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Sunday, 23 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry sorry downtime srlinuxx 21/12/2010 - 8:10am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 2010.12 BitTorrent Links available Texstar 21/12/2010 - 8:07am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 2010.12 Holiday CD's available Texstar 18/12/2010 - 11:11pm
Blog entry Enlightenment E17 Beta 3 update ready for PCLinuxOS Texstar 16/12/2010 - 9:50am
Blog entry Red Hat Layoffs srlinuxx 09/12/2010 - 6:40pm
Blog entry Woohoo, we're back srlinuxx 7 13/12/2010 - 1:19pm
Blog entry December 2010 Issue of The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine Released Texstar 03/12/2010 - 4:36pm
Blog entry KDE 4.5.4 now available for PCLinuxOS Texstar 02/12/2010 - 8:24pm
Blog entry gave it up srlinuxx 1 06/02/2011 - 12:14pm
Blog entry Mandriva Linux 2011TP (Tech Preview) - Quick Look gfranken 08/02/2011 - 6:46pm

Qt Creator 4.2.2 released

Filed under
KDE

The spring has arrived, so we took our brooms and swept the bugs from under the carpets and out of the door.

We meticulously noted down all the classes, orders, families, species, and other details of what we found and removed, which you can look up in our spring cleaning log.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux PC builder System76 plans to design, manufacture its own hardware

    System76 is one of only a handful of PC vendors that exclusively sells computers with Linux-based software. Up until now, that’s meant the company has chosen hardware that it could guarantee would work well with custom firmware and the Ubuntu Linux operating system.

  • Opto 22 Fortifies Commitment to Open-source Technology by Joining The Linux Foundation

    Industrial automation manufacturer Opto 22 announces it has joined The Linux Foundation as a Silver Level member. As a Linux Foundation member, Opto 22 will help support the greatest shared technology resources in history, while also accelerating the company’s technology and innovation through open-source leadership and participation. In joining The Linux Foundation, Opto 22 hopes to spearhead the adoption of open-source technology in the industrial automation and process control industries, and accelerate the rollout of Industrial Internet of Things applications.

  • Indicator Bulletin – A Clipboard Manager for Searching and Formatting Text

    Yes, yes – there are already many clipboard managers in the Linux community but how many of them are posses a slick UI and are searchable? Today we bring you one such app to add to the number in your head.

    Indicator Bulletin is a clipboard manager applet through which you can intelligently search for (using regular expressions) and edit text you have saved to its clipboard.

    It was built for Ubuntu by Serg, who already has a handful of clipboard manager apps under his belt.

  • Copr <3 Modularity
  • Jonathan Blow's next game looks like it might support Linux

    Take this with a pinch of salt, since it's early days for his next game, but Jonathan Blow (Braid, The Witness) actually showed off his next game 'Jai Sokoban' running on Linux.

  • KDE Fans Launch Petition to Make Plasma Ubuntu’s Next Desktop

    A new petition is calling for Canonical to make KDE Plasma Ubuntu's next desktop, following news that the distro is to drop Unity in favour of GNOME.

  • Samba, Ceph, LightDM Update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

    Snapshots released the past two weeks of openSUSE Tumbleweed have slowed down a bit, but new software continues to be updated in the five snapshots that have been release since April 6.

  • Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F26 Alpha

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • MIUI is never going to be close to stock Android, and that's a good thing
  • Chrome 58 for Android allows full screen web apps, tweaks History & Autofill settings
  • The Weird Antitrust Questions Of A Google Chrome Ad Blocker

    So rumors have started flying that Google is about to build some ad blocker technology into Chrome, that would block ads that the company considers to be "unacceptable ads" -- as determined by the "Coalition for Better Ads." Of course, while a coalition for "better ads" sounds like a good thing, this Coalition for Better Ads has been criticized. It was put together by the biggest companies in the internet ad space, and many worry that it's just an attempt to whitewash over a lot of bad practices by declaring just the extremely egregious practices as "bad." Either way, the original report from the paywalled Wall Street Journal notes that the ad blocker might even block all ads on sites that run "bad" ads (i.e., not just the bad ads).

    There have been all sorts of reactions to the news of a built-in Chrome ad blocker, but a lot of people are raising the antitrust questions. Obviously, Google is unlikely to consider its own ads to be the "bad ads." And thus, an official Google ad blocker -- especially one that allows its own ads through and is default on its very popular browser -- at least raises eyebrows about antitrust issues. There's a strong argument to be made (and I'm pretty sure that some ad firms would raise this with a court within a day or so of such an ad blocker being released) that this is an anti-competitive move to suppress competing ad firms.

Linux on Servers

Filed under
Server

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Event report: FOSSASIA 2017

    FOSSASIA 2017 reminded me of foss.in. After a long time, finally, a conference which has the similar aspects. Similar kind of tight organizing team, the presence of upstream communities from different locations. The participation from the local Singapore tech community along with Hackerspace Singapore is a serious boost. This was my 4th FOSSASIA conference, and also 3rd time in Singapore. I should thank Mario, Hong, and rest of the organizers to make this event a very pleasant experience.

  • Share Your Apache Mesos Expertise and Best Practices at MesosCon Events in 2017
  • Advantages of Choosing an Open-Source App Builder

    You’re launching a new business and you want to create a mobile application for you or your customers? Many tools exist to achieve it, but do you know the differences between them and what it implies for your business?

  • WordPress 4.7.4 Maintenance Release
  • When Open Source Opens The Door For Cybersecurity Risks [Ed: Yet another "useful idiot" (or paid marketer) for Black Duck the FUD agency]
  • Scality Accelerates Multi-Cloud Adoption with New Open-Source Release

    Scality, world leader in object and cloud storage, today announced immediate availability of a new open-source Scality S3 Server release, under the Apache 2.0 license, with support for high availability and multiple cloud data backends.

  • Facebook Modernizes Open Source Relay JavaScript Framework for Mobile [Ed: React = can’t even fork!]
  • Two tender announcements: lock-in vs. moving freely

    Using open source software and avoiding proprietary products is the only way to structurally prevent vendor lock-in. This principle has once again become clear from two procurement announcements recently published on Tenders Electronic Daily (TED), the public procurement journal of the European Union.

  • Open source @ Midburn, the Israeli burning man

    Our code is available on GitHub at https://github.com/Midburn/. And while it still need to be more tidy, I prefer the release early and often approach. The main idea we want to bring to the Burn infrastructure is using Spark as a database and have already began talking with parallel teams of other burn events. I’ll follow up on our technological agenda / vision. In the mean while, you are more than welcome to comment on the code or join one of the teams (e.g. volunteers module to organize who does which shift during the event).

  • Flying The First Open Source Satellite

    The Libre Space Foundation is an organization dedicated to the development of libre space hardware. It was born from the SatNOGS project — the winners of the first Hackaday Prize — and now this foundation is in space. The Libre Space Foundation hitched a ride on the Orbital ATK launch yesterday, and right now their completely Open Source cube sat is on its way to the International Space Station.

  • Why open source pharma is the path to both new and cheaper medicines

    We can all agree that we have some life-saving medicines available to us. We may have benefited directly, or have family members who are benefiting at the moment.

    Some medicines, however, are too expensive. Some don’t work too well and there are, of course, many terrible diseases for which we have no medicines at all. These issues affect rich and poor nations alike.

  • States are moving to cut college costs by introducing open-source textbooks

    Every cost associated with higher learning has steadily increased over the past decade, but none more so than college textbooks. While tuition increased by 63% between 2006 and 2016, and housing costs increased by 50%, the cost of textbooks went up by 88%, according to data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

  • Intel axes lack Lustre file systems and open sources features

    According to The Register, Trish Damkroger, Intel’s Vice President and General Manager for Technical Computing Initiative sent an email this week to partners and customers confirming the change.

    [...]

    The Enterprise Edition provides large-scale, high bandwidth storage with the power and scalability of Lustre, whilst the Foundation Edition offers maximum speed and scale Lustre storage with support from Intel.

  • Should Desktop 3D Printing Be Open Source or Closed Source?

    Open source development has brought a lot of advantages to desktop 3D printing. Is our flirtation with open source a youthful indiscretion that will soon be discarded? Or is open source the key to our recent past and to unlocking the future of 3D printing?

  • How desktop 3D printing's open source platforms shaped the industry's diverse material supply

    Ten years ago, John Kawola remembers the 3D printing industry as a very different place to how it looks today. While still a dynamic field with innovation aplenty, it was dominated by a handful of players. “3D Systems, Stratasys, EOS and EnvisionTEC,” the President of Ultimaker North America lists. Between them, they dominated the 3D printer business, they drove innovation at a rate smaller companies could not keep up with, and they all had a closed materials environment.

  • Rblpapi 0.3.6
  • clang(1) added to base on amd64 and i386

    [...] clang(1) added to the base system (as a non-default compiler) on the amd64 and i386 platforms

Big Data and OpenStack

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Open Source Tools for Enterprise Data Science
  • Open for business: Hortonworks aims for open source profitability

    It used to be the Hadoop Summit, but the strategic focus at Hortonworks the enterprise-ready open source Apache Hadoop provider, has evolved. So, this year it was renamed DataWorks Summit. The company now encompasses data at rest (the Hadoop Data Platform now in version 2.6), data in motion (the Hadoop Data Flow) and data in the cloud (the Hadoop Data Cloud). Hortonworks aims to become a multi-platform and multi-cloud company. The focus is on the data in data driven organisations. Just a few years ago Hortonworks connected with IT architects. Today it’s launching conversations with lines of business and chief marketing officers.

  • What's new in OpenStack Ocata

    OpenStack Ocata has now been out for a little over a month and we're about to see the first milestone of the Pike release. Past cycles show that now's about the time when people start looking at the new release to see if they should consider moving to it. So here's a quick overview of what's new in this release.

  • Research: OpenStack user satisfaction ratings drop, as adoption of the open source cloud rises

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

Unity and I never saw eye to eye, but it did a good job of pushing the Linux desktop in new directions and it emphasised something that, particularly when it arrived, was otherwise lacking – innovation in design.

Unity might have borrowed a few elements from Apple's OS X, but it quickly outgrew those initial imitations and forged its own path and its own aesthetic, something that's all too rare in open-source software.

Read more

UK GDS looking for architects with open source expertise

Filed under
OSS

The UK Government Digital Service (GDS) has released a 'Technical Architects recruitment guide'. The agency hopes to attract more technical architects by describing its recruitment process, thereby helping candidates to prepare better for the job interviews and making these more accessible to people unfamiliar with the Civil Service Commission recruitment principles.

Read more

Debian Derivatives: Elive, TeX Live, and deepin

Filed under
Debian
  • Elive 2.9.0 beta released

    The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 2.9.0

  • TeX Live 2017 pretest started

    Preparations for the release of TeX Live 2017 have started a few days ago with the freeze of updates in TeX Live 2016 and the announcement of the official start of the pretest period. That means that we invite people to test the new release and help fixing bugs.

  • deepin 15.4 Released With New Features — One Of The Best Looking Linux Distros

    The deepin development team has released deepin 15.4 Linux distro. This release is powered by Linux kernel 4.9.8, which means that now more number of devices are supported. The major highlights of this elegant operating system are new designs for control center and desktop, improvements in the installer and hot corners, etc.

Hardware/Modding

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Atreus: Building a custom ergonomic keyboard

    As mentioned in my Working on Android post, I’ve been using a mechanical keyboard for a couple of years now. Now that I work on Flowhub from home, it was a good time to re-evaluate the whole work setup. As far as regular keyboards go, the MiniLa was nice, but I wanted something more compact and ergonomic.

  • Intel Open Sources All Lustre Work, Brent Gorda Exits

    In a letter to the Lustre community posted on the Intel website, Vice President of Intel’s Data Center Group Trish Damkroger informs that effective immediately the company will be contributing all Lustre development to the open source community. Damkroger also announced that Brent Gorda, General Manager, High Performance Data Division at Intel is leaving the company. Gorda is the former CEO of Whamcloud, the Lustre specialist acquired by Intel in 2012.

  • Korean researchers develop open source 3D bioprinter

    Researchers from Seoul National University of Science and Technology in Korea have published the schematics for an open source 3D bioprinter.

  • 3d-Printing is cool

    I've heard about 3d-printing a lot in the past, although the hype seems to have mostly died down. My view has always been "That seems cool", coupled with "Everybody says making the models is very hard", and "the process itself is fiddly & time-consuming".

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • 5 ways to succeed at learning a programming language

    Whether you're taking up programming for the first time, or learning your 50th language, you might ask, "What's the best way to learn to program?" I surveyed dozens of people who taught themselves to program in Rust as part of my OSCON talk in 2016, and asked the expert autodidacts what advice they would give to others for picking up a new language. I found that despite their diverse backgrounds, all of my interviewees shared five common approaches to building new programming skills.

  • GitHub Developer Program shows bigger love

    The GitHub Developer Program (programme, if we’re using Her Majesty’s English) has been around for around three years now.

    Essentially, this initiative exists to encourage developers to test out application builds that integrate with GitHub.

  • GitHub Opens Developer Program to All

    GitHub Inc. has revamped its developer program with several changes, including opening it up to all developers for the first time.

    Previously, the three-year-old GitHub Developer Program was available to only those developers who had paid accounts at the open source code repository and software development platform specializing in Git-based version control.

  • RcppQuantuccia 0.0.1
  • 3 open source code libraries to handle MARC-formatted records

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Black Duck Attacks FOSS Again, for Marketing Purposes, Pretends It's "Research"

Filed under
OSS
Security

Mirantis enters the Kubernetes game and ups its OpenStack play

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Mirantis enters the Kubernetes game and ups its OpenStack play

    The Sunnyvale, Calif. company is doing this by launching a new single integrated distribution of OpenStack and Kubernetes: Mirantis Cloud Platform (MCP) 1.0. This new release also offers a unique build-operate-transfer delivery model.

  • Mirantis launches its new OpenStack and Kubernetes cloud platform

    Mirantis, one of the earliest players in the OpenStack ecosystem, today announced that it will end-of-life Mirantis OpenStack support in September 2019. The Mirantis Cloud Platform, which combines OpenStack with the Kubernetes container platform (or which could even be used to run Kubernetes separately), is going to take its place.

    While Mirantis is obviously not getting out of the OpenStack game, this move clearly shows that there is a growing interest in the Kubernetes container platform and that Mirantis’ customers are now starting to look at this as a way to modernize their software deployment strategies without going to OpenStack. The new platform allows users to deploy multiple Kubernetes clusters side-by-side with OpenStack — or separately.

A group of middle-school girls is learning to program, courtesy of Red Hat

Filed under
Development
Red Hat

If you're walking in the area of Boston's City Hall Plaza today, you might find yourself the subject of unique photo collage tomorrow.

Twenty-five local middle school girl are out roaming the city with digital cameras they built themselves as part of Red Hat Inc.'s (NYSE: RHT) CO.LAB initiative. On Friday, they'll turn the photos into a digital art installation that will be displayed at City Hall and Boston University.

The girls built the cameras on Wednesday out of Raspberry Pi computer kits — small, simple devices that teach the basics of programming. (Click through the gallery above to see the building process.)

Read more

Financial news:

Fedora:

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • 'Benign' worm seeks out vulnerable smart devices

    A "benign" worm is scouring the net seeking out poorly protected smart gadgets.

    CCTV systems, routers, digital video recorders and other internet-of-things (IoT) devices are now believed to be harbouring the Hajime worm.

  • How to manage the computer-security threat

    COMPUTER security is a contradiction in terms. Consider the past year alone: cyberthieves stole $81m from the central bank of Bangladesh; the $4.8bn takeover of Yahoo, an internet firm, by Verizon, a telecoms firm, was nearly derailed by two enormous data breaches; and Russian hackers interfered in the American presidential election.

    Away from the headlines, a black market in computerised extortion, hacking-for-hire and stolen digital goods is booming. The problem is about to get worse. Computers increasingly deal not just with abstract data like credit-card details and databases, but also with the real world of physical objects and vulnerable human bodies. A modern car is a computer on wheels; an aeroplane is a computer with wings. The arrival of the “Internet of Things” will see computers baked into everything from road signs and MRI scanners to prosthetics and insulin pumps. There is little evidence that these gadgets will be any more trustworthy than their desktop counterparts. Hackers have already proved that they can take remote control of connected cars and pacemakers.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Open Source Remote Access Trojan Targets Telegram Users

    Remote access Trojans are mainly used to steal consumer data, either for consumers themselves or the conglomerate keeping this information safe from prying eyes. However, it appears criminals are looking at a different approach for these tools right now. A new open source remote access Trojan can now be used to extract data from the Telegram communication platform.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Fasd – A Commandline Tool That Offers Quick Access to Files and Directories

    Fasd (pronounced as “fast“) is command-line productivity booster, a self-contained POSIX shell script which enables quick and more efficient access to files and directories.

  • What’s new in SSHGuard 2.0

    SSHGuard is an intrusion prevention utility that parses logs and automatically blocks misbehaving IP addresses with the system firewall. It’s less configurable than the better-known Fail2Ban but has a smaller resource footprint and ships with full IPv6 support. The newly released SSHGuard version 2.0 have been made easier to configure for new users. It also gained support for FirewallD, ipset, and ipfilter firewall backends on Linux; as well as Capsicum sandboxing support on *BSD.

    While we’re still waiting for the next release of Fail2Ban with IPv6 support, I took a look around at some of the alternatives and found an interesting option in SSHGuard. I had to address some Linux compatibility issues when getting started with SSHGuard as the development team was mostly focused on FreeBSD. I submitted patches for those issues and got more involved in the development and release of SSHGuard 2.0 in the process.

  • Steghide – An Easy way to Hide Confidential Data Inside Images and Sound Objects in Linux

    As of now, we have wrote few articles about the same topics but the way of method is different, how to hide files and folders in Linux & how to protect files and folders with password to safe the personal documents from others. It help us to send the secret information over the Internet like mail.

    Today we are going to discuss the same topic once again but the method is completely different. I mean, i will show you, how to hide sensitive data inside image and audio files using steghide utility.

  • 3 Emacs extensions for getting organized

    In the colophon to his book, Just a Geek, actor and writer Wil Wheaton wrote that he wanted to use Emacs to write the book but "couldn't find the text editor." Wheaton was joking, of course, but he highlighted an important point about Emacs: it's gone way beyond its roots as a tool for editing text.

    Thanks to its many modes (extensions that change the way the editor behaves), you can use Emacs for just about anything: browsing the web, reading and sending email, publishing blog posts and books, managing databases, learning with flashcards, and much more.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • The Linux Migration: April 2017 Progress Report
    In December 2016, I kicked off a migration to Linux (from OS X) as my primary laptop OS. In the nearly 4 months since the initial progress report, I’ve published a series of articles providing updates on things like which Linux distribution I selected, how I’m handling running VMs on my Linux laptop, and integration with corporate collaboration systems (here, here, and here). I thought that these “along the way” posts would be sufficient to keep readers informed, but I’ve had a couple of requests in the last week about how the migration is going. This post will help answer that question by summarizing what’s happened so far. Let me start by saying that I am actively using a Linux-powered laptop as my primary laptop right now, and I have been doing so since early February. All the posts I’ve published so far have been updates of how things are going “in production,” so to speak. The following sections describe my current, active environment.
  • Galago Pro: Look Inside
    Look inside the Galago Pro and see how easy it is to upgrade!
  • Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan Continues Progressing
  • Nouveau 1.0.15 X.Org Driver Released With Pascal Support
  • Arch Linux running natively on Pixel C
  • openSUSE Conference 2017 Schedule Posted

Making GNU/Linux Look Nice

Lumina Desktop Gets lumina-mediaplayer

  • 1.3.0 Development Preview: lumina-mediaplayer
  • Lumina Desktop Gets Its Own Media Player
    There's now yet another open-source media player, but this time focused on the BSD-focused Qt-powered Lumina Desktop Environment. Lumina Media Player is one of the new additions for the upcoming Lumina 1.3. Lumina Media Player's UI is quite simple so far and allows playing of local audio/video files along with basic audio streaming -- currently implemented for Pandora.

today's howtos