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Wednesday, 23 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 1+ Year Running Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 2 Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:38am
Story Lunar Linux 1.7.0 (i686 & x86_64) ISO’s released Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:03am
Story Most Popular Desktop Video Player: VLC Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 5:31pm
Story 'One frickin' user interface for Linux' Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:12pm
Story A Dell 4K laptop with Linux: Tough construction and built for developers. Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 8:29am
Story Android (Linux) is creating more jobs than iPhone Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 7:53pm
Story Cinnamon PPA will no longer be maintained for Ubuntu users Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:44am
Story CyanogenMod support arrives for Amazon Kindle Fire HD Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2014 - 10:54am
Story Dell launches Android-based Venue tablets at Computex 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 03/06/2014 - 5:33pm
Story Elementary OS Freya Beta 1 Available For Developers And Testers Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 4:33am

Games: Delores: A Thimbleweed Park Mini-Adventure, Graywalkers: Purgatory and Lots More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Crusader Kings 3 System requirements: can you run it on your PC or Mac?

    Crusader Kings 3 is out on PC, Mac, and Steam OS/Linux. According to the game’s Steam page, you’ll need to have a certain level of machine to run Crusader Kings 3. We’ll keep you updated as things change too – the Crusader Kings series is famous for its huge DLC content drops throughout the game’s life span, and there’s always the chance one of these makes the game more intense to run.

    [...]

    Crusader Kings 3 Steam OS/Linux requirements

    Running CK3 on Linux or Steam OS? Here’s what you’ll need at minimum.

    OS – Ubuntu 18.04

  • Delores: A Thimbleweed Park Mini-Adventure now available for Linux

    After a short Beta testing period, it seems Delores: A Thimbleweed Park Mini-Adventure is now out properly for Linux from developer Ron Gilbert and Terrible Toybox.

    What is it? Delores: A Thimbleweed Park Mini-Adventure started out as a prototype for Ron Gilbert's new point-and-click adventure game engine and grew into a fun little game. Don't think of it as a sequel to Thimbleweed Park, as it's not, it's a mini-adventure for fans who want a little bit more. It's also free!

  • Supernatural post-apocalyptic turn-based strategy Graywalkers: Purgatory is now on Linux

    With its XCOM-like combat and a setting that merges together the supernatural with post-apocalyptic themes, Graywalkers: Purgatory is now available for Linux.

    "Graywalkers: Purgatory is a stylish turn-based strategy RPG set in a supernatural post-apocalyptic world where Heaven and Hell had merged with Earth caused by a event called the Rupture. Inspired by a combination of gameplay from XCom, Jagged Alliance and Fallout, the game generates a unique but familiar experience for the turn-based tactics player."

  • Enjoy the classic Unreal Tournament on modern platforms with OldUnreal - new update out

    OldUnreal release 469 is out now with tons of bug fixes for this classic. It's a long list, with plenty of attention given to the Linux version too.

  • Driving with on-screen controls in Frick, Inc. looks hilarious - releasing October 10

    Frick, Inc. has you use on-screen controls to drive funny little trucks across short, challenging little maps and it looks simply wonderful and also as the name suggests - probably frick-ing frustrating.

    Each truck has a different control layout, so it will continue to mess with you as you progress through it and you'll be doing all this button pressing and lever pulling across 30 varied levels. Once you've really got the controls down, each level also has an additional added challenge you can do.

  • Antimatter is a very ambitious upcoming galaxy-wide exploration city-builder

    Top marks for ambition on this one, as Antimatter from developer Geoffroy Pirard is planned to be a 4x city-builder where you can explore space and colonize many other planets.

    It doesn't seem to really fit into a few standard genres. Is it a city-builder? Yes. Is it a game of space exploration? Seemingly also yes. The developer explains how each planet can be explored and built up with different biomes, native cities, hidden structures, forgotten civilisations and more surprises to find. Not always peaceful either, some planets as expected are quite dangerous places to be exploring.

  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs go open source

    Frictional Games have announced that they've now open source the game engine behind Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs as open source under the GPL.

    It's worth noting, that like a lot of open source releases this is only the code and not all the other media assets. A great way to do it, as the original developer earns their monies as people need to buy it to run it but it can be kept alive for generations to come, ported to new platforms and more. Frictional are no strangers to open source, as they also put up the HPL1 game engine that powered the Penumbra Series in the same way many years ago.

  • According to The Business Research Company’s research report on the browser games market, Asia Pacific has the largest share, accounting for 51% of the global browser games market size. The browser games market in Asia Pacific is supported by the presence of a lar

Lenovo Launches ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Filed under
Hardware

Lenovo and Canonical launched today personal computers from the ThinkPad and ThinkStation family that come preinstalled with the LTS (Long Term Support) version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system.

Today, Lenovo is making available for the general public a total of 27 PCs (13 workstations and 14 laptops) from the ThinkPad and ThinkStation family pre-installed with the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, which were previously available only to enterprises via a customized bid.

Read more

Open Hardware and Google's Linux-powered Platforms

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

  • RISC-V: What’s Missing And Who’s Competing

    Arm is definitely one of the competitors. RISC-V is definitely getting a lot of traction in the microcontroller space, and even Arm is trying to make it easier for other companies to adopt that adopt their baseline designs. Arm and ARC are definitely competitors, especially in the IoT embedded space.

  • AMD Launches Chromebook-Optimized Ryzen and Athlon 3000 C-Series Mobile Processors

    After unveiling Athlon 3000-series of 15W mobile processors earlier this year, AMD has now announced Chromebook-optimized mobile processors with AMD Ryzen and Athlon 3000 C-Series family.

  • Android 11 on Android TV Launches for the Big Screen

    Android 11 may have been released for smartphones on September 8th, but Google has just only announced the launch of Android 11 on Android TV for an optimized experience on the big screen.

    The version of the TV-optimized operating system builds on the many new features introduced for Android 11, but also adds performance and privacy improvements, new features tailored for the TV, and updated developer tools.

Games: Wine, Stadia, Move or Die

Filed under
Gaming

  • Easier Vulkan Debugging Of Windows Applications Running Under Wine Is On The Way

    With patches pending it will be easier to debug Windows games/applications running under Wine on Linux.

    Stemming from a discussion over the ability to forward Vulkan API debugging information to the host loader to receive those calls from the Windows software, there are now Wine patches sent out to make that happen.

  •  

  • The Division 2 on Stadia gets a free weekend for Stadia Pro and more Stadia news

    Seems Google are getting a bit more chatty about Stadia recently. Hot on the heels of announcing another round of new indie games with Stadia Makers, we have another round-up for you.

    For anyone with Stadia Pro, which is still free for a month when you sign up, you will able to play The Division 2 free from September 24 at 16:00 UTC until September 28 at 16:00 UTC. I actually think The Division 2 is one of the better ports on Stadia, with cross-play with the Windows version and it actually looks quite good.

  • Move or Die hits 1 million sales, free to play until September 24 and huge discount

    Move or Die, probably one of the funniest party games around that supports both local and online play has a hit a huge milestone with 1 million sales.

    That sales mark is just on Steam, which sounds like a lot but this is spread across quite a few years since it released back in 2016. Fantastic for an indie developer though, and well deserved because it's a genuine delight to play through. Move or Die is an absurdly fast-paced, 4-player local and online party game where the mechanics change every 20 seconds.

Allan Day: GNOME Shell user research goings on

Filed under
GNOME

It’s been a while since we last blogged about the GNOME Shell design work that’s been happening. While we might not have blogged in a bit, there’s been a lot going on behind the scenes, particularly on the research side, and it’s about time that we told everyone about what we’ve been up to.

As a side note: a great team has developed around this initiative. The existing design team of Jakub, Tobias and myself has been joined by Maria Komarova from System76. Maria has a particularly strong research background and was immensely helpful in running interviews. The development side has also been fully engaged with the process, particularly through Georges and Florian.

Read more

Apostrophe – distraction free Markdown editor

Filed under
Software

Markdown is a plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber in 2004. It’s designed to be easy-to-read and easy-to-write.

Readability is at the very heart of Markdown. It offers the advantages of plain text, provides a convenient format for writing for the web, but it’s not intended to be a replacement for HTML. Markdown is a writing format, not a publishing format. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters included, such as # or *.

Apostrophe is a distraction free Markdown editor. It uses pandoc as backend for Markdown parsing and offers a very clean and sleek user interface.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: DevNation Tech Talks, LINUX Unplugged and mintCast

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Kubernetes: The evolution of distributed systems

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Kubernetes and distributed systems from Bilgin Ibryam and Burr Sutter.

    Cloud-native applications of the future will consist of hybrid workloads: stateful applications, batch jobs, stateless microservices, and functions (plus maybe something else) wrapped as Linux containers and deployed via Kubernetes on any cloud. Functions and the so-called serverless computing model are the latest evolution of what started as service-oriented architecture years ago. But is this the last step of the application architecture evolution and is it here to stay?

    During this talk, we will take you on a journey exploring distributed application needs, and how they evolved with Kubernetes, Istio, Knative, Dapr, and other projects. By the end of the session, you will know what is coming after microservices.

  • Distro Triforce | LINUX Unplugged 372

    What would it really take to get you to switch Linux distributions? We debate the practical reasons more and more people are sticking with the big three.

    Plus Carl from System76 stops by to surprise us with some firmware news.

  • mintCast 344 – Getting Jacked

    First up, in our Wanderings, I fiddle with the Focusrite, Tony Hughes paints it pink, Joe puts a ring on it, Bo gets jacked, Tony Watts reduces, reuses and recycles

Gateworks Venice Industrial IoT SBC Family Features Dual Ethernet and mPCIe Sockets

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The company provides a Linux Ubuntu Board Support Package for the board, as well as a GW7300 Development Kit (GW11049) with the board, U-Boot bootloader, the Linux BSP, interface cables as appropriate for the SBC, a power supply, and a JTAG programmer to update firmware and provide serial console access.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Soldat 2 brings the next-generation of fast-paced online platformer action - out now

    Available now in Early Access, the online platformer shooter Soldat 2 brings in the full charm of the original classic that took the early internet by storm and will continue to expand it.

    If you played the original - right now it's very much as you expect. Fast paced, ridiculous, seriously easy to get into and really rather fun. You can't ask for much more in a military-style platformer shooter, it does exactly what it sets out to do. You run, you throw a grenade, you spray and pray and hopefully get a few frags along the way. Slightly prettier than the original but still just as insane.

    [...]

    Plenty more is to come including more of pretty much everything: levels, weapons, vehicles - you name it and it probably will get it at some point. The big idea with Soldat 2 is to be a platform for others to create, as much as it is a game itself so it's going to have full modding support for all sorts of community content.

  • VirtualBox, 15 practical examples
  • Fedora 32 : Testing the Bookworm software.
  • AMD Dimgrey Cavefish and VanGogh Support Lands In Radeon Linux OpenGL Driver

    The latest enablement work landing in the RadeonSI Gallium3D open-source driver is for AMD Dimgrey Cavefish and VanGogh.

    Merged today to Mesa 20.3-devel was VanGogh and Dimgrey Cavefish support.

    VanGogh and Dimgrey Cavefish are both GFX10.3 (Navi 2) parts. Van Gogh has been rumored for a while as a next-gen mobile API with Zen 2 CPU cores and RDNA2 graphics in the 7.5~18 Watt TDP space. Details on Dimgrey Cavefish are light as it's another Linux-specific codename for a Navi 2 part in following the X.Org color + fish family naming convention.

  • Updates for CAP Deployment in public clouds

    Our vision for the SUSE Cloud Application Platform Deployment tool is to provide the simplest experience possible and do so across a variety of supported cloud service providers. Since my last post we’ve made some significant strides, so it’s time to catch up on our status.

  • Create and import COCO datasets into Maximo Visual Inspection

    A lot of work has gone into the labeling UI for IBM Maximo Visual Inspection (MVI). However, there are situations where you want to work with an already existing dataset that was created outside of MVI. Thankfully, MVI already supports importing COCO datasets, label information and all. That’s easy enough. But what if you want to modify or add some images before importing that dataset? Maybe you have some colleagues without access to MVI who need you to keep things in a common format? Or maybe there are other tools that interact with these datasets? We can’t expect everyone else to use MVI’s dataset format.

    I’m hoping this post will help you along in figuring how to do what you need to do outside of MVI. We’re going to create our own little COCO dataset with LabelMe and LabelMe2coco, and turn that into an MVI dataset that we can train MVI models with.

  • Linux on Lenovo, jdk transition to Git, and more industry trends

    The impact: That is an epic list of achievements on behalf of all of us that use Linux on the desktop. Kudos and thank you to the Fedora Desktop team!

  • Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.5 Delivers Kubernetes-Based Data Services

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Release Candidate 3 is here
    Hello everyone,
    
    After some delay, the llvmorg-11.0.0-rc3 tag was just created.
    
    Source code and docs are available at
    https://prereleases.llvm.org/11.0.0/#rc3
    and
    https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/releases/tag/llvmorg-11.0.0-rc3
    
    Pre-built binaries will be added as they become ready.
    
    Please file bug reports for any issues you find as blockers of
    https://llvm.org/pr46725
    
    Release testers: please start your engines, run the script, share your
    results, and upload binaries. And thank you very much for your help so
    far.
    
    There are currently no open release blockers, so unless anything new
    and bad comes up, this is what the final release will look like.
    
    Thanks,
    Hans
    
  • LLVM 11.0-RC3 Released For This Big LLVM/Clang Update

    LLVM 11.0 was originally scheduled to be released at the end of August while now it looks like that official milestone is coming in the next few days or week.

    Tagged today was LLVM 11.0-RC3 as the belated extra release candidate for this half-year update to the LLVM compiler infrastructure and subprojects like Clang, LLD, FLANG, and libcxx, among others.

  • Excellent Free Books to Learn D

    D is a general-purpose systems programming language with a C-like syntax that compiles to native code.

    It is statically typed and supports both automatic (garbage collected) and manual memory management.

    D programs are structured as modules that can be compiled separately and linked with external libraries to create native libraries or executables.

  • Crosspost: Nginx/Certbot Recipe

    Back in Februrary I posted an article in which I promised a follow up telling you how I now manage my certificates. We’ll all these months later I’ve finally published it to dev.to (to push its reach beyond just Perl) https://dev.to/joelaberger/no-magic-letsencrypt-certbot-and-nginx-configuration-recipe-3a97 .

  • wxPython by Example – Adding a Background Image (Video)

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to add an image to your panel so that you have a background image to put your widgets on.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #439 (Sept. 22, 2020)

Linux kernel report shows more than 20,000 contributors since beginning

Filed under
Development
Linux

As the use of Linux has grown, the number and variety of contributors has done likewise. The study found that from 2007 to 2019, there were 780,048 commits accepted into the Linux kernel from 1730 organisations. The top 20 can be seen in the chart in this article.

In this table, unknown refers to contributions for which a supporting employer’s existence could not be determined. None indicates the patches are from developers known to be working on their own time.

The release model for the kernel now has four categories; Prepatch (or “-rc”) kernels, Mainline, Stable, and Long Term Stable. Each release cycle begins with a two-week “merge window” when new features can be reviewed and then included in the git repository for the next release.

Read more

Puppy Linux 9.5 “FossaPup” Is Here to Revive Your Old PC, Based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux

One of the coolest things about Puppy Linux is that it’s a modular distribution, which means that it lets users swap out the kernel, apps and firmware in seconds. One top of that, it can be turned very easily into a minimal bare bones version just by removing a single file, followed by a reboot, of course.

As its codename suggests, Puppy Linux 9.5 is based on Canonical’s latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system series. This means that users will have access to the official Ubuntu 20.04 LTS software repositories to install any packages they want.

Read more

Announcing Istio 1.6.10

Filed under
Server
Software

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.6.9 and Istio 1.6.10.

Read more

New GNOME Videos

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Christian Hergert: GtkSourceView Next

Filed under
Development
GNOME

Earlier this year I started a branch to track GTK 4 development which is targeted for release by end-of-year. I just merged it which means that our recently released gtksourceview-4-8 branch is going to be our LTS for GTK 3. As you might remember from the previous maintainer, GtkSourceView 4.x is the continuation of the GtkSourceView 3.x API with all the deprecated API removed and a number of API improvements.

Currently, GtkSourceView.Next is 5.x targeting the GTK 4.x API. It’s a bit of an unfortunate number clash, but it’s been fine for WebKit so we’ll see how it goes.

It’s really important that we start getting solid testing because GtkSourceView is used all over the place and is one of those “must have” dependencies when moving to a new GTK major ABI.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Open Hardware and Google's Linux-powered Platforms

  • RISC-V: What’s Missing And Who’s Competing

    Arm is definitely one of the competitors. RISC-V is definitely getting a lot of traction in the microcontroller space, and even Arm is trying to make it easier for other companies to adopt that adopt their baseline designs. Arm and ARC are definitely competitors, especially in the IoT embedded space.

  • AMD Launches Chromebook-Optimized Ryzen and Athlon 3000 C-Series Mobile Processors

    After unveiling Athlon 3000-series of 15W mobile processors earlier this year, AMD has now announced Chromebook-optimized mobile processors with AMD Ryzen and Athlon 3000 C-Series family.

  • Android 11 on Android TV Launches for the Big Screen

    Android 11 may have been released for smartphones on September 8th, but Google has just only announced the launch of Android 11 on Android TV for an optimized experience on the big screen. The version of the TV-optimized operating system builds on the many new features introduced for Android 11, but also adds performance and privacy improvements, new features tailored for the TV, and updated developer tools.

Games: Wine, Stadia, Move or Die

  • Easier Vulkan Debugging Of Windows Applications Running Under Wine Is On The Way

    With patches pending it will be easier to debug Windows games/applications running under Wine on Linux. Stemming from a discussion over the ability to forward Vulkan API debugging information to the host loader to receive those calls from the Windows software, there are now Wine patches sent out to make that happen.

  •  
  • The Division 2 on Stadia gets a free weekend for Stadia Pro and more Stadia news

    Seems Google are getting a bit more chatty about Stadia recently. Hot on the heels of announcing another round of new indie games with Stadia Makers, we have another round-up for you. For anyone with Stadia Pro, which is still free for a month when you sign up, you will able to play The Division 2 free from September 24 at 16:00 UTC until September 28 at 16:00 UTC. I actually think The Division 2 is one of the better ports on Stadia, with cross-play with the Windows version and it actually looks quite good.

  • Move or Die hits 1 million sales, free to play until September 24 and huge discount

    Move or Die, probably one of the funniest party games around that supports both local and online play has a hit a huge milestone with 1 million sales. That sales mark is just on Steam, which sounds like a lot but this is spread across quite a few years since it released back in 2016. Fantastic for an indie developer though, and well deserved because it's a genuine delight to play through. Move or Die is an absurdly fast-paced, 4-player local and online party game where the mechanics change every 20 seconds.

today's howtos

Allan Day: GNOME Shell user research goings on

It’s been a while since we last blogged about the GNOME Shell design work that’s been happening. While we might not have blogged in a bit, there’s been a lot going on behind the scenes, particularly on the research side, and it’s about time that we told everyone about what we’ve been up to. As a side note: a great team has developed around this initiative. The existing design team of Jakub, Tobias and myself has been joined by Maria Komarova from System76. Maria has a particularly strong research background and was immensely helpful in running interviews. The development side has also been fully engaged with the process, particularly through Georges and Florian. Read more