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Sunday, 17 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 1+ Year Running Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 2 Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:38am
Story Lunar Linux 1.7.0 (i686 & x86_64) ISO’s released Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:03am
Story Most Popular Desktop Video Player: VLC Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 5:31pm
Story 'One frickin' user interface for Linux' Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:12pm
Story A Dell 4K laptop with Linux: Tough construction and built for developers. Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 8:29am
Story Android (Linux) is creating more jobs than iPhone Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 7:53pm
Story Cinnamon PPA will no longer be maintained for Ubuntu users Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:44am
Story CyanogenMod support arrives for Amazon Kindle Fire HD Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2014 - 10:54am
Story Dell launches Android-based Venue tablets at Computex 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 03/06/2014 - 5:33pm
Story Elementary OS Freya Beta 1 Available For Developers And Testers Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 4:33am

3D Subscription software driving move to open source

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

3D software makers' move to subscription models is pushing people to use open-source software because users are fed up with the price and neurotic terms and conditions.

For a while now professional 3D software like 3DMax, Maya, AutoCAD (Autodesk) and Substance Painter (Adobe) are only available on a monthly or yearly subscription basis which means that you cannot get your paws on a perpetual license for these industry-standard 3D tools anymore, cannot offline install or activate the tools, and the tools also phone home every few days over the internet to see whether you have "paid your rent".

This means if you stop paying your "rent" the software shuts down, leaving you unable to even look at any 3D project files you may have created with software.

But this has created so much frustration, concern and anxiety among 3D content creators that, increasingly, everybody is trying to replace their commercial 3D software with Open Source 3D tools.

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GNU: denemo 2.3, Guix on CentOS 7 and GNU World Order

Filed under
GNU

Intel: oneAPI and IWD 1.1

Filed under
OSS
  • Intel Releases oneAPI Base Toolkit Beta For Performance-Focused, Cross-Device Software

    The oneAPI Base Toolkit is for writing code that runs across CPUs, GPUs, and FPGAs among other possible accelerators. The primary programming language is their Data Parallel C++ and SYCL fits into the toolchain as well. OpenMP and MPI are supported with the oneAPI HPC toolkit. While other components include the oneAPI IoT Toolkit for developing IoT software and the oneAPI rendering toolkit for ray-tracing and visual rendering. The different toolkits can be found here.

  • IWD 1.1 Released For Intel's Linux Wireless Daemon

    IWD 1.0 stabilized this wireless daemon's interfaces and made it ready for embedded and desktop use-cases as an alternative to the likes of WPA-Supplicant. With IWD 1.1 are just a few changes amounting to some basic fixes while the new feature is radio resource management.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • What is -pipe and should you use it?

    This argument may have been needed in the ye olden times of supporting tens of broken commercial unixes. Nowadays the only platform where this might make a difference is Windows, given that its file system is a lot slower than Linux's. But is its pipe implementation any faster? I don't know, and I'll let other people measure that.

    The "hindsight is perfect" design lesson to be learned

    Looking at this now, it is fairly easy to see that this command line option should not exist. Punting the responsibility of knowing whether files or pipes are faster (or even work) on any given platform to the user is poor usability. Most people don't know that and performance characteristics of operating systems change over time. Instead this should be handled inside the compiler with logic roughly like the following:

  • ABlog v0.10 released¶

    ABlog v0.10 is released with the main focus being to support the latest version of Sphinx as well as Python 3 only support.

    Ablog V0.9.X will no longer be supported as Python 2 comes to an end in a few months and it is time people upgraded.

  • How and why I built Sudoku Solver

    The process was pretty intensive first of all i went to the drawing board thinking of how to actually do this i drew a 3x3 matrix and thought how it could be done on this miniature matrix of 3x3.But figuring out the right path was difficult and to get inspiration or an idea as to how to solve this problem I started solving sudoku problems on my own easy to expert level but once I got a hang of them I got back to my project I noted down every technique or idea in the notebook that I always carried with me,I made sure not too look this up on google I wanted to build this thing from scratch on my own.Experimenting day after day lines of code stacking up it took me 15 days to complete the code and the moment correctly filled sudoku matrix was given out well I was on cloud nine.

  • Unconventional Secure and Asynchronous RESTful APIs using SSH

    Some time ago, in a desperate search for asynchronicity, I came across a Python package that changed the way I look at remote interfaces: AsyncSSH.

    Reading through their documentation and example code, you’ll find an interesting assortment of use cases. All of which take advantage of the authentication and encryption capabilities of SSH, while using Python’s asyncio to handle asynchronous communications.

    Thinking about various applications I’ve developed over the years, many included functions that could benefit from decoupling into separate services. But at times, I would avoid it due to security implications.

    I wanted to build informative dashboards that optimize maintenance tasks. But they bypassed business logic, so I wouldn’t dare expose them over the same interfaces. I even looked at using HTTPS client certs, but support from REST frameworks seemed limited.

Review: Emmabuntüs DE3-1.00

Filed under
Reviews

It was recently pointed out to me that I have never written a review of the Emmabuntüs distribution and I was asked to address this oversight. With that in mind, I downloaded the latest version of this Debian-based, desktop distribution. Emmabuntüs features the Xfce desktop and runs on packages provided by Debian 10 "Buster". The project, which is designed to be run on older or used computers in order to extended their usefulness, is available in 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds.

The distribution strives to lower the bar for trying Linux by providing support for multiple languages and using the friendly Calamares installer to set up the operating system. I downloaded the 64-bit version of Emmabuntüs which is a hefty 3.1GB.

Booting from the Emmabuntüs media brings up a boot menu asking us to pick our preferred language from a list. Then we are asked if we want to try the distribution's live desktop or launch either a text-based or graphical installer. The installer options launch Debian's text and graphical installers, respectively. The Try option launches a live desktop environment running the Xfce 4.12 desktop. I decided to use the live desktop to test the distribution before installing it.

When the Xfce desktop first loads we are shown a series of welcome windows. The first one just displays a short greeting. The next one invites us to change our keyboard's layout (the default mapping is US). Another pop-up asks if we want to turn on a number of features. These include enabling a dock, activating the taskbar, activating the workspace, and enabling a dark theme. To be frank, I'm not sure what the utility means by activating the workspace and none of the options are explained. Enabling the dock gives us a macOS style launcher at the bottom of the screen and the other two options did not appear to have any significant effect whether turned on or not.

The next window offers to install Flash and media codecs. It will then try to download and install these packages while we wait. When it is done, another welcome window appears. This one displays a grid of buttons that provide short-cuts to on-line documentation and a forum, a local PDF with tips on using Debian, and quick access to the software manager, settings panel, and some convenience tools. I will talk about these features later.

A panel at the top of the Xfce desktop holds the application menu, task switcher, and the system tray. In the upper-right corner is a menu we can use to logout or shutdown the computer. Icons on the desktop offer to run the Calamares installer, run an uninstaller, launch the Disks utility to partition the hard drive, and open a tool to change the keyboard layout. There is also an icon for opening a tool to repair the boot loader. The concept of an uninstaller intrigued me since usually people do not remove operating systems so much as remove their partition or install over them. I tested this tool and found the uninstaller will search for partitions with an operating system installed and then offer to format the selected partition with either the NTFS or ext3 filesystem.

The live environment, once we navigate through the welcome windows, worked well for me. Xfce was responsive and straight forward to use. My hardware was working well with the distribution and I was happy to move ahead with running the installer.

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OSMC's November update is here with Kodi 18.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

OSMC's November update is now here with Kodi v18.5. Please be aware that there are currently issues with the TVDB scraper. This is not related to the update and we expect these issues to be resolved shortly.

We continue our development for 3D Frame Packed (MVC) output for Vero 4K / 4K + and a significantly improved video stack which will land before the end of the year.

Our work on preparing Raspberry Pi 4 support continues.

Team Kodi recently announced the 18.5 point release of Kodi Leia. We have now prepared this for all supported OSMC devices and added some improvements and fixes.

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LibreOffice 6.4 beta 1 is available

Filed under
LibO

LibreOffice 6.4 beta 1 is available for downloading now. There are builds for all main OS for 64 bit.

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One Last RC of Linux 5.4, New Features and Linux 5.5

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.4-rc8
    I'm not entirely sure we need an rc8, because last week was pretty
    calm despite the Intel hw workarounds landing. So I considered just
    making a final 5.4 and be done with it, but decided that there's no
    real downside to just doing the rc8 after having a release cycle that
    took a while to calm down.
    
    But it *has* calmed down, and I expect the upcoming week to be quiet
    too (knock wood).
    
    In fact, considering that the week after that is Thanksgiving week in
    the US, I'm hoping that most of the pull requests I get next week
    aren't fixes for 5.4, but people sending me early pull requests for
    when the merge window for 5.5 opens. That way those proactive
    developers can then sit back and relax during that turkey-filled
    feast...
    
    Anyway, looking at the rc8 diffs, the bulk of it is for the intel hw
    issues, both on the CPU side (TSX Async Abort, and the iTLB multihit
    thing), and on the GPU side (GPU hang and invalid accesses). None of
    the patches are big, and honestly, shouldn't affect anybody.
    
    The other noticeable thing in the diffs is the removal of the vboxsf
    filesystem. It will get resubmitted properly later, there was nothing
    obviously wrong with it technically, it just ended up in the wrong
    location and submitted at the wrong time. We'll get it done properly
    probably during 5.5.
    
    Outside of those two areas, there's some kvm fixes, and some minor
    core networking, VM and VFS fixes. And various random small things.
    
    Nothing really looks all that worrisome from a release standpoint, and
    as mentioned I was toying with just skipping this rc entirely. But
    better safe than sorry.
    
    Please do go give the tires a final few kicks before the expected 5.4
    release next weekend.
    
    Thanks,
    
    Linus
    
    
  • Linux 5.4-rc8 Released - Things Are Calm For Linux 5.4's Debut Next Week

    As expected, Linus Torvalds opted for doing a 5.4-rc8 kernel release today rather than going straight to Linux 5.4 stable. However, he says he could have just as well done the stable kernel release thanks to the cycle settling down.

    Linus decided to release Linux 5.4-rc8 and then ship Linux 5.4.0 next Sunday to allow for extra testing. But he wouldn't mind if kernel maintainers begin sending in their Linux 5.5 pull requests early especially since the week after next is the US Thanksgiving week.

  • The Exciting Linux 5.4 Changes From exFAT Support To Intel Tiger Lake Graphics

    It's possible this afternoon Linus Torvalds will release Linux 5.4 stable but considering his communications in recent weeks and many changes still flowing in this week, it's more than likely he will divert and release Linux 5.4-rc8 today and then ship this next stable kernel update on the next Sunday.

  • Linux 5.5 Should Bring Another Power Management Improvement For Intel Ice Lake

    The upcoming Linux 5.5 kernel cycle should bring an improvement for power management on Intel's latest-generation Ice Lake processors.

    With my Dell XPS 7390 Ice Lake Core i7 testing the power management has been quite good, but it looks like Linux 5.5 will be even better. On Saturday this commit was staged as part of USB testing code ahead of the upcoming Linux 5.5 merge window.

New challenges for Free Software business models

Filed under
GNU
OSS

This year the FSFE community meeting was combined with the “South Tyrol Free Software Conference” (SFScon) in Bolzano. For me this was a special event because the first international FSFE community meeting ever happened as well at the SFScon in 2006. Back then I met many people from FSFE in person for the first time. For me this was the starting point for getting more and more involved in the Free Software Foundation Europe.

At this years conference I gave a talk about the “New challenges for Free Software business models” at the FSFE track. A few weeks ago I published a article about this topic in the German Linux Magazine. As many of you may know, Free Software as such is not a business model but a license model which can be combined with many different business and development models.

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The 15 Best Linux Bootloader for Home and Embedded Systems

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A bootloader is a small but mandatory software program that allows your CPU to boot your operating system correctly. Bootloaders come in all sorts of variations, each with their trademark features and specific target architecture. Since Linux powers a wide variety of computer hardware, different types of Linux bootloaders exist. So, it’s quite impossible for many starting Linux users to determine the best Linux boot manager for their application. That’s why we’ve curated this research-intensive list of 15 widely used bootloaders. Stay with us to discover the best one for your needs.

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Announcing extrepo

Filed under
Debian

While there is a tool to enable package signatures in Debian packages, the dpkg tool does not enforce the existence of such signatures, and therefore it is possible for an attacker to replace the (signed) .deb file with an unsigned variant, bypassing the whole signature.

In an effort to remedy this whole situation, I looked at creating extrepo, a package that would download repository metadata from a special-purpose repository, verify the signatures placed on that metadata, and if everything matches, enable the repository by creating the necessary apt configuration files.

This should allow users to enable external repository "foo" by running extrepo enable foo, rather than downloading a script from foo's website and executing it as root -- or other similarly insecure options.

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Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

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Debian

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" consists of over two months of updates release through the official software repositories. It includes a total of 115 security updates and bug fixes, offering the community the most up-to-date install mediums for the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series.

Debian GNU/Linux 10.2 "Buster" ISO images are now available to download (see download links below) for all supported architectures, including 32-bit (i386), 64-bit (amd64), ARM64 (AArch64), Armel, ARMhf, MIPS, MIPSel (MIPS Little Endian), MIPS64el (MIPS 64-bit Little Endian), PPC64el (PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian), and s390x (IBM System z).

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Zink Benchmarks - Mesa OpenGL Running Over Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the upcoming Mesa 19.3 release one of the big new features is the "Zink" driver that provides a Mesa OpenGL implementation over Vulkan. This in theory allows for a generic OpenGL driver running over Vulkan hardware drivers, but there is a lot of work ahead before it's really a viable option.

Zink is one of the OpenGL-over-Vulkan options to date that in the future could make it so hardware vendors don't need to maintain OpenGL drivers for future hardware generations but instead could just focus on Vulkan and leave it to these generic implementations. However, a lot of work is needed before it's really to that state in being able to replace existing hardware OpenGL drivers.

With Mesa 19.3, Zink only fully supports OpenGL 2.1. Support for OpenGL 3.x/4.x and OpenGL ES 3.0 is still a work-in-progress likely taking at least a few months to get there if not longer. When trying to launch even the Steam client with Zink, Steam was simply crashing.

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Compact Ryzen V1000 system starts at $689 with pre-loaded Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Simply NUC’s compact “Sequoia” computer features a quad-core Ryzen Embedded V1000, 0 to 60°C support, and an 8-32V input. It starts at $689 with 4GB DDR4, a 128GB SSD, 2x mini-DP++, 3x USB, 2x GbE, 2x COM, and pre-installed Ubuntu.

Simply NUC, which distributes Intel NUC systems such as the recent, Apollo Lake based NUC 8 Rugged, has launched its first AMD-powered computer with a semi-rugged embedded system built around the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000. Aimed at edge analytics, electronic kiosks, digital signage, POS, robotics, and industrial computers, the Sequoia is available for pre-order, with shipments due in January.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Monitoring Bandwidth On Linux: Top 5 Tools in 2019

    Don’t we all wish our networks had infinite bandwidth? The reality is, however, that it is often a severely limited resource. Add to that the fact that bandwidth over-utilization can have huge impacts on network performance and we have a recipe for disaster.

    The solution: set up some bandwidth monitoring system. A lot of them are available. Most of them run on Windows, though, and if your OS of choice it Linux, your options are slightly more limited. You still have plenty of options, however, and we’re about to introduce the best tools for bandwidth monitoring on Linux.

    We’ll begin by introducing bandwidth monitoring and explain what it is. Next, we’ll cover the ins and outs of the Simple Network Management Protocol, or SNMP, one of the most-used monitoring technology. Our next order of business will be to have a look a Linux as an operating system but, more specifically, as a platform for monitoring tools. And finally, we’ll briefly review some of the best tools for bandwidth monitoring on Linux and describe their best features.

  • Bangle.js — A Hackable Smartwatch Powered By Google’s TensorFlow

    The world of smartwatches is ruled mostly by the likes of Apple Watch and WearOS-based devices. But we have seen a few attempts from the open-source community, including PineTime and AsteroidOS. Now, the tech world has got something new to play with — an open-source hackable smartwatch called Bangle.js.

    It’s co-developed by NearForm Research and Espruino, which showcased its latest offering to the attendees of the NodeConf 2019. Until now, the two companies provided digital badges at the conference.

  • Can Google’s New Open Source Tool Make Kubernetes Less Painful?

    Google has pushed Skaffold – a command line tool that automates Kubernetes development workflow – out to the developer community, saying the tool is now generally available after 5,000 commits from nearly 150 contributors to the project.

    Kubernetes – the de facto container orchestration standard – has become the linchpin of much cloud-native computing, sitting underneath swathes of cloud-based tools to manage how applications run across a wide range computing environments.

  • Molly de Blanc: Rebellion

    We spend a lot of time focusing on the epic side of free software and user freedom: joys come from providing encrypted communication options to journalists and political dissidents; losses are when IoT devices are used to victimize and abuse.

    I think a lot about the little ways technology interacts with our lives, the threats to or successes for user freedom we encounter in regular situations that anyone can find themselves able to understand: sexting with a secure app, sharing DRM-free piece of media, or having your communications listened to by a “home assistant.”

    When I was writing a talk about ethics and IoT, I was looking for these small examples of the threats posed by smart doorbells. False arrests and racial profiling, deals with law enforcement to monitor neighborhoods, the digital panopticon — these are big deals. I remembered something I read about kids giving their neighbor a pair of slippers for Christmas. This sort of anonymous gift giving becomes impossible when your front door is constantly being monitored. People laughed when I shared this idea with them — that we’re really losing something by giving up the opportunity to anonymously leave presents.

    We are also giving up what my roommate calls “benign acts of rebellion.” From one perspective, making it harder for teenagers to sneak out at night is a good thing. Keeping better tabs on your kids and where they are is a safety issue. Being able to monitor what they do on their computer can prevent descent into objectively bad communities and behavior patterns, but it can also prevent someone from participating in the cultural coming of age narratives that help define who we are as a society and give us points of connection across generations.

  • FOSSA Wins CNBC Upstart 100 Award [Ed: FOSSA can be a misleading name. They merely deal with data about FOSS but are themselves not FOSS but proprietary software.]

    FOSSA, the open source management company, today announced that it has been selected for the prestigious Upstart 100 List, CNBC's annual list of 100 top startups to watch. The Upstart 100 is an exclusive collection of companies that are building brands, raising money and creating jobs on their path to becoming tomorrow's household names. CNBC's selection committee chose FOSSA from more than 600 nominees, scored across eight equally weighted quantitative metrics, including scalability, sales growth and workforce diversity.

  • Fugue Fregot is now open sourced to enhance the experience working with the Rego policy language

    Rego is part of the Open Policy Agent (OPA) policy engine, which Fugue adopted this year as its policy as code implementation for cloud security and compliance.

    Developed as an alternative to Open Policy Agent’s (OPA) built-in interpreter, Fregot provides error handling that is easy to understand and manage with step-by-step debugging.

  • Chrome, Edge, Safari hacked at elite Chinese hacking contest
  • The Relationship Between Open Source Software and Standard Setting

    Standards and open source development are both processes widely adopted in the ICT industry to develop innovative technologies and drive their adoption in the market. Innovators and policy makers assume that a closer collaboration between standards and open source software development would be mutually beneficial. The interaction between the two is however not yet fully understood, especially with regard to how the intellectual property regimes applied by these organisations influence their ability and motivation to cooperate. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the interaction between standard development organisations (SDOs) and open source software (OSS) communities. The analysis is based on 20 case studies, a survey of stakeholders involved in SDOs and OSS communities, an expert workshop, and a comprehensive review of the literature. In the analysis, we differentiate according to the governance of SDOs and OSS communities, but also considering the involved stakeholders and subject matter. We discuss the preconditions, forms and impacts of collaboration, before we eventually focus on the complementarity of the different Intellectual Property Right (IPR) regimes. Finally, we derive policy recommendations addressing SDOs, OSS communities and policy makers.

Programming: OpenBSD, FreddieMeter, Python and More

Filed under
Development
  • [Older] Linux Systems Performance

    Systems performance is an effective discipline for performance analysis and tuning, and can help you find performance wins for your applications and the kernel. However, most of us are not performance or kernel engineers, and have limited time to study this topic. This talk summarizes the topic for everyone, touring six important areas of Linux systems performance: observability tools, methodologies, benchmarking, profiling, tracing, and tuning. Included are recipes for Linux performance analysis and tuning (using vmstat, mpstat, iostat, etc), overviews of complex areas including profiling (perf_events) and tracing (Ftrace, bcc/BPF, and bpftrace/BPF), and much advice about what is and isn't important to learn. This talk is aimed at everyone: developers, operations, sysadmins, etc, and in any environment running Linux, bare metal or the cloud.

  • Martin Pieuchot: The Unknown Plan

    Since I attend OpenBSD hackathons, I hear stories about how crazy are the ports hackathons. So I try my best to look like a porter in order to experience this craziness. I must admit p2k19 was awesome but the craziness of port hackathons is still an enigma to me.

  • Google's AI-powered FreddieMeter can tell if you sing like Queen's frontman

    While Freddie may have sadly bitten the dust, his fame lives on, so much so that Google's Creative Lab has cooked up the FreddieMeter.

    The show must go on! It's an AI-powered thingy which uses its smarts to figure out if one's singing voice has a pitch, melody and timbre to match that of Mercury's champion vocals.

  • What is Python? Powerful, intuitive programming

    Why the Python programming language shines for data science, machine learning, systems automation, web and API development, and more.

  • Ian Ozsvald: Training Courses for 2020 Q1 – Successful Data Science Projects & Software Engineering for Data Scientists
  • The simplest explanation of Decorators in Python

    Before starting about decorators, first, understand that functions in python have below three properties.

  • Basic Data Types in Python 3: Booleans

    Welcome back to our ongoing series of blog posts on basic data types in Python 3! Last time, we explored the functionality of strings. Today, we dive in to another key data type - booleans. Booleans (and "boolean logic") are an important concept in programming, representing the concept of "true" and "false".

    If you're learning Python, you might also want to check out TwilioQuest 3. You'll learn about basic data types like the boolean, and much more about Python programming.

    Ready to learn how to use booleans in Python 3? Let's get started!

Arch Conf 2019 Report

Filed under
GNU
Linux

During the 5th and 6th of October, 21 team members attended the very first internal Arch Conf. We spent 2 days at Native Instruments in Berlin having workshops, discussions and hack sessions together. We even managed to get into, and escape, an escape room!

It was a great and productive weekend which we hope will continue in the next years. Hopefully we will be able to expand on this in the future and include more community members and users.

There is a report available for the workshops and discussions from the conference!

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • What is -pipe and should you use it?

    This argument may have been needed in the ye olden times of supporting tens of broken commercial unixes. Nowadays the only platform where this might make a difference is Windows, given that its file system is a lot slower than Linux's. But is its pipe implementation any faster? I don't know, and I'll let other people measure that. The "hindsight is perfect" design lesson to be learned Looking at this now, it is fairly easy to see that this command line option should not exist. Punting the responsibility of knowing whether files or pipes are faster (or even work) on any given platform to the user is poor usability. Most people don't know that and performance characteristics of operating systems change over time. Instead this should be handled inside the compiler with logic roughly like the following:

  • ABlog v0.10 released¶

    ABlog v0.10 is released with the main focus being to support the latest version of Sphinx as well as Python 3 only support. Ablog V0.9.X will no longer be supported as Python 2 comes to an end in a few months and it is time people upgraded.

  • How and why I built Sudoku Solver

    The process was pretty intensive first of all i went to the drawing board thinking of how to actually do this i drew a 3x3 matrix and thought how it could be done on this miniature matrix of 3x3.But figuring out the right path was difficult and to get inspiration or an idea as to how to solve this problem I started solving sudoku problems on my own easy to expert level but once I got a hang of them I got back to my project I noted down every technique or idea in the notebook that I always carried with me,I made sure not too look this up on google I wanted to build this thing from scratch on my own.Experimenting day after day lines of code stacking up it took me 15 days to complete the code and the moment correctly filled sudoku matrix was given out well I was on cloud nine.

  • Unconventional Secure and Asynchronous RESTful APIs using SSH

    Some time ago, in a desperate search for asynchronicity, I came across a Python package that changed the way I look at remote interfaces: AsyncSSH. Reading through their documentation and example code, you’ll find an interesting assortment of use cases. All of which take advantage of the authentication and encryption capabilities of SSH, while using Python’s asyncio to handle asynchronous communications. Thinking about various applications I’ve developed over the years, many included functions that could benefit from decoupling into separate services. But at times, I would avoid it due to security implications. I wanted to build informative dashboards that optimize maintenance tasks. But they bypassed business logic, so I wouldn’t dare expose them over the same interfaces. I even looked at using HTTPS client certs, but support from REST frameworks seemed limited.

Review: Emmabuntüs DE3-1.00

It was recently pointed out to me that I have never written a review of the Emmabuntüs distribution and I was asked to address this oversight. With that in mind, I downloaded the latest version of this Debian-based, desktop distribution. Emmabuntüs features the Xfce desktop and runs on packages provided by Debian 10 "Buster". The project, which is designed to be run on older or used computers in order to extended their usefulness, is available in 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds. The distribution strives to lower the bar for trying Linux by providing support for multiple languages and using the friendly Calamares installer to set up the operating system. I downloaded the 64-bit version of Emmabuntüs which is a hefty 3.1GB. Booting from the Emmabuntüs media brings up a boot menu asking us to pick our preferred language from a list. Then we are asked if we want to try the distribution's live desktop or launch either a text-based or graphical installer. The installer options launch Debian's text and graphical installers, respectively. The Try option launches a live desktop environment running the Xfce 4.12 desktop. I decided to use the live desktop to test the distribution before installing it. When the Xfce desktop first loads we are shown a series of welcome windows. The first one just displays a short greeting. The next one invites us to change our keyboard's layout (the default mapping is US). Another pop-up asks if we want to turn on a number of features. These include enabling a dock, activating the taskbar, activating the workspace, and enabling a dark theme. To be frank, I'm not sure what the utility means by activating the workspace and none of the options are explained. Enabling the dock gives us a macOS style launcher at the bottom of the screen and the other two options did not appear to have any significant effect whether turned on or not. The next window offers to install Flash and media codecs. It will then try to download and install these packages while we wait. When it is done, another welcome window appears. This one displays a grid of buttons that provide short-cuts to on-line documentation and a forum, a local PDF with tips on using Debian, and quick access to the software manager, settings panel, and some convenience tools. I will talk about these features later. A panel at the top of the Xfce desktop holds the application menu, task switcher, and the system tray. In the upper-right corner is a menu we can use to logout or shutdown the computer. Icons on the desktop offer to run the Calamares installer, run an uninstaller, launch the Disks utility to partition the hard drive, and open a tool to change the keyboard layout. There is also an icon for opening a tool to repair the boot loader. The concept of an uninstaller intrigued me since usually people do not remove operating systems so much as remove their partition or install over them. I tested this tool and found the uninstaller will search for partitions with an operating system installed and then offer to format the selected partition with either the NTFS or ext3 filesystem. The live environment, once we navigate through the welcome windows, worked well for me. Xfce was responsive and straight forward to use. My hardware was working well with the distribution and I was happy to move ahead with running the installer. Read more

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