Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 20 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 1+ Year Running Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 2 Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:38am
Story Lunar Linux 1.7.0 (i686 & x86_64) ISO’s released Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:03am
Story Most Popular Desktop Video Player: VLC Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 5:31pm
Story 'One frickin' user interface for Linux' Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:12pm
Story A Dell 4K laptop with Linux: Tough construction and built for developers. Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 8:29am
Story Android (Linux) is creating more jobs than iPhone Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 7:53pm
Story Cinnamon PPA will no longer be maintained for Ubuntu users Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:44am
Story CyanogenMod support arrives for Amazon Kindle Fire HD Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2014 - 10:54am
Story Dell launches Android-based Venue tablets at Computex 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 03/06/2014 - 5:33pm
Story Elementary OS Freya Beta 1 Available For Developers And Testers Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 4:33am

Software: Rav1e, Cockpit, SSH Tools and Curl

Filed under
Software
  • Rav1e 0.3.1 Is 25~40% Faster At Low Speed Levels For Rust-Based AV1 Encoding

    It was not even two full weeks ago that Rav1e 0.3 was released with speed optimizations and other AV1 encoding enhancements while released on Tuesday was Rav1e 0.3.1 with a change to boost encode speeds at lower levels.

    The principal change with Rav1e 0.3.1 for this Rust-written AV1 video encoder is 25~40% better performance at lower speed levels (two through five). This big speed-up is by disabling fine directional prediction and intra-block transform splitting within inter-frames. The consequence of disabling these features for the double digit percentage speed improvements is approximately 1~2% lower video quality at these levels, which the developers deemed to be an acceptable trade for the faster encode times.

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 213

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 213.

  • Tools for SSH key management

    I use SSH constantly. Every day I find myself logged in to multiple servers and Pis (both in the same room as me and over the internet). I have many devices I need access to, and different requirements for gaining access, so in addition to using various SSH/SCP command options, I have to maintain a config file with all the connection details.

  • Daniel Stenberg: The command line options we deserve

    A short while ago curl‘s 230th command line option was added (it was --mail-rcpt-allowfails). Two hundred and thirty command line options!

    A look at curl history shows that on average we’ve added more than ten new command line options per year for very long time. As we don’t see any particular slowdown, I think we can expect the number of options to eventually hit and surpass 300.

    Is this manageable? Can we do something about it? Let’s take a look.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Fuels Omnitracs to Deliver Cloud-Native Fleet Management Innovation

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Omnitracs, LLC, the global pioneer of fleet management solutions to transportation and logistics companies, has delivered its Omnitracs One platform, the next-generation of fleet management innovation, on the foundation of Red Hat OpenShift. Using the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform along with Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform, Omnitracs One is a completely cloud-native offering and provides an enhanced user experience with a clear path towards future innovations.

  • Orange Egypt Builds Horizontal Cloud on Red Hat Technologies, Improving Time-to-Market by up to 10x

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud technologies are providing a horizontal cloud platform for Orange Egypt’s virtual network functions (VNFs), helping the service provider to more quickly deliver new services to customers, optimize its network investments and reduce operational expenditure. Building on the foundation of Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage, Orange Egypt is the first Orange affiliate to manage 100% of its live customer traffic over a fully software-based platform spanning several sites across its region.

  • Share-ing the News: the Mainframe is Back!

    What seems like a hundred years ago, I started in the technology business. My first job was as a computer operator for an IBM S/390 mainframe computer for a large networking company. The years zipped by and I now find myself at SUSE as the Product Marketing Manager for system Z and LinuxOne. My how things have come full circle!

    While the mainframes of today have transformed and are not quite the behemoths of yesteryear, the purpose of the mainframe is still the same – providing customers with increased security, fast processing time for large amounts of data, high availability, and rock-solid stability.

    Mainframes today like IBM LinuxOne and system Z provide unprecedented privacy and security for your infrastructure with encryption everywhere and instant recovery. And the best part is you can run your favorite Linux distribution on these systems – SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for system Z and LinuxOne

  • Building a community of practice in 5 steps

    In the first part of this series, we defined community as a fundamental principle in open organizations, where people often define their roles, responsibilities, and affiliations through shared interests and passions, not title, role, or position on an organizational chart. Then, in the second part of the series, we explored the many benefits communities of practice bring to open organizations—including fostering learning, encouraging collaboration, and offering an opportunity for creative problem-solving and innovation.

    Now you know you'd like to start a community of practice, but you may still be unsure where to start. This article will help define your roadmap and build a plan for a successful community of practice—in five simple steps (summarized in Figure 1).

  • Red Hat Combines Continuous Community Innovation with Long-Life Enterprise Support in Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16, the latest version of its highly scalable and agile Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. More than 1,000 enhancements and new features will lay the foundation for enterprise and telco workloads from programmable IaaS for hybrid clouds, developer clouds and production clouds and cloud-native applications like network functions virtualization (NFV), edge computing, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML).

  • Red Hat OpenStack lives on in a new release

    This new OpenStack is built on the foundation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8. The version adds a refined long-life support lifecycle, comprehensive feature consolidation, and a new commitment to delivering continuous community innovation as enterprise-ready features via stream releases. It combines the best features of the last three OpenStack release Train along with Red Hat's own special sauce.

    Modular by design, the new Red Hat OpenStack is meant to optimize IT operations for existing traditional applications. But it's not just the same old IaaS file storage cloud it was 10 years ago. It can now be used as the foundation for cloud-native applications such as network functions virtualization (NFV), edge computing, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML).

  • Fedora Council November 2019 meeting: more miscellaneous stuff

    In addition to the big topic of the Fedora Project Vision, we used the opportunity to cover some other Fedora Council business. Because it’s a lot, we’re breaking the reporting on this into two posts, kind of arbitrarily — here’s the second of those.

  • Return of the son of the panda badger

    Here’s an initial mockup of a new sticker sheet design for Fedora! It features artwork from Fedora Badges. (Actually, now that I think of it, it would be nice to have a licensing notice for the artwork along the bottom or side of the sheet.) The idea behind this is just to be a fun piece of swag to give away at events.

    Before my leave, we produced a Fedora Diversity sticker sheet that has proven to be very popular at events, so it’s time for our panda and badger friends to have their time to shine I think

Programming: PHP, Scheme, Perl, Python and JavaScript

Filed under
Development
  • PHP version 7.2.28, 7.3.15 and 7.4.3

    RPMs of PHP version 7.4.3 are available in remi repository for Fedora 32 and remi-php74 repository for Fedora ≥ 30 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 7 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPMs of PHP version 7.3.15 are available in remi repository for Fedora 30-31 and remi-php73 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPMs of PHP version 7.2.28 are available in remi-php72 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Scheme

    Scheme is a general-purpose, functional, programming language descended from Lisp and Algol. It is a statically scoped and properly tail-recursive dialect of Lisp.

    Scheme is a very simple language with a very simple syntax based on s-expressions. Its simplicity is fundamental in making it a popular introductory language. It follows a minimalist design philosophy specifying a small standard core with powerful tools for language extension. This philosophy helps make Scheme a programming language that can be learned over a weekend. Nevertheless, Scheme is a very versatile language being used to write a diverse range of applications such as financial analysis tools, compilers, virtual reality systems, as well as more mundane software.

    Scheme is used in computing education and research as well as a wide range of industrial applications.

  • Don't like IDEs? Try grepgitvi

    Like most developers, I search and read source code all day long. Personally, I've never gotten used to integrated development environments (IDEs), and for years, I mainly used grep and copy/pasted file names to open Vi(m).

    Eventually, I came up with this script, slowly refining it as needed.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 48: Survivor and Palindrome Dates

    These are some answers to the Week 48 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • Deprecating or Transferring Mojo::ACME

    While Mojo::ACME was a fun experiment, it has several shortcomings at this point and I’ve officially stopped using it. If someone is interested in maintaining it, and if I’m sufficiently convinced of your credibility since this is a security module after all, I can hand it over. Otherwise I will be marking it as deprecated soon.

    Some background

    Mojo::ACME was mostly an experiment for me in learning the ACME (v1) protocol. It was a port of the acme-tiny script to mojo with one significant difference. When used as a plugin in your application it actually could listen for a local connection over websocket from the certificate issuance command to prepare for the authentication challenges. This allowed for zero-downtime intervention-free certificate issuance for your application. It was pretty neat and I’m still proud that it worked. Meanwhile the letsencrypt client, later to be renamed certbot, was in a very painful infancy.

  • KBOS types

    After introducing KBOS I should write about the most fundamental concept in this Perl syntax extension. In fact it's so basic, you could use it even without objects.

    Of course this is not a full fledged type system. Use Raku to get that. Variables with KBOS will stay your perly whatever data container. But like in Moose or Zydeco, you want to verify data - if its consistent with your expectation. And you don't want to write the checking code lines over and over, plus they pollute method logic anyway.

    One of the advantages to have objects in the first place is to be sure, that the attributes obey requirements and you do not have to check them at every function all.

  • Let’s Build A Simple Interpreter. Part 18: Executing Procedure Calls
  • PyCharm 2020.1 EAP 4

    We have a new Early Access Program (EAP) version of PyCharm that can be now downloaded from our website.

    We’ve been hard at work making PyCharm easier to use and adding and improving features to get PyCharm 2020.1 ready for release. We have some good ones for you to try in this build. This EAP also includes loads of fixes from the IntelliJ Platform teams.

  • No Python 2 On Upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Version!

    Python 2 will no longer be available on upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS version”, said by Matthias Klose. The team canonical had a very long discussion and came to a decision to remove Python 2 from Focal Fossa. The exact words are,
    Sorry for delaying that email. Based on some discussions, we are going forward with the Python2 removal.Matthias Klose

  • Android home screen widgets in HTML and JS

    I like having the news headlines on my phone’s home screen. (Well, on the screen to the right.) It helps me keep up with what’s going on in the world. But it’s hard to find a simple headline home screen widget which isn’t full of ads or extra frippery or images or tracking; I just want headlines, plain text, not unpleasantly formatted, and high-density. I don’t want to see three headlines; I’d rather see ten. I tried a whole bunch of news headline home screen widgets and they’re all terrible; not information-dense enough, or they are but they’re ugly, or they insist on putting pictures in, or they display a ton of other information I don’t want.

SharkLinux – Virtualization and cloud compatible Linux distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today, we are going to take a look at a specialized Linux distro, SharkLinux. It is a cloud compatible and virtualization Linux distro that you can use in the cloud.

SharkLinux is an Ubuntu-based distribution featuring the MATE desktop and is best aimed for sysadmin testing, developers, and virtualization hobbyists. It follows a rolling release model for updates.

Read more

Events: WordPress Livestream, SUSECon, JupyterCon, LibrePlanet

Filed under
OSS
  • Pop-Up Livestream on February 22

    This should be a great way to get to hear from some speakers who have yet to share their knowledge on a global stage. WordPress is enriched by a multitude of experiences and perspectives, and I hope you are as excited as I am to hear new voices from a part of the world that is frequently underrepresented in the WordPress open source project.

  • Get Expert Guided Hands-On Experience at the SUSECON 2020 Pre-Conference Workshops
  • Get Certified During SUSECON 2020
  • JupyterCon 2020 is a go!

    Just over a year ago, Project Jupyter announced it was reevaluating its annual community conference. An advisory committee of volunteers recommended a JupyterCon 2020 emphasizing a focus on access and leadership. We are now thrilled to announce a global Jupyter conference...

  • Announcing JupyterCon 2020

    NumFOCUS is excited to be a part of JupyterCon 2020. JupyterCon will be held August 10 – 14 in Berlin, Germany at the Berlin Conference Center.

  • Hot off the presses: a sneak peek at the LibrePlanet 2020 schedule

    LibrePlanet 2020 is organized by the FSF. Hundreds of people from across the globe will converge to explore this year's theme, "Free the Future." We'll be delving into the threats to user freedom that we've all been reading about every day in the media, as well as the unique role the free software movement plays in solving these problems.

    In addition to the first keynote we announced last month, Brewster Kahle, LibrePlanet 2020 will feature a panoply of presentations. Our lineup includes some talks we absolutely can't wait to see, and we think you'll feel the same way! You can now dive in to the speakers already confirmed and start planning your itinerary.

    [...]

    LibrePlanet 2020 offers lots of opportunities for socializing, too! The annual FSF open house will take place on the evening of Friday, March 13th, at the FSF office. And the LibrePlanet Saturday night party will feature a sparkling new location. As we have in the past, we'll organize a dinner specifically for women, genderqueer, nonbinary, and gender non-conforming attendees, please mail campaigns@fsf.org if you're interested in joining. If you are looking to organize your own dinner or meetup, you can do so using the LibrePlanet wiki 2020 conference social and dinner pages as a central place for communication about this.

Graphics: RADV Vulkan Driver, Intel Codecs and Defects, NVIDIA Firmware

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Option For Zeroing Out Video Memory

    New to Mesa 20.1-devel is a new option for the Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver to enable zeroing out video memory allocations.

    This isn't a new concept with other graphics drivers offering similar functionality for zeroing out the vRAM either for security reasons or working around pesky game/app issues. For example, RadeonSI OpenGL zeros out the vRAM for Rocket League to workaround buggy behavior with that game. But zeroing out the video memory normally isn't done by default for all allocations due to performance reasons.

    With the new flag to zero vRAM allocations for the RADV Vulkan driver it was done by Valve's Samuel Pitoiset. In this case he mentions it's in part for "future work."

  • Intel Gen12/Xe Graphics To Support 12-Bit HEVC/VP9 Decode

    We are learning more about the media engine capabilities with the forthcoming Intel "Gen12" (Xe) Tiger Lake graphics.

    The documentation for Intel's open-source media-driver that exposes VA-API capabilities on the Linux desktop was recently updated. That updated Intel VA-API Media Driver points to Intel Gen12 dropping VP8 video capabilities but expanding when it comes to 12-bit codec support.

  • Intel Sends Out Latest Patches For Mitigating Graphics Flaw On Ivybridge/Haswell

    It has been one month and a few days since Intel first made public the need for graphics driver patching of Gen 7/7.5 graphics for older Ivybridge / Haswell hardware to fix a graphics hardware flaw. That vulnerability also affected the common Intel Gen9 graphics but there the mitigation was uneventful and quickly merged without causing any performance hit. But for Ivybridge/Haswell one month later the graphics driver mitigation for CVE-2019-14615 is still being addressed.

    This vulnerability is also known as iGPU Leak by the researchers that discovered it but for the Gen7/Gen7.5 protection the mitigation has been particularly problematic. With the initial Gen7/Gen7.5 patches posted in mid-January there was a huge hit to the graphics performance while Intel worked towards no performance loss.

  • NVIDIA Posts Firmware Needed For Open-Source GeForce 16 Series Acceleration

    As written about last week, in the works for the Linux 5.7 kernel this spring is open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" acceleration for the GeForce 16 series. That code is currently sitting in the Nouveau development tree until landing in DRM-Next for Linux 5.7, but NVIDIA has now posted the necessary firmware binaries needed for enabling the hardware acceleration on these Turing GPUs.

EasyOS version 2.2.11 released (Easy Buster version 2.2.11)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

EasyOS versions 1.x are the "Pyro" series, the latest is 1.3. Easy Pyro is built with packages compiled from source using 'oe-qky-src', a fork of OpenEmbedded. Consequently, the builds are small and streamlined and integrated. The Pyro series may have future releases, but it is considered to be in maintenance status.
The "Buster" series start from version 2.0, and are intended to be where most of the action is, ongoing. Version 2.0 was really a beta-quality build, to allow the testers to report back. The first official release was 2.1.
The main feature of Easy Buster is that it is built from Debian 10 Buster DEBs, using WoofQ (a fork of Woof2: Woof-CE is another fork, used to build Puppy Linux).
The advantage of Buster over Pyro is access to the large Debian package repositories. That is a big plus.

Read more

More in: EasyOS version 2.2.11 released

Also: Working-partition ext4 filesystem shuts down unclean

Games: Dad Quest, Unrailed, SteamWorld, Dying Light, Steam and SGT Puzzles Collection

Filed under
Gaming
  • Children are indestructible weapons in 'Dad Quest' - Linux Beta out now

    Possibly one of the quirkiest platformers I've ever come across, Dad Quest is now officially in Beta for Linux on Steam.

    A story-based platformer, with what developer Sundae Month claim is their own 'unique brand of comedy'. It's set in a world where children are indestructible weapons, ready to be hurled towards enemies. As a parent, I will admit it sounds amusing. According to the description you will teach your child new combat skills using 'a variety of deadly toys'.

  • Hilarious co-op train track building game 'Unrailed!' is now officially on Linux

    After a little while being in Beta, Indoor Astronaut have today released the Linux (and macOS) versions of Unrailed! so they're officially supported.

  • The full SteamWorld series is heading to Google Stadia "soon"

    While they're seemingly not giving an exact date just yet, Thunderful Publishing and Image & Form announced today that multiple SteamWorld titles are heading to Google Stadia.

  • Dying Light gets a massive update with a 'Story Mode' plus a free weekend

    Techland are keeping their baby alive a while longer (especially after delaying Dying Light 2), and it appears they didn't forget it turned 5 last month with a huge update and celebration.

    Since Dying Light has been out five years they're kicking off a big celebration. It's having a Free Weekend on Steam for the first time! A really good opportunity to see what the fuss is all about and I sure do fuss about it a lot. It really is a great game! One of my absolute favourites.

  • How to use community control schemes in Steam for Linux

    Sick of plugging your gaming controller into your Linux PC, only to find that the game does not have any gamepad controls set up? As it turns out, Steam has a solution for that. Did you know that you can add custom controller layouts for your Steam games on Linux? It’s true! Thanks to Steam’s stellar controller support on Linux, anyone can bind custom controls to their gaming controller! Follow along to learn how to do it on your system!

  • SGT Puzzles Collection 0.2.5 Released

    SGT Puzzles Collection, or simply sgt-launcher, is a game launcher and wrapper for Simon Tatham’s Portable Puzzle Collection, a popular collection of logic games by the developer of PuTTY.

    Joining the Xubuntu package set way back in Xubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark", SGT Puzzles Collection has quietly provided Xubuntu users with a variety of distracting games for several releases. If you want to learn more about the project, check out my introductory blog post.

Linux Foundation: LF Networking, Xen Project Outreachy Connected to Microsoft, FUD Against FOSS Connected to Snyk and Synopsys (Black Duck, Microsoft 'Outposts')

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • LF Networking Expands Ecosystem — Adds Members, Leads Initiatives to Automate 5G deployments and accelerate Automation

    LF Networking (LFN), which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across open networking projects, today announced the addition of nine new members.The project welcomes new Silver members A10 Networks, AMD, Codilime, Mirantis, Robin.io, Solutions by STC, ULAK, and Xilinx, and Associate members University of California San Diego, and University of Surrey.

    “It’s great to kick off 2020 by welcoming a new swath of global members to the LFN community,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge & IoT, the Linux Foundation. “We’re expanding our member ecosystem in tandem with growth across initiatives that harmonize open source an open standards, enable automated testing and deployment, and further Cloud Native Network Functions as open source becomes more mainstream.”

    The newest LFN members will work alongside the 100+ existing member organizations to drive development, testing and implementation of LFN’s networking projects, including FD.io, ONAP, OpenDaylight, OpenSwitch, OPNFV, PNDA, SNAS, and Tungsten Fabric.

  • Xen Project is Participating in May 2020 to August 2020 Outreachy Internships Round [Ed: Microsoft continues to 'buy the agenda' of the 'Linux' Foundation]

    The Xen Project is excited to be participating in the Outreachy internship program which supports diversity in free and open source software. The Xen Project’s participation in this round is being sponsored by Microsoft (1 internship). Interns have to make an initial application which primarily verifies eligibility to the Outreachy program by February 25 at 4pm UTC: for more information see here. Applicants with an approved initial application can start to enquire about projects from March 5th and can then formally apply.

    During the application period, applicants are expected to contribute to the Xen Project while in parallel working on the detailed application. The final application deadline is April 7, 2020 at 4pm UTC. Applicants interested in becoming a Xen Project Intern can see our projects here and here (link not live until March 5th).

  • New Linux Foundation | Harvard Study Reveals Hard Truths, Actionable Steps for Open Source Security [Ed: Linux Foundation now works with Microsoft proxies/allies Snyk and Black Duck to smear FOSS]

    Open source has made its way into almost every server farm, consumer device and service we use, and it’s done so without most people even realizing it. Almost no one knows what is in their phones, apps or business data centers. This is wreaking havoc on the global supply chain, so much so that the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee sent a letter to the Linux Foundation inquiring about it. The Linux Foundation did its best to summarize a very complex situation in its response.

    So with the help of Harvard researchers and companies like Snyk and Synopsys, we set out to produce our second Census of open source software but this time, with a focus on what open source software projects show up in production applications. At the heart of this is a desire to understand how we take a preventative care approach to security, rather than a reactionary one.

Supporting an open source operating system: a Q&A with the FreeBSD Foundation

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

When discussing alternative operating systems to Microsoft’s Windows or Apple’s macOS, Linux often comes to mind. However, while Linux is a recreation of UNIX, FreeBSD is more of a continuation. The free and open source operating system was initially developed by students at the University of California at Berkeley which is why the BSD in its name stands for Berkeley Software Distribution.

FreeBSD runs on its own kernel and all of the operating system’s key components have been developed to be part of a single whole. This is where it differs the most from Linux because Linux is just the kernel and the other components are supplied by third parties.

To learn more about FreeBSD and its ongoing development, TechRadar Pro spoke to the executive director of the FreeBSD Foundation, Deb Goodkin.

Read more

Linux-driven ADAS computer features 6x FAKRA cameras

Filed under
Linux

VIA’s rugged “VIA Mobile360 M810” in-vehicle computer runs Linux on a Snapdragon 820E and offers 6x FAKRA camera ports plus software for ADAS, driver monitoring, surround view, and DVR.

Taiwan-based VIA Technologies, which appears to be increasingly focused on automotive and other vision processing applications, has launched an ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance System) computer primarily aimed at bus fleets, but also available for trucks and delivery vans. The VIA Mobile360 M810 follows earlier Mobile360 systems such as the VIA Mobile360 D700 Drive Recorder, which runs Linux on a dual -A53 Novatek NT96685T SoC, and the VIA Mobile360 Surround View Sample Kit, which runs Android 5.0 on an unnamed octa-core SoC.

Read more

KDE’s Plasma Mobile Is Shaping Up Nicely on the PinePhone

Filed under
KDE

Last month, we took a closer look at how UBports’ Ubuntu Touch mobile OS progressed on the PinePhone, thanks to a video shared by developer Marius Gripsgård. Now, we have a sneak peek at another great system for the PinePhone, KDE’s Plasma Mobile.

Unlike Ubuntu Touch, which is a full-fledged mobile operating system, Plasma Mobile is actually a user interface (UI) for mobile devices running on top of a GNU/Linux distribution, such as KDE neon or the Alpine Linux-based postmarketOS.

Read more

What is Mobile PureOS?

Filed under
OS

Since I’ve seen plenty of misconceptions flying around, let’s go through a quick sum up of what is included in PureOS, the default GNU/Linux distribution installed on the Librem 5.

tl;dr: it’s pretty much Debian Stable with GNOME with Purism’s phosh, phoc, libhandy, Calls, and Chats, with some amount of adaptive apps, backports, and cosmetic patches

Read more

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS Receive New Kernel Live Patch

Filed under
Ubuntu

The new kernel live patch comes two and a half weeks after the last kernel live patch and just a day after the major kernel security updates released for all supported Ubuntu released on February 18th. It addresses a total of five security flaws affecting Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) systems.

Among the fixes, there’s the well-known vulnerability affecting systems with Intel Graphics Processing Units (CVE-2019-14615), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information, as well as a race condition (CVE-2020-7053) in the i915 driver that could let a local attacker to crash the system or execute arbitrary code.

Read more

FreeBSD vs. Linux Scaling Up To 128 Threads With The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I looked at the Windows vs. Linux scaling performance on the Threadripper 3990X at varying core/thread counts followed by looking at the Windows 10 performance against eight Linux distributions for this $3990 USD processor running within the System76 Thelio Major workstation. Now the tables have turned for our first look at this 64-core / 128-thread processor running on the BSDs, FreeBSD 12.1 in particular. With this article is looking at the FreeBSD 12.1 performance and seeing how the performance scales compared to Ubuntu 20.04 Linux and the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 based CentOS Stream.

Read more

Try the GNOME Nightly VM images with GNOME Boxes

Filed under
GNOME

It was a long time overdue but we now have bootable VM images for GNOME again. These VMs are good for testing and documenting new features before they reach distros.

To provide the best experience in terms of performance and host-guest integration, we landed in BoxesDevel (Nightly GNOME Boxes) an option to create GNOME VMs with the correct device drivers and configurations assigned to it. You know…the Boxes way™.

Read more

Red Hat: libinput, backports, edge computing, survey and more

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Peter Hutterer: A tale of missing touches

    libinput 1.15.1 had a new feature: it matched the expected touch count with the one actually seen as opposed to the one advertised by the kernel. That is good news for ALPS devices whose kernel driver lies about their capabilities because these days who doesn't. However, in some cases that feature had the side-effect of reducing the touch count to zero - meaning libinput would ignore any touch. This caused a slight UX degradation.

    After a bit of debugging and/or cursing, the issue was identified as a libevdev issue, specifically - the way libevdev replays events after a SYN_DROPPED event. And after several days of fixing things, adding stuff to the CI and adding meson support for libevdev so the CI can actually run a few useful things, it's time for a blog post to brain-dump and possibly entertain the occasional reader such as you are. Congratulations, I guess.

    The Linux kernel's evdev protocol is a serial protocol where all events have a type, a code and a value. Events are grouped by EV_SYN.SYN_REPORT events, so the event type is EV_SYN (0), the event code is SYN_REPORT (also 0). The value is usually (but not always), you guessed it, zero. A SYN_REPORT signals that the current event sequence (also called a "frame") is to be interpreted as one hardware event [0].

  • What is backporting, and how does it apply to RHEL and other Red Hat products?

    Version numbers are important, but aren't always what they seem at first glance. Red Hat, for example, often backports updates to the software we ship in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) to maintain the version that we shipped.

    This is a post to follow to Jean-Sébastien Tougne’s post on finding the latest available kernel. Jean-Sébastien’s article was responding to a question on the Red Hat Learning Community, where the poster was seeking the latest version of the kernel for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. That prompted me to write an article that went deeper into the nuance and strategy the Red Hat Enterprise Linux team employs for this to be magically delicious for administrators.

  • The edge is open: Why scale-out computing doesn’t exist without open hybrid cloud

    The past year has seen the rise of applications that push enterprise IT to the (literal) edge, from using autonomous vehicles guided by artificial intelligence (AI) to vast sensor networks that rely on 5G for instant connectivity and emergency reaction times. Whether it's the Internet-of-Things (IoT), fog computing or edge computing, the intent is to bring computing resources like processing power and storage closer to the end user or data source to improve the ability to scale, responsiveness and the overall service experience.

    We can look at the edge as the newest IT footprint, becoming an extension of the data center just like bare-metal, virtual environments, private cloud and public cloud. In a sense, edge computing is a summation of the other four footprints, blending pieces from each to create infrastructure aimed at tackling specific customer demands that traditional IT models cannot address.

  • Enterprise open source software is growing within innovative companies

    Red Hat has been at the forefront of the global open source discussion, fighting for software freedom in the U.S Supreme Court, and offering free tech products for cloud infrastructure, automation, AI, and much more. After conducting research and interviewing IT leaders from around the world, Red Hat released a report examining the state of enterprise open source in 2020.

    950 IT leaders, unaware that Red Hat was the research sponsor, were surveyed about their practices and opinions on enterprise open source software.

  • Multicluster Management and GitOps Workshop

    There’s so much more to come. In the next few weeks, we’ll dive deeper into customer ideas and finish the design thinking process by producing designs, prototyping them, and finally testing their validity.

    We also want you to join us. To help influence the future of OpenShift, sign up to be notified about research participation opportunities or provide feedback on your experience by filling out this brief survey. If you’d like to attend the next workshop, keep an eye on the OpenShift Commons calendar for upcoming events. Feel free to reach out by email if you have any questions.

Linux Community: Stop Doing This To Windows 10 And MacOS Users

Unpopular opinion time: dual-booting Windows and Linux on your PC is actually great. I do it and I encourage it. Now, if you’ve read my articles here for the last 18 months or so, this statement may seem shocking. To some Linux users, it may come off as downright sacrilegious. I get it. “Prominent Forbes tech writer ditches Windows (1, 2), starts covering Linux full-time while touting all the benefits Linux has over Windows 10, produces a Linux podcast and YouTube channel, then says using Windows is fine?”

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming: PHP, Scheme, Perl, Python and JavaScript

  • PHP version 7.2.28, 7.3.15 and 7.4.3

    RPMs of PHP version 7.4.3 are available in remi repository for Fedora 32 and remi-php74 repository for Fedora ≥ 30 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 7 (RHEL, CentOS). RPMs of PHP version 7.3.15 are available in remi repository for Fedora 30-31 and remi-php73 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS). RPMs of PHP version 7.2.28 are available in remi-php72 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Scheme

    Scheme is a general-purpose, functional, programming language descended from Lisp and Algol. It is a statically scoped and properly tail-recursive dialect of Lisp. Scheme is a very simple language with a very simple syntax based on s-expressions. Its simplicity is fundamental in making it a popular introductory language. It follows a minimalist design philosophy specifying a small standard core with powerful tools for language extension. This philosophy helps make Scheme a programming language that can be learned over a weekend. Nevertheless, Scheme is a very versatile language being used to write a diverse range of applications such as financial analysis tools, compilers, virtual reality systems, as well as more mundane software. Scheme is used in computing education and research as well as a wide range of industrial applications.

  • Don't like IDEs? Try grepgitvi

    Like most developers, I search and read source code all day long. Personally, I've never gotten used to integrated development environments (IDEs), and for years, I mainly used grep and copy/pasted file names to open Vi(m). Eventually, I came up with this script, slowly refining it as needed.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 48: Survivor and Palindrome Dates

    These are some answers to the Week 48 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • Deprecating or Transferring Mojo::ACME

    While Mojo::ACME was a fun experiment, it has several shortcomings at this point and I’ve officially stopped using it. If someone is interested in maintaining it, and if I’m sufficiently convinced of your credibility since this is a security module after all, I can hand it over. Otherwise I will be marking it as deprecated soon. Some background Mojo::ACME was mostly an experiment for me in learning the ACME (v1) protocol. It was a port of the acme-tiny script to mojo with one significant difference. When used as a plugin in your application it actually could listen for a local connection over websocket from the certificate issuance command to prepare for the authentication challenges. This allowed for zero-downtime intervention-free certificate issuance for your application. It was pretty neat and I’m still proud that it worked. Meanwhile the letsencrypt client, later to be renamed certbot, was in a very painful infancy.

  • KBOS types

    After introducing KBOS I should write about the most fundamental concept in this Perl syntax extension. In fact it's so basic, you could use it even without objects. Of course this is not a full fledged type system. Use Raku to get that. Variables with KBOS will stay your perly whatever data container. But like in Moose or Zydeco, you want to verify data - if its consistent with your expectation. And you don't want to write the checking code lines over and over, plus they pollute method logic anyway. One of the advantages to have objects in the first place is to be sure, that the attributes obey requirements and you do not have to check them at every function all.

  • Let’s Build A Simple Interpreter. Part 18: Executing Procedure Calls
  • PyCharm 2020.1 EAP 4

    We have a new Early Access Program (EAP) version of PyCharm that can be now downloaded from our website. We’ve been hard at work making PyCharm easier to use and adding and improving features to get PyCharm 2020.1 ready for release. We have some good ones for you to try in this build. This EAP also includes loads of fixes from the IntelliJ Platform teams.

  • No Python 2 On Upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Version!

    Python 2 will no longer be available on upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS version”, said by Matthias Klose. The team canonical had a very long discussion and came to a decision to remove Python 2 from Focal Fossa. The exact words are, Sorry for delaying that email. Based on some discussions, we are going forward with the Python2 removal.Matthias Klose

  • Android home screen widgets in HTML and JS

    I like having the news headlines on my phone’s home screen. (Well, on the screen to the right.) It helps me keep up with what’s going on in the world. But it’s hard to find a simple headline home screen widget which isn’t full of ads or extra frippery or images or tracking; I just want headlines, plain text, not unpleasantly formatted, and high-density. I don’t want to see three headlines; I’d rather see ten. I tried a whole bunch of news headline home screen widgets and they’re all terrible; not information-dense enough, or they are but they’re ugly, or they insist on putting pictures in, or they display a ton of other information I don’t want.

SharkLinux – Virtualization and cloud compatible Linux distro

Today, we are going to take a look at a specialized Linux distro, SharkLinux. It is a cloud compatible and virtualization Linux distro that you can use in the cloud. SharkLinux is an Ubuntu-based distribution featuring the MATE desktop and is best aimed for sysadmin testing, developers, and virtualization hobbyists. It follows a rolling release model for updates. Read more

Events: WordPress Livestream, SUSECon, JupyterCon, LibrePlanet

  • Pop-Up Livestream on February 22

    This should be a great way to get to hear from some speakers who have yet to share their knowledge on a global stage. WordPress is enriched by a multitude of experiences and perspectives, and I hope you are as excited as I am to hear new voices from a part of the world that is frequently underrepresented in the WordPress open source project.

  • Get Expert Guided Hands-On Experience at the SUSECON 2020 Pre-Conference Workshops
  • Get Certified During SUSECON 2020
  • JupyterCon 2020 is a go!

    Just over a year ago, Project Jupyter announced it was reevaluating its annual community conference. An advisory committee of volunteers recommended a JupyterCon 2020 emphasizing a focus on access and leadership. We are now thrilled to announce a global Jupyter conference...

  • Announcing JupyterCon 2020

    NumFOCUS is excited to be a part of JupyterCon 2020. JupyterCon will be held August 10 – 14 in Berlin, Germany at the Berlin Conference Center.

  • Hot off the presses: a sneak peek at the LibrePlanet 2020 schedule

    LibrePlanet 2020 is organized by the FSF. Hundreds of people from across the globe will converge to explore this year's theme, "Free the Future." We'll be delving into the threats to user freedom that we've all been reading about every day in the media, as well as the unique role the free software movement plays in solving these problems. In addition to the first keynote we announced last month, Brewster Kahle, LibrePlanet 2020 will feature a panoply of presentations. Our lineup includes some talks we absolutely can't wait to see, and we think you'll feel the same way! You can now dive in to the speakers already confirmed and start planning your itinerary. [...] LibrePlanet 2020 offers lots of opportunities for socializing, too! The annual FSF open house will take place on the evening of Friday, March 13th, at the FSF office. And the LibrePlanet Saturday night party will feature a sparkling new location. As we have in the past, we'll organize a dinner specifically for women, genderqueer, nonbinary, and gender non-conforming attendees, please mail campaigns@fsf.org if you're interested in joining. If you are looking to organize your own dinner or meetup, you can do so using the LibrePlanet wiki 2020 conference social and dinner pages as a central place for communication about this.

Graphics: RADV Vulkan Driver, Intel Codecs and Defects, NVIDIA Firmware

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Option For Zeroing Out Video Memory

    New to Mesa 20.1-devel is a new option for the Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver to enable zeroing out video memory allocations. This isn't a new concept with other graphics drivers offering similar functionality for zeroing out the vRAM either for security reasons or working around pesky game/app issues. For example, RadeonSI OpenGL zeros out the vRAM for Rocket League to workaround buggy behavior with that game. But zeroing out the video memory normally isn't done by default for all allocations due to performance reasons. With the new flag to zero vRAM allocations for the RADV Vulkan driver it was done by Valve's Samuel Pitoiset. In this case he mentions it's in part for "future work."

  • Intel Gen12/Xe Graphics To Support 12-Bit HEVC/VP9 Decode

    We are learning more about the media engine capabilities with the forthcoming Intel "Gen12" (Xe) Tiger Lake graphics. The documentation for Intel's open-source media-driver that exposes VA-API capabilities on the Linux desktop was recently updated. That updated Intel VA-API Media Driver points to Intel Gen12 dropping VP8 video capabilities but expanding when it comes to 12-bit codec support.

  • Intel Sends Out Latest Patches For Mitigating Graphics Flaw On Ivybridge/Haswell

    It has been one month and a few days since Intel first made public the need for graphics driver patching of Gen 7/7.5 graphics for older Ivybridge / Haswell hardware to fix a graphics hardware flaw. That vulnerability also affected the common Intel Gen9 graphics but there the mitigation was uneventful and quickly merged without causing any performance hit. But for Ivybridge/Haswell one month later the graphics driver mitigation for CVE-2019-14615 is still being addressed. This vulnerability is also known as iGPU Leak by the researchers that discovered it but for the Gen7/Gen7.5 protection the mitigation has been particularly problematic. With the initial Gen7/Gen7.5 patches posted in mid-January there was a huge hit to the graphics performance while Intel worked towards no performance loss.

  • NVIDIA Posts Firmware Needed For Open-Source GeForce 16 Series Acceleration

    As written about last week, in the works for the Linux 5.7 kernel this spring is open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" acceleration for the GeForce 16 series. That code is currently sitting in the Nouveau development tree until landing in DRM-Next for Linux 5.7, but NVIDIA has now posted the necessary firmware binaries needed for enabling the hardware acceleration on these Turing GPUs.