
Humor

Nothing happened this week. Sorry.

But that never stopped me before, so...

If Novell and Microsoft were in the car production and sales business...

Filed under
SUSE

Look at it this way for a moment: If I, as an end-user, bought a car from Ford, that does indeed contain technology infringing some patent owned by DaimlerChrysler -- would there by any likelyhood that Ford would sue me, the end-user? However, if I, as an end-user, buy a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, that *may* contain (well, it doesn't, and never will, as Novell strongly reassures me) software patented technology owned by Microsoft -- would there be any likelyhood that Microsoft would sue me, the end-user?

How to find the owner of a Network or Domain to track down offenders

Filed under
HowTos

Sometime you need to track down offenders who are trying to attack against your services such as routers, mail, web server etc. In some cases you just wanted to find out who is sending traffic or hot linking your images etc.

Abit AW9D i975X

Filed under
Hardware

Abit's AW8 and AW8-MAX were exceptionally well-designed i955X motherboards, and Abit's latest attempt at a high-performance Intel LGA-775 solution is the AW9D series. We have the Abit AW9D on our test bench, which is backed by Intel's flagship 975X processor and boasts an arsenal of innovative features. But how does this product perform under GNU/Linux? We have all of the performance metrics to share today.

Open-source vendors seek help from Congress

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software vendors are prodding Congress to define some legal standards to support the development and deployment of such software.

Matt Asay: The GPL doesn't violate US antitrust law (Duh!)

Filed under
OSS

The verdict is in: The GPL, by driving license costs to zero, is not a violation of US antitrust (e.g., price fixing) law. Whew! I was worried for a minute there.

Open Source Indemnification: More Harm than Good

Filed under
OSS

Since SCO filed its lawsuit against IBM several years ago, a number of vendors have stepped forward to indemnify their customers from suit if the customer becomes embroiled in any litigation involving open source software that the vendor distributed.

Writer's Cafe Offers Novel Approach to Writing

Filed under
Software

As a fiction or novel writer, are you searching for a writing tool to help you harness your creativity and get down to efficiently developing your plot? You might have a cast of characters and need to incorporate several different sub-plots. Maybe you think in a non-linear fashion and need to get your million dollar manuscript done sometime this next... oh, I don't know... decade.

Perhaps you are a Linux user, too.

Secure Kerberized authentication on Solaris 10 using IBM AIX Version 5.3

Filed under
Linux

Set up a Kerberized environment to work with Solaris(TM) 10 and learn how to configure a Key Distribution Center (KDC) on AIX(R) Version 5.3. You'll also run through a series of steps for configuring a Kerberos client on Solaris 10 to authenticate users for Telnet, remote shell (rsh), and Secure Shell (SSH) using AIX Version 5.3 as your KDC.

Configure grub and usplash settings using Simple GUI Interface in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

If you want to Configure grub and usplash using Simple GUI Interface here is the tool called Startup Manager. This is a simple pyton script.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Rise of Open Cloud Architecture and Over-the-Top (OTT) Network Services
  • Amazon’s Giving Away the AI Behind Its Product Recommendations
    Amazon has become the latest tech giant that’s giving away some of its most sophisticated technology. Today the company unveiled DSSTNE (pronounced “destiny”), an open source artificial intelligence framework that the company developed to power its product recommendation system. Now any company, researcher, or curious tinkerer can use it for their own AI applications.
  • Genode OS Framework release 16.05
    The current release marks the most profound API revision in the project's history. The new API is designed to reinforce the best practices for implementing Genode components. It is the result of countless experiments and the practical experiences made while developing over hundred genuine components during the past ten years.
  • Old projects and the free-software community
    The Community Leadership Summit (CLS) is an annual event for community managers, developer evangelists, people who work on public-facing forums, and those with a general interest in engagement or community development for free-software projects. The 2016 edition was held in Austin, Texas the weekend before OSCON. Several sessions at CLS 2016 dealt with the differences exhibited between old and new free-software projects where community management is concerned. One of those tackled the problem of how to foster community around an older software project, which poses a distinct set of challenges.
  • Thunderbird powered by SoftMaker
    Thunderbird, powered by SoftMaker, is a custom version of the popular email client featuring enhancements that come all in the form of extensions. [...] SoftMaker, a company best known for its SoftMaker Office suite, announced recently that it plans to include the Thunderbird email client into the 2016 version of the office suite.
  • The Document Liberation Project: What we do
    The Document Liberation Project: empowering creators to free their data from proprietary formats.
  • EMC Releases UniK Software for Cloud and IoT App Deployments
  • Microsoft Research Awards Demonstrate Commitment to Open Source [Ed: Microsoft openwashing and claims to be about research rather than cheating, bribery, witch-hunting etc.]
  • The open-source generation gap
    OSI General Manager Patrick Masson was one of the session's attendees, and he pushed back on that last point. There is too much "open-washing" these days, he said, but it does not come from the OSI. There is still only one Open Source Definition; the dilution of the term comes from others who use "open" to describe organizations, workflows, processes, and other things unrelated to software licensing. "We have open hardware and open data, but also 'open cola' and 'open beer.' That blurs over an important distinction. Not everything fits." [...] Among the other points raised during the session, attendees noted that it was important that the community distinguish between minting new project contributors and minting new free-software activists, and that it was important for projects to put a check on flamewar-style debates—particularly those that focus on dismissing certain technologies. It is easy for experienced developers to become attached to a language or framework, but there will always be new languages and projects popping up that are the entry points for new coders. Project members deriding language Y because it is not language X may only serve to tell newcomers that they are not welcome.
  • A discussion on combining CDDL and GPL code
    Within the context of an event dedicated to discussing free and open-source software (FOSS) legalities, such as the Free Software Legal & Licensing Workshop (LLW), the topic of conflicting licenses was bound to come up. The decision by Canonical to start shipping the ZFS filesystem with its Ubuntu server distribution back in February led to a discussion at LLW about distributing the kernel combined with ZFS. Discussions at LLW are held under the Chatham House Rule, which means that names and affiliations of participants are only available for those who have agreed to be identified. This year's LLW was held in Barcelona, April 13-15.
  • Mobile Age: using mobility and open data to include senior citizens in open government
    Helping older European people to be part of the open government process and encouraging their access to civic participation through mobility are the main goals of the Mobile Age project, launched last February.
  • All European scientific articles to be freely accessible by 2020
    And, according to the new Innovation Principle, new European legislation must take account of its impact on innovation. These are the main outcomes of the meeting of the Competitiveness Council in Brussels on 27 May.
  • Council of the European Union calls for full open access to scientific research by 2020
    A few weeks ago we wrote about how the European Union is pushing ahead its support for open access to EU-funded scientific research and data. Today at the meeting of the Council of the European Union, the Council reinforced the commitment to making all scientific articles and data openly accessible and reusable by 2020.
  • Hackaday Prize Entry: An Interface For The Headless Linux System
    Connecting a headless Raspberry Pi to a wireless network can be quite a paradoxical situation. To connect it to the network, you need to open an SSH connection to configure the wireless port. But to do so, you need a network connection in the first place. Of course, you can still get command-line access using a USB-to-UART adapter or the Pi’s ethernet port – if present – but [Arsenijs] worked out a much more convenient solution for his Hackaday Prize entry: The pyLCI Linux Control Interface.
  • RepRap, Open Source and 3DPrinting
    The RepRap project started in 2005 by Adrian Bowyer – “Mister RepRap”, when the patent about this technology expired. 3DPrintings isn’t a new technology, history dates that the first model of stereolithography printing emerged in 1984. The main idea around RepRap projects is to produce 3DPrinters that can auto-replicate most of the parts itself. And in 2006, the RepRap 0.2 successfully printed the first part of itself and in 2008, the first 3d model was printed by an end-user. Currently, the printer more replicated and customized of the 67 printers that are listed on RepRap website, is the Prusa Mendel, the model created by Josef Průša, that was disponibility to the public in 2011 and had a lot of development since.
  • Here is a web interface for switching on your light
    Like I mentioned in a previous post, I wanted to try out a more hackable wifi plug. I got a Kankun “smart” plug. Like the other one I have the software is horrible. The good news is that they left SSH enabled on it.
  • LeMaker Guitar review
    Anyone who has worked with the Compute Module will find the LeMaker Guitar immediately familiar. The system-on-chip processor, an Actions S500, sits alongside 1GB of memory, a combined audio and power management unit, and 8GB of NAND flash storage on an over-sized small-outline DIMM (SODIMM) form factor circuit board. This board then connects to a baseboard, supplied with the Guitar, which provides more accessible connectivity than the SODIMM’s 204 electrical contacts.
  • Open Source Vs Personal Life — Should GitHub Remove Contribution Graph?
    Should GitHub remove contribution graph from the personal profile of the contributors or the developers? This step might be taken for the personal well-being of the developers. Open source is good but personal life cannot be ignored either.

Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

Red Hat News

  • Why SELinux is inherently complex
    The root of SELinux's problems is that SELinux is a complex security mechanism that is hard to get right. Unfortunately this complexity is not (just) simply an implementation artifact of the current SELinux code; instead, it's inherent in what SELinux is trying to do.
  • SELinux is beyond saving at this point
    SELinux has problems. It has a complexity problem (in that it is quite complex), it has technical problems with important issues like usability and visibility, it has pragmatic problems with getting in the way, and most of all it has a social problem. At this point, I no longer believe that SELinux can be saved and become an important part of the Linux security landscape (at least if Linux remains commonly used). The fundamental reason why SELinux is beyond saving at this point is that after something like a decade of SELinux's toxic mistake, the only people who are left in the SELinux community are the true believers, the people who believe that SELinux is not a sysadmin usability nightmare, that those who disable it are fools, and so on. That your community narrows is what naturally happens when you double down on calling other people things; if people say you are an idiot for questioning the SELinux way, well, you generally leave.
  • Systemd 230 Is Upsetting Some Over Its KillUserProcess Setting
    Systemd 230 was released just last week and it has taken heat not only for opening up FBDEV to potential security issues, which already reverted, but also for changing the default behavior of user processes. Systemd 230 made a change where KillUserProcess defaults to yes. This terminates user processes that are part of the user session scope when the user logs out. This is causing problems for ssh-agent, screen, and other common Linux processes.
  • Basics you must know for RHCSA Exam preparation
  • Test Fedora 24 Beta in an OpenStack cloud
    Although there are a few weeks remaining before Fedora 24 is released, you can test out the Fedora 24 Beta release today! This is a great way to get a sneak peek at new features and help find bugs that still need a fix.
  • State of syslog-ng 3.8 rpm packaging
  • My Fedora Badges intern
    For the past two weeks I was lucky to have an intern, who worked on Fedora Badges. Badges is a great way to start as a Fedora design contributor, as they have low entry level. Templates are ready, graphics is available to download, all the resources available here.