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Monday, 22 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 1+ Year Running Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 2 Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:38am
Story Lunar Linux 1.7.0 (i686 & x86_64) ISO’s released Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:03am
Story Most Popular Desktop Video Player: VLC Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 5:31pm
Story 'One frickin' user interface for Linux' Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:12pm
Story A Dell 4K laptop with Linux: Tough construction and built for developers. Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 8:29am
Story Android (Linux) is creating more jobs than iPhone Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 7:53pm
Story Cinnamon PPA will no longer be maintained for Ubuntu users Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:44am
Story CyanogenMod support arrives for Amazon Kindle Fire HD Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2014 - 10:54am
Story Dell launches Android-based Venue tablets at Computex 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 03/06/2014 - 5:33pm
Story Elementary OS Freya Beta 1 Available For Developers And Testers Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 4:33am

One Mix 1S Yoga mini laptop Linux test

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I took a loaded up a few different GNU/Linux distributions onto USB flash drives, booted into them (by pressing F7 on the One Mix 1S Yoga at the boot splash screen), and checked to see what works out of the box, and what doesn’t.

Here’s what I found.

Priced at about $440, the One Mix 1S Yoga is one of the most affordable laptops around with a screen size smaller than 7 inches.

But it’s also one of the newest models, and I’m not aware of any custom GNU/Linux distributions optimized for this particular computer yet. The folks behind Ubuntu MATE, for example, offer a custom version of that operating system that’s designed for UMPC (Ultra Mobile PC) computers including the GPD Pocket, GPD Pocket 2, GPD MicroPC, and Topjoy Falcon. But it doesn’t yet seem to support the One Mix 1S Yoga (the operating system loads fine, but some of the display tweaks don’t work).

Still, while the out-of-the-box experience with most Linux-based operating systems I’ve tested so far is imperfect, it’s also promising.

Read more

Compute module and SBC showcase Cortex-A7/M4 processor

Filed under
Android
Linux

Emtrion’s “emSBC argon” SBC is powered by an “emSTAMP-Argon” module that runs Linux or Android on a dual-core Cortex-A7 STM32MP157 SoC and offers dual CAN ports.

Germany-based Emtrion has posted a product page for a compute module and SBC equipped with the new STM32MP1 system-on-chip from STMicroelectronics (ST). Like the Renesas RZ/N1D SoC that powers Emtrion’s SBC-RZN1D, the STM32MP1 on Emtrion’s emSTAMP-Argon module combines a pair of 650MHz Cortex-A7 cores with a Cortex-M MCU, in this case a 209MHz Cortex-M4. Unlike the monolithic SBC-RZN1D, the emSBC argon SBC is a sandwich-style product that integrates the emSTAMP-Argon module using an edge-castellated “stamp hole” interface.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Weekly Roundup #35

    Hello and welcome to this week's Linux Roundup and what a wonderful week we had!

    We have plenty of Linux Distro releases and LibreOffice 6.3 RC1.

    The Linux distros with releases this week are Q4OS 3.8, SparkyLinux 5.8, Mageia 7.1, ArcoLinux 19.07.11, Deepin 15.11, ArchBang 2107-beta, Bluestar 5.2.1, Slackel 7.2 "Openbox" and Endeavour OS 2019.07.15.

    I looked at most of these Linux Distros, links below, I will look at some of them in the new week and some I will unfortunately not have a look at, for download links and more, please visit distrowatch.com

    Well, this is this week's Linux Roundup, thank you so much for your time! Have a great week!

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #140
  • Christopher Allan Webber: ActivityPub Conf 2019

    That's right! We're hosting the first ever ActivityPub Conf. It's immediately following Rebooting Web of Trust in Prague.

    There's no admission fee to attend. (Relatedly, the conference is kind of being done on the cheap, because it is being funded by organizers who are themselves barely funded.) The venue, however, is quite cool: it's at the DOX Centre for Contemporary Art, which is itself exploring the ways the digital world is affecting our lives.

    If you plan on attending (and maybe also speaking), you should get in your application soon (see the flier for details). We've never done one of these, and we have no idea what the response will be like, so this is going to be a smaller gathering (about 40 people). In some ways, it will be somewhere between a conference and a gathering of people-who-are-interested-in-activitypub.

    As said in the flier, by attending, you are agreeing to the code of conduct, so be sure to read that.

Sysadmin Appreciation Day, IBM and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Gift ideas for Sysadmin Appreciation Day

    Sysadmin Appreciation Day is coming up this Friday, July 26. To help honor sysadmins everywhere, we want you to share your best gift ideas. What would be the best way a team member or customer could show their appreciation for you? As a sysadmin, what was the best gift you've ever received? We asked our writers the same question, and here are their answers:

    "Whilst working in the Ubuntu community on Edubuntu, I took it upon myself to develop the startup/shutdown sound scheme, which became the default in Ubuntu for, from what I can understand, the next decade. Whilst people had a love-hate relationship with my sound scheme, and rightly so, I had a love-hate relationship with my sound card during the development.

    At the time I had recorded all my sound samples using one sample rate, but my new sound card, as my motherboard had exploded a few days earlier, did not support it. I had two choices, resample all my samples (which I didn't really want to do) or buy a new sound card.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform with Red Hat Ceph Storage: Radosbench baseline performance evaluation

    Red Hat Ceph Storage is popular storage for Red Hat OpenStack Platform. Customers around the world run their hyperscale, production workloads on Red Hat Ceph Storage and Red Hat OpenStack Platform. This is driven by the high level of integration between Ceph storage and OpenStack private cloud platforms. With each release of both platforms, the level of integration has grown and performance and automation has increased. As the customer's storage and compute needs for footprints have grown, we have seen more interest towards running compute and storage as one unit and providing a hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) layer based on OpenStack and Ceph.

    [...]

    Continuing the benchmarking series, in the next post you’ll learn performance insights of running multi-instance MySQL database on Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage across decoupled and hyperconverged architectures. We’ll also compare results from a near-equal environment backed by all-flash cluster nodes.

  • The State of Java in Flathub

    For maintainers of Java-based applications in Flathub, it's worth noting that even if you consume the Latest OpenJDK extension in your application, users will not be broken by major updates because OpenJDK is bundled into your Flatpak. The implication of this for users is that they won't see updates to their Java version until the application maintainer rebuilds the application in Flathub.

    If you maintain a Java-based Flatpak application on Flathub, you can consume the latest version of your chosen OpenJDK stream (either LTS or Latest) simply by rebuilding; the latest version of that OpenJDK steam will be pulled in automatically.

  • Fedora Magazine: Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.1. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, Jul 22, 2019 through Monday, Jul 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Bootstrappable Debian BoF

    Greetings from DebConf 19 in Curitiba! Just a quick reminder that I will run a Bootstrappable Debian BoF on Tuesday 23rd, at 13.30 Brasilia time (which is 16.30 UTC, if I am not mistaken). If you are curious about bootstrappability in Debian, why do we want it and where we are right now, you are welcome to come in person if you are at DebCon or to follow the streaming.

  • Candy Tsai: Outreachy Week 6 – Week 7: Getting Code Merge

    You can’t overhear what others are doing or learn something about your colleagues through gossip over lunch break when working remotely. So after being stuck for quite a bit, terceiro suggested that we try pair programming.

    After our first remote pair programming session, I think there should be no difference in pair programming in person. We shared the same terminal, looked at the same code and discussed just like people standing side by side.

    Through our pair programming session, I found out that I had a bad habit. I didn’t run tests on my code that often, so when I had failing tests that didn’t fail before, I spent more time debugging than I should have. Pair programming gave insight to how others work and I think little improvements go a long way.

  • about your wiki page on I/O schedulers and BFQ
    Hi,
    this is basically to report outdated statements in your wiki page on
    I/O schedulers [1].
    
    The main problematic statement is that BFQ "...  is not ideal for
    devices with slow CPUs or high throughput I/O devices" because too
    heavy.  BFQ is definitely more sophisticated than any of the other I/O
    schedulers.  We have designed it that way to provide an incomparably
    better service quality, at a very low overhead.  As reported in [2],
    the execution time of BFQ on an old laptop CPU is 0.6 us per I/O
    event, against 0.2 us for mq-deadline (which is the lightest Linux I/O
    scheduler).
    
    To put these figures into context, BFQ proved to be so good for
    "devices with slow CPUs" that, e.g., Chromium OS migrated to BFQ a few
    months ago.  In particular, Google crew got convinced by a demo [3] I
    made for them, on one of the cheapest and slowest Chromebook on the
    market.  In the demo, a fast download is performed.  Without BFQ, the
    download makes the device completely unresponsive.  With BFQ, the
    device remains as responsive as if it was totally idle.
    
    As for the other part of the statement, "...  not ideal for ...  high
    throughput I/O devices", a few days ago I ran benchmarks (on Ubuntu)
    also with one of the fastest consumer-grade NVMe SSDs: a Samsung SSD
    970 PRO.  Results [4] can be summarized as follows.  Throughput with
    BFQ is about the same as with the other I/O schedulers (it couldn't be
    higher, because this kind of drives just wants the scheduler to stay
    as aside as possible, when it comes to throughput).  But, in the
    presence of writes as background workload, start-up times with BFQ are
    at least 16 times as low as with the other I/O schedulers.  In
    absolute terms, gnome-terminal starts in ~1.8 seconds with BFQ, while
    it takes at least 28.7 (!) seconds with the other I/O schedulers.
    Finally, only with BFQ, no frame gets lost in video-playing
    benchmarks.
    
    BFQ then provides other important benefits, such as from 5x to 10X
    throughput boost in multi-client server workloads [5].
    
    So, is there any chance that the outdated/wrong information on your
    wiki page [1] gets updated somehow?  If I may, I'd be glad to update
    it myself, after providing you with all the results you may ask.
    
    In addition, why doesn't Ubuntu too consider switching to BFQ as
    default I/O scheduler, for all drives that BFQ supports (namely all
    drives with a maximum speed not above ~500 KIOPS)?
    
    Looking forward to your feedback,
    Paolo
    
    
  • Should Ubuntu Use The BFQ I/O Scheduler?

    The BFQ I/O scheduler is working out fairly well these days as shown in our benchmarks. The Budget Fair Queueing scheduler supports both throughput and low-latency modes while working particularly well for consumer-grade hardware. Should the Ubuntu desktop be using BFQ by default?

    [...]

    But in addition to wanting to correct that Wiki information, Paolo pops the question of why doesn't Ubuntu switch to BFQ as the default I/O scheduler for supported drives. Though as of yet, no Ubuntu kernel developers have yet commented on the prospect of switching to BFQ.

Devices With Linux Support

Filed under
Hardware
  • Quest Releases KACE SDA & SMA Updates

    The update to 7.0 for KACE Systems Deployment Appliance is primarily about bringing a scope of endpoint management capabilities with new support for Linux devices to the table.

  • Rugged, Kaby Lake transport computer has a 10-port LAN switch with PoE

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready “tBOX400-510-FL” transportation system has a 7th Gen Intel CPU and a 10-port managed switch with 8x M12-style 10/100Mbps PoE and 2x GbE ports. The rugged system also has 3x mini-PCIe slots and dual swappable SATA drives.

    Axiomtek has launched a fanless, Kaby Lake-U based transportation computer with a choice of power supplies designed for in-vehicle, marine, or railway applications. The rugged tBOX400-510-FL features a Qualcomm-driven, Layer 2 managed PoE switch with support for IP surveillance and video management applications. “Customers can connect IP cameras directly without installing an extra PoE switch, minimizing overall deployment costs and installation space onboard,” stated Axiomtek product manager Sharon Huang.

Software: Open Build Service (OBS) and Spotify 'App'

Filed under
Software
  • Introducing Open Build Service, Version 2.10

    We are pleased to announce the availability of Open Build Service (OBS) version 2.10!

    After more than one year of development, this new version of OBS brings a revamped web user interface, improved support for shipping your software in containers and integrating your package builds with source code management systems like GitLab and Pagure.

  • Spotify’s Snap App Was Outdated, But Now It Isn’t

    I’ll be honest: when Spotify arrived on the Snap store I thought: “hurrah”.

    Hurrah for an easier way to install the music streaming client (no need to futz around adding the Spotify repository like in the past) and hurrah for automatic background updates that ensure I’m always running the latest release.

    At least, that was the theory.

    Alas, the official Spotify for Linux Snap package has not been updated since April of this year.

    “Oh,” I thought, “I guess there hasn’t been an update to the Spotify Linux desktop client since then!”

    But there has — several updates, in fact!

KDE: Sponsorship, GSoC and KDE Connect

Filed under
KDE
  • Couture Becomes a KDE Patron

    enioka Haute Couture is a software development house that creates complete and tailor-made solutions. enioka strives to return ownership of the software development and innovation to its customers. To that effect, it co-creates the software with its customers' teams to allow them to retain control of their projects in complex systems or organizations.

    "We are excited to welcome enioka Haute Couture as a Patron of KDE. They truly understand what it means to empower people when creating software; something KDE cares deeply about", said Lydia Pintscher, President of KDE e.V.

  • GSoC Milestone Update 1.1

    The second part of Milestone 1 for my Google Summer of Code 2019’s project porting KDE Connect to Windows involves enabling the SFTP plugin that ships in the linux build.

    The plugin allows you to navigate through your mobile device’s files (like you do with a file manager) ON YOUR DESKTOP! It makes use of sshfs to allow mounting the remote file system on your desktop. After that, you can use any file manager you like; heck, you can even use your terminal to have a walk through your mobile’s files. Once that is done, you can do literally anything with the mobile device’s files as you would do with the local filesystem: move files, copy them to your desktop machine, delete them, rename, anything!

  • KDE Connect sprint 2019

    From friday the 19th to sunday the 21st, we had the KDE Connect sprint. It's always a nice opportunity to meet the others working on KDE Connect, since we usually only talk to each other online.

  • KDE Connect is Being Ported to Windows 10

    Google Summer of Code 2019 is proving to be a bumper one for KDE Connect, the open source Android-to-PC integration suite.

    Last week we reported on the progress made by a GSoC student on KDE Connect for Mac. This week we bring word on a new KDE Connect Windows port.

    “Wait, isn’t KDE Connect already available for Windows?”, you might (rightly) ask — and the answer is yes, kind of!

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (bind9, exiv2, kernel, nss, openjdk-11, openjdk-8, patch, and squid3), Fedora (gvfs, libldb, and samba), Mageia (firefox, gvfs, libreswan, rdesktop, and thunderbird), openSUSE (bzip2, clementine, dbus-1, expat, fence-agents, firefox, glib2, kernel, kernel-firmware, ledger, libqb, libu2f-host, pam_u2f, libvirt, neovim, php7, postgresql10, python-requests, python-Twisted, ruby-bundled-gems-rpmhelper, ruby2.5, samba, webkit2gtk3, zeromq, and znc), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, rh-maven35-jackson-databind, rh-nodejs8-nodejs, and rh-redis5-redis), Slackware (kernel), and SUSE (ucode-intel).

  • VLC Player hit by buffer overflow vulnerability

    A security researcher has warned of a serious vulnerability in VideoLAN's VLC Player (VLC), a popular media playback tool, for which no patch is yet available.

  • Critical flaw in VLC Player affecs Linux, Windows and UNIX apps

    GERMAN SECURITY AGENCY CERT-Bund has uncovered a critical flaw n VLC Media Player that could enable hackers to access and modify data on devices.

Forget Windows, Linux or MacOS: Try these alternative operating systems

Filed under
OS

While Linux is a recreation of UNIX, FreeBSD is more of a continuation. It was initially developed by students working from a Research Unix source license obtained by the University of California Berkeley – the 'BSD' bit stands for Berkeley Software Distribution. The only reason it's not called BSD Unix is that pesky trademark and licensing gremlin.

The OS runs on its own kernel, and all of its key components have been developed as part of a single whole. Linux, on the other hand, is just the kernel; the rest of it is supplied by third parties so it lacks BSD's overall coherency.

This is a highly complete and very reliable operating system, perfect both for server applications and desktop use. That said, it doesn't come with a GUI by default – the X-window system is thankfully straightforward to install, and there are ports of Linux window managers like Gnome and KDE available.

One final note: BSD forms the core of perhaps the most polished and stable desktop operating system out there in macOS, so you know you're in good hands here.

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Radeon RX 5700 XT: A Handful Of Early Linux Gaming Benchmarks On Ubuntu 18.04

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gaming
Ubuntu

I've already published my thoughts on AMD's new 7nm Navi graphics card lineup. Both the RX 5700 and RX 5700 XT punch above their weight class on Windows and are a compelling alternative to Nvidia's new SUPER series. But how is their performance looking on Linux? Well, that's a bit more difficult to answer since widespread Linux support is still largely absent.

Still, I wanted to fire up the RX 5700 XT on my Ubuntu 18.04 and Ryzen 9 3900X test bench and see how things are shaping up.

The official AMDGPU 19.30 driver package (i.e. from AMD itself) only supports Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS, while solid widespread support for the RX 5700 cards won't arrive until MESA 19.3. However, development is moving very quickly on this.

Your mileage may vary, but I found the "easiest" solution was to install Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, install the official AMD 19.30 packaged driver, then add the Oibaf PPA. A quick sudo apt update / upgrade later, and you should have Mesa 19.2-git which will enable Vulkan support. The situation may have changed over the last several days, but this is how I got mine up and running with performance that is mostly expected.

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Company of Heroes 2 Ported to GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Calculate KS Statistic with Python

    It stands for Kolmogorov–Smirnov which is named after Andrey Kolmogorov and Nikolai Smirnov. It compares the two cumulative distributions and returns the maximum difference between them. It is a non-parametric test which means you don't need to test any assumption related to the distribution of data. In KS Test, Null hypothesis states null both cumulative distributions are similar. Rejecting the null hypothesis means cumulative distributions are different.
    In data science, it compares the cumulative distribution of events and non-events and KS is where there is a maximum difference between the two distributions. In simple words, it helps us to understand how well our predictive model is able to discriminate between events and non-events.

  • Python binding for Kuesa

    KUESA™ is a Qt module designed to load, render and manipulate glTF 2.0 models in applications using Qt 3D.

    Kuesa provides a C++ and a QML API which makes it easy to do things like triggering animations contained in the glTF files, finding camera details defined by the designer, etc.

    It is a great tool so that designers and developers can share glTF based 3D assets.

    With the upcoming release of Kuesa 1.1, we are introducing a python binding for Kuesa. This provides a simple yet powerful way for programmers to integrate glTF content in their python applications with just a few lines of code.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Cris Medina

    I was born in the Dominican Republic. I finished highschool there and went to Puerto Rico to study Computer Engineering, specializing in hardware. But I’ve been writing software in some form since I can remember. My dad introduced me to IBM System 360 Basic as my first language. Go figure!

    Most of my professional career (going on 17 years now) was spent doing test engineering, along with developing all the hardware and software tools required to execute those tests and maintain their infrastructure. The rest of the time I’ve held formal software engineering roles.

    I like to spend some of my free time with music. My mother is a music teacher and she got me into piano early on. Though I moved into string instruments as I got older. Today I mostly play classical guitar, but I own several types of guitars and dabble in other string instruments.

  • Backend support merged

    This has been a very exciting week for me, with lots of progress made on my GSoC project. For the past couple of months I've been working on adding the new scipy.fft module which supercedes the existing scipy.fftpack submodule and adds a range of new features and interface improvements. Chief among these planned features was a backend system, allowing users to install their own fft libraries as implementations for the scipy.fft interface.

Oracle Linux on Btrfs for the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

Oracle Linux 7 has been released for the Raspberry Pi 3. The release packages Btrfs as the root filesystem on the UEK-branded Linux 4.14 Long Term Support (LTS) kernel. A bootable disk image with a minimal install is provided along with a standard ISO installer.

CentOS appears to support only the "Mustang" Applied Micro X-Gene for AArch64, and it provides the older AArch32 environment for all models of the Raspberry Pi. Oracle Linux is a compelling option among RPM distributions in supporting AArch64 for the Pi Model 3.

This is not to say that Oracle AArch64 Linux is without flaw, as Oracle warns that this is "a preview release and for development purposes only; Oracle suggests these not be used in production." The non-functional WiFi device is missing firmware and documentation, which Oracle admits was overlooked. No X11 graphics are included in the image, although you can install them. The eponymous database client (and server) are absent. Oracle has provided a previous example of orphaned software with its Linux for SPARC project, which was abandoned after two minor releases. There's no guarantee that this ARM version will not suffer the same fate, although Oracle has responded that "our eventual target is server class platforms". One possible hardware target is the Fujitsu A64FX, a new server processor that bundles 48 addressable AArch64 cores and 32GB of RAM on one die, asserted to be the "fastest server processor" that exists.

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Here's why Windows 10 users are switching to other platforms

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

People have been dealing with Windows 10 issues since the OS was first introduced in 2015. There are many die-heart Windows fans who prefer to deal with these issues rather than looking for other platforms.

Well, Linux has been around for years but many people are still reluctant to adopt Linux.

Recently, YouTuber Chris Titus Tech published a video to discuss the matter. The video discusses why Windows 10 keeps getting worse with each passing day.

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Nils Brauckmann, SUSE's CEO, Steps Down (The first of many goodbyes)

Filed under
SUSE

I have recently made the decision to retire as the SUSE CEO and subsequently to leave SUSE. I care very deeply for the SUSE business and its employees, and this difficult decision is based entirely on personal reasons. My step down from the SUSE CEO role will be effective August 5.
My decision comes at a positive point in time for SUSE, where the business has completed its journey to becoming standalone and has a solid foundation to continue to accelerate its success and growth as an independent company.
For me personally this means I will have more time to devote myself to other important things in my life.
In FY18, the SUSE business saw record-breaking revenues. This level of growth has only been realized through the whole SUSE Team showing huge commitment to working together to deliver great outcomes. I am extremely proud of what we have achieved collectively over the last eight years, and I have every confidence that SUSE will exceed all future expectations. I will naturally be following the SUSE journey closely during my retirement, and my positive wishes will always be with the company and all connected with it.
As we look to the future I am delighted and, of course, reassured to be passing the SUSE CEO baton to such a talented and accomplished leader as Melissa Di Donato. Melissa has an outstanding track record of growth, leadership and transformation in the tech sector, having enjoyed enormous success as the chief operating officer and chief revenue officer at SAP. Prior to SAP, she held senior executive positions at Salesforce and was recognized for her contribution to growing global organizations by winning the 2018 Digital Masters Award for Excellence in Commercial Management.

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7-Way Linux Distribution Benchmarks For July 2019, Including LTO'ed openSUSE Tumbleweed

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

As it's been a few weeks since last hosting any Linux distribution comparison and now with the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed enabling LTO by default, here are some fresh Linux distribution comparison results plus tossing the newly-released Debian 10.0 into the mix as well. This round of testing included Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu 19.04, Fedora Workstation 30, openSUSE Leap 15.1, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Clear Linux 30450, and Debian 10.0.

This round of benchmarking was done on an Intel Core i9 7980XE with ASUS PRIME X299-A motherboard, 16GB of RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X graphics, and Samsung 970 EVO 500GB NVMe solid-state drive.

The Ubuntu, openSUSE, Fedora, Clear Linux, and Debian releases were all tested following clean installations with all stable release updates present as of testing. Manjaro/Arch isn't in this round of testing due to Manjaro running into issues with Nouveau on the GTX TITAN X present in this test system. Unfortunately I didn't have any very recent openSUSE Tumbleweed benchmark results handy pre-LTO-by-default and with not being aware of any other way to roll-back/archive the Tumbleweed system state, there are just Tumbleweed tests from the latest build after they began defaulting to Link Time Optimizations on their packages. System details below in full for this default/out-of-the-box Linux performance experience comparison.

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