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Wednesday, 02 Sep 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
linpc srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:57am
ondiskgoblinx srlinuxx 04/09/2007 - 9:36pm
linuxextremedesktop srlinuxx 20/08/2007 - 2:13am
ondisk-mint srlinuxx 11/08/2007 - 3:58pm
adadheader srlinuxx 27/04/2007 - 1:18am
pclos srlinuxx 27/04/2007 - 4:39am
adadcontent srlinuxx 29/04/2007 - 8:54pm
salesad srlinuxx 01/05/2007 - 5:38pm
easyS srlinuxx 03/05/2007 - 7:03pm
ondisk-pclos-header srlinuxx 24/05/2007 - 3:25pm

Android Leftovers

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Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • OpenStack Summit Tokyo 2015: Presentation
  • Common problems in open source communities (and how to solve them)

    In her Texas Linux Fest keynote, Joan Touzet talked to us about how to improve our open source communities. Joan's talk was a series of stories about communities who have faced a crisis and then rose above it.

  • OpenStack Was Key To Building Servers.Com

    When XBT Holding S.A. decided to simplify how its subsidiaries provided global hosting, network solutions, and web development they turned to the open source cloud infrastructure platform OpenStack. By consolidating the offerings under a single service provider, Servers.com, customers can more easily browse, mix, compare and choose the most suitable services.

  • ZeroStack Comes Out of Stealth, Focused on Private Clouds

    There is another OpenStack-focused startup on the scene, and you have to appreciate its creative name: ZeroStack. The cloud computing company has come out of stealth mode to introduce a private cloud solution that it claims is easier to configure, consume and manage than any other technology on the market.

  • Apache Ignite, a Big Data Tool, Graduates as a Top-Level Project

    Only a few days ago, Apache, which is the steward for and incubates more than 350 Open Source projects, announced that Apache Lens, an open source Big Data and analytics tool, has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Now, the ASF has announced that Apache Ignite is to become a top-level project. It's an open source effort to build an in-memory data fabric that was driven by GridGain Systems and WANdisco.

  • Funding the Cloud: Top VCs Aim for the Silver Lining
  • How Apache Spark Is Transforming Big Data Processing, Development
  • PiwigoPress release 2.31

    I just pushed a new release of PiwigoPress (main page, WordPress plugin dir) to the WordPress servers. This release incorporates new features for the sidebar widget, and better interoperability with some Piwigo galleries.

  • How to teach student sys admins

    Students spend the 16-week long course learning practical skills using real tools. To support their systems, students learn about using support tickets and documentation by using RT and MediaWiki. To deploy and maintain their systems, they learn about configuration management using Puppet, system monitoring using Nagios, and backup and recovery using Bacula. But the broad concepts are more important than the specific software packages I just mentioned. The point is to learn, for example, configuration management, not to be trained to use Puppet. The software used by Clark is used because it works for him, but the software is flexible and changeable.

  • ownCloud beefing up security with bounty program

    ownCloud Inc. have announced a partnership with HackerOne to help with the newly created Security Bug Bounty Program in an effort to find vulnerabilities and fix them before they become an issue for users.

  • National Science Foundation Commits $6 Million to Secure IoT
  • Schiphol Airport working on open innovation

    ...open data and an open programming interface...

  • How open film project Cosmos Laundromat made Blender better

    If you're not familiar with the string of open projects that the Blender Institute has kicked out over the years, you might not be familiar with the term "open movie." Simply put, not only is Cosmos Laundromat produced using free and open source tools like Blender, GIMP, Krita, and Inkscape, but the film itself, and all of its assets—models, textures, character rigs, animations, all of it—are available under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license. Want to see what a production character rig looks like? Or know how that giant color tornado was created? How about actually using a character (or just a prop) in your own project? Maybe you even want to redo the entire film to your own tastes. It's an open movie! You can!

  • Making strides in container integration, and more OpenStack news
  • The thin line between good and bad automation

    I don't like automation -- I love it. I whisper sweet nothings, come 'round with flowers, and buy milkshakes for automation. I've even stood outside the window with a boombox for automation. I will go out of my way to automate tasks that, while they are not terribly tedious, I don't want to have to remember exactly how to do them somewhere down the road, when months have gone by since the last time I had to relearn them.

  • The new IT is all about the customer

    Open source code. GitHub and other cloud repositories enable developers to share and consume code for almost any purpose imaginable. This reflects today's practical, non-ideological open source culture: Why code it yourself if someone else is offering it free under the most liberal license imaginable?

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Coming Soon to OpenBSD/amd64: A Native Hypervisor

    Earlier today, Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) published a teaser for something he's been working on for a while.

  • the peculiar libretunnel situation

    The author of stunnel has (once, twice) asserted that stunnel may not be used with LibreSSL, only with OpenSSL. This is perhaps a strange thing for free software to do, and it creates the potential for some very weird consequences.

    First, some background. The OpenSSL license and the GPL are both free software licenses, but they are different flavors of freedom, meaning you can’t mix them. It would be like mixing savory and sweet. Can’t do it. Alright, so maybe technically you can do it, but you’re not supposed to. The flavor, er, freedom police will come get you. One workaround is for the GPL software to say, oh, but maybe wait, here’s an exception. (Does this make the software more or less free?) Here’s a longer explanation with sample exception.

  • FreeBSD on Beagle Bone Black (with X11)

    X11 clients on the Beagle Bone Black .. that’s X11 over the network, with the X Server elsewhere. No display as yet. The FreeBSD wiki notes that there’s no (mini) HDMI driver yet. So I built some X11 programs, xauth(1) and xmessage(1), and installed them on the Bone. Since I bought a blue case for the Bone, and it is the smallest computer in the house (discounting phones .. let’s call it the smallest hackable computer in the house) the kids decided to call it smurf. Here’s a screenshot of poudriere’s text console as it builds packages.

OpenSSL Security: A Year in Review

Filed under
OSS
Security

Over the last 10 years, OpenSSL has published advisories on over 100 vulnerabilities. Many more were likely silently fixed in the early days, but in the past year our goal has been to establish a clear public record.

Read more

Also: Tuesday's security advisories

Linux Foundation publishes best practices for secure workstations

Openwashing (Fake FOSS)

Filed under
OSS

Linux Foundation Puts Free Chromebooks in the Hands of its Training Students Throughout September

Filed under
Linux
Google

The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux and collaborative development, today announced it will give away one Chromebook to every person who enrolls in Linux Foundation training courses during September.

Read more

Also: Why Chromebooks are better than iPads

Netrunner 14.2 LTS – Update Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Netrunner team is proud to announce the release of Netrunner 14.2 LTS – 32bit and 64bit ISOs.

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A scalable tool for deploying Linux containers in high-performance computing

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

One increasingly popular approach is container-based computing, designed to support flexible, scalable computing. Linux containers, which are just now beginning to find their way into the HPC environment, allow an application to be packaged with its entire software stack, including portions of the base operating system files, user environment variables and application "entry points."

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Lenovo teams up with Red Hat, offers hefty rebates in bids to boost server business (and other Red Hat news)

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

AMD Linux Graphics: The Latest Open-Source RadeonSI Driver Moves On To Smacking Catalyst

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Following this weekend's Radeon R9 Fury open-source Linux driver tests with the DRM-Next code to be merged into Linux 4.3, the latest Mesa 11.1-devel Git code, and LLVM 3.8 SVN for the AMDGPU compiler back-end, I proceeded to run some bleeding-edge open-source Radeon Gallium3D graphics versus AMD Catalyst Linux benchmarks on Ubuntu.

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GNOME's Evolution 3.18 Email Client Gets a Second Beta Build with Multiple Bugfixes

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME Project is currently working on updating packages for the second Beta build towards the GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, due for release later this month, on September 23.

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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Announcing Marble Maps for Android Open Beta

    It’s my pleasure to announce the Open Beta version of Marble Maps for Android. Marble Maps is a port of the Desktop application Marble Virtual Globe and right now features an OpenStreetMap viewer, search and routing. The app is not yet feature complete; future updates will add turn-by-turn navigation, improve vector rendering and add basic OSM editing capabilities.

  • Randa Meetings 2015 – What I plan to do

    It is time for one more Randa Meetings this year, and over 50 KDE developers are going to participate in it along with me as well. The Randa Meetings is a codesprint sponsored by KDE and organized by Mario Fux, in which KDE developers from all across the globe are invited, and get to sit under the same roof and work together to collaborate on different ideas, coming up with some awesome feature implementations within a time span of about a week. These meetings generally focus on a common topic every year. Last year (2014) it was focused mainly on porting of various KDE applications to the KF5 framework. Similarly, this year we have a common focus as well, and it is aimed at bringing more of KDE to the mobile platform as much as possible. Now, since I am a Marble developer, let me tell you in brief what are my plans for Randa Meetings this year.

  • Interview with Brian Delano
  • Kubuntu Site Revamped

    With the move to Plasma 5, updating the Kubuntu website seemed timely. Many people have contributed, including Ovidiu-Florin Bogdan, Aaron Honeycutt, Marcin Sągol and many others.

    We want to show off the beauty of Plasma 5, as well as allow easy access for Kubuntu users to the latest news, downloads, documentation, and other resources.

Linux Lite 2.6 Is Out with Firefox 40.0.3 and LibreOffice 5.0.1, Based on Ubuntu 14.04.3 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Today, September 1, Jerry Bezencon has announced the immediate availability for download of the final version of the Linux Lite 2.6 operating system, a release that brings a great number of new features.

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NetworkManager 1.2 Pre-Release Soon Coming For Fedora 24

Filed under
Red Hat

While Fedora 24 isn't set to be released until H1'2016, developers are already working on getting a NetworkManager 1.2 pre-release into the distribution's archive early.

NetworkManager 1.2 is a major update that is set to happen later this year. Given the magnitude of the update and NetworkManager being important to the Fedora/GNOME desktop, the developers want to get the fresh code into F24 packages early.

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Nvidia Linux Video Driver 355.11 Adds Experimental OpenGL Support to EGL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Three days after the release of the Nvidia 352.41 long-lived branch proprietary video driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris operating systems, Nvidia announced on the last day of August the immediate availability for download of the short-lived Nvidia 355.11 graphics driver.

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Latest Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 Update Adds KDE Plasma 5.4, LibreOffice 5.0.1, More

Filed under
KDE
LibO
Linux

The Manjaro development team announced on the last day of August that the eleventh maintenance update for the stable Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 operating system series is now available to users worldwide.

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Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 Reviewed: The Ultimate Android Tablet

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Both models of the Galaxy Tab S2 are impressive. Of the two, I’m partial to the 8-inch Tab because its size is perfect for what I like to do with a tablet, like reading comics and watching movies.

The question now is, should you buy a Tab S2 instead of the iPad?

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Nextbit’s Robin Is An Android Smartphone That Taps The Cloud For Bonus Smarts

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Android

After weeks of teasing out little details on Twitter, Nextbit has finally spilled the beans on what they’ve been working: Robin, a “cloud-first” Android smartphone.

So what does “cloud-first” mean? At least initially (the company suggests that the cloud integration will only get deeper in time), it means smart, automated offloading of your photos, videos, and apps to free up the local storage space on your device.

Robin has 32GB of storage built in. As you fill this, it’ll automatically back up your photos and apps to a private 100GB box on their cloud server.

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Xiaomi said to release notebook in 2016 with help from Inventec and Foxconn

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The sources believe Xiaomi will likely release a 15-inch notebook as it is the mainstream size in China and will adopt Linux operating system. The notebook is estimated to be priced at CNY2,999 (US$471) and will heap pressure on competitors' simliar products priced between CNY4,000-6,000.

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Also: Xiaomi GNU/Linux Notebook In 2016

First RC Build of Tiny Core Linux 6.4 Adds a New ASCII Penguin in MOTD

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Robert Shingledecker, the creator, maintainer, and lead developer of the Tiny Core project announced earlier today, September 1, the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Release Candidate (RC) build of Tiny Core Linux 6.4.

Read more

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