Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 19 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Chief Architect of Cloudera on growth of Hadoop Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:12pm
Story City of Vienna increasingly turns to open source Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 2:13pm
Story Collaborative robotics software development Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2015 - 9:49am
Story Confessions of a systems librarian Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 5:53pm
Story Could Oracle stifle the open-source movement? srlinuxx 18/02/2006 - 2:54am
Story Croatian policy encourages open source adoption Roy Schestowitz 28/08/2015 - 9:51am
Story DAISY: A Linux-compatible text format for the visually impaired Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2016 - 9:27pm
Story DemocracyOS promotes civic engagement on both sides Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 10:44am
Story DevOps principles resonate with student Linux program Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:22pm
Story Did You Know You Can Try BSD With VirtualBSD? srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 1:47am

Initial Benchmarks Of Microsoft's WSL2 - Windows Subsystem For Linux 2 On Windows 10 Is A Mixed Bag

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the release of WSL2 as a Windows 10 Insider Preview update this week, we've been putting the new Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 under some benchmarks compared to WSL1 and bare metal Linux. While WSL2 has improved the I/O performance thanks to the new Hyper-V-based virtualization approach employed by WSL2, the performance has regressed in other areas for running Linux binaries on Windows 10. Here are our preliminary benchmark results.

In this comparison is a look at the Windows 10 WSL1 performance against that of the new WSL2 when using the same Windows 10 Insiders build as of this week that introduced the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 support. The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS WSL instance was used for testing with its default packages. In addition to looking at the WSL1 vs. WSL2 performance of Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS itself was also tested bare metal on the same system for looking at the raw performance of Ubuntu on the Intel desktop being tested. Additionally, Clear Linux 29920 was also tested for what has largely become a "gold standard" for Linux performance in showing what Intel systems are capable of achieving performance-wise under Linux, so that is being used in this comparison as a reference point.

Read more

Nebra AnyBeam: A Raspberry Pi powered home cinema projector you can fit in your pocket [Review]

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Before large screen televisions and 4K content became a thing, I used to enjoy watching films projected onto a white wall at home. I had a Canon projector hooked up to my PC with surround sound, and it was like having a personal cinema.

Technology has moved on quite some way since then, and you can now buy reasonable quality projectors for a fraction of the price. Case in point is Nebra AnyBeam, a Raspberry Pi powered pocket sized projector.

Read more

Use Albert Launcher On Linux To Boost Your Productivity

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Albert is a productivity app inspired by Quicksilver, Alfred and other similar tools, that runs on Linux. Written in C++ / Qt5, this free and open source launcher uses a plugin-based architecture that makes it very flexible and powerful.

Read more

12 Best Web Browsers for Ubuntu

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Selecting the best web browsers for Ubuntu largely depends on your personal needs, but usually, browsers are used for accessing/browsing websites.

In this article, we will look under the hood and highlight some of the best web browsers for Ubuntu.

Read more

Games: Valve, SkateBIRD, Starbound, Rings of Saturn, Relic Hunters Legend, Vector 36, Skellboy, Volcanoids

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve release a new stable Steam Client from all the recent Beta builds, nice fixes for Linux

    Valve have once again gathered all the new features and fixes from a bunch of recent Beta builds and pushed it out to everyone, this includes a bunch of nice fixes for Linux.

    Steam Remote Play is one of the biggest changes (previously in-home streaming), now it's "experimentally" available outside the home too with the renaming. You should now be able to stream games from one Steam client to another, wherever they are.

  • SkateBIRD has flown past the Kickstarter goal, Linux demo now available

    Get ready to explore a bird-sized skatepark, as SkateBIRD has not only flown right past the initial goal on Kickstarter, it also now has a Linux demo for you to flap your wings in excitement with

  • Starbound's massive 1.4 "Bounty Hunter" update is out now

    After a long wait, with this being the first update to Starbound since October last year. Seems like the wait may have been worth it though!

    The Bounty Hunter 1.4 update launched yesterday and it brings with it absolutely tons of news toys. The biggest new feature being the Bounty Hunting system, which has you take on procedurally-generated quests.

  • Hard sci-fi space game 'Rings of Saturn' is now doing an Early Access crowdfunding mix on itch

    Rings of Saturn, a hard sci-fi space simulation game made with the FOSS Godot Engine is now opening up Early Access builds on itch, with a slight difference.

    This isn't your usual Early Access model, as it's mixing in crowdfunding at the same time. Anyone who pays at least $9.99 on itch.io gets full access to the game and it has an always up to date demo to try first too. This is probably one of the nicest ways to do crowdfunding I've seen, something Fig also started doing recently with Vagrus.

  • Relic Hunters Legend to enter Alpha later this month, includes Linux support

    Relic Hunters Legend, the crowdfunded shoot and loot RPG from Rogue Snail is gearing up for the Alpha release this month.

    It sounds like it's going to be quite fun, an online co-op shoot and loot RPG from the creators of Chroma Squad, Dungeonland and Relic Hunters Zero. If you've not heard of it before, when it's eventually ready it will be going free to play so everyone can jump in, however they went to Kickstarter originally to get the funded need to actually make the game a reality.

  • Unique racing game 'Vector 36' adds online multiplayer in the latest update and a free weekend

    Vector 36 is a racing game that's quite unusual, as you're piloting a Skimmer across the surface of Mars.

  • Skellboy looks like a very sweet action-RPG where you swap body parts

    Skellboy, a recent discovery being developed by UmaikiGames and published by Fabraz (Slime-San, Planet Diver) looks like a very sweet action-RPG that I'm pretty excited about. Only appearing on Steam recently, it's going to be releasing with Linux support in "mid 2019" and they're very clear about the platforms too. On the official site, it's right there.

    Why am I exited about Skellboy? Well, not only does the graphical style look fantastic mixing in flat shapes with pixel-art and a 3D environment, the gameplay sounds highly amusing too. As you progress, you will be able to replace your bones with different body parts taken from others, which is a little weird but it does sound rather comical with the cute graphical style to it.

  • The latest Volcanoids update sounds amazing, lets you directly pilot your drillship

    Volcanoids, the steampunk survival game where your base of operations is a massive moving drill just had a massive update and it sounds like they're taking it in a fun direction.

    Released yesterday, the Travel Update has changed the way you explore. Previously, it felt like you had no real freedom to explore and as the developer said, the old map system was nothing more than a glorified fast-travel system. That's gone! Instead, you now get a Pilot Seat and this allows you to dig deep and explore directly. Also, while you're piloting your drillship you can actually use the massive drill to get resources on the map too making it even more handy.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Educational Operating Systems: What Are They? [Ed: Seems like an old article. Plagiarism? Some of the named distros no longer exist.]

    To start with our list, let’s talk about one of the more popular educational operating systems, EduBuntu. Does the name sound familiar, well this OS is a variation of the popular Windows alternative, Ubuntu. It’s built on the reliable Linux system and is supported by a strong Linux community.

    The software was built from kids aged 6 to 18. The system was built in collaboration with Educators around the world to ensure that the system serves its purpose as a great education source for kids. The system is built for teachers in mind as well as you don’t need a lot of technical knowledge to set it up in your computer lab or PC.

    Edubuntu comes packed with a number of useful education programs such as the KDE Edutainment application suite. What we love about this OS is that there is no need to reformat your PC if it’s already running Ubuntu. You can simply turn the Ubuntu software into Edubuntu through a series of steps.

  • 10 Best Free Human Resource Management Software

    It wasn’t too long ago that we published an article on the best open source accounting software for Linux. Today, we’re concentrating on software that’ll enable you to manage your Human Resources efficiently.

    Human resource management is difficult irrespective of whether you’re running a small or large business. Most HR tools require a subscription plan or one-time fee but there are a good number of alternatives that are available at little to no cost.

    As I usually do, here is my list of the best HR management software and they are all free.

  • Rosanne DiMesio is Conservancy's New Technical Bookkeeper

    We're excited to announce that we've hired Rosanne DiMesio to be our new Technical Bookkeeper. Rosanne is a longtime volunteer with the Wine project ( which was one of Conservancy's founding member projects) where she focuses her efforts on making things easier for users. She is also an Outreachy (also a Conservancy project) graduate who completed her internship working with Wine on improving their Applications Database (AppDB). Rosanne has done many different things during her career, including working as an English teacher and doing tech support for emergency response services. She brings her passion for free software and her care for new free software users to the role at Conservancy.

    "Rosanne has been an incredible force for good within the Wine project. I am delighted to know that my fellow Conservancy project members are going to get the benefit of her organization and insight; this is a huge win for Conservancy." says Jeremy White, a member of the leadership committee for the Wine project and CEO of CodeWeavers.

  • Doom Remake 4 shuts down due to cease and desist from Zenimax [Ed: GPL compliance]
  • Open hardware for musicians and music lovers: Headphone, amps, and more

    The world is full of great open source music players, but why stop at using open source just to play music? You can also use open source hardware to make music. All of the instruments described in this article are certified by the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA). That means you are free to build upon them, remix them, or do anything else with them.

  • Apple Joins Open Source Organization CNCF

    It’s well known that Apple not only uses but also contributes to many open source projects. You may not know but Siri, the virtual assistant of Apple, is powered by Apache Mesos.

    Apple heavily contributes to the open source projects they use. Unlike many other companies, Apple doesn’t like to talk much about it.

    The first time I saw Apple booth at any Open Source conference was at KubeCon in Seattle last year.

Debian: Outreachy, Patches and LTS Work by Raphaël Hertzog

Filed under
Debian

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Ruby 2.6 now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat Software Collections supply the latest, stable versions of development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. As part of the latest Software Collections 3.3 release, we are pleased to share that Ruby 2.6 is now generally available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

  • How Unicef Is Using Big Data To Close The Education Divide

    Given that challenges around education are only growing, Unicef and Red Hat hope to expand the platform over the coming months.

    Palau Montava says: “We have a pipeline of interested countries that want to be involved, so we anticipate the project will continue to grow. It’s an exciting time to be building these open source projects, and we think they will continue to change the world.

    The school mapping project forms part of the wider Magic Box platform that Unicef will continue to invest in. "Magic Box is an open source collaborative platform where partners like Red Hat share their data and expertise for public good. It’s this great place to harness real-time data generated by the private sector to give organizations like Unicef critical insights," concludes Palau Montava.

  • UPS delivers Agile plan for legacy application modernization

    The switch from Db2 and mainframe application code allowed UPS to access the data through open source Linux systems and host the data on open source Linux container orchestration systems, namely Red Hat OpenShift. This platform is also easier to update frequently and iteratively, as applications change through automated Jenkins CI/CD pipelines, Jani said.

  • Red Hat Takes Home a Trio of CODiE Awards

    It was a big awards night for Red Hat, recently, as three of our products won best in category business technology awards. The 2019 SIIA CODiE Awards have been distributed for over 30 years, now. They are the only peer-recognized program in the business and ed tech industries. In the words of the awards body, “Each CODiE Award win serves as incredible market validation for a product’s innovation, vision and overall industry impact.”

Events: Talks, Linux Plumbers Conference, and Red Hat

Filed under
OSS
  • Learning by teaching, and speaking, in open source

    When Jenny Han wrote these words, I doubt she had the open source community in mind. Yet, for our group of dispersed nomads, the summer brings a wave of conferences that allow us to connect in person.

    From OSCON in Portland to Drupal GovCon in Bethesda, and Open Source Summit North America in San Diego, there’s no shortage of ways to match faces with Twitter avatars. After months of working on open source projects via Slack and Google Hangouts, the face time that these summer conferences offer is invaluable.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Live Patching Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Live Patching Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! There are some workloads that require 100% uptime so rebooting for maintenance is not an option. But this can make the system insecure as new security vulnerabilities may have been discovered in the running kernel. Live kernel patching is a technique to update the kernel without taking down the machine. As one can imagine, patching a running kernel is far from trivial. Although it is being used in production today[1][2], there are still many issues that need to be solved.

  • Virtual event: Conquer complexity with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

    Since the general release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, we’ve had great response from those of you who have downloaded the product and used our complimentary RHEL 8 resources. RHEL 8 is the most developer-friendly version ever, but you may still have questions.

    [...]

    In addition to development, topics will include management, scalability, performance, workloads and migration, security, and deploying to a hybrid cloud.

today's howtos and programming leftovers

Filed under
Development
HowTos

GNU/Linux on Chrome OS and on Lenovo's 2019 ThinkPad P Series

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Ubuntu
  • Best Linux-Centric File Managers for Chrome OS

    I recently covered how to install Linux on Chromebook and you can check it out here. Today, let’s divert our attention to the File Manager in Chrome OS.

    Chrome OS is a beautiful Operating System (as is expected of all Google products) and it houses a responsive file manager for navigating its file trees.

    While it works excellently on Chrome OS which it was designed for, navigating Linux directories with it doesn’t feel as “Linuxy” and it can be helpful to install a Linux-centric file manager to eliminate that need.

  • Proposed Chrome OS 78 change will use the Files app to restore Linux containers on Chromebooks

    Chrome OS 74 brought the ability to backup and restore Linux containers on a Chromebook. It’s handy and it works. However, to use it, you have to go to the Linux settings in Chrome OS, which isn’t ideal.

  • Lenovo's 2019 ThinkPad P Series Lineup: OLED, RTX Quadro, Ubuntu, and More

    All P Series mobile workstations can also be configured with either Windows (up to Windows 10 Pro) or Ubuntu, making these a powerful mobile option for Linux users.

Graphics: AMDGPU, Vulkan, Direct Rendering Manager

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • New GFX1011 / GFX1012 Targets Appear In AMDGPU LLVM Compiler Backend

    To date the open-source AMD "Navi" graphics code inside their LLVM compiler back-end has been focused on the "GFX1010" target but now it's been branched out to also GFX1011 and GFX1012.

    We now know the initial Navi/GFX10 products to be the Radeon RX 5700 and Radeon RX 5700XT. We are still waiting to see the full open-source Linux driver code in full while over the past two days we've seen more AMDGPU LLVM GFX10 code continue to drop.

  • MoltenVK 1.0.35 Brings Many Additions & Improvements For Vulkan On macOS
  • It's The Season For Cleaning & Restructuring Within The Intel Linux Kernel Graphics Code

    With Intel's Icelake/Gen11 graphics support considered production-ready when on the latest Linux graphics driver components and ahead of the real enablement around their highly anticipated Xe Graphics discrete hardware, it's making for a summer of clean-ups and restructuring within their kernel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver.

    There's still bug fixing and other minor work going into the Intel Gen11 Linux graphics driver code (along with new PCI IDs and the like), but now with the driver developers in the period between introducing major generational work and in particular Intel's dGPU plans that will require a lot of new driver code, there's been a lot of low-level code clean-ups and restructuring going on within the i915 DRM driver.

Audiocasts/Shows: Latest Ubuntu Podcast and BadVoltage

Filed under
Ubuntu

Curseradio – curses interface for browsing and playing internet radio

Filed under
Software

My roadmap is to review all actively maintained internet radio players. To date, I’ve covered odio, Shortwave, Radiotray-NG, PyRadio, and StreamTuner2. Only PyRadio is console based software.

It’s only right and proper that I turn to another console based internet radio streamer. Like PyRadio, Curseradio offers a curses interface for browsing and playing an OPML directory of internet radio streams. It’s also written in the Python programming language.

Read more

Software: libhandy, OpenNebula, Cockpit and LibreOffice

Filed under
Software
  • Adrien Plazas: libhandy 0.0.10

    libhandy 0.0.10 just got released, and it comes with a few new adaptive widgets for your GTK app.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: OpenNebula

    With the current conversation shifting away from centralized cloud infrastructure and refocusing toward bringing the computing power closer to the users in a concerted effort to reduce latency, OpenNebula's 5.8 "Edge" release is a direct response to the evolving computing and infrastructure needs, and it offers fresh capabilities to extend one's cloud functionality to the edge. Gaming companies, among others, who have been using OpenNebula were of the first to push for these features (yet they don't have the be the only ones to benefit from them).

  • Cockpit 196

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 196.

  • bibisect-linux-64-6.4 is available with KDE5 support!

    The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce the bisect repository from libreoffice-6-3-branch-point to latest master is available for cloning from Gerrit. As a novelty, this repository adds support for KDE5 environment.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • WSL2 and Kali
  • Security service tracks embedded Linux vulnerabilities

    Timesys has launched a Vigiles security monitoring and management platform with CVE tracking for embedded Linux available as free software or as a subscription service.

    Timesys Vigiles automates the identification, tracking, and analysis of vulnerabilities by comparing embedded Linux firmware with NIST’s daily Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) notifications. The software helps customers focus on vulnerabilities that pose the biggest threats to a customer’s specific software components, thereby “eliminating the need to manually monitor and analyze thousands of vulnerabilities,” says Timesys.

  • Vim devs fix system-pwning text editor bug [Ed: This requires obtaining and opening malicious files though]

    The attack exploits a vulnerability in a Vim feature called modelines, which lets you set variables specific to a file. As long as these statements are in the first few lines, Vim interprets them as instructions. They might tell Vim to display the file with a text width of 60 characters, for example. Or maybe you want to expand tabs to spaces to avoid another geek’s ire.

  • Mail servers running Exim come under attack

    Mail servers running the Exim mail transport agent are being exploited, with the attackers using a vulnerability disclosed a few days ago to run arbitrary commands as root, a security practitioner has warned.

    Exim, one of the four MTAs commonly used on Unix servers, is developed by Phillip Hazel at the University of Cambridge. It is the default on some Linux distributions, like Debian.

    [...]

    The original post about the vulnerability was released by Qualys Research Labs on 5 June, which said it was trivially exploitable in local and non-default cases, but with the default configuration an attack would take a long time to succeed.

  • Exim email servers are now under attack [Ed: The drama queen that CBS hired (Cimpanu) says "Almost half of the internet's email servers are now being attacked with a new exploit." It sounds a lot worse when in fact many are patched and the "half" refers to number of installs, not attacks. Misreporting. FUD. ZDNet is not a news site but a tech tabloid. It should be regarded as such.]

Games: Dota, Space Mercs, Atari VCS

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve have officially announced Dota Underlords, coming to Linux soon with an open Beta in around a week

    A lot sooner than expected, Valve have revealed Dota Underlords, their stand-alone version of Dota 2 Auto Chess.

  • Extreme 3D space shooter 'Space Mercs' that's developed on Linux is sounding impressive

    Speaking with the developer today, they told me they took on a load of feedback from the initial public demo to include things like: an actual targetting system, an overhaul to damage feedback, a damage direction indicator, a new ship, a cockpit view has been added with radar tracking in cockpit view too, objectives, you can see bullets coming your way, improved gamepad support and so on. Sounds like it's shaping up to be an impressive arcade shooter!

  • Atari VCS supports Windows, Chrome OS and Linux

    Atari's VCS system sounds quite flexible, even if it's an iffy gamble. The console is an open platform that can run multiple operating systems like Windows 10, Linux, Chrome OS to transform it into a fully-fledged mini PC-console for your TV. This opens tons of opportunities for entertainment options, from old-school gaming via emulators to playing Xbox Game Pass PC games on the competing system. Gamers could even run Steam games on the Atari VCS via Windows, and its built-in AMD Ryzen APU should be up to par for modern games.

    The only trick is you'll have to provide the Windows, Linux or Chrome OS yourself. Predictably we won't see these OS' pre-loaded onto the Atari VCS. The system only comes with the custom AtariOS right out of the box. Gamers will use the console's Sandbox mode to boot up and run operating systems from a USB drive, and from there install programs, apps, and games.

DJI incorporates Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system into new Manifold 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical’s Ubuntu, the Linux operating system for IoT, has now been made available on the Manifold 2.

As part of the offering, the Manifold 2 will also feature Canonical’s snaps technologies which are containerised software packages, designed to work perfectly across cloud, desktop, and IoT devices.

DJI says the ability to add multiple snaps means a drone’s functionality can be altered, updated, and expanded over time.

Depending on the desired use case, enterprises can ensure the form a drone is shipped in does not represent its final iteration or future worth.

Snaps also feature enhanced security and greater flexibility for developers meaning drones can receive automatic updates in the field, which will become vital as enterprises begin to deploy large-scale fleets.

Read more

Latest From Mozilla and Chrome 76 Beta

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Security Blog: Updated GPG key for signing Firefox Releases

    The GPG key used to sign the Firefox release manifests is expiring soon, and so we’re going to be switching over to new key shortly.

    The new GPG subkey’s fingerprint is 097B 3130 77AE 62A0 2F84 DA4D F1A6 668F BB7D 572E, and it expires 2021-05-29.

  • Happy BMO Push Day!
  • Extensions in Firefox 68

    In Firefox 68, we are introducing a new API and some enhancements to webRequest and private browsing. We’ve also fixed a few issues in order to improve compatibility and resolve issues developers were having with Firefox.

  • Chrome 76 Beta: dark mode, payments, new PWA features and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Find more information about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 76 is beta as of June 13, 2019.

  • Chrome 76 Beta Brings Dark Mode Media Query, Other Improvements

    Following last week's release of Chrome 75, Google today issued the first public beta for the Chrome 76 web-browser. 

    The Chrome 76 browser now supports the "prefers-color-scheme" media query that can be used if wanting to implement a dark mode for a web-site to match any dark theme/mode of the device / operating system.

Programming: Python, GCC and Bash

Filed under
Development
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Alpine 3.10.0 released

We are pleased to announce the release of Alpine Linux 3.10.0, the first in the v3.10 stable series. Read more Also: Alpine Linux 3.10 Brings Support For Intel's IWD, Better Arm Support

Open Invention Network, the Linux-based patent non-aggression community, exceeds 3,000 licensees

OIN's mission is to enable Linux, its related software, and its programmers to develop and monetize without being hogtied by patent fights. In Linux's early years, this was a constant threat. Now, thanks largely to the OIN's efforts to get everyone to agree on the basic open-source principle -- that's it's better and more profitable to share than to cling to proprietary property -- open-source software has taken off in the marketplace. The OIN isn't the first to take this concept and apply it to the Unix/Linux operating system family. After Novell bought Unix from AT&T, rather than keep fighting with Berkeley Software Design Inc. (BSDO) over possible Unix IP rights violations in BSD/OS, an early, commercial BSD Unix, Noorda famously declared that he'd rather compete in the marketplace than in court. This Unix case was settled in 1994. That was a one off. The OIN, which has grown by 50% in the last two years, has turned patent non-aggression into policy for thousands of companies. By agreeing to the OIN license, members gain access to patented inventions worth hundreds of millions of dollars while promoting a favorable environment for Linux and related open source software. Read more

today's howtos

Leftovers: IBM, Mozilla and SUSE

  • What Is Razee, and Why IBM Open Sourced It
    The continuous delivery software that's been doing the heavy lifting on IBM's global Kubernetes platform is now open source.
  • View Source 5 comes to Amsterdam
    Mozilla’s View Source Conference is back for a fifth year, this time in Amsterdam, September 30 – October 1, 2019. Tickets are available now.
  • SUSE & SAP “A 20 years of Partnership”
  • SUSE on the IO500 List for HPC Storage
    If you haven’t been hanging around the Ceph world for a bit, you may not realize that Ceph was originally intended to provide a distributed file-system to service HPC clusters.  While this was the original intent, Ceph has taken a round-a-bout path to relevance in this space, especially given that we are only supporting multiple active MDS servers since the Luminous release.  The result is that we are, only now, really starting to see adoption in the HPC space, and mostly for the second tier storage needs. Enter, the science project.  Given an all-flash environment on SATA SSDS with a fast storage pool on Intel Optane for the metadata, would it be possible to provide a reasonable storage environment for HPC clusters?