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Friday, 19 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 1+ Year Running Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 2 Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:38am
Story Lunar Linux 1.7.0 (i686 & x86_64) ISO’s released Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:03am
Story Most Popular Desktop Video Player: VLC Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 5:31pm
Story 'One frickin' user interface for Linux' Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:12pm
Story A Dell 4K laptop with Linux: Tough construction and built for developers. Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 8:29am
Story Android (Linux) is creating more jobs than iPhone Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 7:53pm
Story Cinnamon PPA will no longer be maintained for Ubuntu users Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:44am
Story CyanogenMod support arrives for Amazon Kindle Fire HD Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2014 - 10:54am
Story Dell launches Android-based Venue tablets at Computex 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 03/06/2014 - 5:33pm
Story Elementary OS Freya Beta 1 Available For Developers And Testers Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 4:33am

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, Python Podcasts, User Error

Filed under
Interviews
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S12E15 – Diablo

    This week we’ve been buying a new phone and playing with QEMU. We discuss the release fo Debian 10, Ubuntu users saying “Thank you”, Nvidia drivers, WSL and Ubuntu MATE for the GPD MicroPC. We also round up some events and tech news.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 15 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Stuart Langridge are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Episode #139: f"Yes!" for the f-strings
  • Episode #221: Empowering developers by embedding Python

    How do we get kids excited about programming? Make programming tangible with embedded devices. Did you know that after kids learned to code with the BBC micro:bit, 90% of kids "thought coding was for everyone" and 86% said it made CS topics more interesting?

  • Old and Insecure | User Error 70

    Whether Linux is inherently secure, the next phase of online interaction, and wasting our free time.

    Plus where to focus your contributions, and a tricky hypothetical question.

Graphics: Nouveau, Wayland's Weston and Libinput

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Driver Gets A Batch Of Fixes For Linux 5.3

    Originally on Thursday was finally the Nouveau-next 5.3 pull request that offered improvements to the display color management, fixes to Secure Boot on newer hardware, and Turing TU116 mode-setting support. But that was rejected by the DRM maintainers for being way too late as usually the cut-off for new feature material is when hitting RC6 on the previous cycle, just not days before the end of the current merge window. Not that those changes were all too exciting or notable, but this pushes back the color management and other work to Linux 5.4.

    Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs of Red Hat as a result today sent in Nouveau-fixes 5.3. This pull request has support still for the TU116 GPU since that shouldn't regress any existing support as well as having fixes around KMS, a memory leak, and a few other basic fixes.

  • Wayland's Weston Lands A Pipewire Plug-In As New Remote Desktop Streaming Option

    Wayland's Weston compositor for the past year has provided a remoting plug-in for virtual output streaming that was built atop RTP/GStreamer. Now though a new plug-in has landed in the Weston code-base making use of Red Hat's promising PipeWire project.

    The PipeWire plug-in was merged into Weston today and is similar to the GStreamer-powered remoting plug-in but instead leverages PipeWire. The compositor's frames are exported to PipeWire and the same virtual output API is shared between these plug-ins. The virtual outputs can be configured using the weston.ini configuration file. Any PipeWire client in turn can read these frames.

  • Libinput 1.14 RC Arrives With Better Thumb Detection & Dell Canvas Totem Support

    Linux input expert Peter Hutterer of Red Hat shipped the much anticipated release candidate today for libinput 1.14, the open-source input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland systems.

  • libinput 1.13.901
    The first RC for libinput 1.14 is now available.
    
    We have new and improved thumb detection for touchpads, thanks to Matt
    Mayfield. On Clickpad devices this should make interactions where a thumb is
    resting on the touchpad or dropped during an interaction more reliable. A
    summary of the changes can be found here:
    https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/07/libinputs-new-thumb-detection-code.html
    
    The Dell Canvas Totem is now supported by libinput. It is exposed as a new
    tool type through the tablet interface along with two new axes. Note that
    this is only low-level support, the actual integration of the totem needs
    Wayland protocol changes and significant changes in all applications that
    want to make use of it. A summary of the changes can be found here:
    https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/06/libinput-and-dell-canvas-totem.html
    
    Touch-capable tablets now tie both devices together for rotation. If you set
    the tablet to left-handed, the touchpad will be rotated along with the
    tablet. Note that this does not affect the left-handed-ness of the touchpad,
    merely the rotation. 
    
    Tablet proximity out handling for tablets that are unreliably sending
    proximity out events is now always timeout-based. It is no longer necessary
    to add per-device quirks to enable this feature and it is completely
    transparent on devices that work correctly anyway. A summar of the
    changes can be found here:
    https://who-t.blogspot.com/2019/06/libinput-and-tablet-proximity-handling.html
    
    Tablets that send duplicate tools (BTN_TOOL_PEN and BTN_TOOL_ERASER) now
    ignore the latter. This is an intermediate fix only but at least makes those
    tablets more usable than they are now. Issue #259 is the tracker for this
    particular behaviour if you are affected by it.
    
    The handling of kernel fuzz has been slightly improved. Where our udev rule
    fails to reset the fuzz on the kernel device, we disable the hysteresis and
    rely on the kernel now to handle it. Previously our hysteresis would take
    effect on top of the kernel's, causing nonresponsive behaviour.
    
    Note to distribitors: the python-evdev dependency has been dropped, the
    tools that used it are now using python-libevdev instead.
    
    And of course a random assortment of fixes, improvements, etc. Many thanks
    to all contributors and testers.
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    

Powered by Plasma: ALBA Synchrotron in Barcelona, Spain

Filed under
KDE

As you go about your daily tasks, you’re probably unaware that Plasma runs on the computers in one of Europe’s largest research facilities. We were also oblivious – until we met Sergi Blanch-Torné at FOSDEM 2019.

We’re always looking for interesting stories from people who use KDE software at their workplace, in school, or in government institutions. You can imagine our delight, then, when we met Sergi Blanch-Torné at this year’s FOSDEM.

Sergi is a Controls Software Engineer at ALBA, a KDE user, and a Free software advocate and contributor. Not only was he willing to tell us about his favorite KDE apps, but he also works at one of the most amazing places on Earth! In this interview, he tells us what it’s like to work at ALBA, and answers the burning question: “what even is a synchrotron?”.

ALBA is a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility in the Barcelona Synchrotron Park, in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain. Managed by the Consortium for the Construction, Equipping and Exploitation of the Synchrotron Light Source (CELLS), it is jointly funded by the Spanish and the Catalonian Administration.

Read more

Kernel: F2FS, AMDGPU/AMDKFD, RISC-V

Filed under
Linux
  • F2FS Is The Latest Linux File-System With Patches For Case-Insensitive Support

    Following EXT4 getting initial (and opt-in) support for case-insensitive directories/files, the Flash-Friendly File-System has a set of patches pending that extend the case-folding support to this F2FS file-system that is becoming increasingly used by Android smartphones and other devices.

    Sent out today were a revised set of two patches and just 300+ lines of code that implement case-folding support inside the F2FS file-system. This case-folding support for case-insensitive file-name look-ups is based upon the support found within EXT4 on the latest kernels.

  • AMDGPU/AMDKFD Queue Up Early Linux 5.3 Fixes For Navi & More

    While the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window isn't even over until this weekend when it will kick off with 5.3-rc1 and headlining new features like Radeon RX 5700 series support, AMD has already sent in a batch of AMDGPU/AMDKFD fixes. Making these fixes notable are some early fixes around the new open-source Radeon RX "Navi" support.

  • RISC-V's Kernel Support Continues Maturing With Linux 5.3

    With the RISC-V support in Linux 5.3 there is now support for huge-pages, image header support (based on the ARM64 kernel image header), initial page table setup is split into two stages, CONFIG_SOC support has been started with initially catering to the SiFive SoCs, high resolution timers and dynamic ticks have now made it into the default RISC-V 64-bit default configuration, and other low-level work.

deepin 15.11 - Better Never Stops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing a beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users.
deepin is an open source GNU/Linux operating system, based on Linux kernel and mainly on desktop applications, supporting laptops, desktops, and all-in-ones. It preinstalls Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE) and nearly 30 deepin native applications, as well as several applications from the open source community to meet users' daily learning and work needs. In addition, about a thousand applications are offered in Deepin Store to meet users' various requirements.
Welcome to deepin 15.11 release. Compared with deepin 15.10, deepin 15.11 comes with new features - Cloud Sync in Control Center and disc burning function in Deepin File Manager. Besides, kwin window manager was fixed and optimized for better stability and compatibility, and a number of bugs were fixed. In deepin 15.11, you will enjoy smooth and better user experiences!

Read more

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Server Planning A New Means For Automated Installations

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's server team is working on a new means of carrying out automated installations of Ubuntu Server in time for their 20.04 LTS release.

Traditionally Ubuntu Server has supported automated installations in the same manner of Debian as they had been relying upon the text-based Debian Installer and thus allowed using pre-seeds. But since Ubuntu 18.04 LTS when they rolled out their new text-based installer for Ubuntu Server that isn't based on the long-standing Debian Installer, they lost the pre-seed support.

Rather than trying to support pre-seeds as in the same format as the Debian Installer, they are working on a new approach they hope to have ready by Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS. Their proposed approach is using YAML as the format for specifying the server installation data and makes different assumptions about what to do in the case of missing data and other behavior.

Read more

Also: Robot lifecycle management with Ubuntu

Buying a Linux-ready laptop

Filed under
Linux

Recently, I bought and started using a Tuxedo Book BC1507, a Linux laptop computer. Ten years ago, if someone had told me that, by the end of the decade, I could buy top-quality, "penguin-ready" laptops from companies such as System76, Slimbook, and Tuxedo, I probably would have laughed. Well, now I'm laughing, but with joy!

Going beyond designing computers for free/libre open source software (FLOSS), all three companies recently announced they are trying to eliminate proprietary BIOS software by switching to Coreboot.

Read more

Use HackMD to collaborate on open source projects

Filed under
OSS

HackMD.io is an open source, collaborative Markdown editor. It allows people to share, comment, and collaborate on documents. As open source software, users can choose between using the online platform or installing it as a local service using the upstream project CodiMD.

HackMD's primary feature is obviously the text editor; it leverages the Markdown language, provides handy tools like inserting checkboxes and horizontal separator lines, and allows users to visualize the Markdown rendering while they're working on a document. But HackMD's real power is in enabling collaboration. Let's have a closer look at those features.

Read more

SBC runs Yocto or Debian on STM32MP1 SoC

Filed under
Linux
Debian

i2SOM offers its PanGu SBC based on ST’s dual-core STM32MP1 series SoC. It supports both Yocto and Debian and provides 1GB DRAM, HDMI, Ethernet, LCD, USB OTG, USB Host, TF Card, audio and other interfaces.

i2SOM has unveiled its PanGu SBC based on the STMicroelectronics (ST) STM32MP1 series SoC. The PanGu Board uses the STM32MP157AAA3 version of the SoC series. This version combines a 650MHz Arm dual-core Cortex-A7 core and 209MHz Cortex-M4 coprocessor with an FPU, MPU, and DSP instructions.

The PanGu Board integrates HDMI, 1000Mbps Ethernet, LCD, USB OTG, USB Host, TF Card, audio and other interfaces. The 70 mm × 105.5mm form factor board is designed for applications including industrial systems, the IoT, portable consumer electronics, automotive electronics and others. The PanGu supports Yocto Linux as well as the Jessie version of Debian.

Read more

Indian politicians are missing a huge edutech leap by ignoring Raspberry Pi and Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Around a decade ago, an India-based company called Datawind got a nod from the Central government to make and market a low-cost tablet PC called Aakash for students in the country. About half a decade before that — 2004, to be exact — the country launched GSAT-3 aka EDUSAT, its first satellite to be used entirely for the education sector.

Cut to the present, and it is more than two months since Datawind shut down permanently. Meanwhile, EDUSAT was deactivated in 2010, and has since been moved to a part of space that the world refers to as "graveyard orbit."

They were both examples of a political class thinking a little too ahead of time when it came to the technology needed for education. Something similar is now happening at the other end of the spectrum: While the world is agog about the latest iteration of the Raspberry Pi and an increasing number of people is adopting one or the other distro of Linux, most of India seems to be oblivious to both.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Re: [DNG] EvilGnome

    Basically, this doesn't strike me as even a tiny bit interesting. The template of '$EVILCODE does $STUFF to your system if you run it' raises the obvious question of 'What about _not_ running it?' By and large, code doesn't run itself, so failure to answer that 'one interesting question' means the interesting bit got omitted.

  • Web server security – Part 0: How to start

    Many server hardening or server security guides directly start with installing software packages and changing some configuration files. This is fine for experienced server administrators. However, people who try to set up their first server hit on problems and most importantly they very likely forget things that aren’t covered by such guides.

    So, please do not start to set up your first server by blindly following any guide on the internet (including our guides!).

  • “Sudo Mastery, 2nd Edition” open for tech review

    I need all reviews back by 5 August. This gives me time (if everything goes well) to have the book in print for vBSDCon. Assuming they accept my proposal, that is.

Daniel Pocock: Codes of Conduct and Hypocrisy

Filed under
OSS
Debian

In 2016, when serious accusations of sexual misconduct were made against a volunteer who participates in multiple online communities, the Debian Account Managers sent him a threat of expulsion and gave him two days to respond.

Yet in 2018, when Chris Lamb decided to indulge in removing members from the Debian keyring, he simply did it spontaneously, using the Debian Account Managers as puppets to do his bidding. Members targetted by these politically-motivated assassinations weren't given the same two day notice period as the person facing allegations of sexual assault.

Two days hardly seems like sufficient time to respond to such allegations, especially for the member who was ambushed the week before Christmas. What if such a message was sent when he was already on vacation and didn't even receive the message until January? Nonetheless, however crude, a two day response period is a process. Chris Lamb threw that process out the window. There is something incredibly arrogant about that, a leader who doesn't need to listen to people before making such a serious decision, it is as if he thinks being Debian Project Leader is equivalent to being God.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 10 tells us that Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations. They were probably thinking about more than a two day response period when they wrote that.

Any organization seeking to have a credible code of conduct seeks to have a clause equivalent to article 10. Yet the recent scandals in Debian and Wikimedia demonstrate what happens in the absence of such clauses. As Lord Denning put it, without any process or hearing, members are faced with the arbitrary authority of the despot.

Read more

Installing five flavours of Linux on my new laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I let the Windows setup procedure run on first boot, until I got to the point where it became clear to me that it is now impossible to install Windows without a Microsoft account. Absolutely impossible. Windows 10 has always asked for a Microsoft account during setup, but there was a tiny (nearly invisible) option to use only a local account, which I always did. Well, now that option is gone, and if you dig around long enough you can eventually find an explanation that says if you don't want to use a Microsoft account, well, you have to anyway, but after the installation is complete you can go back into the configuration and change it to use a local account.

So, that was the end of Windows on this new system. I have never had a Microsoft account, and I never will. I booted a Linux Live USB stick, deleted the Windows partition, and set about the task of installing a few of my favorite Linux distributions.

The first thing I had to do was get into the BIOS Setup Utility to disable UEFI Secure Boot. That turns out to be a bit more tricky than you might think, because there is a "POST hotkey delay (sec)" parameter in the BIOS which is initially set to 0, so there is very little time after power-on to press F10 before it starts to boot Windows (or at least tries to). Once into the BIOS Setup, I went to System Configuration / Boot Options / Secure Boot, and changed that to Disabled. While I was in there, I also changed the POST hotkey delay to 5 seconds. Save that (F10) and exit.

[...]

Installation was easy and uneventful; I noticed that Mint has improved their installer on UEFI systems so that it now allows you to choose the EFI Boot Partition, that's nice. Unfortunately it still installed the bootloader to a directory called "ubuntu", which can be inconvenient if you also have Ubuntu installed on the system.

Booting after the installation completed still brought up openSUSE by default, which is actually what I wanted – but if you wanted to boot Mint by default, it would simply require a trip through the BIOS Configuration again. In my case, I just generated a new grub configuration file on openSUSE (grub2-mkconfig), and it added Mint to the Grub boot menu.

Read more

Games: Vagrus, Hive Quest, ATRIUM, GameMode, Elemental War, TerraTech, Higurashi When They Cry Hou, Citadel

Filed under
Gaming
  • The dark strategy RPG "Vagrus - The Riven Realms" is doing well, quite an experience to play

    Currently in "Open Access" on Fig, a hybrid Early Access/Crowdfunding model, Vagrus - The Riven Realms seems to be doing well.

    It's only been going for a couple of months but they've already managed to raise $23,071. It's an interesting system, where you back the campaign with your pledge and get immediate access. At various funding points, it unlocks the next part of their development roadmap with the very next milestone very close to being hit.

  • The strange real time strategy adventure "Hive Quest" is now on Kickstarter

    Love insects and other creepy crawlies? Hive Quest might be a game you will enjoy, one that's coming to Linux and it's now crowdfunding on Kickstarter.

    Inspired partially by the classic Black & White from Lionhead Studios, it's not meant to be graphically impressive. In fact, the developer opted to go for a more retro 3D look with it. Gameplay involves you managing a tribe, along with gathering resources like food to keep them going. It's a bit of an odd one, due to the mix of gameplay involved. It blends a strategy game with puzzles, exploration and a little mystery wrapped in an ancient magical theme with insects and spirits.

  • Strategy game "ATRIUM" released recently, it's pretty much the game Carcassonne

    Carcassonne is that you? Well if you want to play something almost the same, ATRIUM just recently released from Black Potion.

    ATRIUM is a tile-based digital board game, where the board gets built as you go. On each turn, a player can place down a tile which you're given two at random each time and a person, with different tiles giving different benefits. Some might turn your people into a powerful character, some might give you extra points and so on. You basically play each turn, until you run out of tiles and the person who has the most territory wins.

  • GameMode – A Tool To Improve Gaming Performance On Linux

    Ask some Linux users why they still sticks with Windows dual boot, probably the answer would be – “Games!”. It was true! Luckily, open source gaming platforms like Steam and Lutris have brought many games to Linux platforms and improved the Linux gaming experience significantly over the years. Today, I stumbled upon yet another Linux gaming-related, open source tool named GameMode, which allows the users to improve gaming performance on Linux.

    GameMode is basically a daemon/lib combo that lets the games optimise Linux system performance on demand. I thought GameMode is a kind of tool that would kill some resource-hungry tools running in the background. But it is different. What it does actually is just instruct the CPU to automatically run in Performance mode when playing games and helps the Linux users to get best possible performance out of their games.

    GameMode improves the gaming performance significantly by requesting a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS while playing the games.

  • Tower Defense game "Elemental War" leaves Early Access today

    Leaving Early Access today after nine months with a fresh update is Elemental War, a Tower Defense game from Clockwork Origins.

    This one is a little unusual, in the way that unlike a lot of Tower Defense games there's no story campaign to play through. Instead it offers multiple game modes for single-player including a standard 60 wave defence mode, a survival mode to go as long as you can and a hero mode where your enemies are given random abilities. On top of that, there's also a level editor and a versus online mode to send waves against other players.

  • Open-world sandbox adventure game "TerraTech" now has a co-op campaign for up to 4 players

    This is awesome. TerraTech is actually a really fun game for those who like to build vehicles and then go exploring and it just got a big update.

    Version 1.3 was released yesterday, building on the work they did in a previous update to give a co-op creative mode it now has a fully online co-op campaign mode. You will be sharing everything from the blocks available to the mission log, so it will require working together.

  • Chapter 7 of Higurashi When They Cry Hou is now out with Linux support

    After waiting a whole year, the seventh chapter of the Higurashi When They Cry Hou is now available with Higurashi When They Cry Hou - Ch.7 Minagoroshi.

    Continuing to support Linux just like all the other chapters, this highly rated series is worth a look for anyone who enjoys a good mystery. This is a kinetic/sound novel, not one if you like to pick lots of options and change the story. It's a linear experience but still worth going through if you like your novels.

  • Looks like Valve are developing another new game, something to do with "Citadel"

    Warm up that cup of speculation, as it appears Valve are working on another game that seems to be going by the name of Citadel.

    Linking into Half-Life, since the Citadel is the HQ from where the Combine govern Earth. Apparently though, this is entirely separate to the unannounced Half-Life VR game with Citadel being a completely different Source 2 project. As always though, do not take this as any form of confirmation.

Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta

Filed under
Reviews

Today we are looking at Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta. Feren OS Next is Feren's distro in development, a work in progress, but it is improving a lot and this is a major release for this distro, as it is now called Beta.

It is based on Ubuntu 18.04.2, uses Linux Kernel 4.18 and KDE Plasma 5.16.3. It uses about 700MB of ram when idling.

Since the last point release, its highly customized features have been stabilized, not perfect yet as expected, and new features and graphical art has been added. It is truly becoming a beautiful and unique KDE Plasma distro.

Read more

Original/video: Feren OS Next 19.07 Beta Run Through

Kernel: NVMe and VirtIO-IOMMU

Filed under
Linux
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Kernel: F2FS, AMDGPU/AMDKFD, RISC-V

  • F2FS Is The Latest Linux File-System With Patches For Case-Insensitive Support

    Following EXT4 getting initial (and opt-in) support for case-insensitive directories/files, the Flash-Friendly File-System has a set of patches pending that extend the case-folding support to this F2FS file-system that is becoming increasingly used by Android smartphones and other devices. Sent out today were a revised set of two patches and just 300+ lines of code that implement case-folding support inside the F2FS file-system. This case-folding support for case-insensitive file-name look-ups is based upon the support found within EXT4 on the latest kernels.

  • AMDGPU/AMDKFD Queue Up Early Linux 5.3 Fixes For Navi & More

    While the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window isn't even over until this weekend when it will kick off with 5.3-rc1 and headlining new features like Radeon RX 5700 series support, AMD has already sent in a batch of AMDGPU/AMDKFD fixes. Making these fixes notable are some early fixes around the new open-source Radeon RX "Navi" support.

  • RISC-V's Kernel Support Continues Maturing With Linux 5.3

    With the RISC-V support in Linux 5.3 there is now support for huge-pages, image header support (based on the ARM64 kernel image header), initial page table setup is split into two stages, CONFIG_SOC support has been started with initially catering to the SiFive SoCs, high resolution timers and dynamic ticks have now made it into the default RISC-V 64-bit default configuration, and other low-level work.

deepin 15.11 - Better Never Stops

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing a beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. deepin is an open source GNU/Linux operating system, based on Linux kernel and mainly on desktop applications, supporting laptops, desktops, and all-in-ones. It preinstalls Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE) and nearly 30 deepin native applications, as well as several applications from the open source community to meet users' daily learning and work needs. In addition, about a thousand applications are offered in Deepin Store to meet users' various requirements. Welcome to deepin 15.11 release. Compared with deepin 15.10, deepin 15.11 comes with new features - Cloud Sync in Control Center and disc burning function in Deepin File Manager. Besides, kwin window manager was fixed and optimized for better stability and compatibility, and a number of bugs were fixed. In deepin 15.11, you will enjoy smooth and better user experiences! Read more

Android Leftovers